Expected Result: 11 EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT MANAGEMENT PERFORMANCE AND OVERSIGHT OF THE ORGANIZATION

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1 World Meteorological Organization EC-LXII/Doc. 7.2(1) EXECUTIVE COUNCIL Secretary-General & Submitted by: Chairman, EC Working Group on WMO Strategic and Operational Planning Date: 31.V.2010 SIXTY-SECOND SESSION Original Language: English Geneva, 8 to 18 June 2010 Agenda Item: 7.2 Expected Result: 11 EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT MANAGEMENT PERFORMANCE AND OVERSIGHT OF THE ORGANIZATION Strategic Thrust: Efficient Management and Good Governance STRATEGIC PLAN AND OPERATING PLAN SUMMARY ISSUES TO BE DISCUSSED: 1. The draft WMO Strategic Plan and Operating Plan Preliminary discussion on the preparation of the next WMO Strategic and Operating Plans ADDITIONAL FINANCIAL IMPLICATION: None DECISIONS/ACTIONS REQUIRED: (a) To review the draft WMO Strategic Plan ; (b) To review the draft WMO Operating Plan; (c) To agree on the development of the next WMO Strategic Plan REFERENCES: 1. Abridged Final Report with Resolutions of the Fifty-eighth Session of the Executive Council (WMO-No. 1007), general summary, paragraph Resolution 28 (Cg-XV) Preparation of the WMO Strategic Plan for Abridged Final Report with Resolutions of the Sixty-first session of the Executive Council (WMO-No. 1042), general summary, paragraphs Meeting of the Presidents of Technical Commissions (Geneva, January 2010) 5. Recommendations of the EC Working Group on WMO Strategic and Operational Planning (Geneva, March 2010) - CONTENT OF DOCUMENT: Appendices for inclusion in the final report: A. Draft text for inclusion in the general summary of EC-LXII B. Draft WMO Strategic Plan Appendix for information: EC-LXII/Rep. 7.2(1): Progress/Activity Report

2 EC-LXII/Doc. 7.2(1), APPENDIX A DRAFT TEXT FOR INCLUSION IN THE GENERAL SUMMARY OF EC-LXII 7.2 EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT MANAGEMENT PERFORMANCE AND OVERSIGHT OF THE ORGANIZATION (agenda item 7.2).. WMO Strategic Plan (SP) x.1 The Executive Council (EC) recalled its decisions on the preparation of the WMO Strategic Plan (SP) and WMO Operating Plan (OP), in particular the recommendations of EC-LXI (paragraphs ) and Resolution 28 of the Fifteenth World Meteorological Congress (Cg-XV). It noted with appreciation the report and recommendations of its Working Group on WMO Strategic and Operational Planning on these issues and took these into account in its deliberations. 7.2.x.2 The Council noted that strategic planning for the period represented the second phase of results-based management (RBM) Strategic Planning Framework for WMO and builds upon the previous long-term planning process that had enabled the World Meteorological Congress to respond to the changing needs of its Members and society in general. 7.2.x.3 The Council noted with appreciation the involvement of technical commissions (TCs), regional associations (RAs), WMO Bureau, WMO joint programmes and the Secretariat in the development of the WMO Strategic Plan [see Appendix B], which ensured that the document reflected the collective view of all WMO constituent bodies. 7.2.x.4 The Council reaffirmed the importance of the SP as a foundation for the WMO resultsbased management (RBM) framework and its influence on the planning of activities and resource allocation for the Secretariat in the strategic planning period. It noted that the preparation of the WMO Operating Plan and results-based budget for the period was based on the Strategic Plan. 7.2.x.5 The Council considered the draft WMO Strategic Plan and decided WMO Strategic Executive Summary 7.2.x.6 Concerning the WMO Strategic Executive Summary, the Council recalled its decision (EC-LXI, paragraph ) to have a document written in a language that would appeal to those outside WMO, particularly those who make decisions related to the funding of NMHSs and the Secretariat, and that it should be prepared as an additional document. 7.2.x.7 The Council noted that the draft Strategic Plan was short, succinct and concise, as per recommendations of its Working Group on WMO Strategic and Operational Planning (WG/SOP) and the presidents of technical commissions (PTCs) and could potentially be used as the document targeted at decision-makers following Congress approval. The Council decided that... WMO Operating Plan 7.2.x.8 The Council noted that the WMO-wide Operating Plan ( ) provided details on activities and deliverables, which guided resource allocation and estimates. The Council

