Psychometric Properties of the Children's Atypical Development Scale

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Psychometric Properties of the Children's Atypical Development Scale"

Transcription

1 Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, Vol. 22, No. 2, 1994 Psychometric Properties of the Children's Atypical Development Scale Mark A. Stein, 1,3 Emily Szumowski, 1 Ron Sandoval, 1 David Nadelman, 2 Tara O'Brien, 1 Matt Krasowski, 1 and Warren Phillips I The Children's Atypical Development Scale (CADS) is a 53-item rating scale designed to measure unusual behaviors in children. Principal-factor analysis on a clinic-referred and pediatric sample of 474 children resulted in a four-factor solution: Communication Deficits, Lability, Social Relatedness Deficits, and Preoccupation. The CADS is internally consistent and has adequate temporal stability. CADS factor scores were differentially associated with parent and teacher rating scales, IQ, and Continuous Performance Test errors. The scale shows promise as a clinical and research tool for assessing atypical behaviors associated with pervasive developmental disorder and other neurobehavioral disorders. Odd or unusual childhood behaviors are associated with a variety of childhood disorders, including pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), Asperger's syndrome and multiple complex developmental disorder (MCDD) (Towbin, Dykens, Pearson, & Cohen, 1993). Although a number of rating scales and questionnaires are available which assess behaviors associated with autism (e.g., Childhood Autism Rating Scale, Abberent Behavior Scale), these scales may be less applicable for higher-functioning children (Rutter & Schopler, 1988). On the other hand, scales frequently used with nondevelopmentally delayed children to assess learning or behavior problems (e.g., Conners Parent or Teacher Rating Scale, ACTeRS) do not adequately sample odd or unusual behaviors. To address these limitations, Dinklage and Guevremont recently developed the Children's Atypical De- Manuscript received in final form August 10, This research was supported in part by a grant from the Smart Family Foundation. The authors are grateful to James P. O'Donnell, Catherine Lord, and Frank A. Zelko for their comments on an earlier draft. 1Departments of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois North Suburban Clinic, Hoffman Estates, Illinois Address all correspondence to Dr. Mark A. Stein, Section of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Chicago, 5840 S. Maryland Ave., Chicago, Illinois /94/ / Plenum Publishing Corporation

2 168 Stein et al. velopment Scale (CADS; see Barkley, 1990, pp ). The CADS appears to be unique in that it utilizes a relatively brief questionnaire format designed to be completed by parents and to sample unusual behaviors observed in higher-functioning children. The purpose of the present series of studies is to explore the psychometric properties of the CADS. Instrument Children's Atypical Development Scale. The CADS is a 53-item parent rating scale designed to measure a variety of unusual behaviors. The item content was generated by four experienced clinicians who compiled an extensive list of unusual behaviors based on Cohen, Paul, and Volkmar (1986) and the medical records of 40 children diagnosed with PDD (pervasive developmental disorder) (personal communication, Barkley, July 1993). The CADS was then completed by parents of 23 children clinically diagnosed with PDD using DSM-IIIR criteria (American Psychiatric Association, 1987) and 20 children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Both groups had normal intelligence and were referred to the same academic medical center. Two control groups of children with learning disabilities (LD) (n = 12) obtained from an educational clinic and normals (n -- 12) were also added. Parents were asked to rate each item on a 3- point scale. CADS items were most characteristic of the PDD group, endorsed to a lesser extent by parents of ADHD children, and rarely reported for the LD and normal control groups (Barkley, 1990). STUDY 1: FACTOR STRUCTURE OF THE CADS Overview The purpose of Study 1 was to explore the factor structure of the CADS and to examine the relationship of CADS factor scores with major demographic variables using a sample of children with predominantly disruptive behavior disorders and pediatric controls. Subjects and Setting The base sample of 474 children was composed of 381 children conseeutively referred to a child psychiatry clinic specializing in attention and learning problems and 93 pediatric outpatients not referred nor currently in treatment for psychiatric or learning problems. There were 364 boys and

3 Psychometric Properties of the CADS girls from ages 4 to 16 (M = 8.7, SD = 3.1). DSM-III-R diagnoses based upon multidisciplinary team consensus after semistructured interviews with the parents and children, psychological testing, and physical exams were obtained for 335 of the 381 psychiatric-referred children. Of the psychiatric-referred children, 59% (n = 220) met criteria for ADHD, which was the most common diagnosis, 36% (n = 135) had oppositional defiant or conduct disorder, 8% (n = 30) had an anxiety disorder, and 8% (n = 30) were diagnosed with PDD. There was a high degree of comorbidity, with the majority of children meeting criteria for two or more Axis I disorders. Although there was a wide range in socioeconomic status (SES), the vast majority of the families were from Hollingshead (1975) classes I, II, and III (M = 2.2, SD = 1.0). Statistical Analysis To examine the factor structure of the CADS, exploratory factor-analytic procedures, following the recommendations of Cattell (1988) and Comrey (1988) were employed. Principal-factor analysis (PFA) with squared multiple correlations as communality estimates were conducted using oblique rotation criteria (direct quartimin). The number of factors to extract was determined on the basis of examination of the screen plot and eigenvalues greater than 1. Factor loadings for each item were required to be above.40. Results Factor Analysis. PFA resulted in a four-factor solution which accounted for 73% of the variance (see Table I). The first factor, Communication Deficits, accounted for 54% of the variance and contained eight items reflecting deficits in expressive and receptive interpersonal communication. The second factor, Lability, accounted for 9% of the variance and included five items. This factor is defined by extreme mood lability and explosiveness, with an absence of concern for, or awareness of, social appropriateness. The third factor, Social Relatedness Deficits, accounted for 6% of the variance and contained seven items reflecting lack of interest in social interactions and withdrawal. A fourth, minor factor, Preoccupation, accounted for 4% of the variance and is defined by two items reflecting fantasizing and rigidity. These four factors correspond closely with the DSM-III-R criteria for pervasive developmental disorder.

4 170 Stein et al. Table I. CADS Factor Loadings (N = 474) a Item number and content Factors 1 II III IV I, Communication Deficits 23. Desen'bes the details of an event but misses the meaning "Misses the point" or main idea in conversation Rambling speech.7..~ Confuses causes of events.6"/ Confuses sequence of events Makes irrelevant comments Speaks without concern about being understood.5.._ Seems to be extremely naive II. 38. Lability Gets angry for little apparent reason Extreme reactions to inconvenience Mood changes quickly without apparent reason.05.6._ Preoccupied with violent stories Overreacts to pain Excessively preoccupied with violence III. Social Relatedness Deficits 19. Lacks interest in peers _ Dislikes being held or touched Does not respond to initiations of other children _ Makes poor eye contact with others _ Overly suspicious Poor judge of other people's reactions Lacks compassion when others are hurt _.! -.14 IV. 44. Preoccupation Spends time fantasizing _ Obsessive interest in narrow or atypical topic _..0 Eigenvalue % Total variance aunderlined values indicate significant factor Ioadings % 9% 6% 4% Relationships with Demographic Variables No gender differences were found on the four CADS factors, or for the total CADS score of all 53 items. Pearson correlation coefficients between age and CADS scores were computed for the total sample and for boys and girls separately. There were significant correlations between age and Social Relatedness Deficits for girls (r =.32, p <.001), and for the total sample (r =.13, p <.01). All other correlations with age were nonsignificant, raging from -.04 to.06 for boys and.05 to.10 for girls. Since the percentage of variance accounted for by age on each score was very small (0 to 2%), separate age norms were deemed unnecessary.

