MUTATION, DNA REPAIR AND CANCER

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "MUTATION, DNA REPAIR AND CANCER"

Transcription

1 MUTATION, DNA REPAIR AND CANCER 1

2 Mutation A heritable change in the genetic material Essential to the continuity of life Source of variation for natural selection New mutations are more likely to be harmful than beneficial DNA repair systems reverse DNA damage Cancer is a disease caused by gene mutations 2

3 Gene mutations alter the DNA sequence Point mutation affects only a single base pair 2 basic alterations 1. Change base sequence 2. Add or remove nucleotide(s) 3

4 Examples Change base sequence Base substitution 5 CCCGCTAGATA 3 5 CCCGCGAGATA 3 3 GGGCGARCTAT 5 3 GGGCGCTCTAT 5 Add or remove a single base pair 5 GGCGCTAGATC 3 5 GGCAGCTAGATC 3 3 CCGCGATCTAG 5 3 CCGTCGATCTAG 5 4

5 Gene mutations may affect amino acid sequences Silent or neutral mutations Do not alter the amino acid sequence Genetic code is degenerate Missense mutation Changes a single amino acid in a polypeptide May be neutral if substituted amino acid similar in chemistry to original Sickle-cell anemia is the result of a single amino acid substitution 5

6 6

7 Nonsense mutation Change from a normal codon to a stop or termination codon Produces a truncated polypeptide Frameshift mutation Addition or deletion of nucleotides that are not multiples of 3 Completely different amino acid sequence downstream from mutation 7

8 Gene mutations outside of coding sequences Promoter Up promoter mutations or down promoter mutations Transcriptional response element/ operator site May alter regulation of transcription Splice junctions Mutations at the boundaries between introns and exons can prevent proper splicing Translational response elements May prevent proper translational regulation 8

9 Germ-line or somatic cell mutations Exact time and location of a mutation is critical to severity of effect and to the ability to pass on the mutation Germ-line cells give rise to gametes Can occur in a sperm or egg cell or in cell that gives rise to eggs and sperm Somatic cells are all other body cells Can occur early or late in development Genetic mosaic results from patches of mutated tissue 9

10 10

11 Spontaneous or induced mutations Spontaneous mutations result from abnormalities in biological processes Rates vary from species to species and from gene to gene Expected rate of background mutation approximately 1 mutation for every 1 million genes 11

12 Induced mutations are brought on by environmental agents Mutation rate higher than spontaneous mutation rate Mutagens are chemical or physical agents Can alter DNA in various ways 12

13 13

14 DNA repair All living organisms must have the ability to repair changes that occur in DNA in order to minimize mutation Requires DNA damage be detected Repair of DNA damage 14

15 Types of repair Direct repair Enzyme removes a modification (for example an alkyl group) Altered DNA strand removed and new segment synthesized More common Nucleotide excision repair Methyl-directed mismatch repair 15

16 Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) Most common DNA repair system Region encompassing several nucleotides in the damaged strand is removed from the DNA Found in all eukaryotes. Intact undamaged strand is used as a template for resynthesis of a normal complementary strand 16

17 17

18 Methyl-directed mismatch repair system Base mismatch is an abnormality where the AT/GC rule not obeyed DNA polymerase may make a mistake May correct itself with proofreading ability Methyl-directed mismatch repair systems exist in all species Detect mismatch and specifically remove segment from newly made strand Specifically repairs the new strand rather than the parental template strand 18

19 19

20 Cancer Disease of multicellular organisms that is characterized by uncontrolled cell division Over 1 million Americans are diagnosed with cancer each year, and about half that number will die from the disease In about 10% of cancers, a higher predisposition to develop the disease is an inherited trait Most cancers, about 90%, do not involve genetic changes that are passed from parent to offspring 20

21 Carcinogens About 80% of all human cancers are related to exposure to carcinogens Agents that increase the likelihood of developing cancer Most carcinogens, such as UV light and certain chemicals in cigarette smoke, are mutagens that promote genetic changes in somatic cells DNA alterations can lead to effects on gene expression that ultimately affect cell division, and thereby lead to cancer 21

22 Cancers originate from a single cell Mutates so that cell grows abnormally Tumor- an overgrowth of cells with no useful purpose Tumor may begin as a benign or precancerous 22

23 Cancerous stage Malignant - lost normal growth regulation Invasive- can invade healthy tissue Metastatic- can migrate to other parts of the body Left untreated, malignant cells will cause the death of the organism 23

24 24

25 Cancer-causing genes Oncogene When a mutation causes this gene to be overactive, uncontrolled cell growth occurs. Tumor-suppressor gene Normally, this gene encodes a protein that prevents cancer If a mutation eliminates this function, cancer can occur 25

26 Oncogenes Cell division regulated by hormones called growth factors Bind to cell surface and initiate cascade leading to cell division which includes activating specific genes Mutations in genes producing cell growth signaling proteins can change them into oncogenes producing abnormally high level of activity in some proteins An oncogene may promote cancer by keeping the cell division signaling pathway in a permanent on position In some cancers the amount of gene product is abnormally high In others the gene produces a functionally hyperactive protein 26

