Recantation and False Allegations of Child Abuse

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Recantation and False Allegations of Child Abuse"

Transcription

1 Recantation and False Allegations of Child Abuse Prepared by David N. King, Ph.D. Maureen Drost, B.A. Selected Bibliography 2005 Updated 2011 Muriel K. Wells, MLIS This publication was supported in part by Grant No. SM from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Copyright 2005, 2011 National Children s Advocacy Center. All rights reserved. 1

2 Selected Bibliography Introduction The issues pertaining to recantation and false allegations of abuse by children are among the more complex to understand psychologically and to interpret accurately. Ac-cording to Lipian, Mills and Brantman (2004), false allegations of abuse may derive from (1) submitting to suggestion by authority figures; (2) the result of "pseudo memories;" or (3) the product of evading honest answers. Recantation may result from the same reasons. Scope This bibliography focuses specifically on literature related to recantation and false allegations of abuse experienced in childhood. The relationship between disclosure, memory, truthfulness, fantastical storytelling, suggestibility, and coaching with recantation and false allegations is complex. To the extent possible, this bibliography does not, except in passing, delve deeply into those topics, preferring instead to provide guidance to publications that specifically address the core topic of false allegations and recanted accusation. Those other topics so closely intertwined with the issue of false allegations and recantation will be addressed in subsequent bibliographies in this series. Publications The publications listed here are books, chapters in books, and journal articles published in English, The bibliography does not include theses and dissertations, conference papers, technical reports, audiovisual materials, or ephemera. Organization This bibliography is arranged chronologically, from most recent to oldest publication date. When possible, the abstracts that were included with the original publication are used in this bibliography. These are designated with as Author Abstract. When an original abstract was not available, abstracts were written by staff of the National Children s Advocacy Center Research Library and are designated as NCAC Abstract. In some cases, abstracts are drawn from the American Psychological Association s PsycInfo database and are used here with permission of American Psychological Association. 2

3 Ahern, E. C., Lyon, T. D., & Quas, J. A. (2011). Young children s emerging ability to make false statements. Developmental Psychology, 47(1), This study examined the origins of children s ability to make consciously false statements, a necessary component of lying. Children 2 to 5 years of age were rewarded for claiming that they saw a picture of a bird when viewing pictures of fish. They were asked outcome questions ( Do you win/lose? ), recognition questions ( Do you have a bird/fish? ), and recall questions ( What do you have? ), which were hypothesized to vary in difficulty depending on the need for consciousness of falsity (less for outcome questions) and self-generation of an appropriate response (more for recall questions). The youngest children (21 2 to 31 2 years old) were above chance on outcome questions, but it was not until age 31 2 that children performed above chance on recognition questions or were capable of maintaining false claims across question types. Findings have implications for understanding the emergence of deception in young children. (Author Abstract) Mart, E. G. (2010). Common errors in the assessment of allegations of child sexual abuse. Journal of Psychiatry and Law, 38(3), The assessment of child sexual abuse (CSA) allegations is a complex, challenging, high-stakes undertaking. The consequences of sloppy assessments leading to false positive or false negative court decisions are clearly severe. Despite this, many professionals and paraprofessionals who undertake such assessments continue to perform substandard child sexual abuse investigations. This article presents some of the common errors made by CSA investigators and suggests the use of research-based investigative protocols and ongoing training as ways of improving this situation. (Author Abstract) Kuehnle, K. & Connell, M. (Eds). (2009). The evaluation of child sexual abuse allegations: A comprehensive guide to assessment and testimony. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons. The evaluation of child sexual abuse allegations: A comprehensive guide to assessment and testimony is an in-depth and practical guide for forensic psychologists and other mental health professionals working on child sexual abuse cases. It reflects the current knowledge in this field through contributions written by nationally and internationally recognized experts in applied research and practice. Applying empirically based clinical decision-making to child sexual abuse evaluations, this timely book orients readers to the extraordinary catastrophes that can unfold 3

4 when children are interviewed with faulty techniques and provides vital assistance to understanding the research that guides the work of all well-trained clinicians. This thorough yet accessible guide explores: (a) Well-established empirical findings on decision-making and the relationship to false negative and positive errors in cases of alleged child sexual abuse; (b) The difficulties in conducting reliable and meaningful research; (c) Children's behavior and the fallacy of symptoms as markers when child sexual abuse is suspected; (d) The impact of Megan's Law on children with sexual behavior problems; (e) The literature concerning children's susceptibility to suggestibility; (f) Controversies within the field including repeated interviews, inconsistencies in children's statements, and recantations of sexual abuse allegations; and (g) The effectiveness of using props, including dolls, drawings, and photographs, to make memory more accessible for verbal reporting. Providing guidance for mental health professionals working to protect children, The evaluation of child sexual abuse allegations: A comprehensive guide to assessment and testimony offers practical and important measures for the accurate and thoughtful evaluation and assessment of children who are possible victims of sexual abuse. (Author Abstract) Lindahl, M. W. (2009). Beyond Munchausen by proxy: A proposed conceptualization for cases of recurring, unsubstantiated sexual abuse allegations. Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, 18(2), In the emerging literature, cases involving recurring, unsubstantiated allegations of child sexual abuse have generally been categorized as Munchausen by proxy. Recent scholars have recommended restricting the label to the original conceptualization, involving purposeful deception motivated by psychological needs for medical attention. This leaves many cases unclassified that do not fit the Munchausen by proxy criteria, involve significant risks to the child, and ultimately fall outside of existing structures for Child Protective Services/legal intervention. This paper presents a reconceptualization of such cases, proposing to label them "recurring sexual abuse allegation" cases. Defining the set of cases more clearly can aid child protection workers in their management and encourage research on prevalence, consequences to children, treatment strategies, and needed legal reforms. (Author Abstract) 4

5 London, K., Bruck, M., Wright, D. B., & Ceci, S. J. (2008). Review of the contemporary literature on how children report sexual abuse to others: Findings, methodological issues, and implications for forensic interviewers. Memory, 16(1), Methods used during forensic interviews with children are driven by beliefs about how children recall and report child sexual abuse (CSA) to others. Summit (1983) proposed a theory (Child Sexual Abuse Accommodation Syndrome) contending that, due to the specific traumatic characteristics of CSA, children will often delay disclosing abuse or altogether fail to disclose during childhood, deny abuse when asked, and often recant abuse allegations. His theory has had a tremendous impact on the field of CSA forensic evaluations, despite its dearth of empirical support. In this paper, we review and critique the contemporary literature from two main sources: retrospective accounts from adults reporting CSA experiences and studies of children undergoing forensic evaluation for CSA. We conclude that data support the notion that children often delay abuse disclosure, but that among valid abuse cases undergoing forensic evaluation, denial and recantation are not common. Methodological issues and implications for forensic interviewers are discussed. (Author Abstract) Lyon, T. D., Malloy, L. C., Quas, J. A., & Talwar, V. A. (2008). Coaching, truth induction, and young maltreated children s false allegations and false denials. Child Development, 79(4), This study examined the effects of coaching (encouragement and rehearsal of false reports) and truth induction (a child-friendly version of the oath or general reassurance about the consequences of disclosure) on 4- to 7-year-old maltreated children s reports (N 5 198). Children were questioned using free recall, repeated yes no questions, and highly suggestive suppositional questions. Coaching impaired children s accuracy. For free-recall and repeated yes no questions, the oath exhibited some positive effects, but this effect diminished in the face of highly suggestive questions. Reassurance had few positive effects and no ill effects. Neither age nor understanding of the meaning and negative consequences of lying consistently predicted accuracy. The results support the utility of truth induction in enhancing the accuracy of child witnesses reports. (Author Abstract) 5

6 Faller, K. C. (2007). Coaching children about sexual abuse: A pilot study of professionals perceptions. Child Abuse & Neglect, 31(9), Examines professionals' perceptions on coaching children about sexual abuse. Relevant to the coaching issue is a recent analysis of the Canadian Incidence Study 98 Data (data collected periodically in Canada and used to project the rates, types, and risk factors for child maltreatment, 2005). Trocmé and Bala explored the issue of intentional false allegations of all kinds of maltreatment (as opposed to unsubstantiated cases, which were 31% of the dispositions), who made the false reports, and on what types of cases. This study is a survey of 7,672 child protection workers and, therefore, represents their opinions regarding intentionality. Overall, the researchers found an intentional false allegation rate of 4%. The most frequent type of maltreatment to involve a false allegation was neglect, although slightly higher proportions of sexual abuse cases (6%) were deemed false than other types of child maltreatment (neglect = 4%, physical abuse = 4%, and emotional abuse = 2%). Non-custodial parents' (usually fathers) allegations of all types of maltreatment were more likely to be intentionally false (15%) than custodial parents' (2%) (usually mothers). Only 2% of false reports were made by children; none of children's false reports involved sexual abuse. On the other hand, the child protection workers involved in Trocmé and Bala's study report the frequency of false allegations in custody disputes as 12%, three times the overall rate of false allegations. They did not differentiate coaching from other types of false allegations. (Author Abstract) Malloy, L. C., Lyon, T. D., & Quas, J. A. (2007). Filial dependency and recantation of child sexual abuse allegations. Journal of the Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 46(2), Controversy abounds regarding the process by which child sexual abuse victims disclose their experiences, particularly the extent to which and the reasons why some children, once having disclosed abuse, later recant their allegations. This study examined the prevalence and predictors of recantation among 2- to 17-year-old child sexual abuse victims. Case files (n = 257) were randomly selected from all substantiated cases resulting in a dependency court filing in a large urban county between 1999 and Recantation (i.e., denial of abuse postdisclosure) was scored across formal and informal interviews. Cases were also coded for characteristics of the child, family, and abuse. A 23.1% recantation rate was observed. Multivariate analyses supported a filial dependency model of recantation, whereby abuse victims who were more vulnerable to familial adult influences (i.e., younger children, those 6

