Theory of Evolution. A. the beginning of life B. the evolution of eukaryotes C. the evolution of archaebacteria D. the beginning of terrestrial life

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Theory of Evolution. A. the beginning of life B. the evolution of eukaryotes C. the evolution of archaebacteria D. the beginning of terrestrial life"

Transcription

1 Theory of Evolution 1. In 1966, American biologist Lynn Margulis proposed the theory of endosymbiosis, or the idea that mitochondria are the descendents of symbiotic, aerobic eubacteria. What does the theory of endosymbiosis help explain? A. the beginning of life B. the evolution of eukaryotes C. the evolution of archaebacteria D. the beginning of terrestrial life 2. Scientists know that organisms that are more closely related will have DNA sequences more similar to each other than organisms that are distantly related. Which two organisms below would most likely have the fewest similar nucleotide sequences in a given gene? A. scorpion and tarantula B. orangutan and howler monkey C. alligator and earthworm D. lion and horse 3. The study of embryological similarities and differences among species is called. A. developmental psychology B. comparative embryology C. investigative neurology D. cooperative anatomy

2 4. The instructions for building proteins necessary for all life functions are coded within an organism's genetic code. The genetic code of an organism consists of codons, or sequences of three nucleotides, that each code for a specific amino acid. Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins. The amino acids coded by specific codons A. differ between members of different species. B. are different for every organism on Earth. C. are almost universal among all living things. D. differ between plants and animals. 5. The front leg of an iguana and the wing of a bird look different, but both limbs likely evolved from the same limb of a shared ancestor. Structures such as these are said to be. A. heterogeneous B. differentiated C. homologous D. vestigial 6. A scientist is doing research on the evolutionary relationship between whales and hippopotamuses. Which of the following is a reasonable hypothesis that the scientist could make about this relationship? Whales are more closely related to dolphins and porpoises than they are to other marine animals. A. Whales are more closely related to hippopotamuses than they are to cartilaginous fish such as sharks. B. Which mammalian species are whales most closely related to in terms of their evolutionary history? C. How did whales evolve to live in the ocean instead of on the land like other mammals? D.

3 7. What does it mean to say that two different species of organisms are closely related? A. They have the same parents. B. They have a common evolutionary ancestor. C. They live in the same habitat. D. They have the same preferences in diet. 8. The theory of endosymbiosis claims that millions of years ago, aerobic bacteria were taken inside of anaerobic cells through endophagocytosis. The aerobic bacteria then fed on the half-digested food molecules in the cell's cytoplasm and gained a great amount of energy, which, in turn, benefited the host cell. Since both organisms benefited, they formed an endosymbiotic relationship, the bacteria evolved into organelles, such as mitochondria and chloroplasts, and the aerobic cells evolved into eukaryotic cells. Which of the following can be cited as evidence for the theory of endosymbiosis? A. B. C. Eukaryotic cells appeared on Earth around 1.5 billion years ago, whereas chloroplasts appeared on Earth only 2.5 million years ago. Mitochondria are typically above 50 microns in size, whereas eukaryotic cells are typically smaller than 10 microns. The ribosomes of chloroplasts are more similar in structure to ribosomes found in prokaryotes than to ribosomes found in eukaryotes. Mitochondria contain multiple linear chromosomes similar to those found in eukaryotic cells. D. 9. Fur seals and sea lions have similar body shapes and features. Based on their anatomy, they seem to have a relatively recent common evolutionary ancestor. What further evidence would best substantiate that the two animals have a recent common ancestor? A. The animals are members of different taxonomic kingdoms. B. Both animals live in the Pacific Ocean. C. Ten million year old fossils are found of both animals. D. The animals have very similar sequences in their DNA.

4 10. Technology Enhanced Questions are not available in Word format. 11. The first organisms evolved on Earth around 4 billion years ago. The fossil record indicates that the first organisms were which of the following? A. plastids B. eukaryotes C. mitochondria D. prokaryotes 12. Nearly all mammals have seven cervical (neck) vertebrae. This fact implies that A. all mammals descended from a common ancestor. B. all mammals have to stretch their necks to obtain food. C. all animals can turn their heads the same amount. D. predators prefer to eat animals with either six or eight cervical vertebrae. 13. Charles Darwin originally published the idea that all species have descended over time from common ancestors. This idea is known as evolution. Evolution is best categorized as A. a scientific theory that is supported by evidence. B. an unproven observation about a small number of organisms. C. a scientific hypothesis that has not been researched. D. a scientific fact that has not been modified since Darwin's time. 14. The study of structural differences and similarities among living things is called. A. neurology B. comparative anatomy C. comparative biochemistry D. embryology 15. The fossil record shows that the forelimbs of humans, cats, dolphins, and bats have the same skeletal elements. These skeletal elements have evolved into different shapes and sizes based on their function. For example, the flipper of a dolphin is adapted for swimming and the wing of a bat is adapted for flying.

5 What do the similarities between the skeletal structures of these four species most likely indicate about their evolutionary history? These four species are not related and do not share a common ancestor. A. These four species are distantly related and share a common ancestor. B. These four species all evolved from a common flying ancestor. C. These four species are all descended from the same parent organism. D.

6 16. Look at the representation of a hillside below. The symbols in each stratus of the cross-section represent fossils of different organisms. Which of the following organisms must have evolved first? A. * B. # C. $ % * ^ ^ * % $ $ $ # # # * * * * * $ * * * $ $ # # # % # * < < < < < = = 17. Which of the following is a direct observation that could be used as evidence to support the theory of evolution? Populations that are separated for thousands of years can evolve into diverse species. A. Humans, cats, whales, and bats all have similar forelimb skeletal structures. B. Species that have similar DNA sequences are probably closely related in terms of evolution. C. Fossils found deeper in the ground are older than fossils found near the surface. D.

