REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE"

Transcription

1 US Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center Data Management Systems for Water Resources Planning August 1981 Approved for Public Release. Distribution Unlimited. TP-81

2 REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No The public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to the Department of Defense, Executive Services and Communications Directorate ( ). Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ORGANIZATION. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 2. REPORT TYPE August 1981 Technical Paper 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Data Management Systems for Water Resources Planning 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Darryl W. Davis 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5F. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) US Army Corps of Engineers Institute for Water Resources Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC) 609 Second Street Davis, CA SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER TP SPONSOR/ MONITOR'S ACRONYM(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 11. SPONSOR/ MONITOR'S REPORT NUMBER(S) 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Presented at the Water Forum '81 Specialty Conference, San Francisco, California, August ABSTRACT Water resources planning at the Federal level is comprehensive multi-purpose multi-objective planning. The increasing complexity of issues, planning alternatives, and evaluation criteria have spawned an ever growing need for increased data and associated analysis procedures. The increased number of such models, both demanding and generating large amounts of data, have stimulated awareness of the need for planning oriented data management systems. This paper describes recent activities of the Corps of Engineers' Hydrologic Engineering Center in data management for water resources planning studies. 15. SUBJECT TERMS planning, data management, spatial data, water resources systems, systems analysis 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION 18. NUMBER 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE OF OF ABSTRACT PAGES U U U 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER UU 18 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18

3 Data Management Systems for Water Resources Planning August 1981 US Army Corps of Engineers Institute for Water Resources Hydrologic Engineering Center 609 Second Street Davis, CA (530) (530) FAX TP-81

4 Papers in this series have resulted from technical activities of the Hydrologic Engineering Center. Versions of some of these have been published in technical journals or in conference proceedings. The purpose of this series is to make the information available for use in the Center's training program and for distribution with the Corps of Engineers. The findings in this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position unless so designated by other authorized documents. The contents of this report are not to be used for advertising, publication, or promotional purposes. Citation of trade names does not constitute an official endorsement or approval of the use of such commercial products.

5 1 Data Management Systems for Water Resources Planning Darryl. W. Davis, Member, ASCE 2 ABSTRACT: Water resources planning at the federal level is comprehensive multipurpose multi-objective planning. The increasing complexity of issues, planning alternatives, and evaluation criteriahavespawned an ever growing need for increased data and associated analysis procedures. The increased sophistication of computer simulation models, and the increased number of such models, both demanding and generating large amounts of data, have stimulated awareness of the need for planning oriented data management systems. This paper describes recent activities of the Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center in data management for water resources planning studies. DATA MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING Planning Context and Data Management Role -- Water resources planning in the Corps of Engineers is the product of decades of experience in performing both large and small studies and the collective sum of legislation, executive orders, court decrees, and interagency coordination. The Water Resources Council's Principles and Standards (I), and the Corps implementing guidance (2) govern both the substance and conduct of planning studies. The mandate is to perform studies in an open public decision making forum., consider the broad spectrum of resources management issues, and develop plans that provide balanced management of the nation'swater resources. The phraseology associated with this charge is "comprehensive multipurpose, multi-objective planning". What this translates to at the level of the technologist is that a great variety of technical studies covering the spectrum from biological to social sciences, from demographic to engineering, from institutional to implementation are needed. Data must be assembled, analyzed, and interpreted; information must be extracted from the data, and the findings reported, documented and processed through severaldecision making bodies before the planning task is considered complete. The role of data management as a concept is to facilitate this pro-. cess in an efficient and effective manner. That is to facilitate defining the objectives, formulating and evaluating alternatives, and cornmu-- nicating findings in a simple yet complete manner. The number of specific studies and actions that involve a data management type operation for a typical planning study probably number in the tens to hundreds. The types of data management operations will range from simple hand I Presented at the August 1981 Water Forum '81 Specialty Conference, San Francisco, California. 2~hi.ef, Planning Analysis Branch, The Hydrologic Engineering Center, Corps of Engineers, Davis, California. Davis

6 record keeping and transfers to interfaces with large, institutionally maintained data sets such as U. S. Census Bureau demographic files and streamflow records of the U. S. Geological Survey. From a practical and common sense standpoint it would seem inappropriate to attempt to create a universal data management system for all planning needs. It seems more appropriate to develop collected sets of data management concepts and systems that can then be selectively assembled to meet the specific needs of the study being performed. Data Management Concepts.. - Data management concepts and systems that are relevant to water resources planning can be informally divided into several categories. Tradi.tiona1. i.nf ormation stor age/retri.eval systems that basically provide an "organized" repository of data comprises the first category. Typical of these are record keeping systems such as what might be used to main-- tai.n mailing 1.i.sts and catalogue rel.evant regulations and 1egisl.ati.on. A second category might be more techni.ca1 data oriented such as might be used to catalogue data for subsequent st~atistical or selective tabular summary. Dem0graphi.c data fi.1.e systems would fit this category. The great majori.ty of hi.stori.ca1 data management applicati.on in planning fall into this category.. in effect technical. data storage/retri.eval. for si.mple analyses/di.spl.ay purposes. Another category might be those systems that by their inherent structure and use are eit:her major contributors to or are powerful. ana1.ysi.s tools in their own right. Systems of this type include certain spatial data management systems, and per-, haps network/topologic systems. Spatial data systems will be discussed at length later. The last category that might be of interest are data management systems designed to facilitate the automated transfer of data to other uses, specifically as might be the case for exchange of data in a standardi.zed manner between computer simul.ati.on models. Each of these categories of data management systems is relevant to water resources planning and can contribute significantly to the efficient prosecution of the full range of activities needed to perform a planning study. The Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC) has focused its attention on the subject of data management concepts that facilitate the analytical aspects of planning.. the formulation and evaluation of water resources management alternatives. As a consequence developmental work has been directed to the area of spatial data management (to facilitate comprehensive resource based analysis) and automated filecreation/ transfer (to facilitate the simple and efficient exchange of modelling data between computer simulation and analysis models). Evolution of Data Management - 2stems at HEC The HEC is a major creator and purveyor of computer software in the field of water resources management (3). In early years focus was primarily on programs that automated hydrologic engineering computations. In recent years, activities have broadened to include several other areas relevant to water resources planning including; general purpose water resources simulation models, flood damage inventory and analysis, system formulation and optimization models, environmental analysis and general data management and display tools (4).