5 Psychometric Properties of the CADS 171 A significant correlation was found between SES and Factor I (r =.21, p <.001), Factor II (r =.14, p <.05), and total CADS (r =.19, p <.01), indicating that parents from lower SES families were more likely to report more Communication Deficits, Lability, and higher total CADS scores. STUDY Ih RELIABILITY Overview The purpose of Study II was to examine the internal consistency and temporal stability of the CADS factors. Method The internal consistency of each CADS factor was assessed by Cronbach's alpha (Nunnally, 1978) using the sample employed in Study I. Data on test-retest reliability were based on 32 clinic-referred children seen during the past year whose mothers completed the CADS prior to the first appointment and again before the feedback session. There is typically a 2-week interval between the first appointment and feedback. However, due to the length of the waiting list, the time between administrations ranged from 2 weeks to 2 months, with an average interval of 30 days. Results Cronbach's alpha and 30-day test-retest reliabilities are reported in Table II. The first three CADS major factors were internally consistent with alphas ranging from.80 to.87. Scale IV, Preoccupied, was not internally consistent. However, estimates of internal consistency corrected for Table II. Reliability of CADS Factors and Total Score Number of Cronbach's CADS factor/score items a Test-retest Communication Deficits Lability Social Relatedness Preoccupation CADS total

6 172 Stein et al. scale length using the Spearman-Brown formula resulted in a corrected Cronbach'a alpha of.82 for the Preoccupied factor. Test-retest reliability for the total CADS score was high (r =.87, p <.001), while individual factor scores were moderately stable, with Pearson correlations ranging from.61 to.80. STUDY III: CONCURRENT VALIDITY Overview Standardized parent and teacher rating scales and individually administered measures of intelligence, attention, and impulsivity served as criterion variables for the concurrent validation of CADS factor scores. We hypothesized that CADS factor scores would be differentially associated with criterion measures reflecting socialization deficits, IQ, and impulsivity and internalizing symptoms such as anxiety and thought disturbance. For example, we expected that the Communication Deficits and Social Relatedness Deficits factors would relate most strongly to ratings of poor social skills, social withdrawal, and anxiety, while the Lability factor would relate most strongly to impulsive, delinquent, aggressive, and oppositional behaviors as well as anxiety and withdrawal. Method Subjects were 219 clinic-referred children and 82 pediatric outpatients from Study I foi" whom complete data on the validity measures were available. (For pediatric patients, younger children, and those evaluated during the summer, teacher ratings were unavailable.) In addition to the CADS, parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL; Achenbach & Edelbrock, 1983) and the Conners Parent Rating Scale (CPRS; Goyette, Conners, & Ulrich, 1978). The child's primary teacher completed the ADD- H Comprehensive Teacher Rating Scale (ACTeRS; Ullman, Sleator, & Sprague, 1985) and the Teacher Report Form (TRF; Achenbach & Edelbrock, 1986). As a measure of IQ, children were administered the WISC-R (Wechsler, 1974) or the WPPSI-R (Wr 1989). Each child was also administered a computerized version of the Continuous Performance Test (CPT; Conners, 1985) which involved the visual presentation of 50 "X" targets interspersed with other letters presented in random order. Commission and omission errors derived from the CPT are indices of impulsivity and distractibility, respectively.

7 Psychometric Properties of the CADS 173 Results CADS scores correlated significantly with the parent report measures, including virtually all the subscales on Conners Parent Rating Scale, as well as on both the Internalizing and Externalizing scales of the CBCL. Correlations ranged from.38 to.50 for Internalizing and.21 to.63 for Externalizing subscales (see Table III). Correlations between CADS scores and measures not based on parental report showed a more variable pattern (see Table IV). High scores on the CADS Communication Deficits factor were associated with higher teacher ratings of social skills deficits, withdrawal, anxiety/depression, and lower IQ. A different pattern was found for Lability, which correlated with teacher reports of both externalizing and internalizing problems, including anxiety/depression, delinquent behavior, and thought problems, and with impulsivity on the CPT. High scores on the Social Relatedness Deficits factor were significantly associated with social skill deficits, withdrawal, anxiety/depression, and thought problems, but not with measures of IQ or attention, while high scores on Preoccupation were associated with internalizing problems such as thought problems, withdrawal, and somatic complaints. Finally, total CADS was associated with anxiety, social skill deficits, withdrawal, thought problems, delinquency, and lower IQ. Table III. Correlations of CADS Factor Scores with Parent Rating Scales = CADS factor Variable I II III IV Total CPRS Conduct Problems CPRS Learning Problem CPRS Psychosomatic.16 b.18 b CPRS Impulsive/Hyperactive CPRS Anxiety.11, n.s..24 b CPRS Hyperactivity Index CBCL Withdrawal.17 b.32 CBCL Somatic Complaints.15 b.19 b CBCL Anxious/Depressed CBCL Social Problems CBCL Thought Problems CBCL Attention Problems CBCL Delinquent Behavior CBCL Aggressive Behavior , n.s b b.13, n.s ~' b.19 b b.05, n.s..16 b b b.60 =Factor I = Communication Deficits; II = Lability; IIl ffi Social Relatedness Deficits; IV = Preoccupation; CADS = total Child Atypical Development Scale score; CPRS = Conners Parent Rating Scale; CBCL = Child Behavior Checklist. Unless otherwise noted, all correlations are significant at p <.001, two tailed. bp <.05, two-tailed.