7 abused by a parent figure and who lacked support from the nonoffending caregiver) were more likely to recant. An alternative hypothesis, that recantations resulted from potential inclusion of cases involving false allegations, was not supported. Results provide new insight into the process by which children reveal interpersonal trauma and have implications for debates concerning the credibility of child sexual abuse allegations and treatment in dependency samples. (Author Abstract) Kopetski, L. M., Rand, D. C., & Rand, R. (2006). Incidence, gender, and false allegations of child abuse: Data on 84 parental alienation syndrome cases. In R. A. Gardner, S. R. Sauber, & D. Lorandos (Eds.), The International Handbook of Parental Alienation Syndrome (pp ). Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas Publisher Limited. This chapter presents descriptive statistics on 84 cases of parental alienation syndrome (PAS), compiled by a custody evaluator in Colorado. Kopetsi s work on alienation began in the 1970s and was fully developed by the time she learned of Richard Gardner s work. In 1991, Kopetski presented her work on PAS at the Fifteenth Annual child custody Conference in Keystone, Colorado (Kopetski, 1991). She recognized Gardner s contribution in the introduction, and described her astonishment upon learning of his work in Simultaneously, while unaware of Gardner s work, she had arrived at observations and conclusions that were remarkably similar in many respects. The paper included descriptive statistics on 84 cases, which Kopetski used to test some of Gardner s findings and hypotheses, such as those relating to the disproportionate number of alienating mother. Kopetski s clinical observations of PAS families were eventually in The Colorado Layer (Kopetski, 1998). Her descriptive statistics on 84 cases are published here for the first time. They document a significant increase in PAS cases from 1976 to The ratio of mothers to fathers alienating was 2 to 1. False allegations of child abuse, defined as physical or sexual abuse, or child neglect, appeared in 54 percent of cases, with child neglect alleged primarily by alienating fathers and sex abuse alleged primarily by alienating mothers. (Author Abstract) Lyon, T. D. & Saywitz, K. J. (2006). From post-mortem to preventive medicine: Next steps for research on child witnesses. Journal of Social Issues, 62(4), We propose five directions for future child witness research, inspired by recognition of the dayto-day realities of the legal system and the opportunities of psychology to react proactively to challenges child witnesses face. These directions include (1) the refinement of developmentally 7

8 sensitive questioning aids that increase completeness without increasing suggestibility, (2) the development of approaches to non-disclosure and recantation, including understanding of the reasons underlying non-disclosure and the potential for building rapport and increasing trust, (3) the construction of interventions that meet mental health needs of child-victim witnesses without creating false memories or tainting testimony, (4) a focus on details of children's narratives that are often lacking, including temporal information and emotional reactions, and (5) expanding our attention beyond child sexual abuse allegations in criminal court and considering the many contexts in which child witnesses are questioned, including areas in which preferences rather than memories are elicited. (Author Abstract) Malloy, L. C., & Lyon, T. D. (2006). Caregiver support and child sexual abuse: Why does it matter? Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, 15(4), The article focuses on the importance of a caregiver's supportiveness and his or her relation to a child's disclosure, recantation and adjustment after being sexually abused. It has been noted that maternal reactions to abuse, including whether the mother believed the child's allegations and, whether she acted in a protective manner or supportive manner, are important not only in the aftermath of child sexual abuse discovery, but also in terms of children's willingness to disclose. A mother should carefully assessed the situation after the child has reported such crime so that she could impose proper measures. On the other hand, nonsupportiveness may lead the child to fail to disclose the abuse when questioned by social services. (Author Abstract) Olafson, E., & Lederman, C. S. (2006). The state of the debate about children s disclosure patterns in child sexual abuse cases. Juvenile and Family Court Journal, Winter, In current research studies about the disclosure patterns of sexually abused children, experts agree that most victims delay disclosure for years, often until adulthood. Researchers disagree about disclosure rates and recantation rates among children during formal interviews. Studies of children who had not previously disclosed but are known through corroborative evidence to have been sexually abused show lower rates of disclosure than do studies of children who had disclosed prior to the formal interview. Gradual disclosures among children are common, and more than a single interview may be necessary in some cases. Prior disclosure, level of support by non-offending parents, developmental level, and relationship to perpetrator affect children s rates of disclosure and their disclosure patterns. More research is necessary to clarify children s post-disclosure recantation rates and predictors. (Author Abstract) 8

9 London, K., Bruck, M., Ceci, S. J., & Shuman, D. W. (2005). Disclosure of child sexual abuse: What does the research tell us about the ways that children tell? Psychology, Public Policy, & Law, 11(1), The empirical basis for the child sexual abuse accommodation syndrome (CSAAS), a theoretical model that posits that sexually abused children frequently display secrecy, tentative disclosures, and retractions of abuse statements, was reviewed. Two data sources were evaluated: retrospective studies of adults' reports of having been abused as children and concurrent or chart-review studies of children undergoing evaluation or treatment for sexual abuse. The evidence indicates that the majority of abused children do not reveal abuse during childhood. However, the evidence fails to support the notion that denials, tentative disclosures, and recantations characterize the disclosure patterns of children with validated histories of sexual abuse. These results are discussed in terms of their implications governing the admissibility of expert testimony on CSAAS. (Author Abstract) Trocmé N, Bala N., (2005). False allegations of abuse and neglect when parents separate. Child Abuse & Neglect, 29(12), The 1998 Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (CIS-98) is the first national study to document the rate of intentionally false allegations of abuse and neglect investigated by child welfare services in Canada. This paper provides a detailed summary of the characteristics associated with intentionally false reports of child abuse and neglect within the context of parental separation. A multistage sampling design was used, first to select a representative sample of 51 child welfare service areas across Canada. Child maltreatment investigations conducted in the selected sites during the months of October-December 1998 were tracked, yielding a final sample of 7,672 child maltreatment investigations reported to child welfare authorities because of suspected child abuse or neglect. Consistent with other national studies of reported child maltreatment, CIS-98 data indicate that more than one-third of maltreatment investigations are unsubstantiated, but only 4% of all cases are considered to be intentionally fabricated. Within the subsample of cases wherein a custody or access dispute has occurred, the rate of intentionally false allegations is higher: 12%. Results of this analysis show that neglect is the most common form of intentionally fabricated maltreatment, while anonymous reporters and noncustodial parents (usually fathers) most frequently make intentionally false reports. Of the intentionally false allegations of maltreatment tracked by the CIS-98, custodial parents (usually mothers) and children were least likely to fabricate reports of abuse or neglect. While the CIS-98 documents that the rate of intentionally false allegations is relatively low, these results raise important clinical and legal issues, which require further consideration. (Author Abstract) 9

10 Cavanagh, S. L. (2004). Upsetting desires in the classroom: School sex scandals and the pedagogy of the femme fatale. Psychoanalysis, Culture & Society, 9(3), This paper examines the female teacher sex scandal involving former Canadian teacher Annie Markson and false allegations that she indecently assaulted an underage boy student. Using feminist psychoanalytic theory I argue that the media coverage of the story had a voyeuristic quality to it that can best be understood by interpreting the role of the counter-transference in education. The news story also reveals a psychic anxiety about normative masculine identity development, heterosexual bifurcations of gender, and female teacher sexuality. (Author Abstract) Lipian, M. S., Mills, M. J., & Brantman, A. (2004). Assessing the verity of children's allegations of abuse: A psychiatric overview. International Journal of Law & Psychiatry, 27(3), This overview discusses the evaluation of children's allegations of physical and sexual abuse. Like similar false allegations by adults, false recounts by children can be the result of one of three different scenarios: (1) the false claims come from submitting to suggestion by authority figures; (2) the false allegations are the result of "pseudo memories;" or (3) the false claims are the product of evading honest answers. The authors of this article examine all these scenarios in detail. The factors underlying false accusations are explored, including how child development may affect accusations, how emotions may influence cognition, how memory functions in children of different ages, and how suggestible and reliable youngsters' statements are. Analysis is supplemented by practical suggestions to evaluate whether a child's allegation is true or false. Such evaluations are critical to appropriately work with the child and the accused offender in clinical and legal settings. (NCAC Abstract) Lovett, B. B. (2004). Child sexual abuse disclosure: Maternal response and other variables impacting the victim. Child & Adolescent Social Work Journal, 21(4), Disclosure of childhood sexual abuse is a process unique to each victim and may be influenced by factors of race, ethnicity, culture, religion, and gender, as well as by abuse specific factors. The response by caregivers and professionals effects disclosure and can be responsible for recantation. Maternal responses that convey protection and support have been found to be associated with victims' improved mental health and social functioning. Non-abusive caregivers are often marginalized by the child welfare system in its attempt to secure physical safety for the child. This article summarizes the literature regarding sexual abuse disclosure and maternal response. Areas for future research are discussed. (Author Abstract) 10

