AGREED SYLLABUS FOR RELIGIOUS EDUCATION SUPPLEMENT

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1 AGREED SYLLABUS FOR RELIGIOUS EDUCATION SUPPLEMENT September 2005

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3 CONTENTS Page 1. Foreword 3 2. The Middlesbrough Agreed Syllabus and QCA 5 3. QCA Scheme of Work for RE 5 4. QCA Non Statutory National Framework for RE 5 5. The Contribution of RE to the School Curriculum 6 6. Supporting the Aims of the Curriculum 7 7. The Middlesbrough Syllabus and Whole School Aims 8 8. Learning across the curriculum: the contribution of RE 9 9. The Foundation Stage and RE RE at Key Stages 1 and RE at Key Stages 3 and Assessing Attainment in RE Appendices 31 1

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5 FOREWORD The Middlesbrough Agreed Syllabus was published in Since then, there have been a number of curriculum developments and new educational initiatives. In religious education, the most significant development has been the publication of the Non Statutory National Framework for Religious Education in October Middlesbrough SACRE is committed to a continuous process of monitoring and review in order to ensure that religious education across the LEA is clearly supported and developed. Following the publication of new RE and Assessment Guidelines in September 2003, SACRE agreed to provide a Syllabus Supplement which would take account of recent and relevant national developments in religious education. A consultation document was sent to all schools in the LEA in the latter part of the autumn term 2004 and responses from this process have informed the shape and contents of the Supplement. The Syllabus Supplement is an integral part of the Agreed Syllabus and as such constitutes the statutory basis for religious education in community schools in Middlesbrough. 3

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7 The Middlesbrough Agreed Syllabus and QCA Since the publication of the Middlesbrough Agreed Syllabus in 1998, QCA has produced: a Non Statutory National Scheme of Work for RE (autumn ) and a Non Statutory National Framework (2004) Neither of these publications has replaced the Agreed Syllabus. QCA Scheme of Work for Religious Education The scheme of work is intended as a resource for schools. It is particularly helpful in relation to the development of units of work or medium term plans which can be incorporated into a school s own scheme or long term plan for religious education. Schools should ensure that selected units from the QCA scheme enable pupils to fulfil the learning outcomes outlined in the Agreed Syllabus Programmes of Study 2. QCA Non Statutory National Framework for Religious Education The national framework has been written mainly for: Local Education Authorities (LEAs) Agreed Syllabus Conferences (ASCs) Standing Advisory Councils on Religious Education (SACREs). Religious Education Subject Leaders and Heads of Department may also find the framework a useful resource. The Framework has directly informed the material in this Syllabus Supplement. 1 It is anticipated that a new scheme of work will be published in Autumn 2005 which will be available via the QCA website. 2 The programmes of study are the charts which outline what should be covered in relation to each religion across the Key Stages. Currently the charts are set out in three columns - Learning Outcomes, Suggested Teaching Content and Learning Activities. As schools have developed a more sophisticated understanding of the planning and assessment process they often re interpret the terminology preferring to use Teaching Objectives, Suggested Learning Activities and Learning Outcomes. Although the terminology has developed, the learning process underpinning the Programmes of Study remains sound. The original use of Learning Outcome in the first column also reinforces an approach based on assessment for learning in which outcomes inform planning 5

8 The Contribution of Religious Education to the School Curriculum 3 Supporting the Values of the Curriculum Religious education actively promotes the values of truth, justice, respect for all and care of the environment. It places specific emphasis on: pupils valuing themselves and others the role of family and the community in religious belief and activity the celebration of diversity in society through understanding similarities and differences sustainable development of the earth. Religious education also recognises the changing nature of society, including changes in religious practice and expression, and the influence of religion in the local, national and global community. 3 This section takes account of developments in the curriculum since