27 27

28 Proto-oncogene Normal gene that, if mutated, can become an oncogene 4 common genetic changes 1. Missense mutations 2. Gene amplifications 3. Chromosomal translocations 4. Retroviral insertions 28

29 Missense mutations Chemical mutagens have been shown to cause missense mutations leading to cancer 29

30 30

31 Gene amplifications Abnormal increase in copy number results in too much of the encoded protein Many human cancers are associated with the amplification of particular protooncogenes 31

32 Chromosomal translocations Two different chromosomes break, and the ends of the broken chromosomes fuse with each other incorrectly Very specific types of chromosomal translocations have been identified in certain types of tumors Chimeric genes are composed of two gene fragments fused together 32

33 33

34 Retroviral insertions Viral DNA may insert into a host chromosome in such a way that a viral promoter and response elements are next to a proto-oncogene May result in the overexpression of the proto-oncogene, thereby promoting cancer Alternatively, a virus may cause cancer because it carries an oncogene in the viral genome 34

DNA Replication & Protein Synthesis. This isn t a baaaaaaaddd chapter!!!

DNA Replication & Protein Synthesis. This isn t a baaaaaaaddd chapter!!! DNA Replication & Protein Synthesis This isn t a baaaaaaaddd chapter!!! The Discovery of DNA s Structure Watson and Crick s discovery of DNA s structure was based on almost fifty years of research by other

More information

1 Mutation and Genetic Change

1 Mutation and Genetic Change CHAPTER 14 1 Mutation and Genetic Change SECTION Genes in Action KEY IDEAS As you read this section, keep these questions in mind: What is the origin of genetic differences among organisms? What kinds

More information

LECTURE 6 Gene Mutation (Chapter 16.1-16.2)

LECTURE 6 Gene Mutation (Chapter 16.1-16.2) LECTURE 6 Gene Mutation (Chapter 16.1-16.2) 1 Mutation: A permanent change in the genetic material that can be passed from parent to offspring. Mutant (genotype): An organism whose DNA differs from the

More information

Mutations: 2 general ways to alter DNA. Mutations. What is a mutation? Mutations are rare. Changes in a single DNA base. Change a single DNA base

Mutations: 2 general ways to alter DNA. Mutations. What is a mutation? Mutations are rare. Changes in a single DNA base. Change a single DNA base Mutations Mutations: 2 general ways to alter DNA Change a single DNA base Or entire sections of DNA can move from one place to another What is a mutation? Any change in the nucleotide sequence of DNA Here

More information

The sequence of bases on the mrna is a code that determines the sequence of amino acids in the polypeptide being synthesized:

The sequence of bases on the mrna is a code that determines the sequence of amino acids in the polypeptide being synthesized: Module 3F Protein Synthesis So far in this unit, we have examined: How genes are transmitted from one generation to the next Where genes are located What genes are made of How genes are replicated How

More information

Structure and Function of DNA

Structure and Function of DNA Structure and Function of DNA DNA and RNA Structure DNA and RNA are nucleic acids. They consist of chemical units called nucleotides. The nucleotides are joined by a sugar-phosphate backbone. The four

More information

RNA and Protein Synthesis

RNA and Protein Synthesis Name lass Date RN and Protein Synthesis Information and Heredity Q: How does information fl ow from DN to RN to direct the synthesis of proteins? 13.1 What is RN? WHT I KNOW SMPLE NSWER: RN is a nucleic

More information

How Cancer Begins???????? Chithra Manikandan Nov 2009

How Cancer Begins???????? Chithra Manikandan Nov 2009 Cancer Cancer is one of the most common diseases in the developed world: 1 in 4 deaths are due to cancer 1 in 17 deaths are due to lung cancer Lung cancer is the most common cancer in men Breast cancer

More information

Gene mutation and molecular medicine Chapter 15

Gene mutation and molecular medicine Chapter 15 Gene mutation and molecular medicine Chapter 15 Lecture Objectives What Are Mutations? How Are DNA Molecules and Mutations Analyzed? How Do Defective Proteins Lead to Diseases? What DNA Changes Lead to

More information

a. Ribosomal RNA rrna a type ofrna that combines with proteins to form Ribosomes on which polypeptide chains of proteins are assembled

a. Ribosomal RNA rrna a type ofrna that combines with proteins to form Ribosomes on which polypeptide chains of proteins are assembled Biology 101 Chapter 14 Name: Fill-in-the-Blanks Which base follows the next in a strand of DNA is referred to. as the base (1) Sequence. The region of DNA that calls for the assembly of specific amino

More information

DNA, RNA, Protein synthesis, and Mutations. Chapters 12-13.3

DNA, RNA, Protein synthesis, and Mutations. Chapters 12-13.3 DNA, RNA, Protein synthesis, and Mutations Chapters 12-13.3 1A)Identify the components of DNA and explain its role in heredity. DNA s Role in heredity: Contains the genetic information of a cell that can