8 174 Stein et ai. Table IV. Correlations (N = 219) of CADS Factor Scores with Teacher Ratings and Cognitive Measures* CADS factor Variable I II III IV CADS ACTeRS Attention ACTeRS Hyperactivity b ACTeRS Social Skills -.20 b -,18 b -.29 c c ACTeRS Oppositional c ACTeRS Withdrawn '.20 c.22 c.19 b TRF Somatic Complaints b.14 TRF Anxious/Depressed.16 b.29 c.16 b c TRF Social Problems.22 c.22 c.19 b c TRF Thought Problems c.19 b.25 c.32 c TRF Attention Problems TRF Delinquent Behavior c.15 b c TRF Aggressive Behavior c Full-Scale IQ -.30 c b CPT Commission Errors b CPT Omission Errors *Factor I = Communication Deficits; II = Lability; III = Social Relatedness Deficits; IV = Preoccupation; CADS = total Child Atypical Development Scale score; ACTeRs = ADD-H Comprehensive Teacher Rating Scale; TRF = Child Behavior Checklist--Teacher Report Form; CPT = Continuous Performance Test. bp <.05 Cp <.ol DISCUSSION Three studies were conducted to explore the factor structure of the CADS and to evaluate the reliability and concurrent validity of the scale. The four CADS factors found reflect the major characteristics contained in the DSM-III-R criteria for pervasive development disorders: qualitative impairment in reciprocal social interaction (Social Relatedness Deficits), impairments in communication and imaginative activity (Communication Deficits), and markedly restricted repertoire of activities and interests (Preoccupations). Lability corresponds with the "associated feature" of abnormalities of mood regulation. There is a strong correspondence between the statistically derived CADS factors and the clinically derived DSM-III-R criteria for PDD. The total CADS score and Communications Deficits and Social Relatedness Deficits factors appear to demonstrate satisfactory levels of internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The least temporally stable factor, Lability, by definition reflects dramatic changes in mood and behavior. Consequently, modest test-retest reliability may be a reflection of variability in the underlying construct rather than inconsistencies in accu-

9 Psychometric Properties of the CADS 175 racy of reporting. The fourth factor, Preoccupations, contains only two items. In future revisions of the CADS, this factor would benefit from the inclusion of additional items to increase its reliability. Reflecting primarily source variance, CADS scores correlated highly with all parent report measures. Among the teacher ratings, total CADS scores were most highly correlated with scores on factors reflecting anxiety/depression, thought problems, and social problems. The CADS factor scores demonstrated differential associations with criterion measures which largely corresponded to anticipated patterns. Both IQ and SES were inversely associated with total CADS and Communication Deficits, but not with the other factors. In general, parents of children from lower SES families were likely to report more communication problems and unusual behaviors. Our sample was characterized by a preponderance of boys with disruptive behavior disorders and average IQ. Since the obtained factor structure may be dependent on the characteristics of our sample, caution should be used in extrapolating to samples that differ significantly in demographic characteristics or presenting problems. In summary, the CADS appears to be a useful rating scale for assessing unusual behaviors. Potential uses include: screening for unusual behaviors to alert clinicians to consider a wider range of diagnoses; description and quantification of unusual behaviors; and as a pre- and postintervention measure. At present, clinicians should consider potential limitations or bias in parent reports, and should utilize information obtained from other sources (e.g., teacher ratings, psychometric testing, mental status examination) to confirm diagnostic hypotheses. Future research with the scale should be directed toward determining the ability of the CADS for distinguishing PDD and other "autistic-like" disorders from autism, ad from other psychiatric and learning disorders whose symptoms often overlap. REFERENCES Achenbach, T. M., & Edelbrock, C. (1983). Manual for the Child Behavior Checklist and Revised Child Behavior Profile. Burlington: University of Vermont. Achenbach, T. M., & Edelbrock, C. (1986). Manual for the Teacher's Report Form and Teacher Version of the Child Behavior Profile. Burlington: University of Vermont. American Psychiatric Association (1987). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (3rd ed., rev.). Washington, DC: Author. Barkley, R. A. (1990). Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a handbook for diagnosis and treatment: New York: Guilford Press.

10 176 Stein et al. Cattell, R. B. (1988). The meaning and strategic use of factor analysis. In J. R. Nesselroade & R. B. Cattell (Eds.), Handbook of multivariate experimental psychology (3rd ed.). New York: Plenum Press. Cohen, D. J., Paul, R., & Volkmar, F. R. (1986). Issues in the classification of pervasive and other developmental disorders: Toward DSM-IV. Journal of the American Academy of Child Psychiatry, 25, Comrey, A. L. (1988). Factor-analytic methods of scale development in personality and clinical psychology. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 56, Conners, C. K. (1985). The computerized continuous performance test. Psychopharmacology Bulletin, 21, Goyette, C. H., Conners, C. K., & Ulrich, R. F. (1978). Normative data for revised Conners parent and teacher rating scales. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 6, Hollingshead, A. B. (1975). Four factor index of Social Status. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. Nunnally, J. C. (1978). Psychometric theory (2nd ed.). New York: McGraw-HilL Rutter, M., & Schopler, E. (1988). Autism and pervasive developmental disorders. In M. Ratter, A. Tuma, & I. Lann (Eds.), Assessment and diagnosis in child psychopathology. New York: Guilford Press. Towbin, K. F., Dykens, E. M., Pearson, G., & Cohen, D. J. (1993). Conceptualizing "borderline syndromes of childhood" and "childhood schizophrenia" as a developmental disorder. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 32, Ullmann, R. K., Sleator, E. K., & Sprague, R. L. (1985). A new rating scale for diagnosis and monitoring of ADD children. Psychopharmacology Bulletin, 20, Wechsler, D. (1974). Manual for the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised. San Antonio, TX: The Psychological Corporation. Wechsler, D. (1989). Manual for the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scales of Intelligence. San Antonio, TX: The Psychological Corporation.

Child Behavior Checklist/4-18 Achenbach, T. M. 1991

Child Behavior Checklist/4-18 Achenbach, T. M. 1991 Description of Measure Child Behavior Checklist/4-18 Achenbach, T. M. 1991 Purpose To obtain caregiver reports of a child s competencies and behavior problems in a standardized format. Conceptual Organization

More information

Fact Sheet 10 DSM-5 and Autism Spectrum Disorder

Fact Sheet 10 DSM-5 and Autism Spectrum Disorder Fact Sheet 10 DSM-5 and Autism Spectrum Disorder A diagnosis of autism is made on the basis of observed behaviour. There are no blood tests, no single defining symptom and no physical characteristics that

More information

General Symptom Measures

General Symptom Measures General Symptom Measures SCL-90-R, BSI, MMSE, CBCL, & BASC-2 Symptom Checklist 90 - Revised SCL-90-R 90 item, single page, self-administered questionnaire. Can usually be completed in 10-15 minutes Intended

More information

Child Behavior Checklist/4-18 Achenbach, T. M. 1991

Child Behavior Checklist/4-18 Achenbach, T. M. 1991 Description of Measure Child Behavior Checklist/4-18 Achenbach, T. M. 1991 Purpose To obtain caregiver report of children's competencies and behavior problems in a standardized format. Conceptual Organization

More information

Running head: ADHD AND ASD CASE STUDY 1. Case Study: Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorders. Dianne L.