9 Supporting the Aims of the Curriculum Aim 1: The school curriculum should aim to provide opportunities for all pupils to learn and achieve. Religious education should be a stimulating, interesting and enjoyable subject in which the development of knowledge, skills and understanding are designed to promote the best possible progress and attainment for all pupils. Religious education develops independent and interdependent learning. It makes an important contribution to pupils skills in literacy and information and communication technology (ICT). Religious education promotes an enquiring approach in which pupils carefully consider issues of beliefs and truth in religion. It also enhances the capacity to think coherently and consistently. This enables pupils to evaluate thoughtfully their own and others views in a reasoned and informed manner. Aim 2: The school curriculum should aim to promote pupils spiritual, moral, social and cultural development and prepare all pupils for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of life. Religious education has a significant role in the promotion of spiritual, moral, social and cultural development. At the heart of Religious education is a focus on ultimate questions and ethical issues. This focus enables pupils to appreciate their own and others beliefs and cultures and how these impact on individuals, communities, societies and cultures. Religious education seeks to develop pupils awareness of themselves and others. This helps pupils to gain a clear understanding of the significance of religions and beliefs in the world today and learn about the ways different faith communities relate to each other. 7

10 The Middlesbrough Syllabus and Whole School Aims The Middlesbrough Agreed Syllabus aims to promote religious understanding, discernment and respect and challenge prejudice and stereotyping. Religious education is committed to exploring the significance of the environment, both locally and globally, and the role of human beings and other species within it. A central concern of religious education is the promotion of each pupil s self-worth. A sense of self-worth helps pupils to reflect on their uniqueness as human beings, share their feelings and emotions with others and appreciate the importance of forming and maintaining positive relationships. 8

11 Learning across the curriculum: the contribution of Religious Education This section sets out in general terms how religious education can promote learning across the curriculum in a number of areas such as spiritual, moral, social and cultural development, key skills and thinking skills. 9

12 Promoting Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural Development through Religious Education Religious Education provides opportunities to promote spiritual development through: discussing and reflecting on key questions of meaning and truth such as the origins of the universe, life after death, good and evil, beliefs about God and values such as justice, honesty and truth learning about and reflecting on important concepts, experiences and beliefs that are at the heart of religious and other traditions and practices considering how beliefs and concepts in religion may be expressed through the creative and expressive arts and related to the human and natural sciences, thereby contributing to personal and communal identity considering how religions and other worldviews perceive the value of human beings, and their relationships with one another, with the natural world, and with God valuing relationships and developing a sense of belonging developing their own views and ideas on religious and spiritual issues. 10

13 Religious education provides opportunities to promote moral development through: enhancing the values identified within the National Curriculum, particularly valuing diversity and engaging in issues of truth, justice and truth exploring the influence of family, friends and media on moral choices and how society is influenced by beliefs, teachings, sacred texts and guidance from religious leaders considering what is of ultimate value to pupils and believers through studying the key beliefs and teachings from religion and philosophy about values and ethical codes of practice studying a range of ethical issues, including those that focus on justice, to promote racial and religious respect and personal integrity considering the importance of rights and responsibilities and developing a sense of conscience. 11

14 Religious education provides opportunities to promote social development through: considering how religious and other beliefs lead to particular actions and concerns investigating social issues from religious perspectives, recognising the diversity of viewpoints within and between religions as well as the common ground between religions articulating pupils own and others ideas on a range of contemporary social issues. Religious education provides opportunities to promote cultural development through: encountering people, literature, the creative and expressive arts and resources from differing cultures considering the relationship between religion and cultures and how religions and beliefs contribute to cultural identity and practices promoting racial and interfaith harmony and respect for all, combating prejudice and discrimination, contributing positively to community cohesion and promoting awareness of how interfaith cooperation can support the pursuit of the common good. 12

15 Promoting Citizenship through Religious Education Religious education plays a significant part in promoting citizenship through: developing pupils knowledge and understanding about the diversity of national, regional, religious and ethnic identities in the United Kingdom and the need for mutual respect and understanding enabling pupils to think about topical spiritual, moral, social and cultural issues including the importance of resolving conflict fairly exploring the rights, responsibilities and duties of citizens locally, nationally and globally enabling pupils to justify and defend orally and in writing, personal opinions about issues, problems and events. 13

16 Promoting Personal, Social and Health Education through Religious Education Religious education plays a significant part in promoting personal, social and health education through pupils: developing confidence and responsibility and making the most of their abilities by learning about what is fair and unfair, right and wrong and being encouraged to share their opinions developing a healthy, safer lifestyle by learning about religious beliefs and teachings on drug use and misuse, food and drink, leisure, relationships and human sexuality, learning about the purpose and value of religious beliefs and sensitivities in relation to sex education and enabling pupils to consider and express their own views developing good relationships and respecting the differences between people by learning about the diversity of different ethnic and religious groups and the destructive power of prejudice, challenging racism, discrimination, offending behaviour and bullying, being able to talk about relationships and feelings, considering issues of marriage and family life and meeting and encountering people whose beliefs, views and lifestyles are different from their own. 14