7 18. Look at the organisms in the image above. Which of the following organisms are most closely related evolutionarily? A. fish and starfish B. fish and clam C. starfish and sand dollar D. crab and starfish

8 19. Comparison: Percentage Match of Blood Protein Structure Among Four Organisms Organism Organism A B C D A Not Applicable 76% 65% 60% B 76% Not Applicable 85% 51% C 65% 85% Not Applicable 77% D 60% 51% 77% Not Applicable The structure of a certain blood protein was compared among four organisms. Each organism was compared to each of the other organisms. The level that any two protein structures match can be found at intersection of the rows and columns. Based on the data, which of the following organisms are most closely related by evolution? A. B and D B. A and B C. C and B D. D and C 20. The theory of endosymbiosis provides a possible explanation for how eukaryotic cells came into existence. The presence of chloroplasts in photosynthetic organisms is one phenomenon explained by this theory. Based on the theory of endosymbiosis, what was the significance of the development of chloroplasts? A. The development of chloroplasts led to the initial formation of DNA, which allowed organisms to replicate through asexual reproduction. B. The development of chloroplasts caused a large increase in carbon dioxide levels in Earth's atmosphere, which allowed the evolution of organisms that perform cellular respiration. C. The development of chloroplasts led to the oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere, which allowed the evolution of more complex oxygen-breathing organisms. D. The development of chloroplasts caused a large increase in the amount of water on Earth, which led to the existence of living organisms. 21. Technology Enhanced Questions are not available in Word format. 22. Technology Enhanced Questions are not available in Word format. 23. Technology Enhanced Questions are not available in Word format.

9 24. Scientists know that organisms that are more closely related will have DNA sequences more similar to each other than organisms that are distantly related. Which two organisms below would most likely have the fewest similar nucleotide sequences in a given gene? A. alligator and earthworm B. lion and horse C. orangutan and howler monkey D. scorpion and tarantula 25. The following data table summarizes the number of differences in amino acid sequences found for four different species. Amino Acid Dissimilarities for Beta Hemoglobin Protein A B C D A B 0 1 C 5 Based on the data table, which two species are most closely related? A. species B and species D B. species B and species C C. species C and species D D. species A and species B D

10 26. Over the past century, several scientists around the world have made the following observations: New mitochondria and plastids can only be generated by old mitochondria and plastids through a process similar to binary fission. Both mitochondria and plastids contain DNA that is similar in shape and size to that of bacteria. Mitochondria and plastids are surrounded by two or more membranes whose composition is similar to a prokaryotic cell membrane. Mitochondria and plastids are about the same size as bacteria. These observations led scientists to conclude that mitochondria, plastids, and other cellular organelles are the result of ancient bacterial infections. A. B. mitochondria and plastids are vestigial structures, and they do not serve a useful purpose in modern organisms. prokaryotic organisms living inside the cells of other organisms evolved into mitochondria and plastids. C. the cells found within multicellular organisms, such as humans, are actually parasitic bacterial cells. D. 27. The human appendix is a structure that suggests that humans evolved from plant-eating ancestors. A. vestigial B. embryonic C. essential D. behavioral

11 28. The diagram below shows a variety of animals at different stages of development. Which of the following statements is supported by this diagram? Humans undergo more stages of development than other animals, such as salamanders, tortoises, A. chickens, and pigs. The developmental stages of animals are radically different; they do not possess any similarities at all. B. There are similarities in the developmental stages of different organisms in the animal kingdom. C. D. Diverse organisms in the animal kingdom possess more similarities during the fetal stages of development than during their embryonic stages. 29. Which of the following facts implies that humans and fish had a common ancestor? A. Both species have gill slits when they are embryos. B. Both species have the ability to swim. C. Both species must expel waste materials. D. Both species are consumers.

12 30. Comparative biochemistry is the study of similarities and differences in among organisms. A. homologous structures B. DNA sequences C. vestigial structures D. development Answers 1. B 2. C 3. B 4. C 5. C 6. B 7. B 8. C 9. D D 12. A 13. A 14. B 15. B 16. D 17. B 18. C 19. C 20. C A 25. B 26. C 27. A 28. C 29. A 30. B Explanations 1. The theory of endosymbiosis is part of the theory of how eukaryotes, or organisms composed of one or more nucleus-containing cells, first evolved. Endosymbiosis also explains the origins of other eukaryotic organelles, such as chloroplasts. The fact that both mitochondria and chloroplasts contain their own DNA is evidence for endosymbiosis. 2. Organisms classified into the same genus, family, and even order will have DNA sequences that are more similar to each other than organisms outside of that grouping. Scorpions and tarantulas are both invertebrates. Lions and horses are both mammals. Orangutans and howler monkeys are both primates. An alligator is a vertebrate and an earthworm is an invertebrate.

13 3. Comparative embryology is the study of similarities and differences in embryological development among species. By locating similarities in development, scientists can determine if species are related, even if only distantly. For instance, gills are present in all vertebrate embryos at some stage in development. This common feature likely means that all vertebrates descended from a common fish-like organism. 4. Codons are triplet nucleotide sequences that are derived from RNA as opposed to DNA. These sequences code for specific amino acids in addition to start and stop codons. The genetic code is read as a nonoverlapping sequence of codons. The genetic code is almost universal in that the same codons are assigned to the same amino acids in most living things. It is only nearly universal because there are some exceptions where a few of the codons differ from the standard ones. For instance, it has been seen that one or two of the stop codons have been assigned to amino acids instead. The fact that the genetic code is the same in nearly all living organisms is evidence that they all share a common ancestor. That is, it is evidence for biological evolution. 5. Animals with homologous structures evolved from the same distant ancestor. A horse's leg, a bat's wing, and a bird's wing appear different, but they all evolved from the limbs of that same distant ancestor, so they are all homologous. 6. A hypothesis is written in a statement rather than question form. For a hypothesis to be valid, it does not have to be correct, but it must be testable. Statements which are not testable, such as statements about an animal's emotional state, cannot be hypotheses. A reasonable hypothesis that the scientist could make on the evolutionary history of whales and hippopotamuses would be: Whales are more closely related to hippopotamuses than they are to cartilaginous fish such as sharks. The scientist could then gather evidence to prove or disprove the hypothesis. 7. When two different species have similar anatomy and similar DNA, it shows that they have a recent common evolutionary ancestor. Since evolution is a very slow process that happens over thousands or millions of years, a recent common ancestor, in terms of evolution, is still much further back in generations than a parent or grandparent. 8. There is much evidence to support the theory of endosymbiosis. Some of this evidence is cited below. The 70S ribosomes of chloroplasts and mitochondria are more similar to the 70S ribosomes found in prokaryotes than the 80S ribosomes found in eukaryotes. Eukaryotic cells, mitochondria, and chloroplasts all appeared on Earth at around the same time billion years ago. Prokaryotic cells, mitochondria, and chloroplasts are typically smaller than 10 microns, whereas eukaryotic cells are usually larger than 50 microns. Prokaryotic cells, mitochondria, and chloroplasts contain one single, circular chromosome, whereas eukaryotes contain multiple linear chromosomes. 9. Anatomical evidence was the data that originally led Charles Darwin to the idea that different species evolved from common ancestors. Today, genetic testing of DNA can further support this idea. Animals that have more similarities in their DNA are more likely to have a recent common ancestor than those that have fewer similarities.