Running head: ADHD AND ASD CASE STUDY 1. Case Study: Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorders. Dianne L. Running head: ADHD AND ASD CASE STUDY 1 Case Study: Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorders Dianne L. Ballance University of Calgary APSY 693.89 ADHD AND ASD CASE STUDY 2

More information

The WISC III Freedom From Distractibility Factor: Its Utility in Identifying Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

The WISC III Freedom From Distractibility Factor: Its Utility in Identifying Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder The WISC III Freedom From Distractibility Factor: Its Utility in Identifying Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder By: Arthur D. Anastopoulos, Marc A. Spisto, Mary C. Maher Anastopoulos,

More information

Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales (VABS) II

Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales (VABS) II Outcome Measure Sensitivity to Change Population Domain Type of Measure ICF-Code/s Description Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales (VABS) II Yes Paediatrics Behavioural Function Neuropsychological Impairment

More information

PRELIMINARY DEVELOPMENT OF THE TEACHER-REPORT ADHD IMPAIRMENT RATING SCALE

PRELIMINARY DEVELOPMENT OF THE TEACHER-REPORT ADHD IMPAIRMENT RATING SCALE PRELIMINARY DEVELOPMENT OF THE TEACHER-REPORT ADHD IMPAIRMENT RATING SCALE By KATHERINE ELIZABETH KIKER A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF

More information

Multimethod Assessment of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: The Diagnostic Utility of Clinic-Based Tests

Multimethod Assessment of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: The Diagnostic Utility of Clinic-Based Tests Multimethod Assessment of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: The Diagnostic Utility of Clinic-Based Tests By: George J. DuPaul, Arthur D. Anastopoulos, Terri L. Shelton, David C. Guevremont, Lori

More information

Billy. Austin 8/27/2013. ADHD & Bipolar Disorder: Differentiating the Behavioral Presentation in Children

Billy. Austin 8/27/2013. ADHD & Bipolar Disorder: Differentiating the Behavioral Presentation in Children ADHD & Bipolar Disorder: Differentiating the Behavioral Presentation in Children Judy Goodwin, MSN, CNS Meadows Psychiatric Associates Billy Austin 1 Introduction Distinguishing between ADHD and Bipolar

More information

Attention-Deficit Disorders Evaluation Scale Second Edition, School Version

Attention-Deficit Disorders Evaluation Scale Second Edition, School Version Attention-Deficit Disorders Evaluation Scale Second Edition, School Version (ADDES-2, SV) The Attention-Deficit Disorders Evaluation Scale Second Edition, School Version (J. McCarney, 1995b), is a rating

More information

Abstract. Authors. Azin Taheri, 1,2 Adrienne Perry, 1,2 David C. Factor 2. Correspondence. Keywords. Volume 20, Number 1, 2014

Abstract. Authors. Azin Taheri, 1,2 Adrienne Perry, 1,2 David C. Factor 2. Correspondence. Keywords. Volume 20, Number 1, 2014 brief report: A Further Examination of the DSM 5 Autism Spectrum Disorder Criteria in Practice Volume 20, Number 1, 2014 Authors Azin Taheri, 1,2 Adrienne Perry, 1,2 David C. Factor 2 1 Department of Psychology,

More information

INFORMATION PAPER INTRODUCING THE DSM-5 DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA FOR AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER

INFORMATION PAPER INTRODUCING THE DSM-5 DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA FOR AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER INFORMATION PAPER INTRODUCING THE DSM-5 DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA FOR AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER What is the DSM-5? The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (the DSM) is developed by the American

More information

Brief Report: Thought Disorder in Asperger Syndrome: Comparison with High-Functioning Autism

Brief Report: Thought Disorder in Asperger Syndrome: Comparison with High-Functioning Autism Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, VoL 25 No. 3, 1995 Brief Report: Thought Disorder in Asperger Syndrome: Comparison with High-Functioning Autism Mohammad Ghaziuddin, 1 Lisa Leininger, and

More information

Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Disruptive, Impulse Control and Conduct Disorder (DSM 5)

Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Disruptive, Impulse Control and Conduct Disorder (DSM 5) Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Disruptive, Impulse Control and Conduct Disorder (DSM 5) Matthew Soulier, MD Paula Wadell, MD Scott Summers, MD, PhD UC Davis Department of Psychiatry CONCENTRATION IRRITABILITY

More information

USE OF GILLIAM ASPERGER S DISORDER SCALE IN DIFFERENTIATING HIGH AND LOW FUNCTIONING AUTISM AND ADHD 1

USE OF GILLIAM ASPERGER S DISORDER SCALE IN DIFFERENTIATING HIGH AND LOW FUNCTIONING AUTISM AND ADHD 1 Psychological Reports, 2011, 108, 1, 3-13. Psychological Reports 2011 USE OF GILLIAM ASPERGER S DISORDER SCALE IN DIFFERENTIATING HIGH AND LOW FUNCTIONING AUTISM AND ADHD 1 SUSAN DICKERSON MAYES, SUSAN

More information

Parent and Teacher Ratings of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Preschool: The ADHD Rating Scale-IV Preschool Version

Parent and Teacher Ratings of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Preschool: The ADHD Rating Scale-IV Preschool Version Parent and Teacher Ratings of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Preschool: The ADHD Rating Scale-IV Preschool Version By: Kara E. McGoey, George J. DuPaul, Erin Haley, and Teri L. Shelton McGoey,

More information

Services for youngsters with ADHD and related disorders: Status and policy

Services for youngsters with ADHD and related disorders: Status and policy Services for youngsters with ADHD and related disorders: Status and policy Conference: Family polices and child welfare in the Nordic countries 5.9. 2014 For clarification Youngsters Children aged 5 to

More information

Practical Applications of the Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment (ASEBA) for Ages 1.5 to 90+ Years

Practical Applications of the Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment (ASEBA) for Ages 1.5 to 90+ Years Australian Council for Educational Research ACEReSearch 2004 - The International Test Users' Conference Conference Archive 7-2004 Practical Applications of the Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment

More information

Attention-Deficit Disorders Evaluation Scale Home Version (ADDES-HV)

Attention-Deficit Disorders Evaluation Scale Home Version (ADDES-HV) Attention-Deficit Disorders Evaluation Scale Home Version (ADDES-HV) The Attention-Deficit Disorder Evaluation Scale Home Version (J. McCarney, 1995a) is a counterpart of the Attention-Deficit Disorders

More information

BASC-3 Scales, Composites and Indexes for the TRS, PRS and SRP

BASC-3 Scales, Composites and Indexes for the TRS, PRS and SRP BASC-3 Scales, Composites and Indexes for the TRS, PRS and SRP This document contains information about the scales, composites and indexes provided for the BASC -3 Teacher Rating Scales, Parent Rating

More information

Phenotypic conundrums in the diagnostic appraisal of autism spectrum disorders

Phenotypic conundrums in the diagnostic appraisal of autism spectrum disorders Phenotypic conundrums in the diagnostic appraisal of autism spectrum disorders 2 Tom Insel Director, NIMH 29 th April 2013 The weakness is its lack of validity. Unlike our definitions of ischemic heart

More information

ADHD Documentation Guidelines

ADHD Documentation Guidelines ADHD Documentation Guidelines Introduction Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a psychiatric diagnosis based on criteria defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders

More information

Goals of this presentation Outline DSM-5 changes to Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) classification Opportunity to discuss implications for clinicians

Goals of this presentation Outline DSM-5 changes to Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) classification Opportunity to discuss implications for clinicians Autism Spectrum Disorder in DSM-5: Overview of Updates to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual and to the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS-2) Katherine Gotham, Ph.D. Webinar hosted by the

More information

SAMPLE. Conners 3 Parent Assessment Report. By C. Keith Conners, Ph.D.