17 Promoting Key Skills through Religious Education Religious education provides opportunities for pupils to develop the key skills of: communication through developing a broad and accurate religious vocabulary, reading and responding to a range of written and spoken language (including sacred texts, stories, poetry, prayers, liturgy and worship), communicating ideas using the creative and expressive arts, talking and writing with understanding and insight about religious and other beliefs and values, reflecting critically on ultimate questions of life, using reasoned arguments application of number through calendrical reckoning, collecting, recording, presenting and interpreting data involving graphs, charts and statistical analysis information technology through using CD-ROMs and the internet selectively, researching information about religions and beliefs, teaching and practices, using to communicate and analyse information with people of differing beliefs and cultures, using spreadsheets and databases to handle and present data relevant to the study of religious education working with others through sharing ideas, discussing beliefs, values and practices, collaborating with each other and developing respect and sensitivity improving own learning and performance through setting targets as part of religious education development, reviewing their achievements and identifying ways to improve their own work problem solving through recognising key issues to do with religious belief, practice and expression, interpreting and explaining findings and making personal decisions on religious issues (for example, considering their own and religious ideas on good and evil), ethical dilemmas and priorities in life. 15

18 Promoting other Aspects of the Curriculum Religious education provides opportunities to promote: thinking skills through helping pupils to research, select, interpret and analyse information from religious traditions, reflect and question their own views and ideas and those of others and communicate their ideas in a variety of ways financial capability through considering the responsible use of money, the importance of giving and the ethics of wealth, debt, poverty, gambling, business and investment creativity and culture through considering the scope of human nature, sources of inspiration and discovery, connections between beliefs, values and forms of artistic expression, appreciating the value of cultural distinctiveness and reflecting on beauty, goodness and truth in creative and expressive arts education for racial equality and community cohesion through studying the damaging effects of xenophobia and racial stereotyping, the impact of conflict in religion and the promotion of respect, understanding and cooperation through dialogue between people of different faiths and beliefs effective contributions to scientific, medical and health issues through exploring philosophical and ethical questions of the origin, purpose and destiny of the cosmos and life within it, exploring the nature of humanity and human interaction with the world, exploring developments in genetics and medicine and their application and use and exploring concepts of health and well-being and their promotion links to employment, vocations and work-related learning through a focus on individual sense of purpose and aspiration in life, and through considering the appropriateness and relevance of religious education to a wide range of employment opportunities and the development of spiritual and ethical issues linked to the world of work education for sustainable development through helping pupils consider the origins and value of life, the importance of looking after the environment and studying the ways in which religious beliefs and teachings have influenced attitudes to the environment and other species. 16

19 Religious Education and Inclusion Religious education can make a significant contribution to inclusion, particularly in its focus on promoting respect for all. The national framework for religious education contains many references to the role of religious education in challenging stereotypical views and appreciating, positively, differences in others. The national framework enables all pupils to consider the impact of people s beliefs on their own actions and lifestyle. The national framework also highlights the importance of religions and beliefs and how Religious Education can develop pupils self-esteem. Effective inclusion involves teaching a lively, stimulating religious education curriculum that: builds on and is enriched by the differing experiences pupils bring to religious education meets all pupils learning needs including those with learning difficulties or who are gifted and talented, boys and girls, pupils for whom English is an additional language, pupils from all religious communities and pupils from a wide range of ethnic groups and diverse family backgrounds. To overcome any potential barriers to learning in religious education, some pupils may require: support to access text, such as through prepared tapes, particularly when working with significant quantities of written materials or at speed help to communicate their ideas through methods other than extended writing, where this is a requirement. For example, pupils may demonstrate their understanding through speech or the use of ICT a non-visual way of accessing sources of information when undertaking research in aspects of religious education, for example using audio materials. 17