7 In the early years (mid,1960's) datawere assembled from maps, charts, and tables and then coded onto punched cards and loaded into computers through card readers. Results of analysis were genera1l.y printed output. Data transfer between programs was by use of punched cards (cards were punched on-1.i.ne and used as input to the next program). Later (1at.e.19601s), several smaller programs were consol.idated into iarger, comprehensi.ve general purpose programs which i.n effect internal-. i.zed data transfer between programs. Area and spati-a1 data continued to be manually extracted from maps and transfered to program use via punch-. ed cards. In the early to midd1.e.19701s, computer programs grew in conceptual scope and physical size and probl.ems of transfer of data between programs began to once again emerge as important. Specially wri.tt.en files (normal.1~ tape/disk/dr.um) were generally used for transfers. Area and spatial, data continued to be manually extracted from maps. A major advance in data management responsive to water resources planning for the Corps occurred in the mid to late 1970's. The spatial data management system now known as HEC-SAM (5), was created to provide Corps planning with the capability to create, access, update, analyze and interface other analysis procedures with computerized spatial data. The spatial map type data issue was successfully systematically managed within the HEC-SAM system but program data transfers continued to take place conventionally - manually or by use of off line punched cards. Presently, program data transfers (between spatial files, utility programs, and analysis programs) are mostly accomplished by uniquely created intermediate files. These files are unique to the generating and using computer programs. A major effort is required to keep track of files and correctly manage through machine job control cards the myriad of resulting unique files. It became evident. that a more systematic general purpose data file management. scheme would greatly simplify the task of exchanging data between computer models. The Hydrologic Engineering Center Data Storage System (HEZ-DSS) (6) has been created to fulfill this role. It is a filelrecord management system that can be called by generating and/or using programs to create and/or supply data in a standard labeled format. It is expected to make major contributions to the systematic management of data exchange between computer programs. SPATIAL DATA MANAGEMENT SYSTEM System Characteristics and Capabilities- The HEC-SAM system is a general Yurpose spatial data file focused procedure with applications in water resources planning and management. The system is comprised of a family of data management and analysis computer programs. Figures 1A and 1B present a functional flow diagram of the data management, analysis, and output of HEC-SAM. The solid lines indicate file transfers that are automated and the dashed lines file transfers that are presently under development. Eventually, file transfers between programs will be via the HEC-DSS mechanism described later. The system has three distinct functional elements: Data File Management, Data File Processing Interface, and Comprehensive Analysis. The capped labels in the boxes are titles of individual computer programs. The computer programs comprising each of these functional 3 Davis

8 Data Assembly Data Encodis Data Processing Graphic Displav Data Bank L File tlanasen~ent Required Data Bank 1. Row Number 2. Colunm Number 3. Subbasin I.D. 4. Damage Reach 5. Existing Land Use 6. Future Land Use --- Data File Management -----_._ Figure 18. Spatial Data Management Legend Data F~le Processing Interface and a. b. Flood Hazard Determination Flood Damage Computations Comprehensive Analysis c. Environmental Analysis I I Cor~iputer Hodels- Analysis Programs - {-I Expected Results Annual Damages DATA BANK - * DATA BANK UTILITY FILE PROGRAMS Regulated Flows Flood Event Damges Flood Frequency Required Data Bank ---- Expected Annual Damages 1. Row Number 2. Column Number ----{ SID ATODTA Examples of Addl tional r , L,,,,, 4-1 Interfaces 1 :-{-I 3. Subbasin Under k-*l I Development I STOW, Water Qua1 i 4. Damage Reach 5. Existing Land Use * DAMCAL? 6. Future Land Use ty/ l---v---j WQRRS Erosion ----_ I Single Event Flood Damages ---,, I Attractiveness tbdel ing + Coincident Tabulation n. Land Slope ' 1 HEP CT Habitat Units I Davis

9 elements are described in (5). The data file management element (Figure 1A) is comprised of the subfamily of computer programs required to process raw map or other type data to the grid cell format of the general data bank. The Data File Processing Interface element (utility file programs of Figure 1B) is comprised of computer programs that compile and reformat grid data retrieved from the data bank into a form processable by the general analysis computer programs. The Comprehensive Analysis element (Computer Models - Analysis Programs of Figure 1B) is comprised of the generalized computer programs that perform detailed technical assessments using the linked input data files. These computer programs are standard tools used within the Corps that have been modified to accept data file input as an alternative to the usual card input and, in a few instances, modified to encourage increased systematic analysis to take advantage of access to a comprehensive data bank. The system envisions that the basic spatial data that is normally used in map form during planning studies would be processed into a spatial data file by application of the various Data File Management programs. Analysis is performed for a selected condition, (e.g., a projected land use pattern with a certain flood hazard zoning policy or project) by processing the proposal into the data bank as a new (or modified) variable and successively executing the appropriate Interface and Comprehensive Analysis programs., The analysis programs require specific input data that come both from the data bank and other sources. The initial m~del~calibration is based on observed data supplemented by parameters generated from the data bank. The calibration data are used as the mechanism for forecasting the change in modeling parameters that would result from changed conditions or proposals. The output from these programs includes de-- tailed numeric printout of the complete range of technical output of comprehensive flood plain assessments and grid map graphic displays of the data variables and results of attractiveness and impact analysis. Higher quality graphics can be generated from grid and polygon files if desired. The general capability of HEC-SAM is to provide for assessment of alternative development patterns and flood mitigation plans in the functional areas of flood hazard, flood damage and environmental status. HEC-SAM can evaluate a specific storm event or develop flow and/or elevation exceedance frequency relationships for changed land use patterns and drainage systems, flood plain occupancy encroachments, and engineering works of levees, channel modification, reservoir storage and flow rerouting. HEC-SAM can evaluate the dollar damage for a specific event and the expected value of annual damage for changes in the following: flood plain occupancy, watershed runoff and stream conveyance, structural construction practices, development control policies, values and damage potential of flood plain structures, and effects of engineering works. HEC-SAM can perform a variety of environmental evaluations for the alternatives and conditions described above. The evaluations that can be performed are: forecast changes in wildlife habitat units, forecast changes in land surface erosion, forecast changes in runoff and Davis

10 stream water quali.ty, develop fixst order attracti.veness and impact spatial displays. HEC-SAM was initially developed to service a series of pilot studies, called Expanded Flood Plain Information Studies, which were designed to test the basic concepts of a broadened community service's oriented type of investigation which was under study by Corps management. These pilot studies are now completed. A group of Corps regular planning studies using HEC-SAM have been initiated this past year. Publications are available describing the-research and documenting the initial pilot study findings (7, 8, 9) and documenting selected completed field applications (10, 11). To date, 35 studies have been initiated that in-- volve substantial use of spatial data management techniques. Twenty have been completed, 15 are actively underway and an additional 10 are pending decisions for initiation. HEC DATA STORAGE SYSTEM The HEC Data Storage System (HEC-DSS) is a file management system designed to allow the orderly exchange of data between any REC (and non HEC) computer programs. The HEC-DSS system routines are called by the generating or using program to create and/or supply data in a standard retrievable format. The common mode in which it is being implemented is to provide calling routines at the location within the computer code of a simulation model that data would be written out and/or read in. The files are random access with heirarchial pathname concepts implemented to control data flow (6). HEC is committed to implementing the system for its general purpose computer programs and has set the goal for the near future of making the HEC-DSS system an integral part of HEC programs. It will be the mechanism for transfer of data between programs and inadditionis expected to be a major adjunct to the systematic management of field collected and/or manually prepared data for use by HEC programs. General purpose tabulation, report generation, statistical analysis and computer graphics routines will be appended to the HEC--DSS. Eventually, special tabular, plot and other routines that were in the past written and implemented specifically for each HEC program will be discarded and the standard general appendages to the HEC--DSS used in their place through the HEC-DSS medium. Figure 2 portrays the expected mode of use of the system. The applications programs listed are a selected set of existing generalized HEC programs that include a rainfall-runoff model, reservoir system model, and flood damage analysis models. The utility programs that have thus far been defined (and shown on the figure) are in the developmerital stage. The titles are indicative of the function they are expected to perform. The use and management of the large and growing family of HEC computer programs should be significantly enhanced by the HEC-DSS system. Background EXAMPLE APPLICATION The data management concepts descri.bed herein are being implemented on a growing list of Corps investigations. They have been jointly implemented for a high priori.ty pl.anni.ng investigation for the 6 Davis