More information

Genetics Module B, Anchor 3

Genetics Module B, Anchor 3 Genetics Module B, Anchor 3 Key Concepts: - An individual s characteristics are determines by factors that are passed from one parental generation to the next. - During gamete formation, the alleles for

More information

What is Cancer? Cancer is a genetic disease: Cancer typically involves a change in gene expression/function:

What is Cancer? Cancer is a genetic disease: Cancer typically involves a change in gene expression/function: Cancer is a genetic disease: Inherited cancer Sporadic cancer What is Cancer? Cancer typically involves a change in gene expression/function: Qualitative change Quantitative change Any cancer causing genetic

More information

Umm AL Qura University MUTATIONS. Dr Neda M Bogari

Umm AL Qura University MUTATIONS. Dr Neda M Bogari Umm AL Qura University MUTATIONS Dr Neda M Bogari CONTACTS www.bogari.net http://web.me.com/bogari/bogari.net/ From DNA to Mutations MUTATION Definition: Permanent change in nucleotide sequence. It can

More information

Lesson 3 Reading Material: Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressor Genes

Lesson 3 Reading Material: Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressor Genes Lesson 3 Reading Material: Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressor Genes Becoming a cancer cell isn t easy One of the fundamental molecular characteristics of cancer is that it does not develop all at once, but

More information

Lecture 3: Mutations

Lecture 3: Mutations Lecture 3: Mutations Recall that the flow of information within a cell involves the transcription of DNA to mrna and the translation of mrna to protein. Recall also, that the flow of information between

More information

From DNA to Protein. Proteins. Chapter 13. Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes. The Path From Genes to Proteins. All proteins consist of polypeptide chains

From DNA to Protein. Proteins. Chapter 13. Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes. The Path From Genes to Proteins. All proteins consist of polypeptide chains Proteins From DNA to Protein Chapter 13 All proteins consist of polypeptide chains A linear sequence of amino acids Each chain corresponds to the nucleotide base sequence of a gene The Path From Genes

More information

Bob Jesberg. Boston, MA April 3, 2014

Bob Jesberg. Boston, MA April 3, 2014 DNA, Replication and Transcription Bob Jesberg NSTA Conference Boston, MA April 3, 2014 1 Workshop Agenda Looking at DNA and Forensics The DNA, Replication i and Transcription i Set DNA Ladder The Double

More information

BioBoot Camp Genetics

BioBoot Camp Genetics BioBoot Camp Genetics BIO.B.1.2.1 Describe how the process of DNA replication results in the transmission and/or conservation of genetic information DNA Replication is the process of DNA being copied before

More information

DNA Damage and Repair

DNA Damage and Repair infoaging guides BIOLOGY OF AGING DNA Damage and Repair An introduction to aging science brought to you by the American Federation for Aging Research DNA BASICS DNA stands for deoxyribonucleic acid. The

More information

13.4 Gene Regulation and Expression

13.4 Gene Regulation and Expression 13.4 Gene Regulation and Expression Lesson Objectives Describe gene regulation in prokaryotes. Explain how most eukaryotic genes are regulated. Relate gene regulation to development in multicellular organisms.

More information

Genetic information (DNA) determines structure of proteins DNA RNA proteins cell structure 3.11 3.15 enzymes control cell chemistry ( metabolism )

Genetic information (DNA) determines structure of proteins DNA RNA proteins cell structure 3.11 3.15 enzymes control cell chemistry ( metabolism ) Biology 1406 Exam 3 Notes Structure of DNA Ch. 10 Genetic information (DNA) determines structure of proteins DNA RNA proteins cell structure 3.11 3.15 enzymes control cell chemistry ( metabolism ) Proteins

More information

Appendix C DNA Replication & Mitosis

Appendix C DNA Replication & Mitosis K.Muma Bio 6 Appendix C DNA Replication & Mitosis Study Objectives: Appendix C: DNA replication and Mitosis 1. Describe the structure of DNA and where it is found. 2. Explain complimentary base pairing:

More information

Transcription and Translation of DNA

Transcription and Translation of DNA Transcription and Translation of DNA Genotype our genetic constitution ( makeup) is determined (controlled) by the sequence of bases in its genes Phenotype determined by the proteins synthesised when genes

More information

Chapter 6 DNA Replication

Chapter 6 DNA Replication Chapter 6 DNA Replication Each strand of the DNA double helix contains a sequence of nucleotides that is exactly complementary to the nucleotide sequence of its partner strand. Each strand can therefore

More information

Protein Synthesis How Genes Become Constituent Molecules

Protein Synthesis How Genes Become Constituent Molecules Protein Synthesis Protein Synthesis How Genes Become Constituent Molecules Mendel and The Idea of Gene What is a Chromosome? A chromosome is a molecule of DNA 50% 50% 1. True 2. False True False Protein

More information

Name Class Date. Figure 13 1. 2. Which nucleotide in Figure 13 1 indicates the nucleic acid above is RNA? a. uracil c. cytosine b. guanine d.

