Objective: Work Done by a Variable Force Work Done by a Spring. Homework: Assignment (1-25) Do PROBS # (64, 65) Ch. 6, + Do AP 1986 # 2 (handout)

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Objective: Work Done by a Variable Force Work Done by a Spring. Homework: Assignment (1-25) Do PROBS # (64, 65) Ch. 6, + Do AP 1986 # 2 (handout)"

Transcription

1 Double Date: Objective: Work Done by a Variable Force Work Done by a Spring Homework: Assignment (1-25) Do PROBS # (64, 65) Ch. 6, + Do AP 1986 # 2 (handout)

2 AP Physics B Mr. Mirro Work Done by a Variable Force Date: The work done by a constant force is given by W = (F cos θ) ΔS. Quite often, situations arise in which the force is NOT constant - but changes with the displacement of the object. In general, the work done by a variable force in moving an object is equal to the AREA under the graph of F cos θ versus displacement (s) since work = force x distance. For instance, an archer uses a high-tech instrument called a compound bow. This type of bow consists of a series of pulleys and strings that produce a force versus displacement. The work the archer must do in drawing back the string of the compound bow from [0 to 0.5 m] is based on the variable force that is applied. Consider the graph of F cos θ versus (s) for the compound bow. The work is equal to the colored area under the curved line in the figure. For convenience, this area is divided into a number of small squares, each having an area of: Area A = (9.0 N) x ( m) A = 0.25 Joules per square So, if there are approximately 242 small squares, the area under the curve is close to: A = (242 squares) 0.25 Joules Square 242 squares A 60.5 Joules

3 AP Physics B Mr. Mirro Work Done by a Variable Force Date: Ex 1: The drawing shows the force versus displacement graph for two different bows. These graphs give the force that an archer must apply to draw the bowstring. [CutnellP6.63] a) For which bow is more work required to draw the bow fully from s = 0 to s = 0.5 m? b) Estimate the additional work required for the bow identified in part (a) compared to the other bow. Ex 2: A net external force is applied to a 6 kg object that is initially at rest. The net force component along the displacement of the object varies with the magnitude of the displacement as shown. [CutnellP6.67] a) How much work is done by the net force? b) What is the speed of the object at s = 20 m?

4

5 AP Physics B Mr. Mirro Work Done by a Spring Date: Springs are familiar objects that have many applications, ranging from push-button switches on electronic components, to automobile suspension systems, to mattresses. Elastic objects, such as springs, are useful because they can be either stretched or compressed. Recall that the elasticity of an object refers to the object ability to return to its original shape after deformation. Experiments done by Robert Hooke reveal that for relatively small displacements, the force F applied required to stretch or compress a spring is directly proportional to the displacement Δx. That is, Hooke s Law for the restoring force on an ideal spring can be expressed as: F applied = - k Δx where (k) is the spring constant and (Δx) is the displacement from equilibrium The spring constant (k) is a measure of the relative stiffness of the spring. The higher the spring constant, the stiffer the spring. The stiffer the spring, the more force required to deform the spring. Note: The minus sign in the formula for the force indicates that the restoring force always points in a direction opposite the displacement of the spring.

6 We have seen that when an object is allow to fall, such as the hammer of a pile driver, it can do WORK! Work in the form of the potential energy due to gravity. PE g = mg ΔH A spring also has potential energy when the spring is stretched or compressed which we refer to as elastic potential energy. Def N : Elastic Potential Energy The elastic potential energy PE s is the energy that a spring has by virtue of being temporarily deformed. For an ideal spring that has a spring constant (k) and is stretched or compressed by an amount (Δx) relative to its equilibrium (unstrained) position, the elastic potential energy is: PE s = ½ k (Δx) 2 Consider the following system, where the total mechanical energy of this system is: Entirely elastic potential energy at A Partly elastic potential energy and partly kinetic at B Entirely kinetic at C If we consider the total mechanical energy and apply the conservation of energy principle to the spring system shown, we can develop the following expression: E final = E initial KE + PE g + PE s = KE + PE g + PE s ½ mv 2 + mgh f + ½ kx 2 = ½ mv 2 + mgh f + ½ kx 2

7 AP Physics B Mr. Mirro Work Done by a Spring Date: Ex 1: The diagram shows an object of mass m = 0.20 kg that is vibrating on a horizontal frictionless table. The spring has a spring constant k = 545 N/m. The spring is stretched initially to x 0 = 4.50 cm and then is released from rest (v 0 = 0). [Cutnell10.7] a. Write an expression for the final velocity v f in terms of the spring constant (k), mass (m) and the displacement (x 0 ) and (x f ). b. Determine the final translational speed v f of the object when the final displacement of the spring is at: (i) x f = 2.25 cm and (ii) x f = 0 cm Ex 2: A 0.40 kg ball is attached to a vertical spring as shown. The spring constant of the spring is 28 N/m. The ball, supported initially so that the spring is neither stretched nor compressed, is released from rest. In the absence of air resistance, how far does the ball fall before being brought to a momentary stop by the spring? [Cutnell10.9]

8 Ex 3: One end of a spring whose spring constant k = 50 N/m, is attached to a solid wall while the other end reaches to the edge of a horizontal, frictionless tabletop, which is a distance h = 1m above the floor. A block of mass M =.5 kg is placed against the end of the spring and pushed toward the wall until the spring has been compressed a distance ΔX = 0.2m, as shown below. [AP1986.2sim] The block is released, follows the trajectory shown, striking the floor a horizontal distance D = 0.9 m from the edge of the table. If the air resistance is negligible, Find the following: a. The time elapsed from the instant the block leaves the table to the instant it strikes the floor. b. The horizontal component of the velocity of the block just before it hits the floor. c. The work done on the block by the spring.