20 Religious Education and the use of language Religious education can make an important contribution to pupils use of language by enabling them to: acquire and develop a specialist vocabulary communicate their ideas with depth and precision listen to the views and ideas of others, including people from religious traditions be enthused about the power and beauty of language, recognising its limitations develop their speaking and listening skills when considering religions, beliefs and ideas and articulating their responses read, particularly from sacred texts write in different styles, such as poetry, diaries, extended writing and the synthesis of differing views, beliefs and ideas evaluate clearly and rationally, using a range of reasoned, balanced arguments. 18

21 Religious Education and the use of Information and Communication Technology Religious education can make an important contribution to pupils use of ICT by enabling pupils to: make appropriate use of the internet or CD-ROM sources to investigate, analyse and evaluate different aspects of religious beliefs and practices, ultimate questions and ethical issues use or videoconferencing to communicate and collaborate with individuals in different locations, enabling associations to be made between religions and individual, national and international life use multimedia and presentation software to communicate a personal response, the essence of an argument or a stimulus for discussion use writing-support and concept-mapping software to organise thoughts and communicate knowledge and understanding of the diversity of belief and practice within and between religious traditions use equipment such as digital cameras and digital video to bring authentic images into the classroom to support discussion and reflection, and to enhance understanding of the impact of religious beliefs and practices on the lives of local individuals and faith communities. 19

22 The Foundation Stage and Religious Education 4 The foundation stage describes the phase of a child s education from the age of three to the end of reception at the age of five. Religious education is statutory for all pupils registered on the school roll. The statutory requirement for religious education does not extend to nursery classes in maintained schools and is not, therefore, a legal requirement for much of the foundation stage. In the foundation stage, practitioners plan an appropriate curriculum across the following six areas of learning: personal, social and emotional development communication, language and literacy mathematical development knowledge and understanding of the world physical development creative development. The Early Learning Goals establish expectations for most children to reach by the end of the foundation stage. They provide the basis for planning, learning and assessment. Stepping Stones of progress towards the early learning goals identify knowledge, skills, understanding and attitudes that children need if they are to achieve these early learning goals by the end of the foundation stage. 4 This section is substantially a replication of the equivalent section in the Middlesbrough RE and Assessment Guidelines 20

23 Planning for Learning in the Foundation Stage Throughout the foundation stage, children may encounter a range of religious education related learning experiences and opportunities, across all six areas of learning. However it is likely that such experiences will be more frequently encountered in the following areas of learning: personal, social and emotional development and knowledge and understanding of the world. During the foundation stage, children may begin to explore the world of religion in terms of special people, books, times, places and objects and by visiting places of worship. They listen to and talk about stories. They may be introduced to religious words and use their senses in exploring religions and beliefs, practices and forms of expression. They reflect on their own feelings and experiences. They use their imagination and curiosity to develop their appreciation and wonder of the world in which they live. To provide religious education related learning opportunities, practitioners will need to develop a multi sensory, rich and stimulating approach to planning. The following learning themes could be included as an integral part of the foundation stage curriculum: Special Times Special People Special Places The Natural Cycle of the Year Clothes Our World. 21

24 5 Learning themes should make effective use of a range of resources to provide well planned purposeful activities which build on what children already know and can do. Planning should include: Clear expectations for children s learning through links with early learning goals Suggested learning activities An assessment focus linked to the stepping stones. Activities could include: Role play Drama Story telling Listening to music Cooking Dressing up Dancing Singing. Resources might include: Artefacts Materials Food Stories Music Cards Photographs Puppets Paintings Natural objects. 5 An example of a Learning Theme Planning Sheet is included at the end of this Supplement 22

25 Assessment for Learning The examples of what children can do outlined in the guidance for the foundation stage (QCA 2000) will also provide appropriate activities for religious education related learning experiences through which practitioners in the Foundation Stage can gather evidence for assessing children s learning. This evidence will inform the foundation stage profile. By the end of the foundation stage, children will have had particular opportunities through religious education related learning to work towards the following early learning goals. Personal, social and emotional development: respond to significant experiences, showing a range of feelings where appropriate have a developing awareness of their own needs, views and feelings and be sensitive to the needs, views and feelings of others. Knowledge and understanding of the world: begin to know about their own cultures and beliefs and those of other people have a developing respect for their own cultures and beliefs and those of other people understand that people have different needs, views, cultures and beliefs, that need to be treated with respect understand that they can expect others to treat their needs, views, cultures and beliefs with respect. These particular early learning goals could be incorporated into a school's policy for religious education. The statements could supplement the Statements of Progression outlined in the diocesan syllabus and provide schools with an enhanced framework for evaluating whole school provision in religious education. 6 6 For further information about Religious Education and school self evaluation see Appendices 23