Name Class Date. Figure 13 1. 2. Which nucleotide in Figure 13 1 indicates the nucleic acid above is RNA? a. uracil c. cytosine b. guanine d. 13 Multiple Choice RNA and Protein Synthesis Chapter Test A Write the letter that best answers the question or completes the statement on the line provided. 1. Which of the following are found in both

More information

Just the Facts: A Basic Introduction to the Science Underlying NCBI Resources

Just the Facts: A Basic Introduction to the Science Underlying NCBI Resources 1 of 8 11/7/2004 11:00 AM National Center for Biotechnology Information About NCBI NCBI at a Glance A Science Primer Human Genome Resources Model Organisms Guide Outreach and Education Databases and Tools

More information

Gene Therapy and Genetic Counseling. Chapter 20

Gene Therapy and Genetic Counseling. Chapter 20 Gene Therapy and Genetic Counseling Chapter 20 What is Gene Therapy? Treating a disease by replacing, manipulating or supplementing a gene The act of changing an individual s DNA sequence to fix a non-functional

More information

Gene and Chromosome Mutation Worksheet (reference pgs. 239-240 in Modern Biology textbook)

Gene and Chromosome Mutation Worksheet (reference pgs. 239-240 in Modern Biology textbook) Name Date Per Look at the diagrams, then answer the questions. Gene Mutations affect a single gene by changing its base sequence, resulting in an incorrect, or nonfunctional, protein being made. (a) A

More information

Contents. molecular biology techniques. - Mutations in Factor II. - Mutations in MTHFR gene. - Breast cencer genes. - p53 and breast cancer

Contents. molecular biology techniques. - Mutations in Factor II. - Mutations in MTHFR gene. - Breast cencer genes. - p53 and breast cancer Contents Introduction: biology and medicine, two separated compartments What we need to know: - boring basics in DNA/RNA structure and overview of particular aspects of molecular biology techniques - How

More information

Protein Synthesis. Page 41 Page 44 Page 47 Page 42 Page 45 Page 48 Page 43 Page 46 Page 49. Page 41. DNA RNA Protein. Vocabulary

Protein Synthesis. Page 41 Page 44 Page 47 Page 42 Page 45 Page 48 Page 43 Page 46 Page 49. Page 41. DNA RNA Protein. Vocabulary Protein Synthesis Vocabulary Transcription Translation Translocation Chromosomal mutation Deoxyribonucleic acid Frame shift mutation Gene expression Mutation Point mutation Page 41 Page 41 Page 44 Page

More information

CHAPTER 2: UNDERSTANDING CANCER

CHAPTER 2: UNDERSTANDING CANCER CHAPTER 2: UNDERSTANDING CANCER INTRODUCTION We are witnessing an era of great discovery in the field of cancer research. New insights into the causes and development of cancer are emerging. These discoveries

More information

Gene Models & Bed format: What they represent.

Gene Models & Bed format: What they represent. GeneModels&Bedformat:Whattheyrepresent. Gene models are hypotheses about the structure of transcripts produced by a gene. Like all models, they may be correct, partly correct, or entirely wrong. Typically,

More information

AP BIOLOGY 2010 SCORING GUIDELINES (Form B)

AP BIOLOGY 2010 SCORING GUIDELINES (Form B) AP BIOLOGY 2010 SCORING GUIDELINES (Form B) Question 2 Certain human genetic conditions, such as sickle cell anemia, result from single base-pair mutations in DNA. (a) Explain how a single base-pair mutation

More information

Name Date Period. 2. When a molecule of double-stranded DNA undergoes replication, it results in

Name Date Period. 2. When a molecule of double-stranded DNA undergoes replication, it results in DNA, RNA, Protein Synthesis Keystone 1. During the process shown above, the two strands of one DNA molecule are unwound. Then, DNA polymerases add complementary nucleotides to each strand which results

More information

To be able to describe polypeptide synthesis including transcription and splicing

To be able to describe polypeptide synthesis including transcription and splicing Thursday 8th March COPY LO: To be able to describe polypeptide synthesis including transcription and splicing Starter Explain the difference between transcription and translation BATS Describe and explain

More information

Translation Study Guide

Translation Study Guide Translation Study Guide This study guide is a written version of the material you have seen presented in the replication unit. In translation, the cell uses the genetic information contained in mrna to

More information

Academic Nucleic Acids and Protein Synthesis Test

Academic Nucleic Acids and Protein Synthesis Test Academic Nucleic Acids and Protein Synthesis Test Multiple Choice Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. Each organism has a unique combination

More information

Genomes and SNPs in Malaria and Sickle Cell Anemia

Genomes and SNPs in Malaria and Sickle Cell Anemia Genomes and SNPs in Malaria and Sickle Cell Anemia Introduction to Genome Browsing with Ensembl Ensembl The vast amount of information in biological databases today demands a way of organising and accessing