9

10

11

Chapter 6 Work and Energy

Chapter 6 Work and Energy Chapter 6 WORK AND ENERGY PREVIEW Work is the scalar product of the force acting on an object and the displacement through which it acts. When work is done on or by a system, the energy of that system

More information

Weight The weight of an object is defined as the gravitational force acting on the object. Unit: Newton (N)

Weight The weight of an object is defined as the gravitational force acting on the object. Unit: Newton (N) Gravitational Field A gravitational field as a region in which an object experiences a force due to gravitational attraction Gravitational Field Strength The gravitational field strength at a point in

More information

www.mathsbox.org.uk Displacement (x) Velocity (v) Acceleration (a) x = f(t) differentiate v = dx Acceleration Velocity (v) Displacement x

www.mathsbox.org.uk Displacement (x) Velocity (v) Acceleration (a) x = f(t) differentiate v = dx Acceleration Velocity (v) Displacement x Mechanics 2 : Revision Notes 1. Kinematics and variable acceleration Displacement (x) Velocity (v) Acceleration (a) x = f(t) differentiate v = dx differentiate a = dv = d2 x dt dt dt 2 Acceleration Velocity

More information

Lesson 39: Kinetic Energy & Potential Energy

Lesson 39: Kinetic Energy & Potential Energy Lesson 39: Kinetic Energy & Potential Energy Total Mechanical Energy We sometimes call the total energy of an object (potential and kinetic) the total mechanical energy of an object. Mechanical energy

More information

AP Physics - Chapter 8 Practice Test

AP Physics - Chapter 8 Practice Test AP Physics - Chapter 8 Practice Test Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. A single conservative force F x = (6.0x 12) N (x is in m) acts on

More information

AP Physics C. Oscillations/SHM Review Packet

AP Physics C. Oscillations/SHM Review Packet AP Physics C Oscillations/SHM Review Packet 1. A 0.5 kg mass on a spring has a displacement as a function of time given by the equation x(t) = 0.8Cos(πt). Find the following: a. The time for one complete

More information

Spring Simple Harmonic Oscillator. Spring constant. Potential Energy stored in a Spring. Understanding oscillations. Understanding oscillations

Spring Simple Harmonic Oscillator. Spring constant. Potential Energy stored in a Spring. Understanding oscillations. Understanding oscillations Spring Simple Harmonic Oscillator Simple Harmonic Oscillations and Resonance We have an object attached to a spring. The object is on a horizontal frictionless surface. We move the object so the spring

More information

8. Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy Potential Energy: When an object has potential to have work done on it, it is said to have potential

8. Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy Potential Energy: When an object has potential to have work done on it, it is said to have potential 8. Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy Potential Energy: When an object has potential to have work done on it, it is said to have potential energy, e.g. a ball in your hand has more potential energy

More information

AP1 Oscillations. 1. Which of the following statements about a spring-block oscillator in simple harmonic motion about its equilibrium point is false?

AP1 Oscillations. 1. Which of the following statements about a spring-block oscillator in simple harmonic motion about its equilibrium point is false? 1. Which of the following statements about a spring-block oscillator in simple harmonic motion about its equilibrium point is false? (A) The displacement is directly related to the acceleration. (B) The

More information

Gravitational Potential Energy

Gravitational Potential Energy Gravitational Potential Energy Consider a ball falling from a height of y 0 =h to the floor at height y=0. A net force of gravity has been acting on the ball as it drops. So the total work done on the

More information

Unit 3 Work and Energy Suggested Time: 25 Hours

Unit 3 Work and Energy Suggested Time: 25 Hours Unit 3 Work and Energy Suggested Time: 25 Hours PHYSICS 2204 CURRICULUM GUIDE 55 DYNAMICS Work and Energy Introduction When two or more objects are considered at once, a system is involved. To make sense

More information

WORK DONE BY A CONSTANT FORCE

WORK DONE BY A CONSTANT FORCE WORK DONE BY A CONSTANT FORCE The definition of work, W, when a constant force (F) is in the direction of displacement (d) is W = Fd SI unit is the Newton-meter (Nm) = Joule, J If you exert a force of

More information

Prelab Exercises: Hooke's Law and the Behavior of Springs

Prelab Exercises: Hooke's Law and the Behavior of Springs 59 Prelab Exercises: Hooke's Law and the Behavior of Springs Study the description of the experiment that follows and answer the following questions.. (3 marks) Explain why a mass suspended vertically

More information

EDUH 1017 - SPORTS MECHANICS

EDUH 1017 - SPORTS MECHANICS 4277(a) Semester 2, 2011 Page 1 of 9 THE UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY EDUH 1017 - SPORTS MECHANICS NOVEMBER 2011 Time allowed: TWO Hours Total marks: 90 MARKS INSTRUCTIONS All questions are to be answered. Use

More information

9. The kinetic energy of the moving object is (1) 5 J (3) 15 J (2) 10 J (4) 50 J

9. The kinetic energy of the moving object is (1) 5 J (3) 15 J (2) 10 J (4) 50 J 1. If the kinetic energy of an object is 16 joules when its speed is 4.0 meters per second, then the mass of the objects is (1) 0.5 kg (3) 8.0 kg (2) 2.0 kg (4) 19.6 kg Base your answers to questions 9

More information

PHY231 Section 2, Form A March 22, 2012. 1. Which one of the following statements concerning kinetic energy is true?