14 Different species with a recent common ancestor are said to be related to one another The earliest known fossilized organisms are single-celled organisms known as prokaryotes. Prokaryotes are the simplest form of life found on Earth. Most likely, the first prokaryotes were archaebacteria, with eubacteria following closely behind. 12. Structural similarity is one criterion for determining whether organisms share a common ancestor. The fact that most mammals have seven neck vertebrae implies that they descended from a common ancestor and are therefore related. 13. A scientific theory is a widely accepted explanation for a scientific phenomenon that is supported by extensive amounts of data. Scientific theories can be modified over time as new information is discovered, but they are rarely discarded. Therefore, evolution is classified as a scientific theory because it is supported by evidence gathered through extensive experimentation and observation. 14. The study of structural differences and similarities in living things is called comparative anatomy. Much can be learned by comparing the structural similarities and differences of living things. For example, the identification of homologous structures, or structures in different species that may look different but have origins in a common ancestor, implies that the species are related. Also, the identification of vestigial structures, non-functional remnants of structures that were operational in a distant ancestor, can also imply relatedness between two species. 15. Examining the fossil record can offer new insights into the relationship between species and their evolutionary history. The forelimb of humans, cats, dolphins, and bats have the same skeletal elements because these species most likely are distantly related and share a common ancestor. This common ancestor most likely possessed these skeletal structures, and each divergent species inherited this trait from the ancestor. As the new, divergent species moved into different habitats, their forelimbs adapted based on their function. The original skeletal structure, however, remained the same. 16. Often scientists use relative dating to determine when species evolved. They examine consecutive rock layers to do this. Organisms fossilized on the highest rock layers must have died more recently than organisms fossilized on the lowest rock layers. 17. An observation is something that can be measured or directly perceived with the senses. A scientist could examine the skeletons of various species and directly observe that humans, cats, whales, and bats all have similar forelimb skeletal structures. Structures that are similar because species share a distant common ancestor are known as homologous structures. The other answer choices cannot be directly observed; they require making inferences or conclusions based on interpretations of observations. 18. Darwin cited animals with similar body plans as having evolved from a common ancestor. The starfish and the sand dollar both have radial or circular symmetry, while the fish, crab, and clam have a bilateral symmetry. Therefore, of the animals presented, the starfish and sand dollar are most closely related evolutionarily. 19. Organisms that have the highest percentage of matching nucleotide sequence in protein structure are the most closely related by evolution. For this protein, C and B had the highest level of matching: 85%.

15 20. The theory of endosymbiosis claims that millions of years ago, aerobic bacteria were taken inside of anaerobic cells through endophagocytosis. The aerobic bacteria then fed on the half-digested food molecules in the cell's cytoplasm and gained a great amount of energy, which, in turn, benefited the host cell. Since both organisms benefited, they formed an endosymbiotic relationship, and the bacteria evolved into organelles, such as mitochondria and chloroplasts, and the aerobic cells evolved into eukaryotic cells. The theory of endosymbiosis has important significance in terms of the history of life on Earth. For example, the development of chloroplasts through endosymbiosis led to the oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere, which allowed the evolution of more complex oxygen-breathing organisms, such as humans Organisms classified into the same genus, family, and even order will have DNA sequences that are more similar to each other than organisms outside of that grouping. Scorpions and tarantulas are both invertebrates. Lions and horses are both mammals. Orangutans and howler monkeys are both primates. An alligator is a vertebrate and an earthworm is an invertebrate. 25. Species of organisms that are more closely related have fewer differences in their sequences of amino acids. Similarities in amino acids reflect a similarity in DNA because DNA sequences determine which amino acids are produced. Based on the amino acid sequences for beta hemoglobin protein, species B and species C are most closely related because they have the fewest difference in their amino acid sequences. 26. Observations over time have led scientists to conclude that prokaryotic organisms living inside the cells of other organisms evolved into mitochondria and plastids. This theory, known as the endosymbiotic theory, claims that aerobic bacteria were taken inside of anaerobic cells through endophagocytosis. The aerobic bacteria then fed on the half-digested food molecules in the cell's cytoplasm and gained a great amount of energy, which, in turn, benefited the host cell. Since both organisms benefited, they formed an endosymbiotic relationship, and the bacteria evolved into organelles, such as mitochondria and plastids, and the aerobic cells evolved into eukaryotic cells. 27. Vestigial organs or structures are those that no longer function in the modern form of an organism. These structures, however, provide clues to the evolutionary path of the organism, as well as its relationship to other species. 28. Diverse organisms in the animal kingdom possess similarities in their developmental stages. Overall, these similarities are more pronounced during the earlier stages of development (i.e., zygote through embryo) than in the later stages (i.e., fetal). By comparing developmental stages of organisms (and by examining and interpreting fossils), information can be gained about relationships among living organisms and those that inhabited Earth in the past. This information is often used to modify and clarify existing classification systems. By studying embryological development, scientists hope to gain a better understanding of how different animal species have changed over time and how closely they are related to one another. 29. Both species have gill slits when they are embryos. In fish, gill slits are retained after birth. In humans, however, the gill tissue develops into the jaw, tongue,

16 larynx, and middle ear. Scientists use similarities in embryonic development to determine whether species share a common ancestor. In this case, humans and fish seem to be related, even if the relation is distant. 30. One of the ways scientists judge whether two species are related is through comparative biochemistry--the study of organisms' DNA sequences. While each species has its own unique DNA sequence, sequences of related organisms will be more similar than sequences of unrelated organisms.