More information

Molecular Genetics. RNA, Transcription, & Protein Synthesis

Molecular Genetics. RNA, Transcription, & Protein Synthesis Molecular Genetics RNA, Transcription, & Protein Synthesis Section 1 RNA AND TRANSCRIPTION Objectives Describe the primary functions of RNA Identify how RNA differs from DNA Describe the structure and

More information

RNA & Protein Synthesis

RNA & Protein Synthesis RNA & Protein Synthesis Genes send messages to cellular machinery RNA Plays a major role in process Process has three phases (Genetic) Transcription (Genetic) Translation Protein Synthesis RNA Synthesis

More information

Coding sequence the sequence of nucleotide bases on the DNA that are transcribed into RNA which are in turn translated into protein

Coding sequence the sequence of nucleotide bases on the DNA that are transcribed into RNA which are in turn translated into protein Assignment 3 Michele Owens Vocabulary Gene: A sequence of DNA that instructs a cell to produce a particular protein Promoter a control sequence near the start of a gene Coding sequence the sequence of

More information

Complex multicellular organisms are produced by cells that switch genes on and off during development.

Complex multicellular organisms are produced by cells that switch genes on and off during development. Home Control of Gene Expression Gene Regulation Is Necessary? By switching genes off when they are not needed, cells can prevent resources from being wasted. There should be natural selection favoring

More information

AP BIOLOGY 2009 SCORING GUIDELINES

AP BIOLOGY 2009 SCORING GUIDELINES AP BIOLOGY 2009 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 4 The flow of genetic information from DNA to protein in eukaryotic cells is called the central dogma of biology. (a) Explain the role of each of the following

More information

Lecture 7 Mitosis & Meiosis

Lecture 7 Mitosis & Meiosis Lecture 7 Mitosis & Meiosis Cell Division Essential for body growth and tissue repair Interphase G 1 phase Primary cell growth phase S phase DNA replication G 2 phase Microtubule synthesis Mitosis Nuclear

More information

4. DNA replication Pages: 979-984 Difficulty: 2 Ans: C Which one of the following statements about enzymes that interact with DNA is true?

4. DNA replication Pages: 979-984 Difficulty: 2 Ans: C Which one of the following statements about enzymes that interact with DNA is true? Chapter 25 DNA Metabolism Multiple Choice Questions 1. DNA replication Page: 977 Difficulty: 2 Ans: C The Meselson-Stahl experiment established that: A) DNA polymerase has a crucial role in DNA synthesis.

More information

2. The number of different kinds of nucleotides present in any DNA molecule is A) four B) six C) two D) three

2. The number of different kinds of nucleotides present in any DNA molecule is A) four B) six C) two D) three Chem 121 Chapter 22. Nucleic Acids 1. Any given nucleotide in a nucleic acid contains A) two bases and a sugar. B) one sugar, two bases and one phosphate. C) two sugars and one phosphate. D) one sugar,

More information

Chapter 5: Organization and Expression of Immunoglobulin Genes

Chapter 5: Organization and Expression of Immunoglobulin Genes Chapter 5: Organization and Expression of Immunoglobulin Genes I. Genetic Model Compatible with Ig Structure A. Two models for Ab structure diversity 1. Germ-line theory: maintained that the genome contributed

More information

Control of Gene Expression

Control of Gene Expression Home Gene Regulation Is Necessary? Control of Gene Expression By switching genes off when they are not needed, cells can prevent resources from being wasted. There should be natural selection favoring

More information

GENE REGULATION. Teacher Packet

GENE REGULATION. Teacher Packet AP * BIOLOGY GENE REGULATION Teacher Packet AP* is a trademark of the College Entrance Examination Board. The College Entrance Examination Board was not involved in the production of this material. Pictures

More information

Cancer Genomics: What Does It Mean for You?

Cancer Genomics: What Does It Mean for You? Cancer Genomics: What Does It Mean for You? The Connection Between Cancer and DNA One person dies from cancer each minute in the United States. That s 1,500 deaths each day. As the population ages, this

More information

Control of Gene Expression

Control of Gene Expression Control of Gene Expression What is Gene Expression? Gene expression is the process by which informa9on from a gene is used in the synthesis of a func9onal gene product. What is Gene Expression? Figure

More information

Lecture Series 7. From DNA to Protein. Genotype to Phenotype. Reading Assignments. A. Genes and the Synthesis of Polypeptides

Lecture Series 7. From DNA to Protein. Genotype to Phenotype. Reading Assignments. A. Genes and the Synthesis of Polypeptides Lecture Series 7 From DNA to Protein: Genotype to Phenotype Reading Assignments Read Chapter 7 From DNA to Protein A. Genes and the Synthesis of Polypeptides Genes are made up of DNA and are expressed

More information

Activity 7.21 Transcription factors

Activity 7.21 Transcription factors Purpose To consolidate understanding of protein synthesis. To explain the role of transcription factors and hormones in switching genes on and off. Play the transcription initiation complex game Regulation

More information

Lecture 6: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms (RFLPs)

Lecture 6: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms (RFLPs) Lecture 6: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms (RFLPs) Single nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs (pronounced "snips") are DNA sequence variations that occur

More information

Introduction. What is Ecological Genetics?