PHY231 Section 2, Form A March 22, 2012. 1. Which one of the following statements concerning kinetic energy is true? 1. Which one of the following statements concerning kinetic energy is true? A) Kinetic energy can be measured in watts. B) Kinetic energy is always equal to the potential energy. C) Kinetic energy is always

More information

Chapter 8: Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy. Work and kinetic energy are energies of motion.

Chapter 8: Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy. Work and kinetic energy are energies of motion. Chapter 8: Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy Work and kinetic energy are energies of motion. Consider a vertical spring oscillating with mass m attached to one end. At the extreme ends of travel

More information

Work. Work = Force x parallel distance (parallel component of displacement) F v

Work. Work = Force x parallel distance (parallel component of displacement) F v Work Work = orce x parallel distance (parallel component of displacement) W k = d parallel d parallel Units: N m= J = " joules" = ( kg m2/ s2) = average force computed over the distance r r When is not

More information

AP Physics C Fall Final Web Review

AP Physics C Fall Final Web Review Name: Class: _ Date: _ AP Physics C Fall Final Web Review Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. On a position versus time graph, the slope of

More information

Work, Power, Energy Multiple Choice. PSI Physics. Multiple Choice Questions

Work, Power, Energy Multiple Choice. PSI Physics. Multiple Choice Questions Work, Power, Energy Multiple Choice PSI Physics Name Multiple Choice Questions 1. A block of mass m is pulled over a distance d by an applied force F which is directed in parallel to the displacement.

More information

Ch 7 Kinetic Energy and Work. Question: 7 Problems: 3, 7, 11, 17, 23, 27, 35, 37, 41, 43

Ch 7 Kinetic Energy and Work. Question: 7 Problems: 3, 7, 11, 17, 23, 27, 35, 37, 41, 43 Ch 7 Kinetic Energy and Work Question: 7 Problems: 3, 7, 11, 17, 23, 27, 35, 37, 41, 43 Technical definition of energy a scalar quantity that is associated with that state of one or more objects The state

More information

Uniform Circular Motion III. Homework: Assignment (1-35) Read 5.4, Do CONCEPT QUEST #(8), Do PROBS (20, 21) Ch. 5 + AP 1997 #2 (handout)

Uniform Circular Motion III. Homework: Assignment (1-35) Read 5.4, Do CONCEPT QUEST #(8), Do PROBS (20, 21) Ch. 5 + AP 1997 #2 (handout) Double Date: Objective: Uniform Circular Motion II Uniform Circular Motion III Homework: Assignment (1-35) Read 5.4, Do CONCEPT QUEST #(8), Do PROBS (20, 21) Ch. 5 + AP 1997 #2 (handout) AP Physics B

More information

Practice Test SHM with Answers

Practice Test SHM with Answers Practice Test SHM with Answers MPC 1) If we double the frequency of a system undergoing simple harmonic motion, which of the following statements about that system are true? (There could be more than one

More information

Work, Power, and Energy: Explaining the causes of motion without Newton. KIN335 Spring 2005

Work, Power, and Energy: Explaining the causes of motion without Newton. KIN335 Spring 2005 Work, Power, and Energy: Explaining the causes of motion without Newton KIN335 Spring 2005 What you should know Definition of work and its characteristics Definition of energy (including kinetic energy

More information

ch 15 practice test Multiple Choice Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.

ch 15 practice test Multiple Choice Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. ch 15 practice test Multiple Choice Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. Work is a transfer of a. energy. c. mass. b. force. d. motion. 2. What

More information

Chapter 7 WORK, ENERGY, AND Power Work Done by a Constant Force Kinetic Energy and the Work-Energy Theorem Work Done by a Variable Force Power

Chapter 7 WORK, ENERGY, AND Power Work Done by a Constant Force Kinetic Energy and the Work-Energy Theorem Work Done by a Variable Force Power Chapter 7 WORK, ENERGY, AND Power Work Done by a Constant Force Kinetic Energy and the Work-Energy Theorem Work Done by a Variable Force Power Examples of work. (a) The work done by the force F on this

More information

Physics Notes Class 11 CHAPTER 6 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

Physics Notes Class 11 CHAPTER 6 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER 1 P a g e Work Physics Notes Class 11 CHAPTER 6 WORK, ENERGY AND POWER When a force acts on an object and the object actually moves in the direction of force, then the work is said to be done by the force.