SAMPLE. Conners 3 Parent Assessment Report. By C. Keith Conners, Ph.D. By C. Keith Conners, Ph.D. Conners 3 Parent Assessment Report This Assessment report is intended for use by qualified assessors only, and is not to be shown or presented to the respondent or any other

More information

Since the 1960s there has been a steady increase of youths being referred for mental health

Since the 1960s there has been a steady increase of youths being referred for mental health ODD AND MDD 1 Since the 1960s there has been a steady increase of youths being referred for mental health services due to aggressive, acting out, and disruptive behavior patterns (Achenback & Howell, 1993,

More information

The Conners Parent Rating Scale: Psychometric, clinical and cross-cultural considerations in. typically developing 4- to 12-year-old Frenchspeaking

The Conners Parent Rating Scale: Psychometric, clinical and cross-cultural considerations in. typically developing 4- to 12-year-old Frenchspeaking Running head: Psychometric properties of the Conners Parent Rating Scale The Conners Parent Rating Scale: Psychometric, clinical and cross-cultural considerations in typically developing 4- to 12-year-old

More information

Enlightening Anganwadi Teachers and Parents of Preschoolers on Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorer (Adhd)

Enlightening Anganwadi Teachers and Parents of Preschoolers on Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorer (Adhd) IOSR Journal Of Humanities And Social Science (IOSR-JHSS) Volume 21, Issue 1, Ver. II (Jan. 216) PP 83-88 e-issn: 2279-837, p-issn: 2279-845. www.iosrjournals.org Enlightening Anganwadi Teachers and Parents

More information

ADHD and Autism Spectrum Disorder: They can and do co-exist. Jonathan E. Romain, Ph.D., ABPP-CN

ADHD and Autism Spectrum Disorder: They can and do co-exist. Jonathan E. Romain, Ph.D., ABPP-CN ADHD and Autism Spectrum Disorder: They can and do co-exist Jonathan E. Romain, Ph.D., ABPP-CN Financial Disclosure In accordance with the ACCME policy on relevant financial disclosure, all were asked

More information

Early Childhood Measurement and Evaluation Tool Review

Early Childhood Measurement and Evaluation Tool Review Early Childhood Measurement and Evaluation Tool Review Early Childhood Measurement and Evaluation (ECME), a portfolio within CUP, produces Early Childhood Measurement Tool Reviews as a resource for those

More information

MCPS Special Education Parent Summit

MCPS Special Education Parent Summit MCPS Special Education Parent Summit May 17, 2014 Rockville High School 2100 Baltimore Road Rockville, MD 20851 When ADHD Is Not ADHD: ADHD Look-Alikes and Co-occurring Disorders David W. Holdefer MCPS

More information

Conners' Continuous Performance Test II (CPT II V.5)

Conners' Continuous Performance Test II (CPT II V.5) Conners' Continuous Performance Test II (CPT II V.5) By C. Keith Conners, Ph.D. and MHS Staff CPT II/CRS-R Multimodal Integrated Report This report is intended to be used by the test administrator as an

More information

ASD and ID in DSM-5: Implications For Assessment Practices

ASD and ID in DSM-5: Implications For Assessment Practices ASD and ID in DSM-5: Implications For Assessment Practices Fiona Martin PhD MAPS CEDP Educational and Developmental Psychologist 4 Principles Guided the Revisions: 1) DSM-5 is primarily intended to be

More information

SAMPLE. Conners 3 Parent Assessment Report. By C. Keith Conners, Ph.D.

SAMPLE. Conners 3 Parent Assessment Report. By C. Keith Conners, Ph.D. By C. Keith Conners, Ph.D. Conners 3 Parent Assessment Report This Assessment report is intended for use by qualified assessors only, and is not to be shown or presented to the respondent or any other

More information

Overview of DSM-5: Autism Spectrum Disorder

Overview of DSM-5: Autism Spectrum Disorder Overview of DSM-5: Autism Spectrum Disorder Courtney Burnette, PhD Clinical Psychologist UNM Center for Development and Disability Department of Pediatrics September 20, 2013 Objectives Recognize the changes

More information

Appendix 1: Diagnostic criteria for autism and Asperger syndrome

Appendix 1: Diagnostic criteria for autism and Asperger syndrome Appendix 1: Diagnostic criteria for autism and Asperger syndrome Diagnostic criteria for autism from the two main diagnostic classification systems, the International Classification of Diseases and Related

More information

Teacher s Report Form Achenbach, T. 1991

Teacher s Report Form Achenbach, T. 1991 Teacher s Report Form Achenbach, T. 1991 Description of Measure Purpose To obtain teacher s perception of child s academic performance, adaptive functioning and problem behavior in a standardized format.

More information

The new Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Diagnostic Criteria as defined by the DSM-V

The new Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Diagnostic Criteria as defined by the DSM-V The new Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Diagnostic Criteria as defined by the DSM-V Written by Dr Rucha Joshi, Aspect Victoria, Positive Behaviour Support Specialist. There have been lots of discussions

More information

Early Childhood Measurement and Evaluation Tool Review

Early Childhood Measurement and Evaluation Tool Review Early Childhood Measurement and Evaluation Tool Review Early Childhood Measurement and Evaluation (ECME), a portfolio within CUP, produces Early Childhood Measurement Tool Reviews as a resource for those

More information

Report on Attention Deficit Disorder in Ireland Prepared by the Joint Committee on Health and Children, 1999.