11 APPLICATION PROGRAMS UTILITY PROGRAMS DATA S JORAGE SYSTEM DURDAM (DSS) Figure 2. HEC-DSS Schematic Kissimmee River Basin in south--central Florida. The study is examining a wi.de range of measures of physical works, land use management, and system operati.ona1. modifications designed to provide major envi.ronmenta1. enhancements in the project area (by such means as wetlands creati.on) while preserving t:he existing fl.ood control performance of the recently completed major fl.ood control project. The study area i.s large in geographi.~ scope (3000 square miles), d:i.verse in devel.opment characteristics (wetlands, forest area, improved pasture, orchards and urban), and complex in its hydrol.ogic characteristics - the area is flat with many natural lakes and man-made control structures (12). The decision was made that the analytical strategy for study performance would include the creation of a spatial data file in conjunction with linked analysis programs (13). The spatial data file includes such variables as land use, hydrologic/hydraulic reaches, damage areas, and enviranmental habitats, to enable study of the spatial and land use aspects of the study. The spatial files are linked to a family of computer programs (also linked to each other) that enable detailed analysis of alternatives. Figure 3 is a schematic of the processing flow for the hydrologic and flood damage analysis of the study. Other environmental analysis that make use of programs linked to the spatial (grid cell) data bank will be performed but are not shown. Data Management and Computational Strat.= Rainfall.,-runoff analyses are performed to calculate runoff hydrographs at specified locations, land use management and time horizons of interest throughout t.he watershed (step 1 through 3). The watershed 7 Davis

12 HYDROLOGIC ANALYSIS -- DATA MANAGEMENT --- SYSTEMS FLOOD DAMAGE ANALYSIS n ATODTA LAND USE 1 4. SOILS I t 5. DAMAGE REACHES - 6. REFERENCE FLOOD ELEV. - DUR. DAM. FUNCT. / ( x CAT. X REACH / / HEC DATA SINGLE EVENT DAMAGE x CAT. x REACH $? / RUNOFF HYDROGRAPHS STAGE HYDROGRAPHS OPERATION SIMULATION - SINGLE EVENT DAM. LEGEND - EXPECT. ANN. DAUAGE X CAT. X DATA PROCESSING STEP --b AUTOMATIC DATA ACCESS OPERATION AUTOMATIC DATA OUTPUT &igure 3. Data Processing Flow Kissimmee Invest igat:ion subdivision into subbasins are included as a variab1.e in the grid cell bank. The HYPAR Program (step 1) automat:ical.ly generates from appro,- priately specified data bank variables subbasin drainage area sizes, and hydrol.ogic computation parameters. The HEC-DSS system has not yet been implemented for this step. The ATODTA Program (step 2) accesses these data files and processes the hydrologic parameter data into output files in HEC.-I. card image format. The appropri.ate ATODTA output files are accessed by HEC-1 (step 3) and used to perform rainfall.-runoff analyses of associated al.ternati.ve projects and land use conditions. The HEC-1 rainfall-runoff results const.i.tute a seri.es of hydrographs at each of the designated locations from ratios of input hypothetical. precipitati.on distribution, The runoff hydrographs are output to HEC-DSS for access as input into the analysis programs (CHANOP or HEC-5) for simulation of the operation of the flood control, structures of the Kissimmee River watershed.

13 The CHANOP program (step 4) has been developed to simulate the unique operation of the flood control structures and lakes in the Kissimmee watershed. The CHANOP program automatically accesses the HEC- 1 generated hydrographs from HEC-DSS, performs the simulation analysis and outputs to HEC-DSS, stage-hydrograph records for each ratioed event at each damage reach index location. As an option the HEC-5 Program (srep 4 j may be u~ilized. The expected annual damage computation for alternative proposals is performed in three data processing-and analysis phases (steps 5 through 7). The initial phase (step 5) generates elevation-area (duration) damage relationships using the DAMCAL Program from the spatial data file; the second phase (step 6) computes flood damage associated with flood hydrographs (duration considered) using the DURDAM Program; and the final phase (step 7) computes expected annual damage using the EAD program. The DAMCAL results are aggregated elevation-area-duration damage functions by category and are written to HEC.DSS for subsequent access by the DURDhY Program. The DURDAM Program (step 6) accesses the stagehydrographs (either CHANOP or HEC-5 generated) and the corresponding elevation-duration damage relationships (DAEICAL generated) from the HEC- DSS and calculates single event damage associated with each ratioed hydrograph. These values are output to HEC-DSS for subsequent access by the EAD Program. The EAD Program (step 7) accesses the single event damage results generated by the DURDAM Program from HEC-DSS. These values, along with associated flood frequency assignments comprise the EAD Program input. The results computed are expected annual damage by category at each damage reach. The EAD program is executed each time an alternative is to be evaluated. This processing strategy is repeatedly performed, either beginning with, for exaqle a new land use management condition (step 1 through 7) or with alternatives that can be studied using previously developed intermediate results, for example changed operational procedures (steps 4 through 7). SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS The HEC-SAM system evolved from a need within the Corps to manage spatial data in a systematic way to achieve an increased level of analysis capability for planning studies. The system includes capabilities to create and maintain spatial data files, retrieve and display file contents, and link data sets to sophisticated computer models. The HEC- DSS system emerged from the need to provide simple, efficeint data exchange between modern water resources planning analytical programs. The system is expected to contribute substant-ially to broadened integrated use of analysis programs by interdesciplinary professional study teams. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The original concept for the HEC--SAM system and supervision of its continuing development and servicing has been the responsibility of the author. Staff members at the HEC who contributed substantially include R. Pat Webb--responsible for most of the original development work, Shelle Barkin---continued development and day-to-day servicing, and Mike Burnham--source of many ideas in systems formulation, Jack Dangermond of ESRI has provided software and a continuing flow of ideas. Dr. Males of W. E. Gates and Associates has provided ideas as well as continuing moral support. The original concept of HEC-DSS system and

14 supervision of its continuing development is the respons.i.bi.lity of Dr. Arthur Pabst, Chief of HEC'S Computer Support Group. Mr. Mark Lewis of the HEC staff performed the basic developmental work on the system. The HEC has been under the direction of Mr. Bill S. Eicherc during the time these systems were under development. REFERERCES (1) Water Resources Council, September Principles and Standards for Water and Related Land Resources Planning - Level C. Federal Register Vol. 45, No. 190, 18 CFR Part 711. (2) Corps of Engineers, July ER , Planning Process: Multi-objective Planning Framework. Washington, DC. (3) The Hydrologic Engineering Cent:er, Annual Report, Davis, CA. (4) Feldman, Arlen D., HEC Models for Water Resources Systems Simulation: Theory and Experience. Advances in Hydroscience, Vol. 12, Academic Press, Inc,. (5) Davis, Darryl W., June Flood Mitiation Planning Using HEC-, SAM, proceedings of the ASCE Specialty Conference -. "The Planning and Engineering Interface with a Modernized Land Data System." Denver, CO. (6) Lewis, Mark, HEC-,DSS, Hydrologic Engineering Center Data Storage System--program documentation. The Hydro1.ogi.c Engi.neering Center, Davis, CA. (7) The Hydrologic Engineering Center, Phase I, Oconee Basin Pilot Study- --Trail Creek Test. Davis, CA. (8) Webb, R. P., and Barnham, M. W., Spatial Analysis of Nonstructural Measures. Symposium on Inland Water for Navigation, Flood Control, and Water Diversions. American Society of Civil Engineers. (9) The Hydrologic Eng.ineering Center, Guide Manual for the Creation of Grid Cel.1. Data Banks. Davis, CA. (10) U.S. Army Engineer District, Fort Worth, Rowlett Creek Expanded Flood Plain 1nfor.mati.on Study. (11) U.S. Army Engineer District, Jacksonville, Boggy Creek Expanded Flood Plain Information Study. (12,) Corps of Engineers, Jacksonvi.lle Dist,rict, September Kissimmee River, Florida, Reconnaissance Report (Stage I). Jacksonvill.e, FL. (13) The Hydrologic Engineering Center, September Kissimmee Basin Investigation, HEC-SAM Enhancements for the Jacksonville District (Office Report). Davis, CA.