More information

Simple Harmonic Motion

Simple Harmonic Motion Simple Harmonic Motion 1 Object To determine the period of motion of objects that are executing simple harmonic motion and to check the theoretical prediction of such periods. 2 Apparatus Assorted weights

More information

C B A T 3 T 2 T 1. 1. What is the magnitude of the force T 1? A) 37.5 N B) 75.0 N C) 113 N D) 157 N E) 192 N

C B A T 3 T 2 T 1. 1. What is the magnitude of the force T 1? A) 37.5 N B) 75.0 N C) 113 N D) 157 N E) 192 N Three boxes are connected by massless strings and are resting on a frictionless table. Each box has a mass of 15 kg, and the tension T 1 in the right string is accelerating the boxes to the right at a

More information

CHAPTER 6 WORK AND ENERGY

CHAPTER 6 WORK AND ENERGY CHAPTER 6 WORK AND ENERGY CONCEPTUAL QUESTIONS. REASONING AND SOLUTION The work done by F in moving the box through a displacement s is W = ( F cos 0 ) s= Fs. The work done by F is W = ( F cos θ). s From

More information

PHY231 Section 1, Form B March 22, 2012

PHY231 Section 1, Form B March 22, 2012 1. A car enters a horizontal, curved roadbed of radius 50 m. The coefficient of static friction between the tires and the roadbed is 0.20. What is the maximum speed with which the car can safely negotiate

More information

Objective: Equilibrium Applications of Newton s Laws of Motion I

Objective: Equilibrium Applications of Newton s Laws of Motion I Type: Single Date: Objective: Equilibrium Applications of Newton s Laws of Motion I Homework: Assignment (1-11) Read (4.1-4.5, 4.8, 4.11); Do PROB # s (46, 47, 52, 58) Ch. 4 AP Physics B Mr. Mirro Equilibrium,

More information

Physics 2A, Sec B00: Mechanics -- Winter 2011 Instructor: B. Grinstein Final Exam

Physics 2A, Sec B00: Mechanics -- Winter 2011 Instructor: B. Grinstein Final Exam Physics 2A, Sec B00: Mechanics -- Winter 2011 Instructor: B. Grinstein Final Exam INSTRUCTIONS: Use a pencil #2 to fill your scantron. Write your code number and bubble it in under "EXAM NUMBER;" an entry

More information

A) F = k x B) F = k C) F = x k D) F = x + k E) None of these.

A) F = k x B) F = k C) F = x k D) F = x + k E) None of these. CT16-1 Which of the following is necessary to make an object oscillate? i. a stable equilibrium ii. little or no friction iii. a disturbance A: i only B: ii only C: iii only D: i and iii E: All three Answer:

More information

Physics 125 Practice Exam #3 Chapters 6-7 Professor Siegel

Physics 125 Practice Exam #3 Chapters 6-7 Professor Siegel Physics 125 Practice Exam #3 Chapters 6-7 Professor Siegel Name: Lab Day: 1. A concrete block is pulled 7.0 m across a frictionless surface by means of a rope. The tension in the rope is 40 N; and the

More information

ENERGYand WORK (PART I and II) 9-MAC

ENERGYand WORK (PART I and II) 9-MAC ENERGYand WORK (PART I and II) 9-MAC Purpose: To understand work, potential energy, & kinetic energy. To understand conservation of energy and how energy is converted from one form to the other. Apparatus:

More information

Physics 1120: Simple Harmonic Motion Solutions

Physics 1120: Simple Harmonic Motion Solutions Questions: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Physics 1120: Simple Harmonic Motion Solutions 1. A 1.75 kg particle moves as function of time as follows: x = 4cos(1.33t+π/5) where distance is measured

More information

Review D: Potential Energy and the Conservation of Mechanical Energy

Review D: Potential Energy and the Conservation of Mechanical Energy MSSCHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Department of Physics 8.01 Fall 2005 Review D: Potential Energy and the Conservation of Mechanical Energy D.1 Conservative and Non-conservative Force... 2 D.1.1 Introduction...

More information

Chapter 7: Momentum and Impulse

Chapter 7: Momentum and Impulse Chapter 7: Momentum and Impulse 1. When a baseball bat hits the ball, the impulse delivered to the ball is increased by A. follow through on the swing. B. rapidly stopping the bat after impact. C. letting

More information

Center of Gravity. We touched on this briefly in chapter 7! x 2

Center of Gravity. We touched on this briefly in chapter 7! x 2 Center of Gravity We touched on this briefly in chapter 7! x 1 x 2 cm m 1 m 2 This was for what is known as discrete objects. Discrete refers to the fact that the two objects separated and individual.

More information

WORKSHEET: KINETIC AND POTENTIAL ENERGY PROBLEMS

WORKSHEET: KINETIC AND POTENTIAL ENERGY PROBLEMS WORKSHEET: KINETIC AND POTENTIAL ENERGY PROBLEMS 1. Stored energy or energy due to position is known as Potential energy. 2. The formula for calculating potential energy is mgh. 3. The three factors that

More information

Simple Harmonic Motion(SHM) Period and Frequency. Period and Frequency. Cosines and Sines

Simple Harmonic Motion(SHM) Period and Frequency. Period and Frequency. Cosines and Sines Simple Harmonic Motion(SHM) Vibration (oscillation) Equilibrium position position of the natural length of a spring Amplitude maximum displacement Period and Frequency Period (T) Time for one complete