11 Dalenberg, C. J., Hyland, K. Z., & Cuevas, C. A. (2002). Sources for fantastic elements in allegations of abuse by adults and children. In M. L. Eisen (Ed.), Memory and suggestibility in the forensic interview (pp ). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. This book examines the circumstances of fantastic events in eyewitness memory reports that may involve true allegations of abuse. The authors present preliminary findings supporting this claim. This review is intended to encourage scholars to use specific literature to organize future research on fantastic elements in abuse allegations. Greater understanding of these claims may lead to development of treatment plans that support instead of under-mine patient reality testing. More advanced assessment tools would also reduce the likelihood that these elements could be used to destroy the credibility of youngsters who have valid charges of serious abuse. Also, claims with no basis in reality might be more quickly identified. (NCAC Abstract) Oellerich, T.(2002). The case against the routine provision of psychotherapy to children/adolescents labeled "sexually abused." Sexuality & Culture: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly, 6(2), Discusses whether the routine psychotherapeutic treatment of children labeled sexually abused is warranted. Whether symptomatic or asymptomatic, children labeled sexually abused are routinely offered treatment at consider-able financial cost. One result of this is that mental health professionals are being charged with exploiting the problem of child sexual abuse. Issues discussed include substantiation and false allegations, psychological harm, and the effectiveness of child and adolescent psychotherapy. The author argues that the evidence indicates that routine psychotherapy for children and adolescents labeled sexually abused is not warranted. Further, its provision is not seen to be in the best interests of either. (Author Abstract) Ost, J., Costall, A., & Bull, R. (2002). A perfect symmetry? A study of retractors' experiences of making and then repudiating claims of early sexual abuse. Psychology, Crime & Law, 8(2), The aim of recent research has been to contribute new information to the false memory/recovered memory debate by studying the circumstances of retractors' experiences and their initial claims of abuse. The limited research available has been heavily criticized because the experiences of retractors are not considered reliable evidence; these individuals 11

12 may just be highly suggestible or unreliable witnesses. The study's aim was to examine this criticism by comparing retractors' experiences as they reported and recanted allegations of abuse. Two males and 18 females ages years completed a detailed questionnaire concerning their abuse charges. Results of the questionnaire showed a disparity between the processes of recovery and retraction, for the majority of respondents' retractions took much longer than recovery and involved far less social pressure. Also, respondents said several factors were more important than social pressure in deciding to question their abuse allegations. (NCAC Abstract) Savvidou, I., Bozikas, V. P., & Karavatos, A. (2002). False allegations of child physical abuse: A case of Munchausen by proxy-like syndrome? International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine, 32(2), The diagnosis of factitious disorder by proxy is still under investigation. Few studies have researched the psychological status and potential underlying psychopathology of the perpetrator, as well as the impact on the child's development and the pathological reactions of rearing a child within the context of a distorted reality. In this article, we present the case of a 12-year-old boy where this diagnosis was suspected. Both he and his parents brought forth false allegations of repeated physical abuse induced by his schoolteacher. The parents presented with shared psycho-sis and the child presented with conduct disorder, factitious disorder, and emotional problems. We suggest that this case represents a Münchausen by proxy-like syndrome involving both the legal and medical systems. Hypotheses regarding the pathogenesis of symptoms in the child are noted, underscoring the differences between Münchausen by proxy syndrome appearing in infancy with that appearing in older children. (Author Abstract) Tully, B. (2002). The evaluation of retractions in sexual abuse cases. Child Abuse Review, 11(2), In some cases of alleged sexual abuse, the child or adult retracts allegations made. This poses problems for both civil and criminal legal proceedings. It is argued that the collection and examination of retraction statements often does not receive the same careful attention as is the case with the investigation of the original allegations. Logically, depending on whether the original complaints were true or false or a mixture, so the meaning of a retraction may vary. Where retractions are examined and evaluated with care they may be shown to add to the confidence of the final conclusion rather than simply throwing doubt on that. A systematic 12

13 approach is described, followed by three cases where such application assisted and paradoxically added to the probative value of earlier statements. (Author Abstract) Ahlgrim-Delzell, L., & Dudley, J. R. (2001). Confirmed, unconfirmed, and false allegations of abuse made by adults with mental retardation who are members of a class action suit. Child Abuse & Neglect, 25(8), The purpose is to explore differences in confirmed, unconfirmed, and false allegations of abuse made by consumers with mental retardation in regards to type of abuse and perpetrator. Interviews were conducted with 1,220 people with mental retardation who were part of a class action lawsuit in North Carolina. A content analysis of abuse allegations was performed. Frequencies of responses and subgroup differences are reported for type of abuse allegation and perpetrator. Unconfirmed claims are the most frequent. Females made more allegations of abuse than males in general, and more allegations of rape. There are no significant differences among the subgroups (confirmed, unconfirmed, and false allegations) by type of abuse allegation. There are significant differences among the subgroups in regard to the alleged perpetrator. Other consumers with mental retardation are most frequently accused of confirmed assaults. Staff members are most frequently accused in false allegations. Ability of the alleged victim to report information and timing of the investigation are important factors in substantiating abuse. Awareness of consumer-to-consumer violence and prevalence of false accusations against staff necessitates increased safeguards for both consumers and staff. (Author Abstract) Bala, N., Lee, J., & McNamara, E. (2001). Children as witnesses: Understanding their capacities, needs, and experiences. Journal of Social Distress & the Homeless, 10(1), Historically the law regarded children as inherently unreliable and made it difficult for them to testify. Since 1975 awareness of child abuse has increased and research has established that children can be reliable witnesses. Governments began to recognize the needs and capacities of children and enacted legal reforms to facilitate prosecutions for child abuse. This paper reports on a survey of victim witness workers and other justice system professionals which reveals some of the continued failings of that system in dealing with children. Although relatively rare, there are cases of false allegations of abuse, usually a result of investigations by poorly trained professionals. Further legal reforms and better human supports are required to ensure that the needs of children are met and their capacities as witnesses are fully appreciated. (Author Abstract) 13

14 Hershkowitz, I. (2001). A case study of child sexual false allegation. Child Abuse & Neglect, 25(10), The objectives of the case study reported in this article were twofold. The first objective was to follow the path by which a naive suggestion made in the course of a mother-child conversation was transformed into an allegation of severe sexual abuse. The second objective was to analyze the child s interview scientifically and explore the limitations of scientific tools for detecting implausible allegations. Independent case facts were collected and analyzed to determine whether the event described by the child was likely to have happened. The credibility of the child s account was assessed using Criterion-Based Content Analysis and the information provided in both the "implausible" and "corrected" statements was compared to quantify the fabricated details in the implausible statement. The event described by the child was "very unlikely to have happened" but the credibility assessment failed to detect its implausibility. Comparison of the two statements revealed that the child did fabricate central details but incorporated them into a description of an event she really experienced, and most of the information provided was truthful. The pressure to conform to suggestions can be irresistible, inducing some children to make false allegations of severe sexual abuse. Scientific tools designed for credibility assessment are limited and may fail to detect implausible statements especially when they incorporate information about genuinely experienced events. (Author Abstract) Ost, J., Costall, A., & Bull, R. (2001). False confessions and false memories: A model for understanding retractors' experiences. Journal of Forensic Psychiatry, 12(3), The present paper examines reports by 'retractors' (i.e. adults who have retracted their earlier claims of childhood abuse) to explore suggestions in the literature of possible similarities between their experiences and the experiences of individuals who falsely confess to criminal acts. Despite concerns about the reliability of retractors' reports, these individuals provide valuable insight into the processes involved in making and then repudiating claims of abuse. The present analysis revealed similarities between the contexts in which retractors came to report that they were sexually abused and the contexts in which false confessions arise. Although caution must be taken in generalizing from these findings, these similarities indicate that models of false confession could serve as a useful basis for conceptualizing the processes involved in the development of claims of childhood sexual abuse that are subsequently retracted. (Author Abstract) 14

15 Gries, L. T., Goh, D. S., Andrews, M. B., Gilbert, J., Praver, F., & Stelzer, D. N. (2000). Positive reaction to disclosure and recovery from child sexual abuse. Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, 9(1), The authors studied the relationship between sexually abused children disclosing the abuse then recanting it and their emotional health. Twenty-one foster children ages 6-18 years in therapy because they had been sexually abused completed the Child Behavior Checklist (T. M. Achenbach, 1991), the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children (J. Briere, 1996), the Angie/Andy Cartoon Trauma Scales--Long Form (F. Praver et al., 1996), the Child Depression Inventory--Short Form (M. Kovacs, 1992), and the Disclosure Data Sheet. Therapists grouped the youngsters by current level of disclosure of past abuse and the amount of support they received from significant others. The findings show children in an actively disclosing stage demonstrated far fewer externalizing behavior problems than non-disclosing children. Those fully disclosing without recantation displayed much lower dissociation than the other children. Youngsters who recanted with or without re-disclosing their stories showed far more symptoms of posttraumatic stress. In regard to their current ability to function, children's reactions to disclosure by their foster parents were the most striking. Children who received full support from their foster parents had much lower depression scores than did those who received partial support. (NCAC Abstract) Gudjonsson, G. H., & Sigurdsson, J. F. (2000). Differences and similarities between violent offenders and sex offenders. Child Abuse & Neglect, 24(3), The objective was to investigate differences and similarities between violent offenders and two types of sex offenders, rapists and child molesters, in terms of their personality, the nature of the victim, the role of alcohol, and their confession to their crime. Thirty-six adult sex offenders, 23 child molesters, and 32 violent offenders were compared on personality measures, their relationship with the victim, the presence of alcohol intoxication, their confession rate and retraction at trial, and the reasons they gave for having confessed to the police. Child molesters and adult sex offenders (rapists) were significantly more introverted than the violent offenders. The child molesters had higher social desirability scores than the other groups, they tended to assault relatives and friends, they were rarely intoxicated while committing the offense, and they had strong internal need to confess to the police. Rapists and violent offenders were more commonly intoxicated during the commission of the offense; the former tended to assault acquaintances, where violent offenders most commonly assaulted strangers. Exactly half of the rapists retracted their confession when the case went to trial; in contrast none of the other offenders retracted their confession. The results show that there are significant differences as well as similarities between the three groups of offenders, which have implications for assessment and treatment. (Author Abstract) 15