15 Technical Paper Series TP-1 TP-2 TP-3 TP-4 TP-5 TP-6 TP-7 TP-8 TP-9 TP-10 TP-11 TP-12 TP-13 TP-14 TP-15 TP-16 TP-17 TP-18 TP-19 TP-20 TP-21 TP-22 TP-23 TP-24 TP-25 TP-26 TP-27 TP-28 TP-29 TP-30 TP-31 TP-32 TP-33 TP-34 TP-35 TP-36 TP-37 TP-38 Use of Interrelated Records to Simulate Streamflow Optimization Techniques for Hydrologic Engineering Methods of Determination of Safe Yield and Compensation Water from Storage Reservoirs Functional Evaluation of a Water Resources System Streamflow Synthesis for Ungaged Rivers Simulation of Daily Streamflow Pilot Study for Storage Requirements for Low Flow Augmentation Worth of Streamflow Data for Project Design - A Pilot Study Economic Evaluation of Reservoir System Accomplishments Hydrologic Simulation in Water-Yield Analysis Survey of Programs for Water Surface Profiles Hypothetical Flood Computation for a Stream System Maximum Utilization of Scarce Data in Hydrologic Design Techniques for Evaluating Long-Tem Reservoir Yields Hydrostatistics - Principles of Application A Hydrologic Water Resource System Modeling Techniques Hydrologic Engineering Techniques for Regional Water Resources Planning Estimating Monthly Streamflows Within a Region Suspended Sediment Discharge in Streams Computer Determination of Flow Through Bridges An Approach to Reservoir Temperature Analysis A Finite Difference Methods of Analyzing Liquid Flow in Variably Saturated Porous Media Uses of Simulation in River Basin Planning Hydroelectric Power Analysis in Reservoir Systems Status of Water Resource System Analysis System Relationships for Panama Canal Water Supply System Analysis of the Panama Canal Water Supply Digital Simulation of an Existing Water Resources System Computer Application in Continuing Education Drought Severity and Water Supply Dependability Development of System Operation Rules for an Existing System by Simulation Alternative Approaches to Water Resources System Simulation System Simulation of Integrated Use of Hydroelectric and Thermal Power Generation Optimizing flood Control Allocation for a Multipurpose Reservoir Computer Models for Rainfall-Runoff and River Hydraulic Analysis Evaluation of Drought Effects at Lake Atitlan Downstream Effects of the Levee Overtopping at Wilkes-Barre, PA, During Tropical Storm Agnes Water Quality Evaluation of Aquatic Systems TP-39 TP-40 TP-41 TP-42 TP-43 TP-44 TP-45 TP-46 TP-47 TP-48 TP-49 TP-50 TP-51 TP-52 TP-53 TP-54 TP-55 TP-56 TP-57 TP-58 TP-59 TP-60 TP-61 TP-62 TP-63 TP-64 TP-65 TP-66 TP-67 TP-68 TP-69 A Method for Analyzing Effects of Dam Failures in Design Studies Storm Drainage and Urban Region Flood Control Planning HEC-5C, A Simulation Model for System Formulation and Evaluation Optimal Sizing of Urban Flood Control Systems Hydrologic and Economic Simulation of Flood Control Aspects of Water Resources Systems Sizing Flood Control Reservoir Systems by System Analysis Techniques for Real-Time Operation of Flood Control Reservoirs in the Merrimack River Basin Spatial Data Analysis of Nonstructural Measures Comprehensive Flood Plain Studies Using Spatial Data Management Techniques Direct Runoff Hydrograph Parameters Versus Urbanization Experience of HEC in Disseminating Information on Hydrological Models Effects of Dam Removal: An Approach to Sedimentation Design of Flood Control Improvements by Systems Analysis: A Case Study Potential Use of Digital Computer Ground Water Models Development of Generalized Free Surface Flow Models Using Finite Element Techniques Adjustment of Peak Discharge Rates for Urbanization The Development and Servicing of Spatial Data Management Techniques in the Corps of Engineers Experiences of the Hydrologic Engineering Center in Maintaining Widely Used Hydrologic and Water Resource Computer Models Flood Damage Assessments Using Spatial Data Management Techniques A Model for Evaluating Runoff-Quality in Metropolitan Master Planning Testing of Several Runoff Models on an Urban Watershed Operational Simulation of a Reservoir System with Pumped Storage Technical Factors in Small Hydropower Planning Flood Hydrograph and Peak Flow Frequency Analysis HEC Contribution to Reservoir System Operation Determining Peak-Discharge Frequencies in an Urbanizing Watershed: A Case Study Feasibility Analysis in Small Hydropower Planning Reservoir Storage Determination by Computer Simulation of Flood Control and Conservation Systems Hydrologic Land Use Classification Using LANDSAT Interactive Nonstructural Flood-Control Planning Critical Water Surface by Minimum Specific Energy Using the Parabolic Method