26 Religious Education at Key Stages 1 and 2 The Agreed Syllabus includes Programmes of Study for each Key Stage. These set out the breadth of study for each key stage in relation to Christianity and the other principal religions represented in Great Britain Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Sikhism. The Programmes of Study have not been replaced by this Supplement. Rather, the Supplement confirms the principles outlined in the syllabus that: At Key Stage 1, pupils should have opportunities to learn about and from Christianity and one other principal religion in depth and At Key Stage 2, pupils should have opportunities to learn about and from Christianity and two other religions in depth. Excellence and Enjoyment 7 I believe that what makes good primary education great is the fusion of excellence and enjoyment. 8 These twin principles can be applied to religious education. The focus will be on raising standards while not being afraid to make learning in religious education fun. To ensure excellence and enjoyment in religious education schools will need to: combine high standards with a broad and rich curriculum take ownership of the curriculum be creative and innovative in how they teach develop assessment for learning which enables knowledge about individual children to inform the way they are taught and learn support children with special educational needs, gifted and talented children, and groups whose needs may not have been properly addressed in the past such as those from minority ethnic groups make sure that children are supported at points of transfer and transition. 7 Produced by the Department for Education and Skills in 2003 this key document sets out a strategy for Primary schools 8 Foreword to Excellence and Enjoyment from the Secretary of State 24

27 9 Planning will be an essential aspect of teachers work in religious education. All teachers will need to plan what they will teach in religious education and how they will teach it, but spending excessive amounts of time on long detailed plans does not necessarily lead to better learning and teaching. Although the agreed syllabus provides examples of planning formats for medium and short term plans these are suggested and not prescribed models. The key to effective planning is that: teachers plan effectively using clear objectives that children understand teachers time should be used for aspects of planning that are going to be useful for their own purpose teachers planning has a direct impact on the quality of learning and teaching. Teachers should not spend time producing documentation that does not meet these criteria. Effective planning can be collaborative. It does not need to start from scratch with a blank piece of paper. Planning and Assessment To ensure that planning is linked to assessment: be selective, focus on the key aspects of learning that you wish to assess and highlight these in the plan use a simple system for recording children s progress link curricular targets in religious education to your plans for groups of pupils and some individuals. 9 See further Excellence and Enjoyment - Annex Planning Guidance 25

28 Including Religious Education as part of a Cross Curricular Theme At Key Stages1 and 2, teachers are increasingly using cross curricular themes to plan for a broad and balanced curriculum. Where learning in religious education is included as part of a cross curricular theme, care should be taken to ensure that: the religious education aspect is a legitimate part of the theme learning objectives in religious education are clear and not subsumed within other subject areas the religious education element meets the requirements of the local agreed syllabus the theme allows for continuity and progression in religious education pupils can make progress in religious education. Tenuous links should be avoided and where religious education does not fit naturally into a cross curricular theme, it should be taught as a discrete subject. 26

29 Religious Education at Key Stages 3 and 4 The Programmes of Study in the Agreed Syllabus for Key Stages 3 and 4 have not been amended. However, in line with the new non statutory guidelines from QCA, it is recommended that schools review their scheme of work/long term plan to ensure that, by the end of Key Stage 3 pupils have encountered all six of the principal religions in Britain in sufficient depth 10. Ages The Supplement confirms the Agreed Syllabus position that it is an entitlement for all students to study religious education and to have their learning accredited Worldviews It is essential that religious education enables pupils to share their own beliefs, viewpoints and ideas without embarrassment or ridicule. Many pupils come from religious backgrounds but others have no attachment to religious beliefs and practices. To ensure that all pupils voices are heard and the religious education curriculum is broad and balanced, it is recommended that there are opportunities for all pupils to study: other religious traditions such as the Bah ai faith and Zoroastrianism secular philosophies such as humanism. Pupils should also study how religions relate to each other, recognising both similarities and differences within and between religions. They should be encouraged to reflect on: the significance of interfaith dialogue the important contribution religion can make to community cohesion and combating of religious prejudice and discrimination. 10 See further QCA non statutory framework page 12 27