More information

Physics 590 Homework, Week 6 Week 6, Homework 1

Physics 590 Homework, Week 6 Week 6, Homework 1 Physics 590 Homework, Week 6 Week 6, Homework 1 Prob. 6.1.1 A descent vehicle landing on the moon has a vertical velocity toward the surface of the moon of 35 m/s. At the same time it has a horizontal

More information

F N A) 330 N 0.31 B) 310 N 0.33 C) 250 N 0.27 D) 290 N 0.30 E) 370 N 0.26

F N A) 330 N 0.31 B) 310 N 0.33 C) 250 N 0.27 D) 290 N 0.30 E) 370 N 0.26 Physics 23 Exam 2 Spring 2010 Dr. Alward Page 1 1. A 250-N force is directed horizontally as shown to push a 29-kg box up an inclined plane at a constant speed. Determine the magnitude of the normal force,

More information

Chapter 6. Work and Energy

Chapter 6. Work and Energy Chapter 6 Work and Energy ENERGY IS THE ABILITY TO DO WORK = TO APPLY A FORCE OVER A DISTANCE= Example: push over a distance, pull over a distance. Mechanical energy comes into 2 forms: Kinetic energy

More information

Curso2012-2013 Física Básica Experimental I Cuestiones Tema IV. Trabajo y energía.

Curso2012-2013 Física Básica Experimental I Cuestiones Tema IV. Trabajo y energía. 1. A body of mass m slides a distance d along a horizontal surface. How much work is done by gravity? A) mgd B) zero C) mgd D) One cannot tell from the given information. E) None of these is correct. 2.

More information

Work and Energy. W =!KE = KE f

Work and Energy. W =!KE = KE f Activity 19 PS-2826 Work and Energy Mechanics: work-energy theorem, conservation of energy GLX setup file: work energy Qty Equipment and Materials Part Number 1 PASPORT Xplorer GLX PS-2002 1 PASPORT Motion

More information

P211 Midterm 2 Spring 2004 Form D

P211 Midterm 2 Spring 2004 Form D 1. An archer pulls his bow string back 0.4 m by exerting a force that increases uniformly from zero to 230 N. The equivalent spring constant of the bow is: A. 115 N/m B. 575 N/m C. 1150 N/m D. 287.5 N/m

More information

Physics 41 HW Set 1 Chapter 15

Physics 41 HW Set 1 Chapter 15 Physics 4 HW Set Chapter 5 Serway 8 th OC:, 4, 7 CQ: 4, 8 P: 4, 5, 8, 8, 0, 9,, 4, 9, 4, 5, 5 Discussion Problems:, 57, 59, 67, 74 OC CQ P: 4, 5, 8, 8, 0, 9,, 4, 9, 4, 5, 5 Discussion Problems:, 57, 59,

More information

Work Energy & Power. September 2000 Number 05. 1. Work If a force acts on a body and causes it to move, then the force is doing work.

Work Energy & Power. September 2000 Number 05. 1. Work If a force acts on a body and causes it to move, then the force is doing work. PhysicsFactsheet September 2000 Number 05 Work Energy & Power 1. Work If a force acts on a body and causes it to move, then the force is doing work. W = Fs W = work done (J) F = force applied (N) s = distance

More information

Work and Energy. Physics 1425 Lecture 12. Michael Fowler, UVa

Work and Energy. Physics 1425 Lecture 12. Michael Fowler, UVa Work and Energy Physics 1425 Lecture 12 Michael Fowler, UVa What is Work and What Isn t? In physics, work has a very restricted meaning! Doing homework isn t work. Carrying somebody a mile on a level road

More information

Acceleration due to Gravity

Acceleration due to Gravity Acceleration due to Gravity 1 Object To determine the acceleration due to gravity by different methods. 2 Apparatus Balance, ball bearing, clamps, electric timers, meter stick, paper strips, precision

More information

Lecture 17. Last time we saw that the rotational analog of Newton s 2nd Law is

Lecture 17. Last time we saw that the rotational analog of Newton s 2nd Law is Lecture 17 Rotational Dynamics Rotational Kinetic Energy Stress and Strain and Springs Cutnell+Johnson: 9.4-9.6, 10.1-10.2 Rotational Dynamics (some more) Last time we saw that the rotational analog of

More information

physics 111N work & energy

physics 111N work & energy physics 111N work & energy conservation of energy entirely gravitational potential energy kinetic energy turning into gravitational potential energy gravitational potential energy turning into kinetic

More information

Ch 8 Potential energy and Conservation of Energy. Question: 2, 3, 8, 9 Problems: 3, 9, 15, 21, 24, 25, 31, 32, 35, 41, 43, 47, 49, 53, 55, 63

Ch 8 Potential energy and Conservation of Energy. Question: 2, 3, 8, 9 Problems: 3, 9, 15, 21, 24, 25, 31, 32, 35, 41, 43, 47, 49, 53, 55, 63 Ch 8 Potential energ and Conservation of Energ Question: 2, 3, 8, 9 Problems: 3, 9, 15, 21, 24, 25, 31, 32, 35, 41, 43, 47, 49, 53, 55, 63 Potential energ Kinetic energ energ due to motion Potential energ

More information

Midterm Solutions. mvr = ω f (I wheel + I bullet ) = ω f 2 MR2 + mr 2 ) ω f = v R. 1 + M 2m

Midterm Solutions. mvr = ω f (I wheel + I bullet ) = ω f 2 MR2 + mr 2 ) ω f = v R. 1 + M 2m Midterm Solutions I) A bullet of mass m moving at horizontal velocity v strikes and sticks to the rim of a wheel a solid disc) of mass M, radius R, anchored at its center but free to rotate i) Which of

More information

Key Concepts What is mechanical energy? How do you calculate the amount of mechanical energy an object has?