16 TP-70 Corps of Engineers Experience with Automatic Calibration of a Precipitation-Runoff Model TP-71 Determination of Land Use from Satellite Imagery for Input to Hydrologic Models TP-72 Application of the Finite Element Method to Vertically Stratified Hydrodynamic Flow and Water Quality TP-73 Flood Mitigation Planning Using HEC-SAM TP-74 Hydrographs by Single Linear Reservoir Model TP-75 HEC Activities in Reservoir Analysis TP-76 Institutional Support of Water Resource Models TP-77 Investigation of Soil Conservation Service Urban Hydrology Techniques TP-78 Potential for Increasing the Output of Existing Hydroelectric Plants TP-79 Potential Energy and Capacity Gains from Flood Control Storage Reallocation at Existing U.S. Hydropower Reservoirs TP-80 Use of Non-Sequential Techniques in the Analysis of Power Potential at Storage Projects TP-81 Data Management Systems of Water Resources Planning TP-82 The New HEC-1 Flood Hydrograph Package TP-83 River and Reservoir Systems Water Quality Modeling Capability TP-84 Generalized Real-Time Flood Control System Model TP-85 Operation Policy Analysis: Sam Rayburn Reservoir TP-86 Training the Practitioner: The Hydrologic Engineering Center Program TP-87 Documentation Needs for Water Resources Models TP-88 Reservoir System Regulation for Water Quality Control TP-89 A Software System to Aid in Making Real-Time Water Control Decisions TP-90 Calibration, Verification and Application of a Two- Dimensional Flow Model TP-91 HEC Software Development and Support TP-92 Hydrologic Engineering Center Planning Models TP-93 Flood Routing Through a Flat, Complex Flood Plain Using a One-Dimensional Unsteady Flow Computer Program TP-94 Dredged-Material Disposal Management Model TP-95 Infiltration and Soil Moisture Redistribution in HEC-1 TP-96 The Hydrologic Engineering Center Experience in Nonstructural Planning TP-97 Prediction of the Effects of a Flood Control Project on a Meandering Stream TP-98 Evolution in Computer Programs Causes Evolution in Training Needs: The Hydrologic Engineering Center Experience TP-99 Reservoir System Analysis for Water Quality TP-100 Probable Maximum Flood Estimation - Eastern United States TP-101 Use of Computer Program HEC-5 for Water Supply Analysis TP-102 Role of Calibration in the Application of HEC-6 TP-103 Engineering and Economic Considerations in Formulating TP-104 Modeling Water Resources Systems for Water Quality TP-105 Use of a Two-Dimensional Flow Model to Quantify Aquatic Habitat TP-106 Flood-Runoff Forecasting with HEC-1F TP-107 Dredged-Material Disposal System Capacity Expansion TP-108 Role of Small Computers in Two-Dimensional Flow Modeling TP-109 One-Dimensional Model for Mud Flows TP-110 Subdivision Froude Number TP-111 HEC-5Q: System Water Quality Modeling TP-112 New Developments in HEC Programs for Flood Control TP-113 Modeling and Managing Water Resource Systems for Water Quality TP-114 Accuracy of Computer Water Surface Profiles - Executive Summary TP-115 Application of Spatial-Data Management Techniques in Corps Planning TP-116 The HEC's Activities in Watershed Modeling TP-117 HEC-1 and HEC-2 Applications on the Microcomputer TP-118 Real-Time Snow Simulation Model for the Monongahela River Basin TP-119 Multi-Purpose, Multi-Reservoir Simulation on a PC TP-120 Technology Transfer of Corps' Hydrologic Models TP-121 Development, Calibration and Application of Runoff Forecasting Models for the Allegheny River Basin TP-122 The Estimation of Rainfall for Flood Forecasting Using Radar and Rain Gage Data TP-123 Developing and Managing a Comprehensive Reservoir Analysis Model TP-124 Review of U.S. Army corps of Engineering Involvement With Alluvial Fan Flooding Problems TP-125 An Integrated Software Package for Flood Damage Analysis TP-126 The Value and Depreciation of Existing Facilities: The Case of Reservoirs TP-127 Floodplain-Management Plan Enumeration TP-128 Two-Dimensional Floodplain Modeling TP-129 Status and New Capabilities of Computer Program HEC-6: "Scour and Deposition in Rivers and Reservoirs" TP-130 Estimating Sediment Delivery and Yield on Alluvial Fans TP-131 Hydrologic Aspects of Flood Warning - Preparedness Programs TP-132 Twenty-five Years of Developing, Distributing, and Supporting Hydrologic Engineering Computer Programs TP-133 Predicting Deposition Patterns in Small Basins TP-134 Annual Extreme Lake Elevations by Total Probability Theorem TP-135 A Muskingum-Cunge Channel Flow Routing Method for Drainage Networks TP-136 Prescriptive Reservoir System Analysis Model - Missouri River System Application TP-137 A Generalized Simulation Model for Reservoir System Analysis TP-138 The HEC NexGen Software Development Project TP-139 Issues for Applications Developers TP-140 HEC-2 Water Surface Profiles Program TP-141 HEC Models for Urban Hydrologic Analysis

17 TP-142 Systems Analysis Applications at the Hydrologic Engineering Center TP-143 Runoff Prediction Uncertainty for Ungauged Agricultural Watersheds TP-144 Review of GIS Applications in Hydrologic Modeling TP-145 Application of Rainfall-Runoff Simulation for Flood Forecasting TP-146 Application of the HEC Prescriptive Reservoir Model in the Columbia River Systems TP-147 HEC River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) TP-148 HEC-6: Reservoir Sediment Control Applications TP-149 The Hydrologic Modeling System (HEC-HMS): Design and Development Issues TP-150 The HEC Hydrologic Modeling System TP-151 Bridge Hydraulic Analysis with HEC-RAS TP-152 Use of Land Surface Erosion Techniques with Stream Channel Sediment Models TP-153 Risk-Based Analysis for Corps Flood Project Studies - A Status Report TP-154 Modeling Water-Resource Systems for Water Quality Management TP-155 Runoff simulation Using Radar Rainfall Data TP-156 Status of HEC Next Generation Software Development TP-157 Unsteady Flow Model for Forecasting Missouri and Mississippi Rivers TP-158 Corps Water Management System (CWMS) TP-159 Some History and Hydrology of the Panama Canal TP-160 Application of Risk-Based Analysis to Planning Reservoir and Levee Flood Damage Reduction Systems TP-161 Corps Water Management System - Capabilities and Implementation Status

18

Optimization Techniques for Hydrologic Engineering

Optimization Techniques for Hydrologic Engineering US Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center Optimization Techniques for Hydrologic Engineering April 1966 Approved for Public Release. Distribution Unlimited. TP-2 REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE

More information

Hydrologic Engineering Techniques for Regional Water Resources Planning

Hydrologic Engineering Techniques for Regional Water Resources Planning US Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center Hydrologic Engineering Techniques for Regional Water Resources Planning October 1969 Approved for Public Release. Distribution Unlimited. TP-17

More information

Methods for Determination of Safe Yield and Compensation Water from Storage Reservoirs

Methods for Determination of Safe Yield and Compensation Water from Storage Reservoirs US Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center Methods for Determination of Safe Yield and Compensation Water from Storage Reservoirs October 1966 Approved for Public Release. Distribution Unlimited.

More information

Hydrologic Aspects of Flood Warning Preparedness Programs

Hydrologic Aspects of Flood Warning Preparedness Programs US Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center Hydrologic Aspects of Flood Warning Preparedness Programs August 1990 Approved for Public Release. Distribution Unlimited. TP-131 REPORT DOCUMENTATION

More information

Downstream Effects of the Levee Overtopping at Wilkes-Barre Pennsylvania During Tropical Storm Agnes

Downstream Effects of the Levee Overtopping at Wilkes-Barre Pennsylvania During Tropical Storm Agnes US Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center Downstream Effects of the Levee Overtopping at Wilkes-Barre Pennsylvania During Tropical Storm Agnes April 1973 Approved for Public Release. Distribution

More information

The HEC NexGen Software Development Project

The HEC NexGen Software Development Project US Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center The HEC NexGen Software Development Project January 1993 Approved for Public Release. Distribution Unlimited. TP-138 REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form

More information

Training the Practitioner: The Hydrologic Engineering Center Program

Training the Practitioner: The Hydrologic Engineering Center Program US Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center Training the Practitioner: The Hydrologic Engineering Center Program October 1981 Approved for Public Release. Distribution Unlimited. TP-86 REPORT

More information

Issues for Applications Developers

Issues for Applications Developers US Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center Issues for Applications Developers January 1993 Approved for Public Release. Distribution Unlimited. TP-139 REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved

More information

Application of the HEC Prescriptive Reservoir Model in the Columbia River System

Application of the HEC Prescriptive Reservoir Model in the Columbia River System US Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center Application of the HEC Prescriptive Reservoir Model in the Columbia River System May 1993 Approved for Public Release. Distribution Unlimited. TP-146

More information

Environmental Data Management Programs

Environmental Data Management Programs Hydrologic Engineering Centre (HEC) Software CD Collection of programs, developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Environmental Data Management Programs Name: HEC-DSS Package Purpose: Data Storage

More information

Multi-Purpose, Multi-Reservoir Simulation on a PC

Multi-Purpose, Multi-Reservoir Simulation on a PC US Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center Multi-Purpose, Multi-Reservoir Simulation on a PC August 1988 Approved for Public Release. Distribution Unlimited. TP-119 REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE

More information

The Development and Servicing of Spatial Data Management Techniques in the Corps of Engineers

The Development and Servicing of Spatial Data Management Techniques in the Corps of Engineers US Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center The Development and Servicing of Spatial Data Management Techniques in the Corps of Engineers July 1978 Approved for Public Release. Distribution

More information

EAD Expected Annual Flood Damage Computation

EAD Expected Annual Flood Damage Computation US Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center Generalized Computer Program EAD Expected Annual Flood Damage Computation User's Manual March 1989 Original: June 1977 Revised: August 1979, February

More information

Flood Risk Management

Flood Risk Management Flood Risk Management Value of Flood Risk Management Every year floods sweep through communities across the United States taking lives, destroying property, shutting down businesses, harming the environment

More information

Flood Risk Management

Flood Risk Management Flood Risk Management Value of Flood Risk Management Value to Individuals and Communities Every year floods sweep through communities across the United States taking lives, destroying property, shutting

More information

AZ EGER-PATAK HIDROLÓGIAI VIZSGÁLATA, A FELSZÍNI VÍZKÉSZLETEK VÁRHATÓ VÁLTOZÁSÁBÓL ADÓDÓ MÓDOSULÁSOK AZ ÉGHAJLATVÁLTOZÁS HATÁSÁRA

AZ EGER-PATAK HIDROLÓGIAI VIZSGÁLATA, A FELSZÍNI VÍZKÉSZLETEK VÁRHATÓ VÁLTOZÁSÁBÓL ADÓDÓ MÓDOSULÁSOK AZ ÉGHAJLATVÁLTOZÁS HATÁSÁRA AZ EGER-PATAK HIDROLÓGIAI VIZSGÁLATA, A FELSZÍNI VÍZKÉSZLETEK VÁRHATÓ VÁLTOZÁSÁBÓL ADÓDÓ MÓDOSULÁSOK AZ ÉGHAJLATVÁLTOZÁS HATÁSÁRA GÁBOR KEVE 1, GÉZA HAJNAL 2, KATALIN BENE 3, PÉTER TORMA 4 EXTRAPOLATING

More information

Flooding Design Basis Reevaluation Challenges and Solutions

Flooding Design Basis Reevaluation Challenges and Solutions Flooding Design Basis Reevaluation Challenges and Solutions Dave Schowalter, PhD Dan Gessler, PhD, PE, DWRE Outline Introduction to Alden Flood Hazard Re-Evaluation Background Required Analysis Recommendations

More information

DTIC. The HEC NexGen Software Development Project AD-A273 512 M U11,1111. Technical Paper No. 138. US Army Corps of Engineers. Sf ELECTE DECO 81993

DTIC. The HEC NexGen Software Development Project AD-A273 512 M U11,1111. Technical Paper No. 138. US Army Corps of Engineers. Sf ELECTE DECO 81993 AD-A273 512 M U11,1111 US Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center DTIC Sf ELECTE DECO 81993 A The HEC NexGen Software Development Project Technical Paper No. 138 January 1993 Approved for

More information

Performing a Steady Flow Analysis

Performing a Steady Flow Analysis C H A P T E R 7 Performing a Steady Flow Analysis This chapter discusses how to calculate steady flow water surface profiles. The chapter is divided into two parts. The first part discusses how to enter

More information

Hydrologic Modeling using HEC-HMS

Hydrologic Modeling using HEC-HMS Hydrologic Modeling using HEC-HMS Prepared by Venkatesh Merwade School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University vmerwade@purdue.edu April 2012 Introduction The intent of this exercise is to introduce you

More information

An Integrated Software Package for Flood Damage Analysis

An Integrated Software Package for Flood Damage Analysis US Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center An Integrated Software Package for Flood Damage Analysis February 1989 Approved for Public Release. Distribution Unlimited. TP-125 REPORT DOCUMENTATION

More information

STATISTICAL SOFTWARE PACKAGE

STATISTICAL SOFTWARE PACKAGE STATISTICAL SOFTWARE PACKAGE Jeff Harris david.j.harris@usace.army.mil, Gary Brunnergary.w.brunner@usace.army.mil, Matt Fleming matthew.j.fleming@usace.army.mil, Beth Faber Ph.D. beth.a.faber@usace.army.mil,

More information

The Hydrologic Engineering Center Training Course on

The Hydrologic Engineering Center Training Course on The Hydrologic Engineering Center Training Course on SEDIMENT TRANSPORT ANALYSIS WITH HEC-RAS Davis, California Course Objectives This course is intended to prepare engineers to perform studies using various

More information

ADVANCED STEADY FLOW ANALYSIS WITH HEC-RAS. Objectives

ADVANCED STEADY FLOW ANALYSIS WITH HEC-RAS. Objectives ADVANCED STEADY FLOW ANALYSIS WITH HEC-RAS Objectives This course is intended to provide participants with the knowledge to effectively utilize the HEC- RAS software to analyze difficult hydraulic conditions

More information

Estimating Potential Reduction Flood Benefits of Restored Wetlands

Estimating Potential Reduction Flood Benefits of Restored Wetlands Estimating Potential Reduction Flood Benefits of Restored Wetlands Kenneth W. Potter University of Wisconsin Introduction Throughout the summer of 1993 a recurring question was the impact of wetland drainage

More information

Texas A & M University and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Hydrologic Modeling Inventory Model Description Form

Texas A & M University and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Hydrologic Modeling Inventory Model Description Form Texas A & M University and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Hydrologic Modeling Inventory Model Description Form Name of Model: MIKE SHE JUNE 18, 1999 Model Type: Physically Based, distributed and integrated

More information

USSD Workshop on Dam Break Analysis Applied to Tailings Dams

USSD Workshop on Dam Break Analysis Applied to Tailings Dams USSD Workshop on Dam Break Analysis Applied to Tailings Dams Antecedents Newtonian / non-newtonian flows Available models that allow the simulation of non- Newtonian flows (tailings) Other models used

More information

A Florida Silver Jackets Initiative Pilot Project Proposal

A Florida Silver Jackets Initiative Pilot Project Proposal Development of an Integrated Flood Response Plan - Flood- Inundation and Levee Overtopping Risk Assessment Jane Green Detention Area - Upper St. John River Basin City of Melbourne, Brevard County, Florida

More information

Flood Prevention & Protection. Roles and Responsibilities of Conservation Authorities

Flood Prevention & Protection. Roles and Responsibilities of Conservation Authorities Flood Prevention & Protection Roles and Responsibilities of Conservation Authorities PROTECTING PEOPLE AND PROPERTY Flooding is the leading cause of public emergency in Ontario Climate Change is creating

More information

8. Sediment-related Disaster Prevention Sub-sector. Guideline:

8. Sediment-related Disaster Prevention Sub-sector. Guideline: Sub-sector Guideline: (1) Sediment-related Disaster Prevention (Adaptation Project) (2) Sediment-related Disaster Prevention (BAU Development with Adaptation Options) Basic Concept A. General Concept B.