3 EC-LXII/Doc. 7.2(1), APPENDIX A, p. 2 appreciated the contributions of the TCs and RAs to the development of WMO Operating Plan [see EC-LXII/Doc. 7.2(1), ADD. 1]. 7.2.x.9 The Council considered the draft WMO Operating Plan and noted that it was a highly detailed document that could be used for management decision-making and for monitoring and evaluation of the Strategic Plan. The Council requested that the document be further refined with inputs from TCs, RAs and EC panels and working groups, and encouraged those that had not yet provided their input to do so. It further decided that given the length of the document and the costs for translation, a sample Operating Plan be submitted to Congress for noting and a full document be available on-line to all management groups and Executive Council members. The next WMO Strategic Plan x.10 The Council considered the recommendation of the PTCs to retain the core elements of the current Strategic Plan, viz. GSN, the five Strategic Thrusts and eight Expected Results. It requested its WG/SOP to consider this matter further and to propose to Congress a process for developing the next Strategic Plan taking into account key scenarios in climate change projections, major developments including major UN conferences, and decisions by the United Nations General Assembly, the 5 th Assessment Report of the IPCC, and key scenarios in climate change projections, the ICSU visioning exercise, outcomes of major conferences including the WCRP- Open Science Conference on Climate Research in Service to Society, and implementation of GFCS, among others.

4 EC-LXII/Doc. 7.2(1), APPENDIX B WMO STRATEGIC PLAN Table of Contents Foreword 2 Introduction 3 - Societal benefit of weather, climate and water services 3 - Purpose and context of the WMO Strategic Plan 5 Strategic Thrusts linking to Expected Results, Key Outcomes and Key Performance Indicators Improving service quality and service delivery 9 Advancing scientific research and application as well as development and implementation of technology 10 Strengthening capacity building 12 Building and enhancing partnerships and cooperation 13 Strengthening good governance 14 WMO Operating Plan 14 WMO Results-based Budget 15 Monitoring and Evaluation 15 Conclusion 15 References 16

5 EC-LXII/Doc. 7.2(1), APPENDIX B, p. 2 Foreword The vision of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) is to provide world leadership in expertise and international cooperation in weather, climate, hydrology and water resources, and related environmental issues, thereby contributing to the safety and well-being of people throughout the world and to the societal and economic benefit of all nations. The strategic direction of WMO for the period and beyond is based on five Strategic Thrusts that address the following Global Societal Needs: (a) Improved protection of life and property (related to impacts of hazardous weather, climate, water and other environmental events and increased safety of transport on land, at sea and in the air); (b) Poverty alleviation, sustained livelihoods and economic growth (in connection with the Millennium Development Goals) including improved health and social well-being of citizens (related to weather, climate, water and environmental events and influences); and (c) Sustainable use of natural resources and improved environmental quality. The World Meteorological Congress recognizes that societies all over the world are affected by extreme weather, climate and water events, and the increase in the intensity and frequency of some of these extreme events due to climate variability and change is a big challenge especially to developing and least developed countries. The choice of the three broad societal needs and priority areas of focus take into consideration the interest of all nations to protect the lives, livelihoods and property of their citizens, to improve their well-being through sustainable use of natural resources and to protect environment. The Strategic Plan for builds upon a long-term planning process that has enabled the World Meteorological Congress to respond to the changing needs of its Members and society in general. It recognizes the need to improve service quality and service delivery by advancing scientific research and application, strengthening capacity-building, building and enhancing partnerships and cooperation, and strengthening good governance. It is forward looking in the medium- and long-term, anticipating new needs as well as expected technological advances. Based on the synthesis of all relevant factors and financial realities, the Plan outlines the achievable expected results and outcomes focusing on the period and beyond. The five Strategic Thrusts are amplified by eight Expected Results together with a set of key outcomes and performance indicators. Within the five Strategic Thrusts and eight Expected Results are five priority areas of focus that have significant contributions to the achievement of the Expected Results. The eight Expected Results and a set of key outcomes together with the associated performance indicators form the basis for the development of WMO Operating Plan, including the allocation of resources through Results-based Budget (RBB), and the provision of key elements for Monitoring and Evaluation of the implementation of the Strategic Plan. This Strategic Plan provides a clear way forward for the Organization to address the critical global societal needs within its mission.