Introduction. What is Ecological Genetics? 1 Introduction What is Ecological enetics? Ecological genetics is at the interface of ecology, evolution, and genetics, and thus includes important elements from each of these fields. We can use two closely

More information

Bio 102 Practice Problems Genetic Code and Mutation

Bio 102 Practice Problems Genetic Code and Mutation Bio 102 Practice Problems Genetic Code and Mutation Multiple choice: Unless otherwise directed, circle the one best answer: 1. Beadle and Tatum mutagenized Neurospora to find strains that required arginine

More information

How many of you have checked out the web site on protein-dna interactions?

How many of you have checked out the web site on protein-dna interactions? How many of you have checked out the web site on protein-dna interactions? Example of an approximately 40,000 probe spotted oligo microarray with enlarged inset to show detail. Find and be ready to discuss

More information

Human Genome Organization: An Update. Genome Organization: An Update

Human Genome Organization: An Update. Genome Organization: An Update Human Genome Organization: An Update Genome Organization: An Update Highlights of Human Genome Project Timetable Proposed in 1990 as 3 billion dollar joint venture between DOE and NIH with 15 year completion

More information

12.1 The Role of DNA in Heredity

12.1 The Role of DNA in Heredity 12.1 The Role of DNA in Heredity Only in the last 50 years have scientists understood the role of DNA in heredity. That understanding began with the discovery of DNA s structure. In 1952, Rosalind Franklin

More information

From DNA to Protein

From DNA to Protein Nucleus Control center of the cell contains the genetic library encoded in the sequences of nucleotides in molecules of DNA code for the amino acid sequences of all proteins determines which specific proteins

More information

The Human Genome Project. From genome to health From human genome to other genomes and to gene function Structural Genomics initiative

The Human Genome Project. From genome to health From human genome to other genomes and to gene function Structural Genomics initiative The Human Genome Project From genome to health From human genome to other genomes and to gene function Structural Genomics initiative June 2000 What is the Human Genome Project? U.S. govt. project coordinated

More information

Replication Study Guide

Replication Study Guide Replication Study Guide This study guide is a written version of the material you have seen presented in the replication unit. Self-reproduction is a function of life that human-engineered systems have

More information

Chapter 18 Regulation of Gene Expression

Chapter 18 Regulation of Gene Expression Chapter 18 Regulation of Gene Expression 18.1. Gene Regulation Is Necessary By switching genes off when they are not needed, cells can prevent resources from being wasted. There should be natural selection

More information

Sample Questions for Exam 3

Sample Questions for Exam 3 Sample Questions for Exam 3 1. All of the following occur during prometaphase of mitosis in animal cells except a. the centrioles move toward opposite poles. b. the nucleolus can no longer be seen. c.

More information

Biotechnology and Recombinant DNA (Chapter 9) Lecture Materials for Amy Warenda Czura, Ph.D. Suffolk County Community College

Biotechnology and Recombinant DNA (Chapter 9) Lecture Materials for Amy Warenda Czura, Ph.D. Suffolk County Community College Biotechnology and Recombinant DNA (Chapter 9) Lecture Materials for Amy Warenda Czura, Ph.D. Suffolk County Community College Primary Source for figures and content: Eastern Campus Tortora, G.J. Microbiology

More information

somatic cell egg genotype gamete polar body phenotype homologous chromosome trait dominant autosome genetics recessive

somatic cell egg genotype gamete polar body phenotype homologous chromosome trait dominant autosome genetics recessive CHAPTER 6 MEIOSIS AND MENDEL Vocabulary Practice somatic cell egg genotype gamete polar body phenotype homologous chromosome trait dominant autosome genetics recessive CHAPTER 6 Meiosis and Mendel sex

More information

PRACTICE TEST QUESTIONS

PRACTICE TEST QUESTIONS PART A: MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTIONS PRACTICE TEST QUESTIONS DNA & PROTEIN SYNTHESIS B 1. One of the functions of DNA is to A. secrete vacuoles. B. make copies of itself. C. join amino acids to each other.

More information

Provincial Exam Questions. 9. Give one role of each of the following nucleic acids in the production of an enzyme.

Provincial Exam Questions. 9. Give one role of each of the following nucleic acids in the production of an enzyme. Provincial Exam Questions Unit: Cell Biology: Protein Synthesis (B7 & B8) 2010 Jan 3. Describe the process of translation. (4 marks) 2009 Sample 8. What is the role of ribosomes in protein synthesis? A.

More information

Genetic Mutations. Indicator 4.8: Compare the consequences of mutations in body cells with those in gametes.