1. Over the past century, several scientists around the world have made the following observations:

1. Over the past century, several scientists around the world have made the following observations: Evolution Keystone Review 1. Over the past century, several scientists around the world have made the following observations: New mitochondria and plastids can only be generated by old mitochondria and

More information

b. In Table 1 (question #2 on the Answer Sheet describe the function of each set of bones and answer the question.)

b. In Table 1 (question #2 on the Answer Sheet describe the function of each set of bones and answer the question.) Biology Dry Lab: EVIDENCE OF EVOLUTION INTRODUCTION: Evidence has been found to indicate that living things have changed gradually during their natural history. The study of fossils as well as embryology,

More information

Evidence for evolution factsheet

Evidence for evolution factsheet The theory of evolution by natural selection is supported by a great deal of evidence. Fossils Fossils are formed when organisms become buried in sediments, causing little decomposition of the organism.

More information

Chapter 15. The Idea of Evolution. Objectives. Evolutionary Relationships Between Whales and Hoofed Mammals. Darwin s Ideas

Chapter 15. The Idea of Evolution. Objectives. Evolutionary Relationships Between Whales and Hoofed Mammals. Darwin s Ideas Define the biological process of evolution. Summarize the history of scientific ideas about evolution. Describe Charles Darwin s contributions to scientific thinking about evolution. The Idea of Evolution

More information

16.4 Evidence of Evolution

16.4 Evidence of Evolution 16.4 Evidence of Evolution Lesson Objectives Explain how geologic distribution of species relates to their evolutionary history. Explain how fossils and the fossil record document the descent of modern

More information

Evolution Unit Plan. Stage 1: Identify Desired Results Title: Evolution of Life

Evolution Unit Plan. Stage 1: Identify Desired Results Title: Evolution of Life Evolution Unit Plan Stage 1: Identify Desired Results Title: Evolution of Life Unit Description: Evolution is a topic that is fundamental to the study of Biology, linking areas such as genetics, molecular

More information

Station 1 Fossil Record

Station 1 Fossil Record The very first horses evolved on the North American continent over 55 million years ago. The horse fossil record is very rich in transitional species. This is a series of skulls and front leg fossils of

More information

This is a series of skulls and front leg fossils of organisms believed to be ancestors of the modern-day horse.

This is a series of skulls and front leg fossils of organisms believed to be ancestors of the modern-day horse. Evidence of Evolution Background When Charles Darwin first proposed the idea that all new species descend from an ancestor, he performed an exhaustive amount of research to provide as much evidence as

More information

CHAPTER 15 THEORY OF EVOLUTION

CHAPTER 15 THEORY OF EVOLUTION CHAPTER 15 THEORY OF EVOLUTION MULTIPLE CHOICE 1. Which of the following are examples of fossils? a. shells or old bones b. any traces of dead organisms c. insects trapped in tree sap d. All of the above

More information

Review Questions for Booklet 2

Review Questions for Booklet 2 Review Questions for Booklet 2 Name Class 1. Which statement is basic to the theory of evolution by natural selection? a. In general, living organisms maintain a constant population from generation to

More information

Endosymbiosis Theory

Endosymbiosis Theory From prokaryotes to eukaryotes Endosymbiosis Theory Living things have evolved into three large clusters of closely related organisms, called "domains": Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukaryota. Archaea and Bacteria

More information

2.3: Eukaryotic Evolution and Diversity pg. 67. For about 1.5 billion years Prokaryotes were on the only living organism on Earth.

2.3: Eukaryotic Evolution and Diversity pg. 67. For about 1.5 billion years Prokaryotes were on the only living organism on Earth. 2.3: Eukaryotic Evolution and Diversity pg. 67 For about 1.5 billion years Prokaryotes were on the only living organism on Earth. 3.5 to 2 billion years ago Prokaryotes thrive in many different environments.

More information

Given these characteristics of life, which of the following objects is considered a living organism? W. X. Y. Z.

Given these characteristics of life, which of the following objects is considered a living organism? W. X. Y. Z. Cell Structure and Organization 1. All living things must possess certain characteristics. They are all composed of one or more cells. They can grow, reproduce, and pass their genes on to their offspring.

More information

Evidence for Evolution Stations Activity

Evidence for Evolution Stations Activity Evidence for Evolution Stations Activity Station 1 The Fossil Record Part 1 The Reading: read the article provided and answer the questions below 1. Who was Marie Curie? What did she discover? How did

More information

16.4 Evidence of Evolution

16.4 Evidence of Evolution 16.4 Evidence of Evolution Lesson Objectives Explain how geologic distribution of species relates to their evolutionary history. Explain how fossils and the fossil record document the descent of modern

More information

Darwin observed organisms in diverse environments. Evolution and Diversity. Descent with Modification. Descent with Modification

Darwin observed organisms in diverse environments. Evolution and Diversity. Descent with Modification. Descent with Modification Darwin observed organisms in diverse environments Evolution and Diversity Ch 13 How populations evolve Darwin observed how organisms adapted to their environments The animals living on the Gal√°pagos Islands

More information

8. Which level of organization includes all others? A. cell B. tissue C. organ D. organism E. population 9. Which level of organization is required

8. Which level of organization includes all others? A. cell B. tissue C. organ D. organism E. population 9. Which level of organization is required 1 Student: 1. The simplest structure shared among all living organisms is the A. gut. B. cell. C. photosynthetic chloroplast. D. community. E. nucleus. 2. Which of the following is likely NOT a common

More information

Chapter Test A. Answer Key. Principles of Evolution. Name: Class: Date: Multiple Choice

Chapter Test A. Answer Key. Principles of Evolution. Name: Class: Date: Multiple Choice Name: Class: Date: Principles of Evolution Chapter Test A Answer Key Multiple Choice 1. b 2. c 3. a 4. b 5. a 6. c 7. c 8. d 9. a 10. c 11. b 12. a 13. d 14. c 15. a Short Answer 16. homologous structures

More information

CALIFORNIA LIFE SCIENCE STANDARDS TEST GRADE 10 (Blueprint adopted by the State Board of Education 1/04)

CALIFORNIA LIFE SCIENCE STANDARDS TEST GRADE 10 (Blueprint adopted by the State Board of Education 1/04) GRADE 0 (Blueprint adopted by the State Board of Education /04) CELL BIOLOGY 0 items 7%. All living organisms are composed of cells, from just one to many trillions, whose details usually are visible only

More information

Biology Slide 1 of 41

Biology Slide 1 of 41 Biology 1 of 41 15-3 Darwin Presents His Case 2 of 41 Publication of On the Origin of Species (Publication of On the Origin of Species Darwin filled notebooks with his ideas about species diversity and

More information

EXPLORING LIFE EXERCISE 1: THE FIVE KINGDOMS

EXPLORING LIFE EXERCISE 1: THE FIVE KINGDOMS EXPLORING LIFE EXERCISE 1: THE FIVE KINGDOMS Exercise 1: The Five Kingdoms of Life Workbook Contents Corresponding Section on CD Vocabulary Key Concepts Introduction Introduction to the Series Introduction

More information

CH. 15: Darwin s Theory of Evolution. Directions: READ ch. 15 in your textbook and use the note outline to help you answer the questions below.