30 Assessing Attainment in Religious Education The key indicators of attainment in religious education are contained in the two attainment targets as set out in the Middlesbrough Agreed Syllabus 11 Attainment target 1: Learning about religions Attainment target 2: Learning from religion. In line with National Curriculum subjects, the attainment targets consist of eight level descriptions of increasing difficulty plus a description for exceptional performance above level eight 12. Each level description describes the types and range of performance that pupils working at that level should characteristically demonstrate. Apart from their summative use, these level descriptions can be used in assessment for learning. The level descriptions provide the basis to make judgements about pupils performance at the end of key stages 1, 2 and 3. In the foundation stage, children s attainment is assessed in relation to the early learning goals. At key stage 4, national qualifications are the main means of assessing attainment in religious education. Expected attainment for the majority of pupils at the end of each key stage is as follows: By the end of Key Stage 1 level 2 By the end of Key Stage 2 level 4 By the end of Key Stage 3 level 5/6. 11 The two attainment targets in the non statutory framework are Learning about religion and Learning from religion. This is slightly different to the Middlesbrough syllabus which refers to Learning about religions and Learning from religion 12 The 8 level scale is included in the Middlesbrough Guidelines for Assessment and RE and a slightly amended version taken from the new Non Statutory National Framework is included in the Appendices 28

31 Assessing Attainment at the end of a Key Stage The two attainment targets are closely related and neither should be taught in isolation. Therefore, assessment needs to take place in relation to both attainment targets. In deciding on a pupil s level of attainment at the end of a key stage, teachers should judge which description best fits the pupil s performance. When doing so, each description should be considered alongside descriptions for adjacent levels. There are no national statutory assessment requirements in religious education, but schools must report to parents on pupils progress in religious education. The eight level scale enables schools to report on pupils progress in religious education in terms of levels of attainment. It is important to note that not all aspects of religious education can be assessed. For example, pupils may express personal views and ideas that, although integral to teaching and learning would not be appropriate for formal assessment. 29

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33 APPENDICES Appendix 1 Appendix 2 Appendix 3 Appendix 4 Appendix 5 The Foundation Stage and Religious Education Planning Sheet Religious Education, Inspection and School Self Evaluation Self Evaluation The 8 Level Non Statutory Scale (QCA 2004) Support for Schools 31

34 Learning Theme: The Foundation Stage and Religious Education Planning Sheet Appendix 1 Early Learning Goal Practitioner Learning Activities Stepping Stones Evidence of Learning for FS (Learning Outcomes) Profile (Highlight as appropriate) (Include relevant statements and highlight as appropriate) Respond to significant experiences, showing a range of feelings where appropriate Have a developing awareness of their own needs, views and feelings and be sensitive to the needs, views and feelings of others Begin to know about their own cultures and beliefs and those of other people Have a developing respect for their own cultures and beliefs and those of other people Links to Other areas of Learning/Strands Resources 32

35 Religious Education, Inspection and School Self Evaluation 13 Appendix 2 OFSTED In September 2005, following a period of consultation, OFSTED will introduce a new inspection framework. Inspections will be short notice, light touch with less observation of lessons but they will continue to emphasise school self evaluation. OFSTED PROPOSES Discussions with staff and pupils, scrutiny of written work, examination of data and assessment records and tracking of pupils through a school day will be much more prominent than the inspection of subjects of the curriculum In the new climate of self-evaluation, heads of religious education and subject leaders will have a responsibility to provide evidence to senior managers in the school showing the impact of the subject on pupils knowledge, skills and understanding. Some schools may still receive a focused HMI-led inspection of religious education. 13 For further information about the future of Ofsted inspections see A New Relationship with Schools, 2004, Ofsted and Ofsted s website pages at: 33