Key Concepts What is mechanical energy? How do you calculate the amount of mechanical energy an object has? Physics Outcome 2 Energy and Energy Transformations At the end of this section students will understand and calculate the two types of energy studied in Science 10, kinetic and potential energy This outcome

More information

PHYSICS 111 HOMEWORK SOLUTION #10. April 8, 2013

PHYSICS 111 HOMEWORK SOLUTION #10. April 8, 2013 PHYSICS HOMEWORK SOLUTION #0 April 8, 203 0. Find the net torque on the wheel in the figure below about the axle through O, taking a = 6.0 cm and b = 30.0 cm. A torque that s produced by a force can be

More information

Work, Energy and Power

Work, Energy and Power Work, Energy and Power In this section of the Transport unit, we will look at the energy changes that take place when a force acts upon an object. Energy can t be created or destroyed, it can only be changed

More information

Work, Energy & Momentum Homework Packet Worksheet 1: This is a lot of work!

Work, Energy & Momentum Homework Packet Worksheet 1: This is a lot of work! Work, Energy & Momentum Homework Packet Worksheet 1: This is a lot of work! 1. A student holds her 1.5-kg psychology textbook out of a second floor classroom window until her arm is tired; then she releases

More information

Type: Single Date: Kinetic Theory of Gases. Homework: Read (14.1), Do CONCEPT Q. # (1), Do PROBLEMS # (2, 3, 5) Ch. 14

Type: Single Date: Kinetic Theory of Gases. Homework: Read (14.1), Do CONCEPT Q. # (1), Do PROBLEMS # (2, 3, 5) Ch. 14 Type: Single Date: Objective: Kinetic Theory of Gases Homework: Read (14.1), Do CONCEPT Q. # (1), Do PROBLEMS # (2, 3, 5) Ch. 14 AP Physics Mr. Mirro Kinetic Theory of Gases Date Unlike the condensed phases

More information

Physics 201 Homework 8

Physics 201 Homework 8 Physics 201 Homework 8 Feb 27, 2013 1. A ceiling fan is turned on and a net torque of 1.8 N-m is applied to the blades. 8.2 rad/s 2 The blades have a total moment of inertia of 0.22 kg-m 2. What is the

More information

B) 286 m C) 325 m D) 367 m Answer: B

B) 286 m C) 325 m D) 367 m Answer: B Practice Midterm 1 1) When a parachutist jumps from an airplane, he eventually reaches a constant speed, called the terminal velocity. This means that A) the acceleration is equal to g. B) the force of

More information

Work, Energy and Power Practice Test 1

Work, Energy and Power Practice Test 1 Name: ate: 1. How much work is required to lift a 2-kilogram mass to a height of 10 meters?. 5 joules. 20 joules. 100 joules. 200 joules 5. ar and car of equal mass travel up a hill. ar moves up the hill

More information

Type: Single Date: Homework: READ 12.8, Do CONCEPT Q. # (14) Do PROBLEMS (40, 52, 81) Ch. 12

Type: Single Date: Homework: READ 12.8, Do CONCEPT Q. # (14) Do PROBLEMS (40, 52, 81) Ch. 12 Type: Single Date: Objective: Latent Heat Homework: READ 12.8, Do CONCEPT Q. # (14) Do PROBLEMS (40, 52, 81) Ch. 12 AP Physics B Date: Mr. Mirro Heat and Phase Change When bodies are heated or cooled their

More information

PHYSICS 111 HOMEWORK SOLUTION, week 4, chapter 5, sec 1-7. February 13, 2013

PHYSICS 111 HOMEWORK SOLUTION, week 4, chapter 5, sec 1-7. February 13, 2013 PHYSICS 111 HOMEWORK SOLUTION, week 4, chapter 5, sec 1-7 February 13, 2013 0.1 A 2.00-kg object undergoes an acceleration given by a = (6.00î + 4.00ĵ)m/s 2 a) Find the resultatnt force acting on the object

More information

PHYS 211 FINAL FALL 2004 Form A

PHYS 211 FINAL FALL 2004 Form A 1. Two boys with masses of 40 kg and 60 kg are holding onto either end of a 10 m long massless pole which is initially at rest and floating in still water. They pull themselves along the pole toward each

More information

Chapter 9. is gradually increased, does the center of mass shift toward or away from that particle or does it remain stationary.

Chapter 9. is gradually increased, does the center of mass shift toward or away from that particle or does it remain stationary. Chapter 9 9.2 Figure 9-37 shows a three particle system with masses m 1 3.0 kg, m 2 4.0 kg, and m 3 8.0 kg. The scales are set by x s 2.0 m and y s 2.0 m. What are (a) the x coordinate and (b) the y coordinate

More information

SHORT ANSWER. Write the word or phrase that best completes each statement or answers the question.