CH. 15: Darwin s Theory of Evolution. Directions: READ ch. 15 in your textbook and use the note outline to help you answer the questions below. CH. 15: Darwin s Theory of Evolution Directions: READ ch. 15 in your textbook and use the note outline to help you answer the questions below. 1. What is a theory? 2. Describe some of the ideas that influenced

More information

19.3 Earth s Early History

19.3 Earth s Early History Name Class Date 19.3 Earth s Early History Lesson Objectives Identify some of the hypotheses about early Earth and the origin of life. Explain the endosymbiotic theory. Explain the significance of sexual

More information

Bacteria 7/21/2009. What are bacteria? Where do bacteria live? Bacterial cells have a cell membrane that is. tough cell wall.

Bacteria 7/21/2009. What are bacteria? Where do bacteria live? Bacterial cells have a cell membrane that is. tough cell wall. What are bacteria? Bacteria Cells function similarly in all living organisms. Bacteria are the only prokaryotes (cells with no nuclei). Bacteria consist of a single, prokaryotic cell. All other life forms

More information

Evidence for Evolution

Evidence for Evolution Evidence for Evolution Evidence for evolution 1. Fossil record and age of the earth (using radioactive dating) 2. Biogeography 3. Homologous structures and vestigial organs 4. Embryology 5. Cellular and

More information

Name Date: Doc #: EVOLUTION QUESTIONS ANSWER KEY

Name Date: Doc #: EVOLUTION QUESTIONS ANSWER KEY Name Date: Doc #: EVOLUTION QUESTIONS ANSWER KEY Answer the following questions in complete sentences. Your answer should be in your own words and should be complete thoughts, however may use your notes

More information

This is a series of skulls and front leg fossils of organisms believed to be ancestors of the modernday

This is a series of skulls and front leg fossils of organisms believed to be ancestors of the modernday Evidence of Evolution-Answers in gray Background When Charles Darwin first proposed the idea that all new species descend from an ancestor, he performed an exhaustive amount of research to provide as much

More information

Scientific Process Skills: Scientific Process Skills:

Scientific Process Skills: Scientific Process Skills: Texas University Interscholastic League Contest Event: Science The contest challenges students to read widely in biology, to understand the significance of experiments rather than to recall obscure details,

More information

Strand 3: Characteristics and Interactions of Living Organisms

Strand 3: Characteristics and Interactions of Living Organisms 1. There is a fundamental unity underlying the diversity of all living organisms A Organisms have basic needs for survival Not assessed at this level (Prior knowledge) B a. Recognize cells both increase

More information

Problem Set 5 BILD10 / Winter 2014 Chapters 8, 10-12

Problem Set 5 BILD10 / Winter 2014 Chapters 8, 10-12 Chapter 8: Evolution and Natural Selection 1) A population is: a) a group of species that shares the same habitat. b) a group of individuals of the same species that lives in the same general location

More information

Prentice Hall. Biology - AP (Campbell, Reece), 8th Edition High School

Prentice Hall. Biology - AP (Campbell, Reece), 8th Edition High School Prentice Hall Biology - AP (Campbell, Reece), 8th Edition 2008 High School C O R R E L A T E D T O Biology I Students should understand that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena

More information

1. List and describe Darwin s 5 points in his theory of natural selection. What evidence did he use to prove his theory?

1. List and describe Darwin s 5 points in his theory of natural selection. What evidence did he use to prove his theory? Review for Mod 4 Quiz Concepts: 1. List and describe Darwin s 5 points in his theory of natural selection. What evidence did he use to prove his theory? Overproduction more offspring produced than survive

More information

Section B2: The Darwinian Revolution (continued)

Section B2: The Darwinian Revolution (continued) CHAPTER 22 DESCENT WITH MODIFICATION: A DARWINIAN VIEW OF LIFE Section B2: The Darwinian Revolution (continued) 3. Examples of natural selection provide evidence of evolution 4. Other evidence of evolution

More information

Grade EOC Biology STAAR and STAAR-M Fall 2012 by Objective

Grade EOC Biology STAAR and STAAR-M Fall 2012 by Objective TEKS: (4) The student knows that cells are the basic structures of all living things with specialized parts that perform specific functions, and that viruses are different from cells. Objective: (A) Compare

More information

Evolution II The Evidence

Evolution II The Evidence Evolution II The Evidence The evidence for evolution comes from geology, anatomy, developmental biology, molecular biology, laboratory experiments with selection, and studies of natural selection in natural

More information

Evolution Unit Practice Test

Evolution Unit Practice Test Evolution Unit Practice Test True/False Indicate whether the statement is true or false. 1. Radiometric dating is not possible on rocks that contain fossils since the radioactive isotopes that could be

More information

AGS Globe Biology: Cycles of Life

AGS Globe Biology: Cycles of Life Correlated to STANDARDS BIOLOGY I Copyright 2008 Pearson Education, Inc. or its affiliate(s). All rights reserved Course Description Biology I is a laboratory course that investigates the relationship

More information

Interest Grabber. Half of a Half of a Half...