6 EC-LXII/Doc. 7.2(1), APPENDIX B, p. 3 INTRODUCTION Societal benefits of weather, climate and water services The social and economic value of weather and climate information is derived from their influence on decisions made by users in the sectors sensitive to weather and climate conditions, and tends to increase with the quality, accuracy, timeliness, locational specificity and the user friendliness of the information (4). The estimated economic benefits of climate forecasts related to El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events for the agricultural sector alone range from US $450 to $550 million/year (minimum) for world agriculture, of which $200 - $300 million/year is for US agriculture (1). Recent statistics from the Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters for the period 1980 to 2007 reveal that over 90 per cent of the disasters related to natural hazards, 71 per cent of casualties and 78 per cent of economic losses, are caused by weather-, climate- or waterrelated hazards such as tropical cyclones and storm surges, droughts, floods or health epidemics and insect infestations. Significant reduction in losses of life and an increase in economic losses during the period are evident from Figure 1. Figure 1a Figure 1b Figure 1: Decadal trends in natural hazard impacts over the five last decades showing decreasing loss of life (left panel) and increasing economic losses (right panel) associated with hydrometeorological hazards (3). The warnings formulated from skilful seasonal forecasts can contribute significantly to the reduction in losses of life and property associated with climate related natural disasters, enhanced productivity in sectors dependent on climate (5) and efficient management of the institutions dependent on weather and climate (2). Significant progress in improving the quality, timeliness and utility of weather, climate, water and related environmental services (e.g. improvements in quality of short-term forecasts in the period 1980 to 2006) has resulted from the cooperation of all nations in sharing observations of the Earth System from the local to the global scale, coupled with advances in data assimilation techniques and numerical models (Figure 2).

7 EC-LXII/Doc. 7.2(1), APPENDIX B, p Figure 2: Improvements in anomaly correlation of 500hPa height forecasts for the northern and southern hemispheres linked to the increase in satellite observations and skills of numerical models. Despite the progress in improving services, more societies are increasingly vulnerable to natural hazards and national economies are becoming more sensitive to climate variability and change as evidenced by the greater frequency and intensity of climate extreme events. The losses of life, people affected and economic losses (as a percent of GDP) associated with natural hazards are more severe for the developing countries than for developed countries). This provides a cogent argument for improving weather, climate, water and related environmental services as well as communications and emergency response activities, particularly in developing and least developed countries (LDCs), Small Island Developing States (SIDS), and other vulnerable countries.

8 EC-LXII/Doc. 7.2(1), APPENDIX B, p. 5 WMO is focusing its strategic direction for the period on five Strategic Thrusts that address Global Societal Needs. Its Strategic Plan under-scores the importance of improving service quality and service delivery by advancing scientific research and application; strengthening capacity-building; building and enhancing partnerships and cooperation; and strengthening good governance. The achievements of WMO over decades demonstrate its ability to address the challenges of weather, climate, water and related environmental conditions on the efforts of nations to improve the well-being of society and achieve sustainable development. Global Societal Needs Improved protection of life and property (related to impacts of hazardous weather, climate, water and other environmental events and increased safety of transport on land, at sea and in the air); Poverty alleviation, sustained livelihoods and economic growth (in connection with the Millennium Development Goals) including improved health and social well-being of citizens (related to weather, climate, water and environmental events and influence); and Sustainable use of natural resources and improved environmental quality. Purpose and Context of WMO Strategic Plan The Mission of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), as presented in the Convention establishing the Organization (6) is: (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) To facilitate worldwide cooperation in the establishment of networks of stations for the making of meteorological observations as well as hydrological and other geophysical observations related to meteorology, and to promote the establishment and maintenance of centres charged with the provision of meteorological and related services; To promote the establishment and maintenance of systems for the rapid exchange of meteorological and related information; To promote standardization of meteorological and related observations and to ensure the uniform publication of observations and statistics; To further the application of meteorology to aviation, shipping, water problems, agriculture and other human activities; To promote activities in operational hydrology and to further close cooperation between meteorological and hydrological services; and To encourage research and training in meteorology and, as appropriate, in related fields. and to assist in coordinating international aspects such as research and training. Within its mission and the decision of its 189 Members to address a set of Global Societal Needs, WMO is committed to achieving its vision of providing world leadership in expertise and international cooperation in weather, climate, hydrology and water resources, and related environmental issues, and thereby to contribute to the safety and well-being of people throughout the world and to the economic benefit of all nations. Utilizing the capabilities of the National Meteorological and Hydrological Services (NMHSs), WMO will focus its programmes and activities on providing the best possible services to support safety and well-being of its Members and their efforts to address global societal needs and environmental issues. The WMO occupies a unique niche within the international system, in developing an unmatched system of global cooperation in weather, climate, hydrology and related environmental observations, data and services. It has been most effective in facilitating the development of NMHSs in almost all countries of the world. The achievements of WMO include:

9 EC-LXII/Doc. 7.2(1), APPENDIX B, p. 6 (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) Free and Unrestricted Exchange of Meteorological and Related Data and Products; essential for all real time weather, climate, water and related environmental services together with the assessment of the evolution of the climate system; International Standards for Meteorological and Related Observations ensuring high quality and intercomparability of data a vital feature for detecting climate change and developing global weather and climate models and related services; Capacity Building - in NMHSs throughout the world; Promoting Science and Technology transforming leading edge research into useful products and services; International Leadership - recognized leader in the UN System with respect to the monitoring and prediction of weather, climate, water, and related environmental conditions. WMO will continue to rely on its Members, their NMHSs and national scientific institutions; other partners, e.g., ICSU, UNESCO and UNEP, other professionals from universities and the private sector; and national financial support to provide the scientific, programmatic and infrastructural support necessary to implement a cost-effective international cooperation system. With global societal needs escalating, future weather, climate, water and related environmental products and services will require significant targeted improvements to: (a) Provide user targeted timely, accurate and cost-effective products and services; (b) Provide and promote the use of products and services in addressing the challenges of adaptation to climate variability and change; (c) Enhance the effectiveness of their services and lower costs by promoting cooperation and partnerships nationally and internationally; (d) Enhance the visibility of its Members and their activities by more fully participating in international programmes and conventions; and (e) Assist countries in translating commitments, agreed within the framework of global conferences, summits and international conventions, into effective and practical measures. The Structure of the WMO Strategic Plan Starting with the three Global Societal Needs (GSNs), the WMO Strategic Plan defines five Organization-wide strategic thrusts (STs) and eight Expected Results (ERs) to achieve its vision (Table 1).

10 EC-LXII/Doc. 7.2(1), APPENDIX B, p. 7 Table 1: Schematic representation of the structure of WMO Strategic Plan The eight ERs are further delineated by Key Outcomes (KOs) and their associated key performance indicators to measure the success in achieving the results. Within the five Strategic Thrusts and eight Expected Results are the following five priority areas that have significant contribution to the achievement of the expected results: (a) Global Framework for Climate Services; (b) Aviation meteorological services; (c) Capacity Building for the developing and least developed countries; (d) Implementation of the WMO Integrated Global Observing System (WIGOS) and WMO Information System (WIS); and (e) Disaster Risk Reduction.

11 EC-LXII/Doc. 7.2(1), APPENDIX B, p. 8 Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS) The Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS) is a major initiative for WMO. The Heads of State and Government, Ministers and Heads of Delegations at the World Climate Conference-3 (Geneva, Switzerland, 2009) decided to establish a Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS) to strengthen the production, availability, delivery and application of science-based climate prediction and services. The Framework will benefit from and contribute to the achievement of the outcomes of most of the eight Expected Results. Agriculture Transport Tourism Energy Health Ecosystem Sectoral Users Climate User Interface Water Fisharies Climate Services Information System Observations Climate research, modeling and prediction Capacity Building Figure 3: Components of the Global Framework for Climate Services In addition to the pillars of observations, and climate research, modelling and predictions, Climate Services Information System and Climate User Interface are the two new components of the Framework (Figure 3). The progress made and systems developed over the years under the World Climate through Members and their NMHSs will form the foundation for developing the GFCS. A detailed description of the other priority areas is provided under the related Expected Rresults. This Strategic Plan, while focused on the financial period , takes into consideration longer term social, economic and technological issues facing the Organization. It also serves as the foundation for the WMO Operating Plan, WMO Results-based Budget (RBB), and the performance monitoring and evaluation activities, which together define the detailed deliverables, performance targets and the allocation of resources to achieve the expected results.