16 Wood, J. M., & Garven, S. (2000). How sexual abuse interviews go astray: Implications for prosecutors, police, and child protection services. Child Maltreatment: Journal of the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children, 5(2), This article argues that child sexual abuse interviews can go astray in two different ways: (a) improper interviewing has the potential to elicit false allegations from children, and (b) clumsy interviewing does not typically produce false allegations, but may have other negative consequences, particularly for child victims. The article clarifies the distinction between the two kinds of bad interviewing and suggests that clumsy interviewing is the more common of the two. The potential negative consequences of both improper and clumsy interviewing are described, along with implications for prosecutors, police, and child protection services. In the authors' opinion, improper interviewing can probably be eliminated rather easily, but clumsy interviewing may be considerably more resistant to change. (Author Abstract) Anderson, E. M., & Levine, M. (1999). Concerns about allegations of child sexual abuse against teachers and the teaching environment. Child Abuse & Neglect, 23(8), The major objective was to determine teachers awareness of the potential for child abuse allegations against themselves and the effects on the teaching environment. Of 3,000 questionnaires sent out to a random sample of New York state teachers, 515 were returned. The responding teachers were similar to New York state teachers in terms of gender, age, and racial/ethnic distribution. A large percent of the respondents (56%) were aware of false allegations made against a teacher in their school district. About a third (36.5%) expressed concern that a child abuse allegation could be made against them. In response to a vignette, forty-two (42%) advised a new teacher against being alone in a room with a student; 62% advised against casual touching; 70% advised against hugging or putting an arm around a student. Males more than female teachers, especially those teaching upper grades, advised against such contact. The more teachers expressed concern about abuse allegations against themselves, the more teachers advised against contact. Fear of abuse allegations are salient for teachers. Fears may cause teachers to limit contact with students with potentially adverse consequences for students and the teaching environment. (Author Abstract) 16

17 Carnes, C. N., Nelson-Gardell, D., & Wilson, C. (1999). Addressing challenges and controversies in child sexual abuse interviewing: The forensic evaluation protocol and research project. Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment & Trauma, 2(2), This article describes a forensic evaluation protocol, designed at the National Children's Advocacy Center (NCAC). The means by which the NCAC forensic evaluation protocol addresses the challenges and controversies inherent in the field of sexual abuse allegation assessment are discussed. Results of a two-year study are reported, in which efficacy of the protocol is demonstrated in three areas: (1) in gathering facts to validate true abuse, thus assisting the child protective and legal systems in case decision making, (2) in determining when initial concerning statements of children are actually not due to sexual abuse, but to other events or circumstances, and (3) in uncovering false allegations and vindicating the falsely accused. (Author Abstract) Knapp, S., & VandeCreek, L. (1999). Moral principles underlying the treatment of adults with memories of childhood abuse. Ethics & Behavior, 9(4), The area of treatment of adults with memories of childhood abuse has become controversial in recent years. An analysis of the memory-recovery techniques that have been described in the recanter literature and promoted in the popular self-help press shows that they appear to disregard the moral principles (regard for patient autonomy, nonmalficence, beneficence, and fidelity) that form the moral basis of professional ethics. On the other hand, the treatment recommendations found among prominent authorities in psychology and among the position papers of major mental health organizations are consistent with these moral principles. (Author Abstract) Marmer, S. (1999). Variations on a factitious theme. Journal of Psychiatry & Law, 27(3-4), This article examines three problems. The first problem is determining the difference between malingering and factitious disorders in patients. Malingering disorders are those in which an individual feigns illness when he or she has no clear motive. Factitious disorders are those in which an individual pretends to be ill when there are no obvious personal benefits. Second, deciding whether memories are true is particularly controversial in cases of reported childhood abuse. The authors contend that some patients may have a mixture of Munchausen-like symptoms, adult dissociative symptoms, and childhood trauma. Third, there is the controversy over cases of patients who assert histories of severe childhood abuse and subsequently retract 17

18 those stories. Rather than seeing them as helpless foils of therapists who suggest false claims or as individuals trying to benefit from turning against therapists who had helped them, this paper contends that such patients may be playing a pathological victim role with the therapist and the attorney in a "legal Munchausen syndrome." (NCAC Abstract) Perlis Marx, S. (1999). Victim recantation in child sexual abuse cases: A team approach to prevention, investigation, and trial. Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment & Trauma, 2(2), This article explores the reasons for victim recantation in child sexual abuse cases, problems that surface with a recantation, and practical steps multidisciplinary professionals can take to prevent the recantation of truthful allegations. Secondly, the article discusses the roles of investigative team members in the investigation and evaluation of a victim's recantation and in the trial which may follow. Finally, the article addresses possible final outcomes of criminal court intervention and the team's role in continued support for the child. (Author Abstract) Alpert, J. L., Brown, L. S., & Courtois, C. A. (1998). Comment on Ornstein, Ceci, and Loftus (1998): Adult recollections of childhood abuse. Psychology, Public Policy, & Law, 4(4), This is a response to the article by Ornstein, Ceci and Loftus titled "Adult Recollections of Childhood Abuse: Cognitive and Developmental Perspectives." The original article was derived from a report by the American Psycho-logical Association Working Group on Investigation of Memories of Childhood Abuse. Points on which they agree with Ornstein, Ceci and Loftus include: (1) real occurrences and false allegations of sexual abuse are serious and potentially life-shattering for victims; (2) memory is not perfect; (3) remembering is facilitated by retrieval cues, contextual support, and the re-experiencing of affect similar to that which occurred at the time of an event; (4) some people are suggestible under certain conditions; (5) psycho-therapy can be substandard, as can research; (6) when a report of memory of sexual abuse first arises in therapy, a neutral and exploratory stance by the therapist should be maintained. Points of disagreement include: (1) the selective review of the memory literature, (2) the lack of attention to methodological issues, (3) the selective interpretation of the literature and the resultant drawing of implications, and (4) a serious misunderstanding of some of the concepts under discussion. (NCAC Abstract) 18

19 Campbell, T. W. (1998). Smoke and mirrors: The devastating effect of false sexual abuse claims. New York: Insight Books. Campbell devotes seven chapters in this book to false claims of child sexual abuse. In the first chapter, he discusses how false allegations can happen anywhere to anyone. Paying attention to false claims should not be seen as minimizing or denying the trauma of real abuse, he says. At the same time, victims of false claims also struggle with their own trauma, a trauma that calls for justice and vindication. The number of false allegations likely surpasses the number of true accounts; Campbell cites statistics to make this point. In the following chapter, the author distinguishes between false and fabricated reports, the former occurring without "premeditated malice" and the latter occurring with such intentions. Evaluators, Campbell says, must determine the following when evaluating allegations: (1) who was the first to suspect the child had been abused; (2) how much time was there between the first suspicion and the apparent "confirmation;" and (3) who did the person making the original complaint share their concerns with, what did they discuss, and how did those discussions influence the child's claims. In his third chapter, Campbell says direct interviews with children are far more reliable at identifying abuse than a number of established procedures alone. Chapter 4 focuses on the effects of suggestibility on children's memory with research showing (1) it is easy to distort a child's memory through leading questions and (2) once a youngster's memory has been distorted, the child truly believes the distortion. Campbell discusses pretrial taint hearings in Chapter 5. In these court proceedings, evidence against a defendant is reviewed with the aim of deciding whether the evidence is faulty as the result of interviewing procedures. The New Jersey Supreme Court established this type of hearing after a miscarriage of justice in a particular case. Chapter 6 looks at cases of alleged abuse that are really outright lies, and Chapter 7 discusses the potential hazards of play therapy. (NCAC Abstract) Parnell, T. F. (1998). Defining Munchausen by proxy syndrome. In T. F. Parnell & D. O. Day (Eds.), Munchausen by proxy syndrome: Misunderstood child abuse (pp. 9-46). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. Munchausen by proxy syndrome, the falsification by parents of dramatic medical symptoms in children, has been called multiple names including child abuse, chronic non-accidental poisoning, Medea complex, Polle syndrome, and Meadow's syndrome. The terms Munchausen syndrome and Munchausen syndrome by proxy predominate in published research, but the terms factitious disorder and factitious disorder by proxy are used in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV (DSM-IV). In this chapter, Parnell explores false sexual and physical abuse allegations linked to Munchausen by proxy syndrome. False allegations may arise because of a desire for revenge against the child, mental illness in the 19

20 parent, and a desire to influence child custody disputes. Parnell presents research by a number of professionals involving false allegations and says that clinicians should not only under-stand the dynamics of Munchausen by proxy and sexual abuse but have appropriate interviewing skills, knowledge of child development, and understanding of the literature on youngsters' memory and false allegations of abuse. (NCAC Abstract) Salter, A. C. (1998). Confessions of a whistle-blower: Lessons learned. Ethics & Behavior, 8(2), In 1988 I began a report on the accuracy of expert testimony in child sexual abuse cases utilizing Ralph Underwager and Hollida Wakefield as a case study (Wake-field & Underwager, 1988). In response, Wakefield and Underwager began a campaign of harassment and intimidation, which included multiple lawsuits; an ethics charge; phony (and secretly taped) phone calls; and ad hominem attacks, including one that I was laundering federal grant monies. The harassment and intimidation failed as the author refused demands to retract. In addition, the lawsuits and ethics charges were dismissed. Lessons learned from the experience are discussed. (Author Abstract) Bernet, W. (1997). Case study: Allegations of abuse created in a single interview. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 36(7), The objective was to illustrate how young children can be induced to make false allegations of sexual abuse. The author presents a case that is unusual because elaborate, detailed allegations of sexual abuse came about during a single interview, the interviewer was a babysitter rather than a mental health professional, and the interview was recorded on tape. Children can be induced to make elaborate, detailed false statements after being subjected to repetitive, suggestive, and leading questions during a single interview. Child abuse investigators should determine the origin and evolution of allegations of abuse. Children should not be removed from their parents if is likely that the allegations against the parents are false. (Author Abstract) 20

Interviewing Child Witnesses of Violent Crimes. A Bibliography. All Rights Reserved. The National Children s Advocacy Center. 2010.