Interest Grabber. Half of a Half of a Half... Interest Grabber Section 17-1 Half of a Half of a Half... Some forms of chemical elements are unstable that is, they break down into other substances. Like the decay of leftovers in your refrigerator,

More information

Evidence of Evolution

Evidence of Evolution Evidence of Evolution Objectives Identify the evidence for evolution Differentiate between homologous, analogous, and vestigial structures State the Law of Superposition Explain how the fossil record is

More information

Daring Darwin - Practice Test

Daring Darwin - Practice Test Name: Class: _ Date: _ Daring Darwin - Practice Test Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. Darwin noticed that many organisms seemed well suited

More information

Biology 111. General Biology 1

Biology 111. General Biology 1 Biology 111 General Biology 1 Course Description This introduction to biology covers in detail the basic biological concepts of scientific method, cell structure and function, metabolism, evolution, genetics,

More information

CHAPTER 17 CLASSIFICATION OF ORGANISMS

CHAPTER 17 CLASSIFICATION OF ORGANISMS CHAPTER 17 CLASSIFICATION OF ORGANISMS MULTIPLE CHOICE 1. The science of classifying living things is called a. identification. c. taxonomy. b. classification. d. speciation. ANS: C DIF: 1 OBJ: 17-1.2

More information

Evolution Bio 101 Homework Prof. Fournier

Evolution Bio 101 Homework Prof. Fournier Evolution Bio 101 Homework Prof. Fournier 1) The graph below represents the populations of two different species in an ecosystem over a period of several years. Which statement is a possible explanation

More information

B I G I D E COMPLEX SIMPLE. nucleotides, amino acids, fatty acids, sugars. DNA, RNA, Proteins. protocell (membrane + genetic material.

B I G I D E COMPLEX SIMPLE. nucleotides, amino acids, fatty acids, sugars. DNA, RNA, Proteins. protocell (membrane + genetic material. ORIGIN OF LIFE B I G SIMPLE nucleotides, amino acids, fatty acids, sugars DNA, RNA, Proteins I D E Chemistry Biology protocell (membrane + genetic material prokaryote eukaryote multicellular A COMPLEX

More information

Life s Origin and Early Evolution. Chapter 20

Life s Origin and Early Evolution. Chapter 20 Life s Origin and Early Evolution Chapter 20 Impacts, Issues Looking for Life in All the Odd Places Life can adapt to nearly any environment with sources of carbon and energy including extreme temperatures,

More information

Principles of Evolution - Origin of Species

Principles of Evolution - Origin of Species Theories of Organic Evolution X Multiple Centers of Creation (de Buffon) developed the concept of "centers of creation throughout the world organisms had arisen, which other species had evolved from X

More information

Section 10.1. KEY CONCEPT There were theories of biological and geologic change before Darwin.

Section 10.1. KEY CONCEPT There were theories of biological and geologic change before Darwin. Section 10.1 KEY CONCEPT There were theories of biological and geologic change before Darwin. Early scientists proposed ideas about evolution. Evolution is the biological change process by which descendants

More information

Six Kingdoms 11.1 SECTION EXPECTATIONS

Six Kingdoms 11.1 SECTION EXPECTATIONS SECTION 11.1 Six Kingdoms EXPECTATIONS Describe characteristics of representative organisms. Compare the structure and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Classify organisms living in your neighbourhood.

More information

Chapter Chemical Uniqueness. The Uses of Principles. Zoology: the Study of Animal Life. Fig. 1.1

Chapter Chemical Uniqueness. The Uses of Principles. Zoology: the Study of Animal Life. Fig. 1.1 Copyright The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Fig. 1.1 Chapter 1 Life: Biological Principles and the Science of Zoology BIO 2402 General Zoology The Uses of

More information

Animal Evolution and Diversity

Animal Evolution and Diversity Animal Evolution and Diversity Evolution Q: How have animals descended from earlier forms through the process of evolution? WHAT I KNOW WHAT I LEARNED 26.1 How did invertebrates evolve? SAMPLE ANSWER:

More information

Animal Diversity I Characteristics used in Classification and Preparing a Taxonomic Key

Animal Diversity I Characteristics used in Classification and Preparing a Taxonomic Key Biology 106 Spring '03 Animal Diversity I Page 1 of 14 Animal Diversity I Characteristics used in Classification and Preparing a Taxonomic Key The classification of organisms into groups is known as BIOLOGICAL

More information

Evolution of early cells

Evolution of early cells 1 Life: Early Cells, Classification of Life EVPP 110 Lecture Fall 2003 Dr. Largen 2 evolution of cells earliest cells prokaryotic cells eukaryotic cells classification of life 3 Evolution of early cells

More information

2. Discuss testable models, including terms for them and why testable matters. How does this relate to the supernatural?

2. Discuss testable models, including terms for them and why testable matters. How does this relate to the supernatural? Chapter 1: Introduction The Science of Biology 1. Discuss in your group how the scientific method works, and the difference between inductive and deductive reasoning. Come up with examples of inductive

More information

How Populations Evolve

How Populations Evolve How Populations Evolve Darwin and the Origin of the Species Charles Darwin published On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, November 24, 1859. Darwin presented two main concepts: Life

More information

THE THEORY OF EVOLUTION

THE THEORY OF EVOLUTION 1 THE THEORY OF EVOLUTION Name: Period: Date: I. Evolution- A brief overview EVOLUTION IS: 1. 2. Descent with modifications 3. Plants and animals of today are forms of plants and animals of the past 4.

More information

Phylogenetic Trees. How do the changes in gene sequences allow us to reconstruct the evolutionary relationships between related species?

Phylogenetic Trees. How do the changes in gene sequences allow us to reconstruct the evolutionary relationships between related species? Why? Phylogenetic Trees How do the changes in gene sequences allow us to reconstruct the evolutionary relationships between related species? The saying Don t judge a book by its cover. could be applied

More information

THE INTERESTING HISTORY OF CELLS STUDENT HANDOUT. There are two basic types of cells, prokaryotic cells and eukaryotic cells.

THE INTERESTING HISTORY OF CELLS STUDENT HANDOUT. There are two basic types of cells, prokaryotic cells and eukaryotic cells. THE INTERESTING HISTORY OF CELLS STUDENT HANDOUT There are two basic types of cells, prokaryotic cells and eukaryotic cells. Figure 1. A PROKARYOTIC CELL The prokaryotes are very small singlecelled organisms

More information

EVOLUTION AND NATURAL SELECTION NOTES

EVOLUTION AND NATURAL SELECTION NOTES 5. Evolution and Biodiversity State Frameworks Central Concepts: Evolution is the result of genetic changes that occur in constantly changing environments. Over many generations, changes in the genetic

More information

CH 16 Darwin's Theory of Evolution

CH 16 Darwin's Theory of Evolution CH 16 Darwin's Theory of Evolution Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. Darwin noticed that many organisms seemed well suited to A. being preserved

More information

Answer Key 1) D 2) B 3) A

Answer Key 1) D 2) B 3) A Name: Teacher: Date: Class/Period: 1) 2) 3) 4) Task Please use the space below to write your response(s) to the writing assignment provided by your teacher. If there are multiple tasks to the question,

More information

Why are Prokaryotes important?