More information

M. Tech. Water Resource Engineering

M. Tech. Water Resource Engineering M. Tech. Water Resource Engineering Basic Supporting Courses S. No. Course Code Course Title L-T-P Credits 1. MAS 701 Advanced Engineering Mathematics 3-1-0 4 2. MAS 711 Statistics I 2-0-1 3 3. COMP 805

More information

HEC-DSS Add-In Excel Data Exchange for Excel 2007-2010

HEC-DSS Add-In Excel Data Exchange for Excel 2007-2010 HEC-DSS Add-In Excel Data Exchange for Excel 2007-2010 User's Manual Version 3.2.1 January 2010 Approved for Public Release. Distribution Unlimited. CPD-79b REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB

More information

Appendix J Online Questionnaire

Appendix J Online Questionnaire Appendix J Online Questionnaire In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act, this questionnaire was approved by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The OMB control number and expiration date

More information

Stream-Network Navigation in the U.S. Geological Survey StreamStats Web Application

Stream-Network Navigation in the U.S. Geological Survey StreamStats Web Application 2009 International Conference on Advanced Geographic Information Systems & Web Services Stream-Network Navigation in the U.S. Geological Survey StreamStats Web Application Kernell G. Ries III, Peter A.

More information

Flash Flood Science. Chapter 2. What Is in This Chapter? Flash Flood Processes

Flash Flood Science. Chapter 2. What Is in This Chapter? Flash Flood Processes Chapter 2 Flash Flood Science A flash flood is generally defined as a rapid onset flood of short duration with a relatively high peak discharge (World Meteorological Organization). The American Meteorological

More information

A. Flood Management in Nevada

A. Flood Management in Nevada Nevada Division of Water Planning A. Flood Management in Nevada Introduction Flooding has been a concern for Nevada communities since the first settlers moved to the territory in the mid-1800 s. Fourteen

More information

ROSE CREEK WATERSHED HYDROLOGIC, HYDRAULIC, SEDIMENT TRANSPORT, AND GEOMORPHIC ANALYSES TASK 1 EXISTING DATA AND INFORMATION SUMMARY REPORT BACKGROUND

ROSE CREEK WATERSHED HYDROLOGIC, HYDRAULIC, SEDIMENT TRANSPORT, AND GEOMORPHIC ANALYSES TASK 1 EXISTING DATA AND INFORMATION SUMMARY REPORT BACKGROUND ROSE CREEK WATERSHED HYDROLOGIC, HYDRAULIC, SEDIMENT TRANSPORT, AND GEOMORPHIC ANALYSES TASK 1 EXISTING DATA AND INFORMATION SUMMARY REPORT BACKGROUND The Rose Creek Watershed (RCW) consists of three planning

More information

Hydrologic Modeling System HEC-HMS

Hydrologic Modeling System HEC-HMS Hydrologic Engineering Center Hydrologic Modeling System HEC-HMS Quick Start Guide Version 4.0 December 2013 Approved for Public Release Distribution Unlimited CPD-74D REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved

More information

HEC-RAS. River Analysis System. Applications Guide. Version 4.1 January 2010. US Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center CPD-70

HEC-RAS. River Analysis System. Applications Guide. Version 4.1 January 2010. US Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center CPD-70 US Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center HEC-RAS HEC-RAS River Analysis System Applications Guide Version 4.1 January 2010 Approved for Public Release. Distribution Unlimited CPD-70 REPORT

More information

United States Army Corps of Engineers, Civil Works

United States Army Corps of Engineers, Civil Works United States Army Corps of Engineers, Civil Works Fiscal Year 2013 Federal Program Inventory May 2013 Table of Contents Introduction... 2 Program Inventory... 3 1. Navigation... 3 2. Flood Risk Management...

More information

Evaluation of Open Channel Flow Equations. Introduction :

Evaluation of Open Channel Flow Equations. Introduction : Evaluation of Open Channel Flow Equations Introduction : Most common hydraulic equations for open channels relate the section averaged mean velocity (V) to hydraulic radius (R) and hydraulic gradient (S).

More information

GIS & Water Resources II. Dr Parris Lyew-Ayee Jr Mona GeoInformatics Institute University of the West Indies

GIS & Water Resources II. Dr Parris Lyew-Ayee Jr Mona GeoInformatics Institute University of the West Indies GIS & Water Resources II Dr Parris Lyew-Ayee Jr Mona GeoInformatics Institute University of the West Indies Applications of GIS in Water Resources Management Remote Sensing Watershed management Flood management

More information

HYDROLOGIC/HYDRAULIC MODELING OF WESTMINSTER WATERSHED ORANGE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

HYDROLOGIC/HYDRAULIC MODELING OF WESTMINSTER WATERSHED ORANGE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA HYDROLOGIC/HYDRAULIC MODELING OF WESTMINSTER WATERSHED ORANGE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA James Chieh, Ph.D., P.E., Senior Hydraulic Engineer, USACE, Los Angeles, California, Shih.H.Chieh@usace.army.mil; Jay Pak,

More information

HEC-FDA Flood Damage Reduction Analysis

HEC-FDA Flood Damage Reduction Analysis US Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center HEC-FDA Flood Damage Reduction Analysis User s Manual Version 1.2.4 November 2008 CPD-72 Approved for Public Release. Distribution Unlimited. REPORT

More information

9.1. Adequacy of Available Data and Monitoring Efforts

9.1. Adequacy of Available Data and Monitoring Efforts 9. DATA MANAGEMENT Data management is a crucial aspect of successful implementation of the ARB IRWMP and its component projects. This section discusses the adequacy of available data and monitoring efforts,

More information

A Muskingum-Cunge Channel Flow Routing Method for Drainage Networks

A Muskingum-Cunge Channel Flow Routing Method for Drainage Networks US Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center A Muskingum-Cunge Channel Flow Routing Method for Drainage Networks November 1991 Approved for Public Release. Distribution Unlimited. TP-135 REPORT

More information

Lower Raritan Watershed Management Area Stormwater & Flooding Subcommittee Strategy Worksheet LRSW-S3C1

Lower Raritan Watershed Management Area Stormwater & Flooding Subcommittee Strategy Worksheet LRSW-S3C1 Strategy Name: Reduce Existing Potential for Flood Damages LRSW-S3C1. Develop and implement a program to: Minimize flood damages through the use of structural measures. Minimize flood damages through the

More information

Quantifying Potential Floodplain Restoration Benefits in the Upper Mississippi River Basin, USA

Quantifying Potential Floodplain Restoration Benefits in the Upper Mississippi River Basin, USA Quantifying Potential Floodplain Restoration Benefits in the Upper Mississippi River Basin, USA Michael Schwar, Ph.D. PE (MARS) Eileen Fretz (American Rivers) Mississippi River Commission/USACE Upper Mississippi