Report on Attention Deficit Disorder in Ireland Prepared by the Joint Committee on Health and Children, 1999. Response of The Royal College of Psychiatrists (Irish Division) Child and Adolescent Section to: Report on Attention Deficit Disorder in Ireland Prepared by the Joint Committee on Health and Children,

More information

Three Assessments for School- Aged Children- McAndrew 1. Conners 3 rd Edition

Three Assessments for School- Aged Children- McAndrew 1. Conners 3 rd Edition Three Assessments for School- Aged Children- McAndrew 1 Conners 3 rd Edition Purpose of Instrument The Conners 3 rd Edition is an instrument to assess children and teens ages 6-18. Teachers, parents, and

More information

Conners CBRS Self-Report Assessment Report

Conners CBRS Self-Report Assessment Report By C. Keith Conners, Ph.D. Conners CBRS Self-Report Assessment Report Caution: The youth s reported age is out of the age range (6 18 years). T-scores were computed based on 17 18-year-old age norms; consequently,

More information

Presentation and Assessment of Psychiatric Symptoms in Children and Adolescents with ASD

Presentation and Assessment of Psychiatric Symptoms in Children and Adolescents with ASD Presentation and Assessment of Psychiatric Symptoms in Children and Adolescents with ASD Andrea Witwer, PhD Nisonger Center The Ohio State University Objectives Obstacles in assessment of psychiatric symptoms

More information

Running head: ASPERGER S AND SCHIZOID 1. A New Measure to Differentiate the Autism Spectrum from Schizoid Personality Disorder

Running head: ASPERGER S AND SCHIZOID 1. A New Measure to Differentiate the Autism Spectrum from Schizoid Personality Disorder Running head: ASPERGER S AND SCHIZOID 1 A New Measure to Differentiate the Autism Spectrum from Schizoid Personality Disorder Peter D. Marle, Camille S. Rhoades, and Frederick L. Coolidge University of

More information

DSM-5 Diagnostic Criteria

DSM-5 Diagnostic Criteria DSM-5 Diagnostic Criteria This is the full-text of the diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and the related diagnosis of social communication disorder (SCD), as they appear in the fifth

More information

Conners' Continuous Performance Test II (CPT II V.5)

Conners' Continuous Performance Test II (CPT II V.5) Conners' Continuous Performance Test II (CPT II V.5) By C. Keith Conners, Ph.D., Drew Erhardt, Ph.D., Elizabeth Sparrow, Ph.D., and MHS Staff CPT II/CAARS Multimodal Integrated Report This report is intended

More information

For more than 100 years, extremely hyperactive

For more than 100 years, extremely hyperactive 8 WHAT WE KNOW ADHD Predominantly Inattentive Type For more than 100 years, extremely hyperactive children have been recognized as having behavioral problems. In the 1970s, doctors recognized that those

More information

DSM-5 Diagnostic Criteria

DSM-5 Diagnostic Criteria DSM-5 Diagnostic Criteria Autism Speaks is pleased to provide the full-text of the diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and the related diagnosis of social communication disorder (SCD),

More information

Conners' Parent Rating Scales Revised: Long (CPRS R:L)

Conners' Parent Rating Scales Revised: Long (CPRS R:L) Conners' Parent Rating Scales Revised: Long (CPRS R:L) By C. Keith Conners, Ph.D. Interpretive Report Copyright 2002, Multi-Health Systems Inc. All rights reserved. P.O. Box 950, North Tonawanda, NY 14120-0950

More information

Validity of the parenting scale for parents of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

Validity of the parenting scale for parents of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder Behaviour Research and Therapy 39 (2001) 731 743 www.elsevier.com/locate/brat Validity of the parenting scale for parents of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder Elizabeth Harvey a,*,

More information

Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder

Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder The Center for Counseling Practice, Policy, and Research counseling.org/practice_briefs 703-823-9800 x324 Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder Brandy L. Gilea Ph.D. and Rachel M. O Neill Ph.D., Walden

More information

A Parent Management Training Program for Parents of Very Young Children with a Developmental Disability

A Parent Management Training Program for Parents of Very Young Children with a Developmental Disability A Parent Management Training Program for Parents of Very Young Children with a Developmental Disability Marcia Huipe April 25 th, 2008 Description of Project The purpose of this project was to determine

More information

Autism is one of the pervasive developmental

Autism is one of the pervasive developmental Original Article Symptoms of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder, a clinical sample Ahmad Ghanizadeh, MD 1 Mohammad Reza Mohammadi, MD 2 Shahin Akhondzadeh, PhD 2 Ali Alavi Shooshtari, MD 1 1 Department

More information

Andrew Hall MD, FRCP (C) Assistant Professor Department of Psychiatry University of Manitoba

Andrew Hall MD, FRCP (C) Assistant Professor Department of Psychiatry University of Manitoba Andrew Hall MD, FRCP (C) Assistant Professor Department of Psychiatry University of Manitoba New in the DSM-5: Child and Adolescent 1. To be aware of the new diagnostic classification organization in the

More information

A Training Module for Early. Interventionists. VT-ILEHP ASD LEND Program 2009

A Training Module for Early. Interventionists. VT-ILEHP ASD LEND Program 2009 A Training Module for Early Interventionists VT-ILEHP ASD LEND Program 2009 Gilliam Autism Rating Scale-Second Edition (GARS-2) Standardized, norm referenced Improved reliability from previous edition

More information

Asperger s Disorder and Social Phobia: A Comparison of Social Functioning

Asperger s Disorder and Social Phobia: A Comparison of Social Functioning Vol. 4. Issue 2. 31-41 THE UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL FLORIDA Published December 2, 2010 Asperger s Disorder and Social Phobia: A Comparison of Social Functioning By: Nomara Santos Faculty Mentor: Dr. Deborah

More information

CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINE FOR THE ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT OF CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS. Full version

CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINE FOR THE ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT OF CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS. Full version CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINE FOR THE ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT OF CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS Full version These guidelines are adapted from recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics

More information

Highlights of Changes from DSM-IV-TR to DSM-5

Highlights of Changes from DSM-IV-TR to DSM-5 Highlights of Changes from DSM-IV-TR to DSM-5 Changes made to the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria and texts are outlined in this chapter in the same order in which they appear in the DSM-5 classification. This

More information

Is There a Difference Between Asperger's Syndrome and High Functioning Autism? Dr Tony Attwood

Is There a Difference Between Asperger's Syndrome and High Functioning Autism? Dr Tony Attwood Is There a Difference Between Asperger's Syndrome and High Functioning Autism? Dr Tony Attwood We have been exploring the nature of autism, as described by Leo Kanner, for nearly 60 years. He described

More information

Clinical Practice Guidelines: Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

Clinical Practice Guidelines: Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Clinical Practice Guidelines: Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder AACAP Official Action: OUTLINE OF PRACTICE PARAMETERS FOR THE ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT OF CHILDREN, ADOLESCENTS, AND ADULTS WITH ADHD

More information

TYPES OF DISABILITIES POWER POINT #2. Dr. Gregory W. Little 1

TYPES OF DISABILITIES POWER POINT #2. Dr. Gregory W. Little 1 TYPES OF DISABILITIES POWER POINT #2 Dr. Gregory W. Little glittle@ctohe.org 1 SO WHAT S TYPICAL ANYWAY?? 2 TYPES OF DISABILITIES 1. Learning disability: (SLD & Dyslexia) 2. Other Health Impaired : Attention

More information

UCLA-NPI/VA PG-2 Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Course 2004-5. Week 3:Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