SHORT ANSWER. Write the word or phrase that best completes each statement or answers the question. Exam Name SHORT ANSWER. Write the word or phrase that best completes each statement or answers the question. 1) A person on a sled coasts down a hill and then goes over a slight rise with speed 2.7 m/s.

More information

The Technical Archer. Austin Wargo

The Technical Archer. Austin Wargo The Technical Archer Austin Wargo May 14, 2010 Abstract A mathematical model of the interactions between a long bow and an arrow. The model uses the Euler-Lagrange formula, and is based off conservation

More information

KE =? v o. Page 1 of 12

KE =? v o. Page 1 of 12 Page 1 of 12 CTEnergy-1. A mass m is at the end of light (massless) rod of length R, the other end of which has a frictionless pivot so the rod can swing in a vertical plane. The rod is initially horizontal

More information

Physics 1A Lecture 10C

Physics 1A Lecture 10C Physics 1A Lecture 10C "If you neglect to recharge a battery, it dies. And if you run full speed ahead without stopping for water, you lose momentum to finish the race. --Oprah Winfrey Static Equilibrium

More information

PHY121 #8 Midterm I 3.06.2013

PHY121 #8 Midterm I 3.06.2013 PHY11 #8 Midterm I 3.06.013 AP Physics- Newton s Laws AP Exam Multiple Choice Questions #1 #4 1. When the frictionless system shown above is accelerated by an applied force of magnitude F, the tension

More information

Exam Three Momentum Concept Questions

Exam Three Momentum Concept Questions Exam Three Momentum Concept Questions Isolated Systems 4. A car accelerates from rest. In doing so the absolute value of the car's momentum changes by a certain amount and that of the Earth changes by:

More information

Cambridge International Examinations Cambridge International Advanced Subsidiary and Advanced Level

Cambridge International Examinations Cambridge International Advanced Subsidiary and Advanced Level Cambridge International Examinations Cambridge International Advanced Subsidiary and Advanced Level *0123456789* PHYSICS 9702/02 Paper 2 AS Level Structured Questions For Examination from 2016 SPECIMEN

More information

HOOKE S LAW AND OSCILLATIONS

HOOKE S LAW AND OSCILLATIONS 9 HOOKE S LAW AND OSCILLATIONS OBJECTIVE To measure the effect of amplitude, mass, and spring constant on the period of a spring-mass oscillator. INTRODUCTION The force which restores a spring to its equilibrium

More information

Name Partners Date. Energy Diagrams I

Name Partners Date. Energy Diagrams I Name Partners Date Visual Quantum Mechanics The Next Generation Energy Diagrams I Goal Changes in energy are a good way to describe an object s motion. Here you will construct energy diagrams for a toy

More information

AP Physics: Rotational Dynamics 2

AP Physics: Rotational Dynamics 2 Name: Assignment Due Date: March 30, 2012 AP Physics: Rotational Dynamics 2 Problem A solid cylinder with mass M, radius R, and rotational inertia 1 2 MR2 rolls without slipping down the inclined plane

More information

BHS Freshman Physics Review. Chapter 2 Linear Motion Physics is the oldest science (astronomy) and the foundation for every other science.

BHS Freshman Physics Review. Chapter 2 Linear Motion Physics is the oldest science (astronomy) and the foundation for every other science. BHS Freshman Physics Review Chapter 2 Linear Motion Physics is the oldest science (astronomy) and the foundation for every other science. Galileo (1564-1642): 1 st true scientist and 1 st person to use

More information

PHY2053: Lecture 12. Elastic Forces - Hooke s Law Work done by elastic forces Elastic Potential Energy Power

PHY2053: Lecture 12. Elastic Forces - Hooke s Law Work done by elastic forces Elastic Potential Energy Power PHY2053: Lecture 12 Elastic Forces - Hooke s Law Work done by elastic forces Elastic Potential Energy Power Elastic Forces 2 Hooke s Law Discovered by Robert Hooke cca 1660 ceiiinosssttuv cca 1676 Ut tensio,

More information

226 Chapter 15: OSCILLATIONS

226 Chapter 15: OSCILLATIONS Chapter 15: OSCILLATIONS 1. In simple harmonic motion, the restoring force must be proportional to the: A. amplitude B. frequency C. velocity D. displacement E. displacement squared 2. An oscillatory motion

More information

Sample Questions for the AP Physics 1 Exam

Sample Questions for the AP Physics 1 Exam Sample Questions for the AP Physics 1 Exam Sample Questions for the AP Physics 1 Exam Multiple-choice Questions Note: To simplify calculations, you may use g 5 10 m/s 2 in all problems. Directions: Each

More information

Work-Energy Bar Charts

Work-Energy Bar Charts Name: Work-Energy Bar Charts Read from Lesson 2 of the Work, Energy and Power chapter at The Physics Classroom: http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/energy/u5l2c.html MOP Connection: Work and Energy:

More information

Energy - Key Vocabulary

Energy - Key Vocabulary Energy - Key Vocabulary Term Potential Energy Kinetic Energy Joules Gravity Definition The energy an object possesses due to its position. PE = mgh The energy an object possesses when it is in motion.