36 How will OFSTED continue to inspect subjects, aspects of the curriculum and policy issues? The focus of the new inspections will be firmly on those topics that provide key information, along with other published data and performance indicators about how an institution is getting on. Such inspections by their very nature cannot provide all the evidence that is needed to inform and advise all interested parties and stakeholders. We intend to examine in more detail the quality of subjects/curriculum areas and policy issues through other forms of inspection, with HMI working in partnership with independent inspectors. We propose that subjects be inspected on a rolling programme, with a full report on each subject every two to three years. A sample of schools and other institutions teaching a subject or vocational area will be selected to reflect phase, sector, size, geographical patterns, urban and rural. We intend also to inspect school pyramids and groups of schools where there are established patterns of admission to see how progression and continuity within a subject are managed between years, key stages and institutions at transfer. Schools will be required, as now, to self-assess the extent to which they meet all statutory requirements, including the provision of RE. The quality of RE provision, as in other subjects of the curriculum, will be assessed through subject focused surveys. 34

37 Appendix 3 SELF EVALUATION School self evaluation is an integral part of school development and improvement. The following questions are designed to provide RE heads of department and subject leaders with a focus for reflection in relation to the school s provision for religious education. Key Question: How high are standards achieved in religious education and how do you know? As part of the self evaluation process schools could analyse the school s results and other performance data in religious education and consider: how outcomes and /or results in religious education compare with national expectations for all schools how well the school is doing in setting and meeting appropriate targets for improvement in religious education how different groups of pupils perform in religious education trends in the school s religious education results over time whether the school s standards in religious education are rising, staying at the same level, or falling how well pupils achieve at each stage, based on the progress they make and the standards they reach in religious education how religious education contributes to enabling children in the Foundation Stage to progress towards the early learning goals in Key Stages 1 to 4 and the sixth form, pupils progress in relation to the Middlesbrough Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education the achievement in religious education of pupils with special educational needs the relative achievement in religious education of boys and girls, and different groups and individuals, especially those from different ethnic backgrounds, and those whose home language is not English. 35

38 Key Question: How effective are teaching and learning strategies in religious education and how do you know? As part of the self evaluation process schools could reflect on the quality of teaching and learning in religious education and consider how effectively teachers: demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the subject structure and sequence learning to enable pupils to acquire concepts, skills and attitudes in their learning about religions and from religion plan using clear learning objectives and suitable teaching strategies interest, encourage and engage pupils challenge pupils, expecting the most of them use methods and resources that enable the pupils to learn effectively and draw on links between the school and wider community use time and insist on high standards of behaviour use teaching assistants and other support where appropriate, use homework to reinforce and extend what is learned in school promote equality of opportunity. and how well pupils: acquire new knowledge or skills in their work and develop ideas and increase their understanding show engagement, application and concentration and productively develop the skills and capacity to work independently and collaboratively. 36

39 Key Question: What is the quality of the pupils work and how do you know? Schools could evaluate the extent to which teachers effectively assess pupils' work thoroughly and constructively use assessment to inform their planning and target setting to meet the needs of individual pupils and other groups enable pupils to understand how well they are doing and how they can improve use religious education related learning experiences to enable children in the foundation stage to achieve the early learning goals. 37

40 Appendix 4 THE 8 LEVEL NON STATUTORY SCALE (QCA 2004) Level 1 Attainment target 1: Pupils use some religious words and phrases to recognise and name features of religious life and practice. They can recall religious stories and recognise symbols, and other verbal and visual forms of religious expression. Attainment target 2: Pupils talk about their own experiences and feelings, what they find interesting or puzzling and what is of value and concern to themselves and to others. Level 2 Attainment target 1: Pupils use religious words and phrases to identify some features of religion and its importance for some people. They begin to show awareness of similarities in religions. Pupils retell religious stories and suggest meanings for religious actions and symbols. They identify how religion is expressed in different ways. Attainment target 2: Pupils ask, and respond sensitively to, questions about their own and others experiences and feelings. They recognise that some questions cause people to wonder and are difficult to answer. In relation to matters of right and wrong, they recognise their own values and those of others. Level 3 Attainment target 1: Pupils use a developing religious vocabulary to describe some key features of religions, recognising similarities and differences. They make links between beliefs and sources, including religious stories and sacred texts. They begin to identify the impact religion has on believers lives. They describe some forms of religious expression. Attainment target 2: Pupils identify what influences them, making links between aspects of their own and others experiences. They ask important questions about religion and beliefs, making links between their own and others responses. They make links between values and commitments, and their own attitudes and behaviour. Level 4 Attainment target 1: Pupils use a developing religious vocabulary to describe and show understanding of sources, practices, beliefs, ideas, feelings and experiences. They make links between them, and describe some similarities and differences both within and between religions. They describe the impact of religion on people s lives. They suggest meanings for a range of forms of religious expression. Attainment target 2: Pupils raise, and suggest answers to, questions of identity, belonging, meaning, purpose, truth, values and commitments. They apply their ideas to their own and other people s lives. They describe what inspires and influences themselves and others. Level 5 Attainment target 1: Pupils use an increasingly wide religious vocabulary to explain the impact of beliefs on individuals and communities. They describe why people belong to religions. They understand that similarities and differences illustrate distinctive beliefs within and between religions and suggest possible reasons for this. They explain how religious sources are used to provide answers to ultimate questions and ethical issues, recognising diversity in forms of religious, spiritual and moral expression, within and between religions. Attainment target 2: Pupils ask, and suggest answers to, questions of identity, belonging, meaning, purpose and truth, values and commitments, relating them to their own and others lives. They explain what inspires and influences them, expressing their own and others views on the challenges of belonging to a religion. 38