Why are Prokaryotes important? Why are Prokaryotes important? Date: October 17, 2013 Catalyst: 1. Describe the big bang theory. 2. How did the first life on Earth form? 3. What was the first form of genetic storage? 4. What were the

More information

BIO 1: Review: Evolution

BIO 1: Review: Evolution Name: Class: Date: ID: A BIO 1: Review: Evolution True/False Indicate whether the statement is true or false. 1. Radiometric dating measures the age of an object by measuring the proportions of radioactive

More information

Practice Questions 1: Evolution

Practice Questions 1: Evolution Practice Questions 1: Evolution 1. Which concept is best illustrated in the flowchart below? A. natural selection B. genetic manipulation C. dynamic equilibrium D. material cycles 2. The diagram below

More information

AP BIOLOGY EVOLUTION ESSAY EXAM (RAVEN CHAPTERS 21, 22, 23)

AP BIOLOGY EVOLUTION ESSAY EXAM (RAVEN CHAPTERS 21, 22, 23) Period Date AP BIOLOGY EVOLUTION ESSAY EXAM (RAVEN CHAPTERS 21, 22, 23) 1. Charles Darwin proposed that evolution by natural selection was the basis for the differences that he saw in similar organisms

More information

Biology Overview. High School Core Science Standards Biology

Biology Overview. High School Core Science Standards Biology Overview The biology standards provide students with a basic knowledge of living organisms and the interaction of these organisms with the natural world. The standards establish the scientific inquiry

More information

Unit 1 Scientific Inquiry. Learning Goal: Students will use the Scientific inquiry process to identify, and solve problems.

Unit 1 Scientific Inquiry. Learning Goal: Students will use the Scientific inquiry process to identify, and solve problems. Unit 1 Scientific Inquiry Learning Goal: Students will use the Scientific inquiry process to identify, and solve problems. 4 Student can use the scientific inquiry process to evaluate the validity of other

More information

Biology. list and describe each characteristic of life

Biology. list and describe each characteristic of life Unit Title: Basic Biological Principles Timeline (approximate): 1 week Cells & Cellular Organization BIO.A.1.1.1 Describe the characteristics of life shared by all prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms.

More information

Performance Objective Critical Attributes Benchmarks/Assessment. Can the student describe the major function of cells?

Performance Objective Critical Attributes Benchmarks/Assessment. Can the student describe the major function of cells? Cell Biology SCIENCE 7 Curriculum Standard One: The student will understand all living organisms are composed of cells, from just one to many trillions, whose details usually are visible only through a

More information

6. Which ecological principle is best illustrated by the diagram below?

6. Which ecological principle is best illustrated by the diagram below? 1. According to the heterotroph hypothesis, the earliest heterotrophs must have A) been able to synthesize organic molecules from inorganic compounds B) used oxygen from the atmosphere for respiration

More information

S7L Which is an adaptation that makes it possible for the animal to survive in a cold climate?

S7L Which is an adaptation that makes it possible for the animal to survive in a cold climate? S7L5-1 1. Which is an adaptation that makes it possible for the animal to survive in a cold climate? A. tail on a lizard B. scales on a fish C. stripes on a tiger D. fur on a bear 2. Use the picture of

More information

Biology 1B Evolution Lecture 2 (February 26, 2010) Natural Selection, Phylogenies

Biology 1B Evolution Lecture 2 (February 26, 2010) Natural Selection, Phylogenies Natural Selection (Darwin-Wallace): There are three conditions for natural selection: 1. Variation: Individuals within a population have different characteristics/traits (or phenotypes). 2. Inheritance:

More information

Biology Final Exam. Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.

Biology Final Exam. Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. Biology Final Exam Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. Biology is the study of a. minerals. c. the weather. b. life. d. energy. 2. All organisms

More information

Lecture #19. Evolution. Overview: Darwin Introduces a Revolutionary Theory. Chapter 22~ Descent with Modification: A Darwinian View of Life

Lecture #19. Evolution. Overview: Darwin Introduces a Revolutionary Theory. Chapter 22~ Descent with Modification: A Darwinian View of Life Lecture #19 Date Chapter 22~ Descent with Modification: A Darwinian View of Life Overview: Darwin Introduces a Revolutionary Theory A new era of biology began on November 24, 1859, the day Charles Darwin

More information

Chapter 13. Microorganisms: Prokaryotes and Viruses Worksheets. Lesson 13.1: Prokaryotes Lesson 13.2: Viruses

Chapter 13. Microorganisms: Prokaryotes and Viruses Worksheets. Lesson 13.1: Prokaryotes Lesson 13.2: Viruses Chapter 13 Microorganisms: Prokaryotes and Viruses Worksheets Lesson 13.1: Prokaryotes Lesson 13.2: Viruses (Opening image copyright Michael Taylor, 2010. Used under license from Shutterstock.com.) www.ck12.org

More information

Achievement Level Descriptors for Grade 7 Science

Achievement Level Descriptors for Grade 7 Science Achievement Level Descriptors for Grade 7 Science Georgia Department of Education September 2015 All Rights Reserved Achievement Levels and Achievement Level Descriptors With the implementation of the

More information

I. Early Theory A. Spontaneous Generation - The hypothesis that life arises regularly from non-living things

I. Early Theory A. Spontaneous Generation - The hypothesis that life arises regularly from non-living things ORIGIN OF LIFE I. Early Theory A. Spontaneous Generation - The hypothesis that life arises regularly from non-living things II. Experiments That Helped to Disprove Spontaneous Generation A. Italian physician

More information

Readiness Review Game

Readiness Review Game HEDGEHOG LEARNING Biology EOC Standards Sequence and STAAR Question Frequency Overview Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Day 5 Day 6 Day 7 Day 8 Day 9 STAAR Reporting Category Cell Structure and Function 11 questions

More information

Classification of Living Organisms

Classification of Living Organisms Classification of Living Organisms I. General A. Scientists have described and named a total of 1.5 million species. It is estimated that the total number of species is about 10 million. Life on earth

More information

Classification. Section 18 1 Finding Order in Diversity (pages ) This section explains how living things are organized for study.