12 EC-LXII/Doc. 7.2(1), APPENDIX B, p. 9 Strategic Thrust 1: Improving Service Quality and Service Delivery Despite improvements in understanding and the prediction of the global earth system, societies, especially in developing and least developed countries, are still vulnerable to severe weather and extreme climate conditions. Hence, there is much more for WMO to do to assist countries worldwide to benefit from improvements in the quality of weather, climate, water and related environmental services together with their delivery. This requires collaborative efforts involving the providers and users of information to ensure that the needs of the users are integrated in the development of the products and to enhance feedback between the providers and users of information for further improvement. Strategic Thrust 1 has two Expected Results (ER 1 and ER 2) that focus on the provision of weather, climate and water related services and includes disaster risk reduction as a priority area. The scientific and technical programmes contributing to the achievement of these ERs include the World Weather Watch (WWW), World Climate (WCP), Application of Meteorology (AMP), Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR), and WMO Space (WMOSP). ER1 addresses the rapidly changing paradigm for providing meteorological (weather and climate), hydrological and environmental services that requires service providers to: (a) Understand the use of the information in order to tailor the information to the user needs, e.g., through an effective rolling reviews of client needs for its products and services; (b) Integrate weather, climate, water and environmental information and products into decisionmaking. Aviation Meteorological Services is a priority area of focus under this ER 1. The economic and social benefits that can be derived from air transport make it one of the world s most important industries. Air transport, for example, is a critical factor in world trade and plays a major role in the development of a globalized economy. As an economic catalyst for growth, air transport has a tremendous impact on the performance of regional economies, both through its own activities and as an enabler of other industries in catalytic or spin-off benefits. The advances in air transport have created the need to improve the delivery of services to the sector to contribute to the safety, regularity and efficiency of international air navigation. Such improvements require more training of staff and upgrading of infrastructure. The implementation of quality management system (QMS) comprising of procedures, processes and resources necessary to facilitate quality management of the meteorological information supplied to the users is of paramount importance, as is the demonstration of competencies for aeronautical meteorological personnel especially in developing and least developed countries. The ER 2 addresses the need for NMHSs to be an integral component of multi-hazard national emergency management system and to work with relevant sectors to develop products and information to support their specific needs for decision-making in responding to extreme climate, water and related environmental events. Disaster risk reduction is a priority area due to the negative impacts of natural disasters on the achievement of the GSNs. Weather, climate and water related disasters continue to result in very high human and economic costs, and displacement of large populations in many countries, particularly in developing and least developed countries. By developing a set of contingency measures based on weather, climate, water and related early warning systems, including environmental information and services, nations can save more lives and reduce economic losses associated with natural disasters.

13 EC-LXII/Doc. 7.2(1), APPENDIX B, p. 10 Strategic Thrust 2: Advancing scientific research and application as well as development and implementation of technology Past scientific and technical advances have made significant contributions to improving weather, climate, water and related environmental information and services. Further scientific and technical advances are needed to increase the scope, accuracy and lead time of weather, climate, water and related environmental information and services, and to enhance the availability of comprehensive and robust information networks for improving the quality of services to address the many remaining challenges that have been exacerbated by population growth, greater use of marginal land areas, and diversified human activities. Strategic Thrust 2 has three Expected Results (ER 3, ER 4 and ER 5) (Table 1) together with their key outcomes and performance indicators, and 3 priority areas for implementation in The scientific and technical programmes contributing to the achievement of these ERs include the World Weather Watch (WWW), World Climate (WCP) including the co-sponsored World Climate Research (WCRP) and the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS), Application of Meteorology (AMP), Atmospheric Research and Environment (AREP), Hydrology and Water Resources (HWRP), and WMO Space (WMOSP). ER 3 addresses WMO activities to make its data, products and services more useful to society and relevant in day-to-day decision-making. Greater emphasis on sectoral applications, such as those in agriculture, water management and disaster risk reduction, will be essential in future products and services from the NMHSs. The Global Framework for Climate Services (Figure 3) is a priority area under ER 3 especially as it relates to the two new pillars of the Framework namely the Climate Services Information System (CSIS) and the Climate User Interface. An important feature of the Framework (Figure 3), is the close interaction between users and providers of climate information and products, (i.e., Climate User Interface ), with the value of the service being judged on its ability to improve decision-making. The CSIS will develop better climate information and prediction products from operational NMHS systems and disseminate them more effectively to meet user needs. The progress made and systems developed over the years under the World Climate through Members and their NMHSs will form the foundation for developing the CSIS. The priority in generating hydrologic information and products will be on enhanced, quality, efficiency and effectiveness. Among the initiatives will be to prepare guidance materials to be utilized to increase the capacities of the NMHSs, particularly in developing and least developed countries, to improve hydrological forecasting, water resources assessment and management, and adaptation to climate variability and change. WMO also will seek to mobilize resources for the improvement of hydrological networks in developing and least developed countries. ER 4 addresses improvements in three systems - WIGOS, WIS and a strengthened co-sponsored Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) 1, which facilitates improvements in the quality of climate data of the total climate system to meet the needs of international, regional and national users of climate data and the derived products. These activities will support the observational requirements for the GFCS, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and WMO Members in their national climate services in meeting their obligations in various international conventions such as UNFCCC, the UNCCD and the Ozone Convention. The WMO Integrated Global Observing System (WIGOS) and WMO Information System (WIS) are priority areas under ER 4. 1 The GCOS has the responsibility for setting the requirements of climate observations and related data and products and working with WMO components (NMHSs), technical commissions, regional associations and its observing system partners (e.g., GOOS, GTOS, CEOS, GEOSS of the GEO) to improve climate observations for all observing system domains and from both ground-based and space-based systems.