Genetic Mutations. Indicator 4.8: Compare the consequences of mutations in body cells with those in gametes. Genetic Mutations Indicator 4.8: Compare the consequences of mutations in body cells with those in gametes. Agenda Warm UP: What is a mutation? Body cell? Gamete? Notes on Mutations Karyotype Web Activity

More information

co-sponsored by the Health & Physical Education Department, the Health Services Office, and the Student Development Center

co-sponsored by the Health & Physical Education Department, the Health Services Office, and the Student Development Center Cancer is a group of more than 100 related diseases. Normally, cells grow and divide to produce more cells to keep the body healthy. Sometimes, this process goes wrong. New cells form when the body doesn

More information

LESSON 3.5 WORKBOOK. How do cancer cells evolve? Workbook Lesson 3.5

LESSON 3.5 WORKBOOK. How do cancer cells evolve? Workbook Lesson 3.5 LESSON 3.5 WORKBOOK How do cancer cells evolve? In this unit we have learned how normal cells can be transformed so that they stop behaving as part of a tissue community and become unresponsive to regulation.

More information

Genetics 301 Sample Final Examination Spring 2003

Genetics 301 Sample Final Examination Spring 2003 Genetics 301 Sample Final Examination Spring 2003 50 Multiple Choice Questions-(Choose the best answer) 1. A cross between two true breeding lines one with dark blue flowers and one with bright white flowers

More information

RETRIEVING SEQUENCE INFORMATION. Nucleotide sequence databases. Database search. Sequence alignment and comparison

RETRIEVING SEQUENCE INFORMATION. Nucleotide sequence databases. Database search. Sequence alignment and comparison RETRIEVING SEQUENCE INFORMATION Nucleotide sequence databases Database search Sequence alignment and comparison Biological sequence databases Originally just a storage place for sequences. Currently the

More information

Breast cancer and the role of low penetrance alleles: a focus on ATM gene

Breast cancer and the role of low penetrance alleles: a focus on ATM gene Modena 18-19 novembre 2010 Breast cancer and the role of low penetrance alleles: a focus on ATM gene Dr. Laura La Paglia Breast Cancer genetic Other BC susceptibility genes TP53 PTEN STK11 CHEK2 BRCA1

More information

CCR Biology - Chapter 9 Practice Test - Summer 2012

CCR Biology - Chapter 9 Practice Test - Summer 2012 Name: Class: Date: CCR Biology - Chapter 9 Practice Test - Summer 2012 Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. Genetic engineering is possible

More information

Central Dogma. Lecture 10. Discussing DNA replication. DNA Replication. DNA mutation and repair. Transcription

Central Dogma. Lecture 10. Discussing DNA replication. DNA Replication. DNA mutation and repair. Transcription Central Dogma transcription translation DNA RNA Protein replication Discussing DNA replication (Nucleus of eukaryote, cytoplasm of prokaryote) Recall Replication is semi-conservative and bidirectional

More information

13.2 Ribosomes & Protein Synthesis

13.2 Ribosomes & Protein Synthesis 13.2 Ribosomes & Protein Synthesis Introduction: *A specific sequence of bases in DNA carries the directions for forming a polypeptide, a chain of amino acids (there are 20 different types of amino acid).

More information

14.3 Studying the Human Genome

14.3 Studying the Human Genome 14.3 Studying the Human Genome Lesson Objectives Summarize the methods of DNA analysis. State the goals of the Human Genome Project and explain what we have learned so far. Lesson Summary Manipulating

More information

Genetics Test Biology I

Genetics Test Biology I Genetics Test Biology I Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. Avery s experiments showed that bacteria are transformed by a. RNA. c. proteins.

More information

Sickle cell anemia: Altered beta chain Single AA change (#6 Glu to Val) Consequence: Protein polymerizes Change in RBC shape ---> phenotypes

Sickle cell anemia: Altered beta chain Single AA change (#6 Glu to Val) Consequence: Protein polymerizes Change in RBC shape ---> phenotypes Protein Structure Polypeptide: Protein: Therefore: Example: Single chain of amino acids 1 or more polypeptide chains All polypeptides are proteins Some proteins contain >1 polypeptide Hemoglobin (O 2 binding

More information

Lecture 1 MODULE 3 GENE EXPRESSION AND REGULATION OF GENE EXPRESSION. Professor Bharat Patel Office: Science 2, 2.36 Email: b.patel@griffith.edu.