Interviewing Child Witnesses of Violent Crimes. A Bibliography. All Rights Reserved. The National Children s Advocacy Center. 2010. Interviewing Child Witnesses of Violent Crimes A Bibliography 2010 All Rights Reserved. The National Children s Advocacy Center. 2010. www.nationalcac.org 1 of 7 Scope This bibliography pertains to interviewing

More information

Forensic Interviewing: The Basics. Jennifer Ingalls MSW Vianett Rodriguez M.Ed Forensic Interviewers Childhelp Children s Center

Forensic Interviewing: The Basics. Jennifer Ingalls MSW Vianett Rodriguez M.Ed Forensic Interviewers Childhelp Children s Center Forensic Interviewing: The Basics Jennifer Ingalls MSW Vianett Rodriguez M.Ed Forensic Interviewers Childhelp Children s Center What Is a Forensic Interview? Approached from a neutral perspective Obtain

More information

Resume of Deirdre C. Rand, Ph.D. Marriage, Family and Child Therapist M 5688 (1972 to 1975)

Resume of Deirdre C. Rand, Ph.D. Marriage, Family and Child Therapist M 5688 (1972 to 1975) Resume of Deirdre C. Rand, Ph.D. 45 Camino Alto, Ste. 208 Mill Valley, CA 94941 Phone (415) 383-3281 Fax (415) 383-9595 EDUCATION: Ph.D. - Michigan State University (1971) Doctoral Dissertation: Effects

More information

CROSS EXAMINATION OF AN EXPERT WITNESS IN A CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE CASE. Mark Montgomery

CROSS EXAMINATION OF AN EXPERT WITNESS IN A CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE CASE. Mark Montgomery CROSS EXAMINATION OF AN EXPERT WITNESS IN A CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE CASE Mark Montgomery Post Office Box 161 Durham, NC 27702 (919) 680-6249 mark.montgomery@mindspring.com Opinion Testimony by a Pediatrician/Nurse/Counselor/Social

More information

Assessing Risk in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Assessing Risk in Social and Behavioral Sciences Tracy Arwood, MS Clemson University Sangeeta Panicker, PhD American Psychological Association Assessing Risk in Social and Behavioral Sciences Assessing Risk in Social and Behavioral Sciences Content Authors

More information

I N F O R M A T I O N B U L L E T I N. Considerations for Sexual Assault Coordination

I N F O R M A T I O N B U L L E T I N. Considerations for Sexual Assault Coordination I N F O R M A T I O N B U L L E T I N Considerations for Sexual Assault Coordination This information bulletin is based on the information available at April 4, 2002. In addition to the sources cited,

More information

A Review of Conduct Disorder. William U Borst. Troy State University at Phenix City

A Review of Conduct Disorder. William U Borst. Troy State University at Phenix City A Review of 1 Running head: A REVIEW OF CONDUCT DISORDER A Review of Conduct Disorder William U Borst Troy State University at Phenix City A Review of 2 Abstract Conduct disorders are a complicated set

More information

Additional Information for Community Partners Activity

Additional Information for Community Partners Activity Additional Information for Community Partners Activity Law Enforcement Sexual abuse referrals are referred to police on the CY-104 (Report to Law Enforcement Officials). Note that referrals which do not

More information

WHAT IS PTSD? A HANDOUT FROM THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR PTSD BY JESSICA HAMBLEN, PHD

WHAT IS PTSD? A HANDOUT FROM THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR PTSD BY JESSICA HAMBLEN, PHD WHAT IS PTSD? A HANDOUT FROM THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR PTSD BY JESSICA HAMBLEN, PHD Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can occur following the experience or witnessing of a

More information

FACT SHEET. What is Trauma? TRAUMA-INFORMED CARE FOR WORKING WITH HOMELESS VETERANS

FACT SHEET. What is Trauma? TRAUMA-INFORMED CARE FOR WORKING WITH HOMELESS VETERANS FACT SHEET TRAUMA-INFORMED CARE FOR WORKING WITH HOMELESS VETERANS According to SAMHSA 1, trauma-informed care includes having a basic understanding of how trauma affects the life of individuals seeking

More information

What Happens Next? A PARENTS' A PARENTS GUIDE TO NEW YORK STATE CHILD PROTECTIVE SYSTEM

What Happens Next? A PARENTS' A PARENTS GUIDE TO NEW YORK STATE CHILD PROTECTIVE SYSTEM What Happens Next? A PARENTS' A PARENTS GUIDE TO NEW YORK STATE CHILD PROTECTIVE SYSTEM Revised: April 2012 Adapted by Prevent Child Abuse New York, Inc. from a piece of the same name by Margo Hittleman,

More information

Sexual Assault of a Child VOIR DIRE QUESTIONS

Sexual Assault of a Child VOIR DIRE QUESTIONS ATTORNEYS Sexual Assault of a Child VOIR DIRE QUESTIONS 1. What are your feelings or opinions about criminal defense attorneys? 2. Have you ever had a bad experience with a criminal defense attorney? If

More information

Master of Arts, Counseling Psychology Course Descriptions

Master of Arts, Counseling Psychology Course Descriptions Master of Arts, Counseling Psychology Course Descriptions Advanced Theories of Counseling & Intervention (3 credits) This course addresses the theoretical approaches used in counseling, therapy and intervention.

More information

THE EFFECTS OF FAMILY VIOLENCE ON CHILDREN. Where Does It Hurt?

THE EFFECTS OF FAMILY VIOLENCE ON CHILDREN. Where Does It Hurt? THE EFFECTS OF FAMILY VIOLENCE ON CHILDREN Where Does It Hurt? Child Abuse Hurts Us All Every child has the right to be nurtured and to be safe. According to: Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile

More information

Assessing capacity to consent and to give evidence

Assessing capacity to consent and to give evidence Assessing capacity to consent and to give evidence Dr Theresa Joyce Estia Centre; South London & Maudsley NHS Trust, London, UK This presentation will consider 4 topics Assessing capacity to consent to

More information

A Guide for Childhood Sexual Abuse Survivors

A Guide for Childhood Sexual Abuse Survivors You are not alone. It was not your fault. You have courage. You have choices. You have power. We re here to help. A Guide for Childhood Sexual Abuse Survivors Breaking the silence. Raising Awareness. Fighting

More information

If the people who make the decisions are the people who will also bear the consequences of those decisions, perhaps better decisions will result.

If the people who make the decisions are the people who will also bear the consequences of those decisions, perhaps better decisions will result. VICTIMS OF CRIME If the people who make the decisions are the people who will also bear the consequences of those decisions, perhaps better decisions will result. Introduction - John Abrams The Attorney

More information

Quarterly E-Newsletter

Quarterly E-Newsletter Quarterly E-Newsletter Volume 4 July 2006 10 Custody Myths and How to Counter Them Any attorney who represents clients in custody matters will recognize at least some of the following unfounded clichés

More information

Adolescent Sexual Offenders

Adolescent Sexual Offenders Adolescent Sexual Offenders Information from... The National Clearinghouse on Family Violence Who Are Adolescent Sexual Offenders? The adolescent sexual offender is defined as a youth, from 12 to 17 years

More information

ORDER MO-2114 Appeal MA-060192-1 York Regional Police Services Board

ORDER MO-2114 Appeal MA-060192-1 York Regional Police Services Board ORDER MO-2114 Appeal MA-060192-1 York Regional Police Services Board Tribunal Services Department Services de tribunal administratif 2 Bloor Street East 2, rue Bloor Est Suite 1400 Bureau 1400 Toronto,

More information

Scores, 7: Immediate Recall, Delayed Recall, Yield 1, Yield 2, Shift, Total Suggestibility, Confabulation.

Scores, 7: Immediate Recall, Delayed Recall, Yield 1, Yield 2, Shift, Total Suggestibility, Confabulation. Gudjonsson Suggestibility Scales. Purpose: "Developed in order to measure objectively the vulnerability or proneness of people [to suggestive influence and/or] to give erroneous accounts when interviewed,"

More information

ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF CENTRAL MANAGEMENT SERVICES CLASS SPECIFICATION

ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF CENTRAL MANAGEMENT SERVICES CLASS SPECIFICATION ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF CENTRAL MANAGEMENT SERVICES CLASS SPECIFICATION CLASS TITLE POSITION CODE EFFECTIVE CHILD PROTECTION ASSOCIATE SPECIALIST 07162 09-01-2007 CHILD PROTECTION SPECIALIST 07163 09-01-2007

More information

Trends in Arrests for Child Pornography Possession: The Third National Juvenile Online Victimization Study (NJOV 3)

Trends in Arrests for Child Pornography Possession: The Third National Juvenile Online Victimization Study (NJOV 3) April 2012 Trends in Arrests for Child Pornography Possession: The Third National Juvenile Online Victimization Study (NJOV 3) Abstract Arrests for the possession of child pornography (CP) increased between

More information

Conduct Disorder: Treatment Recommendations. For Vermont Youth. From the. State Interagency Team

Conduct Disorder: Treatment Recommendations. For Vermont Youth. From the. State Interagency Team Conduct Disorder: Treatment Recommendations For Vermont Youth From the State Interagency Team By Bill McMains, Medical Director, Vermont DDMHS Alice Maynard, Mental Health Quality Management Chief, Vermont

More information

A Guide for Larimer County Parents

A Guide for Larimer County Parents Services Child Protection A Guide for Larimer County Parents This booklet was prepared by the Program Committee of the Larimer County Child Advocacy Center in consultation with the Larimer County Department