UCLA-NPI/VA PG-2 Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Course 2004-5. Week 3:Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder UCLA-NPI/VA PG-2 Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Course 2004-5 Week 3:Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder ADHD:Epidemiology Point Prevalence 2-18% M:F>= 2:1 ADHD Symptoms Cognitive (attention) Impulsivity

More information

AUTISM SPECTRUM RATING SCALES (ASRS )

AUTISM SPECTRUM RATING SCALES (ASRS ) AUTISM SPECTRUM RATING ES ( ) Sam Goldstein, Ph.D. & Jack A. Naglieri, Ph.D. PRODUCT OVERVIEW Goldstein & Naglieri Excellence In Assessments In Assessments Autism Spectrum Rating Scales ( ) Product Overview

More information

Asperger s disorder (i)

Asperger s disorder (i) Chapter 2 Asperger s disorder (i) Avril Brer ereton eton and Bruce Tonge WHAT IS ASPERGER S DISORDER? One year after Kanner s (1943) original paper on autism, Hans Asperger published a paper in 1944 that

More information

SAMPLE. Conners 3 Teacher Assessment Report. By C. Keith Conners, Ph.D.

SAMPLE. Conners 3 Teacher Assessment Report. By C. Keith Conners, Ph.D. By C. Keith Conners, Ph.D. Conners 3 Teacher Assessment Report This Assessment report is intended for use by qualified assessors only, and is not to be shown or presented to the respondent or any other

More information

ASSESSMENT OF AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS. Kimberly Hunter, Ph.D. Clinical Psychologist Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at University of Toledo

ASSESSMENT OF AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS. Kimberly Hunter, Ph.D. Clinical Psychologist Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at University of Toledo ASSESSMENT OF AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS Kimberly Hunter, Ph.D. Clinical Psychologist Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at University of Toledo Overview Autism Spectrum Disorders Evidenced Based Assessment

More information

Conners' Teacher Rating Scales Revised: Long (CTRS R:L)

Conners' Teacher Rating Scales Revised: Long (CTRS R:L) Conners' Teacher Rating Scales Revised: Long (CTRS R:L) By C. Keith Conners, Ph.D. Interpretive Report Copyright 2002, Multi-Health Systems Inc. All rights reserved. P.O. Box 950, North Tonawanda, NY 14120-0950

More information

Parenting Stress Among Families of Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Parenting Stress Among Families of Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Parenting Stress Among Families of Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder By: Arthur D. Anastopoulos, David C. Guevremont, Terri L. Shelton, and George J. DuPaul Anastopoulos, A.D., Guevremont,

More information

PTSD In Early Childhood: DSM-5 and Beyond

PTSD In Early Childhood: DSM-5 and Beyond PTSD In Early Childhood: DSM-5 and Beyond Annual Meeting of the North Carolina Psychiatric Association September 27, 2014 Charles H. Zeanah, M.D. Section of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Departments

More information

Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Adolescents with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Monica Mongia, PhD Lily Hechtman, MD, F.R.C.

Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Adolescents with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Monica Mongia, PhD Lily Hechtman, MD, F.R.C. Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Adolescents with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Monica Mongia, PhD Lily Hechtman, MD, F.R.C.P ADHD in Adolescence Adolescence- Crucial stage of development Inattentiveness,

More information

So as we all know and love DSM-IV-TR, the reason I highlight it and David Kupfer mentioned it

So as we all know and love DSM-IV-TR, the reason I highlight it and David Kupfer mentioned it AND MORE, MARTIN L. LUBETSKY, MD 1 So I ll be covering neurodevelopmental disorders and I m going to focus on autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability and briefly a few comments about communication

More information

European Scientific Journal March 2016 edition vol.12, No.7 ISSN: 1857 7881 (Print) e - ISSN 1857-7431

European Scientific Journal March 2016 edition vol.12, No.7 ISSN: 1857 7881 (Print) e - ISSN 1857-7431 Applicability Degree of Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnostic Criteria of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders the 5 the Edition (DSM V) on Children Enrolled in Autism Centers in Jordan

More information

ADHD Diagnosis and Evaluation Robin K. Blitz, MD. ADHD DIAGNOSTIC CLINIC Week 1

ADHD Diagnosis and Evaluation Robin K. Blitz, MD. ADHD DIAGNOSTIC CLINIC Week 1 ADHD Diagnosis and Evaluation Robin K. Blitz, MD ADHD DIAGNOSTIC CLINIC Week 1 ADHD What is it? A neurodevelopmental disorder Developmentally inappropriate levels of hyperactivity, impulsivity, and inattention

More information

Disruptive behaviour disorders Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) / Conduct disorder (CD)

Disruptive behaviour disorders Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) / Conduct disorder (CD) Disruptive behaviour disorders Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) / Conduct disorder (CD) Professor Alasdair Vance Head, Academic Child Psychiatry Department of Paediatrics University of Melbourne Royal

More information

Stacy Lauderdale-Littin. Erica Howell. Jan Blacher

Stacy Lauderdale-Littin. Erica Howell. Jan Blacher Education and Training in Autism and Developmental Disabilities, 2013, 48(4), 469 478 Division on Autism and Developmental Disabilities Educational Placement for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

More information

ASD. DSM-IV TR to DSM-V

ASD. DSM-IV TR to DSM-V ASD DSM-IV TR to DSM-V DSM IS A GUIDE. It is supposed to reflect a consensus of current formulations or hypothesis of mental health disorders based on the evolving knowledge in the field of psychiatry.

More information

Title: Screening for autism and AD/HD. The A-TAC: further validation of a telephone interview in clinical and population samples.

Title: Screening for autism and AD/HD. The A-TAC: further validation of a telephone interview in clinical and population samples. Author's response to reviews Title: Screening for autism and AD/HD. The A-TAC: further validation of a telephone interview in clinical and population samples. Authors: Tomas Larson (Tomas.Larson@med.lu.se)

More information

WISC IV and Children s Memory Scale

WISC IV and Children s Memory Scale TECHNICAL REPORT #5 WISC IV and Children s Memory Scale Lisa W. Drozdick James Holdnack Eric Rolfhus Larry Weiss Assessment of declarative memory functions is an important component of neuropsychological,

More information

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Aggression in Jamaican Students

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Aggression in Jamaican Students Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Aggression in Jamaican Students Scott W. Minor, Garth Lipps, Patricia Prescott, Doneisha Burke, Don-Marie Holder University of the West Indies, Mona Ganesh

More information

PSYCHIATRY OBJECTIVES

PSYCHIATRY OBJECTIVES 1 P a g e PSYCHIATRY OBJECTIVES Phase II Introductory clinical appointment 1. Ability to take a brief psychiatric history, do a mental state examination and relevant physical examination in a patient with

More information

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Clinical Practice Guideline Summary for Primary Care

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Clinical Practice Guideline Summary for Primary Care Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Clinical Practice Guideline Summary for Primary Care CLINICAL ASSESSMENT AND DIAGNOSIS (ADULTS) Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is categorized by recurrent obsessions,