14 EC-LXII/Doc. 7.2(1), APPENDIX B, p. 11 Weather, climate, water and related observations, gathered by NMHSs and partners, form the foundations for the delivery of all services provided by NMHSs and for much of the research to improve our understanding of the Earth system together with its prediction and assessment. The Fifteenth WMO Congress (Cg-XV, May 2007), decided to establish the WMO Integrated Global Observing Systems (WIGOS), a coordinated, comprehensive and sustainable system, to address observational requirements of all WMO s and partners, including those of the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) of the Group on Earth Observations(GEO), in the most cost effective way. The WIGOS will enhance observing capabilities, data and product quality, and interoperability among WMO Global Observing Systems (GOS, GAW and WHYCOS) and other WMO co-sponsored observing systems (Figure 4). 2 The goal is to provide improved information and products to support decision-making at all levels. Figure 4: The WMO Global Observing System that forms the foundation for establishing the WMO Integrated Global Observing Systems (WIGOS) Cg-XV also decided to develop and implement WIS as a pillar of WMO strategy to efficiently manage and move weather, climate, water and related environmental information and products into the 21 st century. The WIS provides an integrated approach suitable for all WMO s to meet the requirements for routine collection and automated dissemination of observed data and products, as well as data discovery, access and retrieval services for all weather, climate, water and related data produced by centres and Members in the framework of any WMO. 2 The WMO co-sponsored systems include the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS), Global Terrestrial Observing System (GTOS) and Global Climate Observing System (GCOS).

15 EC-LXII/Doc. 7.2(1), APPENDIX B, p. 12 The ER 5 addresses improvements in the prediction of weather and climate, and observations and the assessments of atmospheric chemistry. Future research will follow a balanced and seamless approach to weather, climate and water services, including developing forecasts of a broader range of environmental parameters, such as air quality, sand and dust storms, and changes in vegetation, to meet the needs of users and the urgent demands to reduce the vulnerability of communities. Figure 5 shows the challenges of developing seamless products and services, and the available climate information and gaps. The future approach to weather, climate and water research, predictions and services will: (a) (b) (c) Take a unified approach over multiple time and spatial scales, including a requirement for the downscaling of climate information; Invest in increasingly high-performance computing to accommodate the increasing complexity and detail of models; and Develop closer linkages between research, operations and users, e.g., through Forecast Demonstration Projects (FDP) to enable Members to rapidly operationalize research outputs for service delivery. Scenarios Outlook Predictio Guidance n Threats Assessments Forecasts Watches Warnings & Alert Coordination Forecast Lead Time Climate Change. Climate Variability Weather Minutes Days Hours 1 Week 2 Weeks Months Seasons Initial Conditions Years Centuries Decades Boundary Conditions Forecast Uncertainty Anthropogenic Forcing Adapted from: NOAA Applications Protection of Life & Property Water Management Space Applications Transportation Fire Weather Hydropower Agriculture Water Resource Planning Recreation Ecosystem Energy Health Commerce State/Local Planning Environment Figure 5: Schematic diagram showing the challenges of developing seamless products and Services, and the available climate information and gaps (Source: NOAA). Strategic Thrust 3: Strengthening Capacity-Building The human resource and infrastructure capacity of an NMHS has a significant influence on the quality of services and their delivery including the ability of the users to interpret and integrate the services into decision-making. Despite continued improvements in science and technology, many NMHSs in developing and least developed countries often cannot take advantage of these improvements due to inadequate infrastructure and insufficient skilled personnel. Institutional capacity building is needed to improve ability to conduct targeted research; for management, planning and policy development; and to develop communication skills to improve their interactions with clients, the media, and their governments.