More information

Saskatchewan Child Abuse Protocol 2014

Saskatchewan Child Abuse Protocol 2014 Saskatchewan Child Abuse Protocol 2014 A commitment by the Saskatchewan Government, police, professionals and organizations to collaborate in an effort to prevent and investigate child abuse and provide

More information

Minnesota Co-occurring Mental Health & Substance Disorders Competencies:

Minnesota Co-occurring Mental Health & Substance Disorders Competencies: Minnesota Co-occurring Mental Health & Substance Disorders Competencies: This document was developed by the Minnesota Department of Human Services over the course of a series of public input meetings held

More information

Louisiana Licensed Professional Board of Examiners. LPC Guidelines for Conducting Child Custody Evaluations

Louisiana Licensed Professional Board of Examiners. LPC Guidelines for Conducting Child Custody Evaluations Louisiana Licensed Professional Board of Examiners LPC Guidelines for Conducting Child Custody Evaluations Preface: The child custody evaluation process involves a comprehensive compilation of information

More information

Testifying in Court about Trauma: How to Prepare

Testifying in Court about Trauma: How to Prepare Testifying in Court about Trauma: How to Prepare It is critical that therapists willingly go to court to try to impart their knowledge to the judge. The judge will only make a good decision if he or she

More information

Applied Psychology. Course Descriptions

Applied Psychology. Course Descriptions Applied Psychology s AP 6001 PRACTICUM SEMINAR I 1 CREDIT AP 6002 PRACTICUM SEMINAR II 3 CREDITS Prerequisites: AP 6001: Successful completion of core courses. Approval of practicum site by program coordinator.

More information

Child Custody and Access Assessments Standards of Practice

Child Custody and Access Assessments Standards of Practice Child Custody and Access Assessments Standards of Practice Child Custody and Access Assesments Standards of Practice 2010 First Edition: September 2002 Reprinted: 2010 British Columbia College of Social

More information

Case Name: Cllse #I: Date: --L.{...L' County Name: Worker Name: Worker IDN:

Case Name: Cllse #I: Date: --L.{...L' County Name: Worker Name: Worker IDN: NEW MEXICO FAMILY RISK ASSESSMENT OF ABUSFJNEGLECT Case Name: Cllse #I: Date: --L.{...L' County Name: Worker Name: Worker IDN: Neglect ~ AbuK, NI. Current Complaint is for Neglect A I. Prior Complaint

More information

FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY POLICE DEPARTMENT Chief David L. Perry

FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY POLICE DEPARTMENT Chief David L. Perry FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY POLICE DEPARTMENT Chief David L. Perry 830 West Jefferson Street 850-644-1234 VICTIMS' RIGHTS BROCHURE YOUR RIGHTS AS A VICTIM OR WITNESS: ------- We realize that for many persons,

More information

Massachusetts Major City Chiefs. Best Practices in Eyewitness Identification and the Recording of Suspect Interviews

Massachusetts Major City Chiefs. Best Practices in Eyewitness Identification and the Recording of Suspect Interviews Massachusetts Major City Chiefs Best Practices in Eyewitness Identification and the Recording of Suspect Interviews September 2010 Introduction In December 2009 the Boston Bar Association published Getting

More information

NORTH CAROLINA ADMINISTRATIVE CODE TITLE ONE - ADMINISTRATION CHAPTER 17 - COUNCIL ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN SECTION.0700 - ABUSER TREATMENT PROGRAMS

NORTH CAROLINA ADMINISTRATIVE CODE TITLE ONE - ADMINISTRATION CHAPTER 17 - COUNCIL ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN SECTION.0700 - ABUSER TREATMENT PROGRAMS 01 NCAC 17.0701 PURPOSE NORTH CAROLINA ADMINISTRATIVE CODE TITLE ONE - ADMINISTRATION CHAPTER 17 - COUNCIL ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN SECTION.0700 - ABUSER TREATMENT PROGRAMS The purpose of the rules in this

More information

Special Topics. Goals and Objectives

Special Topics. Goals and Objectives Special Topics Goals and Objectives 1. Forensic Psychiatric Evaluation To be capable of performing a competent comprehensive forensic psychiatric evaluation whether it is a civil dispute or criminal matter.

More information

Questions and Answers about Child Sexual Abuse Treatment

Questions and Answers about Child Sexual Abuse Treatment Questions and Answers about Child Sexual Abuse Treatment An Interview with Judith Cohen, MD Dr. Judith Cohen is a member of the and Medical Director of the Center for Traumatic Stress in Children, Department

More information

Dusty L Humes, Ph.D., Licensed Psychologist

Dusty L Humes, Ph.D., Licensed Psychologist ! Dusty L Humes, Ph.D., Licensed Psychologist 2201 San Pedro NE, Building 4-102, Albuquerque, NM 87110 512.917.3126 dustyhumesphd@gmail.com www.dustyhumes.com Profile I am a clinical psychologist who recently

More information

ACADEMIC DIRECTOR: Carla Marquez-Lewis Email Contact: THE PROGRAM Career and Advanced Study Prospects Program Requirements

ACADEMIC DIRECTOR: Carla Marquez-Lewis Email Contact: THE PROGRAM Career and Advanced Study Prospects Program Requirements Psychology (BA) ACADEMIC DIRECTOR: Carla Marquez-Lewis CUNY School of Professional Studies 101 West 31 st Street, 7 th Floor New York, NY 10001 Email Contact: Carla Marquez-Lewis, carla.marquez-lewis@cuny.edu

More information

Client Intake Information. Client Name: Home Phone: OK to leave message? Yes No. Office Phone: OK to leave message? Yes No

Client Intake Information. Client Name: Home Phone: OK to leave message? Yes No. Office Phone: OK to leave message? Yes No : Chris Groff, JD, MA, Licensed Pastor Certified Sex Addiction Therapist Candidate 550 Bailey, Suite 235 Fort Worth, Texas 76107 Client Intake Information Client Name: Street Address: City: State: ZIP:

More information

Great Bay Mental Health Associates, Inc. Notice to Clients and Consent to Mental Health Treatment Agreement Courtney A. Atherton, MA, LCMHC, MLADC

Great Bay Mental Health Associates, Inc. Notice to Clients and Consent to Mental Health Treatment Agreement Courtney A. Atherton, MA, LCMHC, MLADC Great Bay Mental Health Associates, Inc. Notice to Clients and Consent to Mental Health Treatment Agreement Courtney A. Atherton, MA, LCMHC, MLADC Patient Name (please print): Welcome to the therapy services

More information

Child Abuse and Neglect AAP Policy Recommendations

Child Abuse and Neglect AAP Policy Recommendations Child Abuse and Neglect AAP Policy Recommendations When Inflicted Skin Injuries Constitute Child Abuse Committee on Child Abuse and Neglect PEDIATRICS Vol. 110 No. 3 September 2002, pp. 644-645 Recommendations

More information

CHAPTER 6 Diagnosing and Identifying the Need for Trauma Treatment

CHAPTER 6 Diagnosing and Identifying the Need for Trauma Treatment CHAPTER 6 Diagnosing and Identifying the Need for Trauma Treatment This chapter offers mental health professionals: information on diagnosing and identifying the need for trauma treatment guidance in determining

More information

Psychology and Law PSYC 601 001 Sample Syllabus

Psychology and Law PSYC 601 001 Sample Syllabus Psychology and Law PSYC 601 001 Sample Syllabus Course Description: This course serves as an introduction to some of the ways that psychological research is applied to questions of law. A course on psychology

More information

HIGH SCHOOL FOR RECORDING ARTS

HIGH SCHOOL FOR RECORDING ARTS Adopted Revised High School for Recording Arts Bullying Prohibition Policy 1. Purpose Students have the right to be safe and free from threatening situations on school property and at school activities

More information

Lone Star College-Tomball Community Library 30555 Tomball Parkway Tomball, TX 77375 http://www.lonestar.edu/library.

Lone Star College-Tomball Community Library 30555 Tomball Parkway Tomball, TX 77375 http://www.lonestar.edu/library. Lone Star College-Tomball Community Library 30555 Tomball Parkway Tomball, TX 77375 http://www.lonestar.edu/library.htm 832-559-4211 PSYCHOLOGY Scholarly ELECTRONIC Electronic JOURNAL Journals LIST The

More information

ACTIV-8 SAFEGUARDING POLICY

ACTIV-8 SAFEGUARDING POLICY ACTIV-8 SAFEGUARDING POLICY The Department for Education s Working Together to Safeguard Children (2013) defines safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children as: protecting children from maltreatment;

More information

STATE OF OHIO. DEPARTMENT OF REHABILITATION RELATED ACA STANDARDS: EFFECTIVE DATE: AND CORRECTION February 19, 2011 I. AUTHORITY

STATE OF OHIO. DEPARTMENT OF REHABILITATION RELATED ACA STANDARDS: EFFECTIVE DATE: AND CORRECTION February 19, 2011 I. AUTHORITY STATE OF OHIO SUBJECT: PAGE 1 OF 7. Specialized Assessments and Screenings NUMBER: 67-MNH-16 RULE/CODE REFERENCE: SUPERSEDES: AR 5120-11-03, 07, 21 67-MNH-16 dated 01/13/10 ORC 5120.031; 5120.032; 5120.033

More information

414 MANDATED REPORTING OF CHILD NEGLECT OR PHYSICAL OR SEXUAL ABUSE

414 MANDATED REPORTING OF CHILD NEGLECT OR PHYSICAL OR SEXUAL ABUSE 414 MANDATED REPORTING OF CHILD NEGLECT OR PHYSICAL OR SEXUAL ABUSE I. PURPOSE The purpose of this policy is to make clear the statutory requirements of school personnel to report suspected child neglect

More information

BEADLE COUNTY PROCEDURES AND POLICIES FOR PROSECUTION OF SEXUAL ASSAULT CASES

BEADLE COUNTY PROCEDURES AND POLICIES FOR PROSECUTION OF SEXUAL ASSAULT CASES BEADLE COUNTY PROCEDURES AND POLICIES FOR PROSECUTION OF SEXUAL ASSAULT CASES I. Policy Statement A. Overview South Dakota prosecutors have made significant strides in the prosecution of sexual assault

More information

ABUSE, NEGLECT, SELF- NEGLECT & EXPLOITATION OF VULNERABLE ADULTS

ABUSE, NEGLECT, SELF- NEGLECT & EXPLOITATION OF VULNERABLE ADULTS ABUSE, NEGLECT, SELF- NEGLECT & EXPLOITATION OF VULNERABLE ADULTS INDEX CODE: 1810 EFFECTIVE DATE: 01-29-09 Contents: I. Purpose II. Definitions III. Investigative Procedures IV. Protective Services V.