41 Level 6 Attainment target 1: Pupils use religious and philosophical vocabulary to give informed accounts of religions and beliefs, explaining the reasons for diversity within and between them. They explain why the impact of religions and beliefs on individuals, communities and societies varies. They interpret sources and arguments, explaining the reasons that are used in different ways by different traditions to provide answers to ultimate questions and ethical issues. They interpret the significance of different forms of religious, spiritual and moral expression. Attainment target 2: Pupils use reasoning and examples to express insights into the relationship between beliefs, teachings and world issues. They express insights into their own and others views on questions of identity and belonging, meaning, purpose and truth. They consider the challenges of belonging to a religion in the contemporary world, focusing on values and commitments. Level 7 Attainment target 1: Pupils use a wide religious and philosophical vocabulary to show a coherent understanding of a range of religions and beliefs. They analyse issues, values and questions of meaning and truth. They account for the influence of history and culture on aspects of religious life and practice. They explain why the consequences of belonging to a faith are not the same for all people within the same religion or tradition. They use some of the principal methods by which religion, spirituality and ethics are studied, including the use of a variety of sources, evidence and forms of expression. Attainment target 2: Pupils articulate personal and critical responses to questions of meaning, purpose and truth and ethical issues. They evaluate the significance of religious and other views for understanding questions of human relationships, belonging, identity, society, values and commitments, using appropriate evidence and examples. Level 8 Attainment target 1: Pupils use a comprehensive religious and philosophical vocabulary to analyse a range of religions and beliefs. They contextualise interpretations of religion with reference to historical, cultural, social and philosophical ideas. They critically evaluate the impact of religions and beliefs on differing communities and societies. They analyse differing interpretations of religious, spiritual and moral sources, using some of the principal methods by which religion, spirituality and ethics are studied. They interpret and evaluate varied forms of religious, spiritual and moral expression. Attainment target 2: Pupils coherently analyse a wide range of viewpoints on questions of identity, belonging, meaning, purpose, truth, values and commitments. They synthesise a range of evidence, arguments, reflections and examples, fully justifying their own views and ideas and providing a detailed evaluation of the perspectives of others. Exceptional performance Attainment target 1: Pupils use a complex religious, moral and philosophical vocabulary to provide a consistent and detailed analysis of religions and beliefs. They evaluate in depth the importance of religious diversity in a pluralistic society. They clearly recognise the extent to which the impact of religion and beliefs on different communities and societies has changed over time. They provide a detailed analysis of how religious, spiritual and moral sources are interpreted in different ways, evaluating the principal methods by which religion and spirituality are studied. They synthesise effectively their accounts of the varied forms of religious, spiritual and moral expression. Attainment target 2: Pupils analyse in depth a wide range of perspectives on questions of identity and belonging, meaning, purpose and truth, and values and commitments. They give independent, well informed and highly reasoned insights into their own and others perspectives on religious and spiritual issues, providing well-substantiated and balanced conclusions. 39

42 Appendix 5 Support for Schools Middlesbrough SACRE is committed to supporting schools as they seek to implement the Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education. Where schools have professional development needs, they can contact the SACRE consultant Eileen Bellett who will be able to provide appropriate and relevant information. Eileen Bellett can be contacted as follows: Telephone: All other SACRE enquiries should be addressed to: The Clerk to SACRE on

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