16 EC-LXII/Doc. 7.2(1), APPENDIX B, p. 13 Strategic Thrust 3 has one Expected Result (ER 6), which addresses the need to improve infrastructure and systems operated by NMHSs and human resources with special emphasis on the future developments of multi-hazard warning and response systems and climate services to support the Global Framework for Climate Services. The scientific and technical programmes contributing to the achievement of this ER include the World Weather Watch (WWW), World Climate (WCP), Applications of Meteorology (AMP), Hydrology and Water Resources (HWRP), Regional (RP) including the Least Developing Countries (LDCP), Technical Cooperation (TCOP), Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) and WMO Space (WMOSP). Capacity Building for the developing and least developed countries is a priority area in ER 6 since it is critical for improving the NMHSs capabilities and capacities to improve the quality and delivery of services together with the involvement with users in other governmental organizations, civil society, private sector and intergovernmental groupings. The main objectives of this priority area are to: (a) Give particular attention to the education and training needs of NMHSs in developing countries, Least Developed Countries and Small Islands Developing States to address specific issues such as forecaster qualifications for aviation meteorology, the GFCS and disaster risk reduction; (b) Increase awareness on the socio-economic benefits of the products and services provided by the NMHSs and regional centres, including their contribution to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals; (c) Assist NMHSs managers with tools for building effective communication with governments, policy- and decision-makers, and development partners; (d) Continuously assess and address NMHS training needs, including professional training and development, technical training, project development and management training; (e) Expand the number of strategic partnerships with internal and external stakeholders; (f) Support the above initiatives through enhanced resource mobilization. Success in these efforts, especially by developing and least developed countries, will require cooperative efforts with Members, and international and regional partners, to mobilize resources from multiple extrabudgetary sources. Strategic Thrust 4: Building and enhancing partnerships and cooperation The complexity of the Earth system and the interconnections between weather, water, climate and related environmental processes and hazards are increasingly challenging the scientific and financial capacity of WMO to improve the quality and accuracy of information and products. No single government or agency has the necessary resources to address all the challenges on its own. Consequently, the Organization s success depends on its ability to partner effectively with internal stakeholders and external organizations in addressing the GSNs. The partnership strategic thrust is important to: (a) Heighten understanding and use of WMO s environmental information and service capabilities by the United Nations system, WMO Members, and international and national organizations, e.g., in implementing the GFCS and other initiatives; (b) Enhance partnerships with other major international scientific organizations due to the increasing complexity and multi-disciplinary of the basic science issues required to provide improved products and services; (c) Enhance WMO s ability to increase the scope of its information and products and to develop and sustain service improvements by leveraging the capabilities of partners; (d) Broaden partnerships between developed, developing and least developed countries involving relevant national agencies, e.g., with emergency management agencies; and

17 EC-LXII/Doc. 7.2(1), APPENDIX B, p. 14 (e) Maintain a proactive role in ensuring a coherent, science-based approach within the United Nations System and among other stakeholders to implement environmental conventions, including outcomes of World Summits and follow-up to all relevant United Nations Conventions. Strategic Thrust 4 (Table 1) has one Expected Result (ER 7), which addresses the need to enhance cooperation and partnerships among national and international institutions to achieve the shared objectives. The scientific and technical programmes contributing to the achievement of this ER include the World Weather Watch (WWW), World Climate (WCP) including the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Applications of Meteorology (AMP), Atmospheric Research and Environment (AREP), Hydrology and Water Resources (HWRP) and Technical Cooperation (TCOP). Strategic Thrust 5: Strengthening good governance Good governance promotes open and transparent processes, and efficient and effective use of resources and increases accountability for resource expenditure linked to achievement of expected results. This strategic thrust aims to improve management of WMO as a whole by: (a) Improving the efficiency and effectiveness of its governing and constituent bodies; (b) Promoting open and transparent business processes, efficient and effective use of resources and equitable treatment of all parties; (c) Enhancing the efficiency of the WMO Secretariat; (d) Ensuring the integrity of WMO management systems, (e) Improving the connection between its strategic initiatives and programmes and budget, through results-based management systems and practices; (f) Conducting a comprehensive review of its structure, programmes and priorities and implementing the findings thereof. Strategic Thrust 5 has one Expected Result (ER 8), which addresses the need to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the Organization. The management priority is focused on improving the efficiency, effectiveness and transparency of the programmatic and financial management of the Organization. This includes developing a visionary Strategic Plan, a clear and effective WMO Operating Plan and WMO Results-based Budget for the financial period together with a monitoring and evaluation system. It will also enhance the effectiveness and efficiency in service delivery. WMO OPERATING PLAN The WMO Operating Plan translates the Strategic Thrusts, Expected Results and Key Outcomes described in the Strategic Plan into specific programme activities and projects, which are needed to address the global societal needs and achieve the expected results. The WMO Operating Plan is comprehensive in that it distinguishes the contribution of WMO Members, technical commissions, regional associations and the Secretariat. Starting with the Key Outcomes, it specifies the deliverables; programme activities and performance metrics to assess progress in achievement of the Expected Results. It encompasses activities of the eight WMO Technical Commissions {Commission for Basic Systems (CBS), Commission for Instruments and Methods of Observation (CIMO), Commission for Hydrology (CHy), Commission for Atmospheric Sciences (CAS), Commission for Aeronautical Meteorology (CAeM), Commission for Agricultural Meteorology (CAgM), Commission for Climatology (CCl), and Joint WMO-IOC Commission for Oceanography and Marine Meteorology (JCOMM)}, the six regional associations {RA I (Africa), RA II (Asia), RA III (South America), RA IV (North America, Central America and the Caribbean), RA V (South-West Pacific) and RA VI (Europe)} and the EC working groups, panels and committees. It forms the basis for resource allocation and monitoring and evaluation.