More information

APPENDIX B GUIDELINES FOR CHILD CUSTODY EVALUATIONS IN DIVORCE PROCEEDINGS

APPENDIX B GUIDELINES FOR CHILD CUSTODY EVALUATIONS IN DIVORCE PROCEEDINGS APPENDIX B GUIDELINES FOR CHILD CUSTODY EVALUATIONS IN DIVORCE PROCEEDINGS American Psychologist July 1994 Vol. 49, No. 7, 677-680 1994 by the American Psychological Association For personal use only--not

More information

Do not copy, post, or distribute. Forensic psychology encompasses the A SURVEY OF GRADUATE TRAINING PROGRAMS AND COURSEWORK IN FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY*

Do not copy, post, or distribute. Forensic psychology encompasses the A SURVEY OF GRADUATE TRAINING PROGRAMS AND COURSEWORK IN FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY* 1 A SURVEY OF GRADUATE TRAINING PROGRAMS AND COURSEWORK IN FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY* JEFFREY BURL SANJAY SHAH SARAH FILONE ELIZABETH FOSTER DAVID DEMATTEO Forensic psychology encompasses the activities of psychologists,

More information

What is Narrative Exposure Therapy (NET)?

What is Narrative Exposure Therapy (NET)? What is Narrative Exposure Therapy (NET)? Overview NET is a culturally universal short-term intervention used for the reduction of traumatic stress symptoms in survivors of organised violence, torture,

More information

P. O. Box 1520 Columbia, South Carolina 29202. Effective date of implementation: January 1, 2005. Domestic Violence

P. O. Box 1520 Columbia, South Carolina 29202. Effective date of implementation: January 1, 2005. Domestic Violence SOUTH CAROLINA DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES P. O. Box 1520 Columbia, South Carolina 29202 STANDARDS OF CARE FOR BATTERERS TREATMENT Effective date of implementation: January 1, 2005 Domestic Violence

More information

Sexual Assault of People in Aged Care Settings: Towards a Better Understanding and Response

Sexual Assault of People in Aged Care Settings: Towards a Better Understanding and Response Northern Sydney Sexual Assault Service J Blyth, L Kelly Sexual Assault of People in Aged Care Settings: Towards a Better Understanding and Response In the past 25 years there has been widespread focus

More information

Gerald Caplan s Preventive Psychiatry

Gerald Caplan s Preventive Psychiatry Seminar in Preventive Psychological Intervention EDS 246b Stephen E. Brock, Ph.D.,NCSP Course Description: Study and application of various primary, secondary, and tertiary psychological interventions

More information

What is DOMESTIC VIOLENCE?

What is DOMESTIC VIOLENCE? What is DOMESTIC VIOLENCE? Domestic violence is a pattern of control used by one person to exert power over another. Verbal abuse, threats, physical, and sexual abuse are the methods used to maintain power

More information

UNDERSTANDING PSYCHOLOGICAL EVALUATIONS

UNDERSTANDING PSYCHOLOGICAL EVALUATIONS Andrew M. Gothard, Psy.D., P.C. Licensed Psychologist 2308 Perimeter Park Drive 770-457-5577 Suite 100 fax 770-457-5599 Atlanta, GA 30341 andygothard@bellsouth.net UNDERSTANDING PSYCHOLOGICAL EVALUATIONS

More information

Eaton County Youth Facility Intensive Substance Abuse Treatment Program

Eaton County Youth Facility Intensive Substance Abuse Treatment Program Eaton County Youth Facility Intensive Substance Abuse Treatment Program FOCUS ON TREATMENT The Eaton County Youth Facility (ECYF) Intensive Substance Abuse Residential Treatment Program will help your

More information

N.Y.S. PROTECTION OF PEOPLE WITH SPECIAL NEEDS ACT NOTICE TO MANDATED REPORTERS. Justice Center Guidance June 11, 2013

N.Y.S. PROTECTION OF PEOPLE WITH SPECIAL NEEDS ACT NOTICE TO MANDATED REPORTERS. Justice Center Guidance June 11, 2013 N.Y.S. PROTECTION OF PEOPLE WITH SPECIAL NEEDS ACT NOTICE TO MANDATED REPORTERS Justice Center Guidance June 11, 2013 This Notice provides Mandated Reporters with an overview of their legal duties under

More information

SPECIAL OPTIONS SERVICES PROGRAM UNITED STATES PRETRIAL SERVICES AGENCY EASTERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK

SPECIAL OPTIONS SERVICES PROGRAM UNITED STATES PRETRIAL SERVICES AGENCY EASTERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK SPECIAL OPTIONS SERVICES PROGRAM UNITED STATES PRETRIAL SERVICES AGENCY EASTERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK February 4, 2013 1 I. Introduction The Special Options Services (SOS) Program was established in the

More information

Minimize Your Risk: Mental Stress And The WSIB

Minimize Your Risk: Mental Stress And The WSIB Minimize Your Risk: Mental Stress And The WSIB By Joseph Cohen-Lyons and Samantha C. Seabrook Mental health in the workplace has been the focus of both employer and legislative interest in recent years.

More information

OFFICE OF MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE SERVICES BULLETIN

OFFICE OF MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE SERVICES BULLETIN OFFICE OF MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE SERVICES BULLETIN ISSUE DATE April 15, 2015 EFFECTIVE DATE: April 1, 2015 NUMBER: OMHSAS-15-01 SUBJECT: BY: Community Incident Management & Reporting System

More information

Ethical issues in forensic psychiatry are perhaps more

Ethical issues in forensic psychiatry are perhaps more 10 Ethics and Forensic Psychiatry Robert M. Wettstein, M.D. Ethical issues in forensic psychiatry are perhaps more complex than ethics in the practice of general psychiatry. Many professional responsibilities

More information

GOING BEYOND FOSTER CARE

GOING BEYOND FOSTER CARE GOING BEYOND FOSTER CARE Sharon W. Cooper, MD Developmental & Forensic Pediatrics, P.A. University of North Carolina Chapel Hill School of Medicine Sharon_Cooper@med.unc.edu OBJECTIVES Adverse childhood

More information

Course Description. SEMESTER I Fundamental Concepts of Substance Abuse MODULE OBJECTIVES

Course Description. SEMESTER I Fundamental Concepts of Substance Abuse MODULE OBJECTIVES Course Description SEMESTER I Fundamental Concepts of Substance Abuse MODULE OBJECTIVES At the end of this course participants will be able to: Define and distinguish between substance use, abuse and dependence

More information

Mental Health Needs of Juvenile Offenders. Mental Health Needs of Juvenile Offenders. Juvenile Justice Guide Book for Legislators

Mental Health Needs of Juvenile Offenders. Mental Health Needs of Juvenile Offenders. Juvenile Justice Guide Book for Legislators Mental Health Needs of Juvenile Offenders Mental Health Needs of Juvenile Offenders Juvenile Justice Guide Book for Legislators Mental Health Needs of Juvenile Offenders Introduction Children with mental

More information

EFFECTIVENESS OF TREATMENT FOR VIOLENT JUVENILE DELINQUENTS

EFFECTIVENESS OF TREATMENT FOR VIOLENT JUVENILE DELINQUENTS EFFECTIVENESS OF TREATMENT FOR VIOLENT JUVENILE DELINQUENTS THE PROBLEM Traditionally, the philosophy of juvenile courts has emphasized treatment and rehabilitation of young offenders. In recent years,

More information

Rehabilitation programs for young offenders: Towards good practice? Andrew Day. Forensic Psychology Research Group. University of South Australia

Rehabilitation programs for young offenders: Towards good practice? Andrew Day. Forensic Psychology Research Group. University of South Australia 1 Rehabilitation programs for young offenders: Towards good practice? Andrew Day Forensic Psychology Research Group University of South Australia Andrew.day@unisa.edu.au Invited paper for the Understanding

More information

Department of Human Services CHILD WELFARE PROTOCOL

Department of Human Services CHILD WELFARE PROTOCOL Department of Human Services CHILD WELFARE PROTOCOL Notification and Review of Critical Incidents Interpretation: Child Protective Services Program Manager, Office of Safety and Permanency for Children

More information

court. However, without your testimony the defendant might go unpunished.

court. However, without your testimony the defendant might go unpunished. Office of State Attorney Michael J. Satz VICTIM RIGHTS BROCHURE YOUR RIGHTS AS A VICTIM OR WITNESS: CRIMINAL JUSTICE PROCESS The stages of the criminal justice system are as follows: We realize that for

More information

Lisa C. Tang, Ph.D. Licensed Clinical Psychologist 91 W Neal St. Pleasanton, CA 94566 (925) 963-8835

Lisa C. Tang, Ph.D. Licensed Clinical Psychologist 91 W Neal St. Pleasanton, CA 94566 (925) 963-8835 Lisa C. Tang, Ph.D. Licensed Clinical Psychologist 91 W Neal St. Pleasanton, CA 94566 (925) 963-8835 Professional Policies and Consent to Treatment Welcome to my practice. I appreciate your giving me the

More information

School Psychology Program Goals, Objectives, & Competencies

School Psychology Program Goals, Objectives, & Competencies RUTGERS SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM PRACTICUM HANDBOOK Introduction School Psychology is a general practice and health service provider specialty of professional psychology that is concerned with the science

More information

Michael S. McLane, Psy.D. Licensed Psychologist. Informed Consent to Treatment / Evaluation of a Minor Child. who was born on and who resides at

Michael S. McLane, Psy.D. Licensed Psychologist. Informed Consent to Treatment / Evaluation of a Minor Child. who was born on and who resides at Michael S. McLane, Psy.D. Licensed Psychologist 12830 Hillcrest Road Suite D233 Dallas, TX 75230 Ph: (972) 620-1225 Fax: (972) 620-4393 Informed Consent to Treatment / Evaluation of a Minor Child I am

More information

THE BASICS Custody and Visitation in New York State

THE BASICS Custody and Visitation in New York State THE BASICS Custody and Visitation in New York State This booklet answers common questions about custody and visitation when the parents cannot agree about who is responsible for taking care of the children.