More information

Missed Diagnosis or Misdiagnosis? Girls and Women in the Autism Spectrum. Dr Judith Gould Director The NAS Lorna Wing Centre for Autism

Missed Diagnosis or Misdiagnosis? Girls and Women in the Autism Spectrum. Dr Judith Gould Director The NAS Lorna Wing Centre for Autism Missed Diagnosis or Misdiagnosis? Girls and Women in the Autism Spectrum Dr Judith Gould Director The NAS Lorna Wing Centre for Autism Why the Interest NAS Lorna Wing Centre increasing number of girls

More information

Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised

Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised Synonyms ADI-R Abbreviations ADOS ASD Autism diagnostic observation schedule Autism spectrum disorders Description The ( ADI-R; Le Couteur, Lord, & Rutter, 2003; Lord, Rutter, & Le Couteur, 1994) is a

More information

The 5 Axes of the DSM-IV and DC: 0-3R. Purpose of the Diagnostic Classification: 0-3R (DC:0-3R) Early Childhood Mental Health

The 5 Axes of the DSM-IV and DC: 0-3R. Purpose of the Diagnostic Classification: 0-3R (DC:0-3R) Early Childhood Mental Health 23rd Annual Children s Mental Health Research and Policy Conference Tampa, FL March 9, 2010 Validation of the DC:0-3R for Diagnosing Anxiety and Sensory Stimulation s in Young Children Early Childhood

More information

Copyright is owned by the Author of the thesis. Permission is given for a copy to be downloaded by an individual for the purpose of research and

Copyright is owned by the Author of the thesis. Permission is given for a copy to be downloaded by an individual for the purpose of research and Copyright is owned by the Author of the thesis. Permission is given for a copy to be downloaded by an individual for the purpose of research and private study only. The thesis may not be reproduced elsewhere

More information

Psychology 251: Disorders of Childhood University of Vermont

Psychology 251: Disorders of Childhood University of Vermont Psychology 251: Disorders of Childhood University of Vermont Instructor: Eileen Crehan & Justin Parent Meeting Time & Location: Tuesdays Thursdays 9:00-12:45, Aiken 112 Office Hours: UHC St. Joseph s 3400,

More information

The Other Attention Disorder: Sluggish Cognitive Tempo vs. ADHD

The Other Attention Disorder: Sluggish Cognitive Tempo vs. ADHD The Other Attention Disorder: Sluggish Cognitive Tempo vs. ADHD Russell A. Barkley, Ph.D. Clinical Professor of Psychiatry Medical University of South Carolina Charleston, SC Copyright by Russell A. Barkley,

More information

Autism Spectrum Disorders: An Awareness Level Training for Educators

Autism Spectrum Disorders: An Awareness Level Training for Educators Autism Spectrum s: An Awareness Level Training for Educators Autism is the Fastest-Growing Developmental Disability More common than pediatric cancer, diabetes and AIDS combined Autism increased 172% during

More information

Adolescents with ADHD: Patterns of Behavioral Adjustment, Academic Functioning, and Treatment Utilization

Adolescents with ADHD: Patterns of Behavioral Adjustment, Academic Functioning, and Treatment Utilization Adolescents with ADHD: Patterns of Behavioral Adjustment, Academic Functioning, and Treatment Utilization By: RUSSELL A. BARKLEY, PH.D., ARTHUR D. ANASTOPOULOS, PH.D., DAVID C. GUEVREMONT, PH.D., AND KENNETH

More information

Pervasive developmental disorders. workshop

Pervasive developmental disorders. workshop Pervasive developmental disorders workshop Historical perspective Leo Kanner 1943:extreme autistic aloneness, preservation of sameness, excellent memory, delayed echolalia, oversensitivity to stimuli,

More information

SAMPLE. Comparative Report. By C. Keith Conners, Ph.D.

SAMPLE. Comparative Report. By C. Keith Conners, Ph.D. By C. Keith Conners, Ph.D. Comparative Report Parent Teacher/Childcare Provider Teacher/Childcare Provider 1 2 Child's Name/ID: Michaela W Michaela W Michaela W Administration Date: Feb 20, 2009 Feb 20,

More information

Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences- Team Learning Activities Reading

Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences- Team Learning Activities Reading Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences- Team Learning Activities Reading ANXIETY AND SOMATIC SYMPTOM AND RELATED DISORDERS This resource covers several different categories of syndromes, and is designed to help

More information

INFORMATION PAPER: THE PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA FOR AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS (DSM-5)

INFORMATION PAPER: THE PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA FOR AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS (DSM-5) INFORMATION PAPER: THE PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA FOR AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS (DSM-5) What is the DSM-5? The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (the DSM) is developed

More information

Autism and Other Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) or Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDDs)

Autism and Other Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) or Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDDs) Autism and Other Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) or Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDDs) Institute for Development of Mind and Behavior Masataka Ohta June 13, 2007 OUTLINE Concept and Diagnosis of

More information

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Pervasive Developmental Disorders Key Differences

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Pervasive Developmental Disorders Key Differences Comparison of the Diagnostic Criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorder Across DSM-5, 1 DSM-IV-TR, 2 and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) 3 Definition of Autism Colleen M. Harker, M.S.

More information

Differentiating PTSD and ADHD. Elizabeth Risch, Ph.D. & Melissa Hakman, Ph.D.

Differentiating PTSD and ADHD. Elizabeth Risch, Ph.D. & Melissa Hakman, Ph.D. Differentiating PTSD and ADHD Elizabeth Risch, Ph.D. & Melissa Hakman, Ph.D. ADHD vs. PTSD One is a disruptive behavior disorder and the other is a reaction to trauma.so what s to differentiate??? The

More information

Talking about ADHD. INTSP/IN/ADHD/13/0080a October 2013

Talking about ADHD. INTSP/IN/ADHD/13/0080a October 2013 Talking about ADHD Please note, the content of this programme is advisory only and not a substitute for professional and/or medical advice. If you would like any further advice or have any concerns regarding

More information

Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) OBJECTIVE To provide evidence-based recommendations for the management of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). INTRODUCTION Attention Deficit

More information

Disability Information Session. Jennifer Radt, UC Clermont Marcie Mendelsohn, CCHMC

Disability Information Session. Jennifer Radt, UC Clermont Marcie Mendelsohn, CCHMC Asperger s Syndrome Disability Information Session October 23, 2007 Jennifer Radt, UC Clermont Marcie Mendelsohn, CCHMC What is Asperger s Syndrome? Individuals with AS can exhibit a variety of characteristics

More information

Summary of IVA-QS Research Studies

Summary of IVA-QS Research Studies Summary of IVA-QS Research Studies The IVA+Plus and IVA-QS test procedures, structure and quotient scales are essentially the same. Howeverr, the IVA-QS differs in that it is limited to the first 300 trials

More information