18 EC-LXII/Doc. 7.2(1), APPENDIX B, p. 15 WMO RESULTS-BASED BUDGET WMO Results-based Budget (RBB) identifies specific programme activities, initiatives, and the resources that the Secretariat, working with regional associations, technical commissions and the EC working groups, panels and committees, is required to implement to achieve the Key Outcomes and Expected Results. The end result is a results-based budget containing the following items: (a) A logical framework for informed budgetary decision-making, which provides the Expected Results, deliverables, programme activities and performance indicators, together with the required resources; (b) Resource justification by results, which is designed to optimize the use of resources and improve the Secretariat s responsiveness to meet Members needs; (c) Incorporation into the budgetary decision-making process of performance measures gauging progress towards key performance targets against allocated resources. The RBB is approved by the Congress. MONITORING AND EVALUATION The monitoring and evaluation (M&E) are tools to measure the performance of the Organization in the implementation of its Strategic Plan. Monitoring and evaluation also contribute to identifying good practices and lessons learned with respect to implementation as well as policy, strategy and programmatic design that will inform the next phase of strategic planning. They provide information for ensuring the continuing effectiveness and relevance of the WMO s. The evaluation results are important inputs to the strategic planning process and are used to adjust strategic direction and priorities, if required. Whereas monitoring is an ongoing function, annual evaluations are conducted and results are reported to the constituent bodies of WMO, in particular the Executive Council. The M&E procedures and practices are defined in the WMO Monitoring and Evaluation System. Monitoring and evaluation of the implementation of the WMO strategic Plan through the WMO Operating Plan and RBB is the joint responsibility of WMO constituent bodies, Members and the Secretariat. CONCLUSION WMO is focusing its strategic direction for the period on five Strategic Thrusts that address Global Societal Needs and facilitates the achievement of eight Expected Results. Its Strategic Plan under-scores the importance of improving service quality and service delivery by advancing scientific research and application, strengthening capacity-building, building and enhancing partnerships and cooperation, and strengthening good governance. Within the Strategic Thrusts and eight Expected Results are five priority areas of focus that have significant contribution to the achievement of Expected Results. Advancing these priorities offers great potential for improving weather, climate, water and related environmental products and services offered by the NMHSs, for enhancing WMO and its Members contribution to global initiatives, and for strengthening the capacities and involvement of all Members within their countries and in regional and global activities, especially those in developing and least developed countries. This Strategic Plan provides a clear way forward for the Organization to address the critical global societal needs agreed upon by Members. More information about WMO and its strategic planning process is available on its Website:

19 EC-LXII/Doc. 7.2(1), APPENDIX B, p. 16 References 1 Adams, Richard M., Chi-Chung Chen, Bruce A. McCarl, and Rodney F. Weiher. The Economic Consequences of ENSO Events for Agriculture. Climate Research 13: , 1999: 2 Georgakakos, K.P., and N.E. Graham, 2008: Potential Benefits of Seasonal Inflow Prediction Uncertainty for reservoir release decisions, J. Appl. Meteor. And Climatol., 47, Golnaraghi, M, J. Douris, and J.B. Migraine, Saving Lives Through Early Warning Systems and Emergency Preparedness, Risk Wise, Tudor Rose Publishing, pp , Gunasekera, D. : Economic issues relating to meteorological service provision (BMRC Research Report No. 102, Australian Bureau of Meteorology, Meza, F.J., J.W. Hansen and D. Osgood,: Economic Value of Seasonal Climate Forecasts for Agriculture: Review of Ex-Ante Assessments and Recommendations for Future Research, J. Appl. Meteorol and Climatol., 47, , WMO-No.15, Convention of the World Meteorological Organization, Basic Documents No.1, 2007 edition.

20 World Meteorological Organization EC-LXII/Rep. 7.2(1) EXECUTIVE COUNCIL Secretary-General & Chairman, EC Working Submitted by: Group on WMO Strategic and Operational Planning Date: 31.V.2010 SIXTY-SECOND SESSION Original Language: English Geneva, 8 to 18 June 2010 Agenda Item: 7.2 Expected Result: 11 EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT MANAGEMENT PERFORMANCE AND OVERSIGHT OF THE ORGANIZATION Strategic Thrust: Efficient Management and Good Governance STRATEGIC PLAN AND OPERATING PLAN PROGRESS/ACTIVITY REPORT SUMMARY Reference: EC-LXII/Doc. 7.2(1) CONTENT OF DOCUMENT: Appendices: A. Progress/Activity Report B. Detailed description of the Structure, Strategic Thrusts, Expected Results and Key Outcomes of the WMO Strategic Plan

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