More information

Guidelines on justice for child victims and witnesses of crime

Guidelines on justice for child victims and witnesses of crime 2004/27 Guidelines on justice for child victims and witnesses of crime The Economic and Social Council, Recalling General Assembly resolution 40/34 of 29 November 1985, by which the Assembly adopted the

More information

IOWA ATTORNEY GENERALS OFFICE PROCEDURES AND POLICIES FOR PROSECUTION OF DOMESTIC ABUSE CASES Iowa Code 13.2(14) (2007)

IOWA ATTORNEY GENERALS OFFICE PROCEDURES AND POLICIES FOR PROSECUTION OF DOMESTIC ABUSE CASES Iowa Code 13.2(14) (2007) IOWA ATTORNEY GENERALS OFFICE PROCEDURES AND POLICIES FOR PROSECUTION OF DOMESTIC ABUSE CASES Iowa Code 13.2(14) (2007) I. Policy statement. A. Overview. Iowa county attorneys have made significant strides

More information

Steven R. Miller, Ph.D., L.P. Page 1 7/8/13

Steven R. Miller, Ph.D., L.P. Page 1 7/8/13 Steven R. Miller, Ph.D., L.P. Page 1 7/8/13 Vita of Steven R. Miller, Ph.D., L.P., DACFEI 9505 Groh Rd, Suite 210 Grosse Ile, MI 48138 [Mailing Address] P.O. Box 508 Grosse Ile, Michigan 48138 Telephone:

More information

Guide for Parents Walking Your Way Through the Nebraska Juvenile Court Child Protection Process

Guide for Parents Walking Your Way Through the Nebraska Juvenile Court Child Protection Process Guide for Parents Walking Your Way Through the Nebraska Juvenile Court Child Protection Process Nebraska Supreme Court Administrative Office of the Courts P.O. Box 98910 Lincoln, NE 68509 University of

More information

Rachel A. Klein, Psy.D Licensed Clinical Psychologist (610) 368-4041 rachel.klein81@gmail.com

Rachel A. Klein, Psy.D Licensed Clinical Psychologist (610) 368-4041 rachel.klein81@gmail.com Rachel A. Klein, Psy.D Licensed Clinical Psychologist (610) 368-4041 rachel.klein81@gmail.com EDUCATION Widener University, Institute of Graduate Clinical Psychology, Doctor of Psychology, 5/2012 Widener

More information

PREA COMPLIANCE AUDIT INSTRUMENT INTERVIEW GUIDE FOR SPECIALIZED STAFF. Community Confinement Facilities August 11, 2014

PREA COMPLIANCE AUDIT INSTRUMENT INTERVIEW GUIDE FOR SPECIALIZED STAFF. Community Confinement Facilities August 11, 2014 Community Confinement Facilities August 11, 2014 GUIDELINES FOR AUDITORS: SPECIALIZED STAFF INTERVIEWS Selecting specialized staff for interview: Per the instructions for random staff interviews, the auditor

More information

Under the Start Your Search Now box, you may search by author, title and key words.

Under the Start Your Search Now box, you may search by author, title and key words. VISTAS Online VISTAS Online is an innovative publication produced for the American Counseling Association by Dr. Garry R. Walz and Dr. Jeanne C. Bleuer of Counseling Outfitters, LLC. Its purpose is to

More information

Sterman Counseling and Assessment

Sterman Counseling and Assessment Information for Clients Welcome to Sterman Counseling and Assessment. We appreciate the opportunity to be of assistance to you. This packet answers some questions about therapy services. It is important

More information

North Carolina Child and Family Services Reviews. Onsite Review. Instrument and Instructions

North Carolina Child and Family Services Reviews. Onsite Review. Instrument and Instructions rth Carolina Child and Family Services Reviews Onsite Review CASE ME: SAMPLE #: COUNTY: STATE REVIEWER: COUNTY REVIEWER: CASE DEBRIEFED: Instrument and Instructions rth Carolina Department of Health and

More information

SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 53 (Okanagan Similkameen) POLICY

SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 53 (Okanagan Similkameen) POLICY SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 53 (Okanagan Similkameen) POLICY No. F-12 Adopted: June 20, 2012 CHILD PROTECTION Preamble: The Board of Education believes that the health and welfare of a child is an important element

More information

SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE Working with Children and Families Mary Kate Barry, IASW 2015 How are you? Grand Ask me In the hospital Please ask me In the clinic In the church Ask me, ask

More information

OBJECTIVES CRIMINAL PROCESS- PROSECUTING ATTORNEY S OFFICE NAVIGATING THE CRIMINAL AND CIVIL PROCESS IN CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT CASES

OBJECTIVES CRIMINAL PROCESS- PROSECUTING ATTORNEY S OFFICE NAVIGATING THE CRIMINAL AND CIVIL PROCESS IN CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT CASES NAVIGATING THE CRIMINAL AND CIVIL PROCESS IN CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT CASES LORI FLUEGEL ASSISTANT PROSECUTING ATTORNEY JACKSON COUNTY OBJECTIVES UNDERSTANDING OF THE CRIMINAL AND CIVIL PROCESS OF CHILD

More information

HOUSE BILL 1476. State of Washington 64th Legislature 2015 Regular Session

HOUSE BILL 1476. State of Washington 64th Legislature 2015 Regular Session H-0.1 HOUSE BILL State of Washington th Legislature Regular Session By Representatives Rodne, Hayes, Lytton, Zeiger, Orwall, Fagan, Moscoso, Gregerson, and Van De Wege Read first time 01/1/. Referred to

More information

CHILD ABUSE. Administrative Procedure 325 300-37. Background

CHILD ABUSE. Administrative Procedure 325 300-37. Background 300-37 Administrative Procedure 325 CHILD ABUSE Background The District requires all staff to concern themselves with the physical, social and emotional welfare of each student. Abuse or neglect of children

More information

Winter 2013, SW 713-001, Thursdays 2:00 5:00 p.m., Room B684 SSWB

Winter 2013, SW 713-001, Thursdays 2:00 5:00 p.m., Room B684 SSWB 1 Winter 2013, SW 713-001, Thursdays 2:00 5:00 p.m., Room B684 SSWB DIALECTICAL BEHAVIOR THERAPY SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE IN MENTAL HEALTH EMPERICALLY SUPPORTED TREATMENT FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH SEVERE EMOTION

More information

Al Ahliyya Amman University Faculty of Arts Department of Psychology Course Description Psychology

Al Ahliyya Amman University Faculty of Arts Department of Psychology Course Description Psychology Al Ahliyya Amman University Faculty of Arts Department of Psychology Course Description Psychology 0731111 Psychology And Life {3}[3-3] Defining humans behavior; Essential life skills: problem solving,

More information

Programme Specification. MSc/PGDip Forensic and Legal Psychology

Programme Specification. MSc/PGDip Forensic and Legal Psychology Entry Requirements: Programme Specification MSc/PGDip Forensic and Legal Psychology Applicants for the MSc must have a good Honours degree (2:1 or better) in Psychology or a related discipline (e.g. Criminology,

More information

MANDATED REPORTING OF CHILD NEGLECT OR PHYSICAL OR SEXUAL ABUSE

MANDATED REPORTING OF CHILD NEGLECT OR PHYSICAL OR SEXUAL ABUSE POLICY #414 MANDATED REPORTING OF CHILD NEGLECT OR PHYSICAL OR SEXUAL ABUSE I. PURPOSE The purpose of this policy is to make clear the statutory requirements of school personnel to report suspected child

More information

Royal Commission Into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse Submission on Advocacy and Support and Therapeutic Treatment Services

Royal Commission Into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse Submission on Advocacy and Support and Therapeutic Treatment Services Royal Commission Into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse Submission on Advocacy and Support and Therapeutic Treatment Services Dr Michael Salter School of Social Sciences and Psychology Western

More information

Guidelines for Completing the Counseling and Conceptualization Competency (CCC) Bloomsburg University Master of Education in Counseling Program

Guidelines for Completing the Counseling and Conceptualization Competency (CCC) Bloomsburg University Master of Education in Counseling Program Guidelines for Completing the Counseling and Conceptualization Competency (CCC) Bloomsburg University Master of Education in Counseling Program The purpose of this interview is to arrive at an understanding

More information

Programme Specification

Programme Specification Programme Specification MSc in Forensic Psychology Entry Requirements: Applicants for this course must have a good Honours degree (2:1 or better) in Psychology that confers Graduate Basis for Registration

More information