More information

PHYS 101 Lecture 10 - Work and kinetic energy 10-1

PHYS 101 Lecture 10 - Work and kinetic energy 10-1 PHYS 101 Lecture 10 - Work and kinetic energy 10-1 Lecture 10 - Work and Kinetic Energy What s important: impulse, work, kinetic energy, potential energy Demonstrations: block on plane balloon with propellor

More information

Applications of Second-Order Differential Equations

Applications of Second-Order Differential Equations Applications of Second-Order Differential Equations Second-order linear differential equations have a variety of applications in science and engineering. In this section we explore two of them: the vibration

More information

3 Work, Power and Energy

3 Work, Power and Energy 3 Work, Power and Energy At the end of this section you should be able to: a. describe potential energy as energy due to position and derive potential energy as mgh b. describe kinetic energy as energy

More information

Ideal Cable. Linear Spring - 1. Cables, Springs and Pulleys

Ideal Cable. Linear Spring - 1. Cables, Springs and Pulleys Cables, Springs and Pulleys ME 202 Ideal Cable Neglect weight (massless) Neglect bending stiffness Force parallel to cable Force only tensile (cable taut) Neglect stretching (inextensible) 1 2 Sketch a

More information

TEACHER S CLUB EXAMS GRADE 11. PHYSICAL SCIENCES: PHYSICS Paper 1

TEACHER S CLUB EXAMS GRADE 11. PHYSICAL SCIENCES: PHYSICS Paper 1 TEACHER S CLUB EXAMS GRADE 11 PHYSICAL SCIENCES: PHYSICS Paper 1 MARKS: 150 TIME: 3 hours INSTRUCTIONS AND INFORMATION 1. This question paper consists of 12 pages, two data sheets and a sheet of graph

More information

Solution Derivations for Capa #11

Solution Derivations for Capa #11 Solution Derivations for Capa #11 1) A horizontal circular platform (M = 128.1 kg, r = 3.11 m) rotates about a frictionless vertical axle. A student (m = 68.3 kg) walks slowly from the rim of the platform

More information

v v ax v a x a v a v = = = Since F = ma, it follows that a = F/m. The mass of the arrow is unchanged, and ( )

v v ax v a x a v a v = = = Since F = ma, it follows that a = F/m. The mass of the arrow is unchanged, and ( ) Week 3 homework IMPORTANT NOTE ABOUT WEBASSIGN: In the WebAssign versions of these problems, various details have been changed, so that the answers will come out differently. The method to find the solution

More information

Chapter 9. particle is increased.

Chapter 9. particle is increased. Chapter 9 9. Figure 9-36 shows a three particle system. What are (a) the x coordinate and (b) the y coordinate of the center of mass of the three particle system. (c) What happens to the center of mass

More information

Practice Exam Three Solutions

Practice Exam Three Solutions MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Department of Physics Physics 8.01T Fall Term 2004 Practice Exam Three Solutions Problem 1a) (5 points) Collisions and Center of Mass Reference Frame In the lab frame,

More information

Work, Energy and Power

Work, Energy and Power Name: KEY Work, Energy and Power Objectives: 1. To understand work and its relation to energy. 2. To understand how energy can be transformed from one form into another. 3. To compute the power from the

More information

Energy transformations

Energy transformations Energy transformations Objectives Describe examples of energy transformations. Demonstrate and apply the law of conservation of energy to a system involving a vertical spring and mass. Design and implement

More information

Speed A B C. Time. Chapter 3: Falling Objects and Projectile Motion

Speed A B C. Time. Chapter 3: Falling Objects and Projectile Motion Chapter 3: Falling Objects and Projectile Motion 1. Neglecting friction, if a Cadillac and Volkswagen start rolling down a hill together, the heavier Cadillac will get to the bottom A. before the Volkswagen.

More information

Problem Set V Solutions

Problem Set V Solutions Problem Set V Solutions. Consider masses m, m 2, m 3 at x, x 2, x 3. Find X, the C coordinate by finding X 2, the C of mass of and 2, and combining it with m 3. Show this is gives the same result as 3

More information

Spring Force Constant Determination as a Learning Tool for Graphing and Modeling

Spring Force Constant Determination as a Learning Tool for Graphing and Modeling NCSU PHYSICS 205 SECTION 11 LAB II 9 FEBRUARY 2002 Spring Force Constant Determination as a Learning Tool for Graphing and Modeling Newton, I. 1*, Galilei, G. 1, & Einstein, A. 1 (1. PY205_011 Group 4C;

More information

Chapter 11. h = 5m. = mgh + 1 2 mv 2 + 1 2 Iω 2. E f. = E i. v = 4 3 g(h h) = 4 3 9.8m / s2 (8m 5m) = 6.26m / s. ω = v r = 6.

Chapter 11. h = 5m. = mgh + 1 2 mv 2 + 1 2 Iω 2. E f. = E i. v = 4 3 g(h h) = 4 3 9.8m / s2 (8m 5m) = 6.26m / s. ω = v r = 6. Chapter 11 11.7 A solid cylinder of radius 10cm and mass 1kg starts from rest and rolls without slipping a distance of 6m down a house roof that is inclined at 30 degrees (a) What is the angular speed

More information