Classification. Section 18 1 Finding Order in Diversity (pages ) This section explains how living things are organized for study. Chapter 18 Classification Section 18 1 Finding Order in Diversity (pages 447 450) This section explains how living things are organized for study Why Classify? (page 447) 1 Why do biologists use a classification

More information

Lesson 1. The Cell ASSIGNMENT 1: A VIEW OF LIFE. The Unity and Diversity of Life

Lesson 1. The Cell ASSIGNMENT 1: A VIEW OF LIFE. The Unity and Diversity of Life The Cell Your first lesson consists of seven assignments that cover Chapters 1 7 of your textbook, pages 1 110. Chapter 1 introduces the science of biology. Chapters 2 7 cover the cell. When you complete

More information

SCI-LS Grade 7 Life Science Preassessment

SCI-LS Grade 7 Life Science Preassessment SCI-LS Grade 7 Life Science Preassessment [Exam ID:2BYLBA] Scan Number:16283 1 The major contribution of mushrooms, bacteria, fungi, and other decomposers to a Virginia forest ecosystem is that they A

More information

Biology Curriculum Map

Biology Curriculum Map Six Weeks Unit Unit Focus Biology Essential Standards Literacy in Science & Technical Subjects/ 8 Mathematical Practices First Six Wks Unit 1 Sci. Method and Biochemistry Review Steps and processes of

More information

Macroevolution: Part IV Origin of Life

Macroevolution: Part IV Origin of Life Macroevolution: Part IV Origin of Life Possible Steps in the Origin of Life Shown are the steps necessary to create life as we know it Early Atmosphere is Anaerobic Oxygen is a very corrosive gas. It oxidizes

More information

Some Evidence of Evolution

Some Evidence of Evolution Some Evidence of Evolution Pre-Darwin western Christian thought Life arose by special creation Organisms were formed as we find them today That is species do not change Believed to be recent In 1664 Archbishop

More information

Principles of Evolution

Principles of Evolution Principles of Evolution Principles of Evolution -The Origin of Life Creation v. Biology Creationists each species was divinely created by a superior being theory is outside the scope of science since it

More information

Ch.16-17 Review. Name: Class: Date: Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.

Ch.16-17 Review. Name: Class: Date: Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. Name: Class: Date: Ch.16-17 Review Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. Which of the following statements describe what all members of a population

More information

MCAS Biology. Review Packet

MCAS Biology. Review Packet MCAS Biology Review Packet 1 Name Class Date 1. Define organic. THE CHEMISTRY OF LIFE 2. All living things are made up of 6 essential elements: SPONCH. Name the six elements of life. S N P C O H 3. Elements

More information

Biology Performance Level Descriptors

Biology Performance Level Descriptors Limited A student performing at the Limited Level demonstrates a minimal command of Ohio s Learning Standards for Biology. A student at this level has an emerging ability to describe genetic patterns of

More information

Scientists use evidence such as

Scientists use evidence such as 100 DNA: The Evidence Within Nature s Recyclers Activity 80 i n v e s t i g at i o n Scientists use evidence such as similarities in skeletal structures and other physical traits to investigate evolutionary

More information

Section 18-1 Finding Order in Diversity

Section 18-1 Finding Order in Diversity Name Class Date Section 18-1 Finding Order in Diversity (pages 447-450) Key Concepts How are living things organized for study? What is binomial nomenclature? What is Linnaeus s system of classification?

More information

Name(s): Period: Date:

Name(s): Period: Date: Evidences of Evolution HASPI Medical Biology Lab 20 Background/Introduction What Is Evolution? Evolution is most simply change over time. More specifically, it is a change in the inherited characteristics

More information

Three Domains of Life

Three Domains of Life Image from Scientific American blog Three Domains of Life http://www.buzzle.com/articles/three-domains-of-life.html The three-domain system, which classifies life on the planet into three different domains

More information

Chapter 22 Descent with Modification: A Darwinian View of Life. 1. Evolution by Natural Selection 12/5/ Evolution by Natural Selection

Chapter 22 Descent with Modification: A Darwinian View of Life. 1. Evolution by Natural Selection 12/5/ Evolution by Natural Selection Chapter 22 Descent with Modification: A Darwinian View of Life 1. Evolution by Natural Selection 2. Evidence for the Evolutionary Process 1. Evolution by Natural Selection Chapter Reading pp. 462-470 1809

More information

15-3 Darwin Presents His Case Slide 1 of 41

15-3 Darwin Presents His Case Slide 1 of 41 15-3 Darwin Presents His Case 1 of 41 Publication of On the Origin of Species Publication of On the Darwin filled notebooks with his ideas about species diversity and the evolution process. Darwin was

More information

Keystone Review Practice Test Module B Continuity and Unity of Life

Keystone Review Practice Test Module B Continuity and Unity of Life Keystone Review Practice Test Module B Continuity and Unity of Life 1. Which event most likely occurs next in mitosis? a. The chromatin condenses. b. The nuclear envelope dissolves. c. The chromosomes

More information

Name: Class: Date: Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.

Name: Class: Date: Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. Name: Class: Date: Chapter 17 Practice Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. The correct order for the levels of Linnaeus's classification system,

More information

Standard A 1.1 Biology Cover Sheet

Standard A 1.1 Biology Cover Sheet Standard A 1.1 Biology Cover Sheet Students participating in the 1818 ACC Program through enrollment in BIOL 104 and 106 are held to at least the same standards of achievement as those expected of students

More information

Lecture 2: Tree of Life and Evolution. How is All Life Connected?

Lecture 2: Tree of Life and Evolution. How is All Life Connected? Lecture 2: Tree of Life and Evolution How is All Life Connected? What Does It Mean to Say That Something Is Alive? All living organisms share five fundamental characteristics Energy All organisms acquire

More information

The correct answer is b

The correct answer is b 1. Overall similarity of phenotypes may not always reflect evolutionary relationships a. due to convergent evolution b. because of variation in rates of evolutionary change of different kinds of characters

More information

Basic Biological Principles. Biology = The study of Life

Basic Biological Principles. Biology = The study of Life Basic Biological Principles Biology = The study of Life Characteristics of Life Complex Organization Metabolism (Energy Flow) Homeostasis Reproduction and Heredity Growth and Development Response to Stimuli

More information