Lecture 1 MODULE 3 GENE EXPRESSION AND REGULATION OF GENE EXPRESSION. Professor Bharat Patel Office: Science 2, 2.36 Email: b.patel@griffith.edu. Lecture 1 MODULE 3 GENE EXPRESSION AND REGULATION OF GENE EXPRESSION Professor Bharat Patel Office: Science 2, 2.36 Email: b.patel@griffith.edu.au What is Gene Expression & Gene Regulation? 1. Gene Expression

More information

Recombinant DNA and Biotechnology

Recombinant DNA and Biotechnology Recombinant DNA and Biotechnology Chapter 18 Lecture Objectives What Is Recombinant DNA? How Are New Genes Inserted into Cells? What Sources of DNA Are Used in Cloning? What Other Tools Are Used to Study

More information

Appendix 2 Molecular Biology Core Curriculum. Websites and Other Resources

Appendix 2 Molecular Biology Core Curriculum. Websites and Other Resources Appendix 2 Molecular Biology Core Curriculum Websites and Other Resources Chapter 1 - The Molecular Basis of Cancer 1. Inside Cancer http://www.insidecancer.org/ From the Dolan DNA Learning Center Cold

More information

Regents Biology REGENTS REVIEW: PROTEIN SYNTHESIS

Regents Biology REGENTS REVIEW: PROTEIN SYNTHESIS Period Date REGENTS REVIEW: PROTEIN SYNTHESIS 1. The diagram at the right represents a portion of a type of organic molecule present in the cells of organisms. What will most likely happen if there is

More information

Antibody Function & Structure

Antibody Function & Structure Antibody Function & Structure Specifically bind to antigens in both the recognition phase (cellular receptors) and during the effector phase (synthesis and secretion) of humoral immunity Serology: the

More information

Module 3 Questions. 7. Chemotaxis is an example of signal transduction. Explain, with the use of diagrams.

Module 3 Questions. 7. Chemotaxis is an example of signal transduction. Explain, with the use of diagrams. Module 3 Questions Section 1. Essay and Short Answers. Use diagrams wherever possible 1. With the use of a diagram, provide an overview of the general regulation strategies available to a bacterial cell.

More information

Genetic Technology. Name: Class: Date: Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.

Genetic Technology. Name: Class: Date: Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. Name: Class: Date: Genetic Technology Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. An application of using DNA technology to help environmental scientists

More information

Guidance for Industry

Guidance for Industry Guidance for Industry Interpreting Sameness of Monoclonal Antibody Products Under the Orphan Drug Regulations U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Food and Drug Administration Center for Drug Evaluation

More information

Gene Regulation -- The Lac Operon

Gene Regulation -- The Lac Operon Gene Regulation -- The Lac Operon Specific proteins are present in different tissues and some appear only at certain times during development. All cells of a higher organism have the full set of genes:

More information

Algorithms in Computational Biology (236522) spring 2007 Lecture #1

Algorithms in Computational Biology (236522) spring 2007 Lecture #1 Algorithms in Computational Biology (236522) spring 2007 Lecture #1 Lecturer: Shlomo Moran, Taub 639, tel 4363 Office hours: Tuesday 11:00-12:00/by appointment TA: Ilan Gronau, Taub 700, tel 4894 Office

More information

Biological Sciences Initiative. Human Genome

Biological Sciences Initiative. Human Genome Biological Sciences Initiative HHMI Human Genome Introduction In 2000, researchers from around the world published a draft sequence of the entire genome. 20 labs from 6 countries worked on the sequence.

More information

CHROMOSOMES AND INHERITANCE

CHROMOSOMES AND INHERITANCE SECTION 12-1 REVIEW CHROMOSOMES AND INHERITANCE VOCABULARY REVIEW Distinguish between the terms in each of the following pairs of terms. 1. sex chromosome, autosome 2. germ-cell mutation, somatic-cell

More information

ISTEP+: Biology I End-of-Course Assessment Released Items and Scoring Notes

ISTEP+: Biology I End-of-Course Assessment Released Items and Scoring Notes ISTEP+: Biology I End-of-Course Assessment Released Items and Scoring Notes Page 1 of 22 Introduction Indiana students enrolled in Biology I participated in the ISTEP+: Biology I Graduation Examination

More information

Concluding lesson. Student manual. What kind of protein are you? (Basic)

Concluding lesson. Student manual. What kind of protein are you? (Basic) Concluding lesson Student manual What kind of protein are you? (Basic) Part 1 The hereditary material of an organism is stored in a coded way on the DNA. This code consists of four different nucleotides:

More information

RNA: Transcription and Processing

RNA: Transcription and Processing 8 RNA: Transcription and Processing WORKING WITH THE FIGURES 1. In Figure 8-3, why are the arrows for genes 1 and 2 pointing in opposite directions? The arrows for genes 1 and 2 indicate the direction

More information

Human Genome and Human Genome Project. Louxin Zhang

Human Genome and Human Genome Project. Louxin Zhang Human Genome and Human Genome Project Louxin Zhang A Primer to Genomics Cells are the fundamental working units of every living systems. DNA is made of 4 nucleotide bases. The DNA sequence is the particular

More information

DNA Fingerprinting. Unless they are identical twins, individuals have unique DNA

DNA Fingerprinting. Unless they are identical twins, individuals have unique DNA DNA Fingerprinting Unless they are identical twins, individuals have unique DNA DNA fingerprinting The name used for the unambiguous identifying technique that takes advantage of differences in DNA sequence

More information