More information

BALLPARK PMFs. Abstract. Introduction

BALLPARK PMFs. Abstract. Introduction BALLPARK PMFs John Harrison, P.E., Senior Associate, Schnabel Engineering, Inc. Greg Paxson, P.E., Senior Engineer, Schnabel Engineering, Inc. Abstract In preliminary studies and proposals, it is often

More information

BROOKS COUNTY, GEORGIA AND INCORPORATED AREAS

BROOKS COUNTY, GEORGIA AND INCORPORATED AREAS BROOKS COUNTY, GEORGIA AND INCORPORATED AREAS COMMUNITY NAME COMMUNITY NUMBER BROOKS COUNTY (UNINCORPORATED AREAS) 130281 MORVEN, CITY OF 130034 QUITMAN, CITY OF 130015 Brooks County EFFECTIVE: September

More information

COMMUNITY CERTIFICATIONS

COMMUNITY CERTIFICATIONS National Flood Insurance Program Community Rating System COMMUNITY CERTIFICATIONS Public reporting burden for this form is estimated to average 4 hours for annual recertification, per response. The burden

More information

Discussion about the practicability of implementing flood risk. management and urban flood insurance in China. Longhua Gao, Xiaoqing Zhou

Discussion about the practicability of implementing flood risk. management and urban flood insurance in China. Longhua Gao, Xiaoqing Zhou Discussion about the practicability of implementing flood risk management and urban flood insurance in China Longhua Gao, Xiaoqing Zhou Abstract: This paper explains the flood risk management at first,

More information

STUDY ON RULE CURVE DEVELOPMENT FOR HYDRO ELECTRIC POWER (HEP) DAM OPERATION. CASE STUDY: MURUM HEP DAM

STUDY ON RULE CURVE DEVELOPMENT FOR HYDRO ELECTRIC POWER (HEP) DAM OPERATION. CASE STUDY: MURUM HEP DAM Journal of Civil Engineering, Science and Technology Volume 7, Issue 2, September 2016 STUDY ON RULE CURVE DEVELOPMENT FOR HYDRO ELECTRIC POWER (HEP) DAM OPERATION. CASE STUDY: MURUM HEP DAM Gregory Titus

More information

Computing Stormwater Runoff Rates and Volumes

Computing Stormwater Runoff Rates and Volumes New Jersey Stormwater Best Management Practices Manual February 2004 C H A P T E R 5 Computing Stormwater Runoff Rates and Volumes This chapter discusses the fundamentals of computing stormwater runoff

More information

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY EM 1110-2-1619 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers CECW-EH-Y Washington, DC 20314-1000

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY EM 1110-2-1619 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers CECW-EH-Y Washington, DC 20314-1000 DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY EM 1110-2-1619 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers CECW-EH-Y Washington, DC 20314-1000 Manual No. 1110-2-1619 1 August 1996 Engineering and Design RISK-BASED ANALYSIS FOR FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION

More information

Next Generation Flood Alert in Houston

Next Generation Flood Alert in Houston Next Generation Flood Alert in Houston Philip B. Bedient Civil and Environmental Eng., Rice University Houston, TX Major Causes of Urban Flooding (Excess Water that Inundates) Highly Developed (urbanized)

More information

GIS Tools for Proactive Urban Watershed Management

GIS Tools for Proactive Urban Watershed Management GIS Tools for Proactive Urban Watershed Management Scott D. Bryant, PE *, Kenneth A. Carper, PE ** and John Nicholson, PhD *** *Manager & Chief Engineer, City of Greensboro Stormwater Management Division,

More information

National Disaster Management Institute

National Disaster Management Institute National Disaster Management Institute CONTENTS one Cause of Urban Flood Disaster two Urban Flood Damage Case three Disaster Prevention Measures for Future Urban Flood four NDMI s Measures & Strategy for

More information

STORM WATER MANAGEMENT ACT

STORM WATER MANAGEMENT ACT COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION HARRISBURG, PENNSYLVANIA STORM WATER MANAGEMENT ACT OFFICE OF WATER MANAGEMENT BUREAU OF WATERSHED MANAGEMENT STORM WATER MANAGEMENT

More information

Stream Rehabilitation Concepts, Guidelines and Examples. Objectives. Pierre Y. Julien. Three Laws of Stream Restoration

Stream Rehabilitation Concepts, Guidelines and Examples. Objectives. Pierre Y. Julien. Three Laws of Stream Restoration Stream Rehabilitation Concepts, Guidelines and Examples Pierre Y. Julien Wuhan 2005 Objectives Part I - Stream restoration and rehabilitation: 1. Present and discuss important concepts, laws, criteria

More information

Hydraulic Analysis Guidance Document

Hydraulic Analysis Guidance Document STATE OF CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION BUREAU OF WATER MANAGEMENT INLAND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION Hydraulic Analysis Guidance Document Supplemental Guidelines for Preparing Riverine

More information

SIMULATION OF SEDIMENT TRANSPORT AND CHANNEL MORPHOLOGY CHANGE IN LARGE RIVER SYSTEMS. Stephen H. Scott 1 and Yafei Jia 2

SIMULATION OF SEDIMENT TRANSPORT AND CHANNEL MORPHOLOGY CHANGE IN LARGE RIVER SYSTEMS. Stephen H. Scott 1 and Yafei Jia 2 US-CHINA WORKSHOP ON ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODELLING IN HYDROSCIENCE & ENGINEERING September 19-21, Oxford, Mississippi, USA SIMULATION OF SEDIMENT TRANSPORT AND CHANNEL MORPHOLOGY CHANGE IN LARGE RIVER

More information

TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER 1. FLOOD INSURANCE STUDY GENERAL BACKGROUND AND REQUIREMENTS

TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER 1. FLOOD INSURANCE STUDY GENERAL BACKGROUND AND REQUIREMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS Page CHAPTER 1. FLOOD INSURANCE STUDY GENERAL BACKGROUND AND REQUIREMENTS A. Introduction 1-1 B. General Performance Requirements 1-2 CHAPTER 2. DETERMINING SCOPE OF STUDY A. General

More information

Climate Change Resilience and Preparedness

Climate Change Resilience and Preparedness Climate Change Resilience and Preparedness Chris Benjamin Director, Corporate Sustainability August 14, 2015 Climate Change Resilience 2 Robust emergency response plans and procedures to address near-term

More information

Hydrologic Modeling System HEC-HMS

Hydrologic Modeling System HEC-HMS Hydrologic Engineering Center Hydrologic Modeling System HEC-HMS Release Notes Version 4.0 December 2013 Approved for Public Release Distribution Unlimited Hydrologic Modeling System HEC-HMS, Release Notes

More information

Section 19. Basin-wide Mitigation Action Plans

Section 19. Basin-wide Mitigation Action Plans Section 19. Basin-wide Mitigation Action Plans This Mitigation Plan identifies twelve specific hazards that could affect the Basin. Section 20 of this Plan set forth mitigation action plans to be carried

More information

URBAN DRAINAGE CRITERIA

URBAN DRAINAGE CRITERIA URBAN DRAINAGE CRITERIA I. Introduction This division contains guidelines for drainage system design and establishes a policy for recognized and established engineering design of storm drain facilities

More information

Flood Flow Contribution of the Upper Otter Tail River Watershed September 2010

Flood Flow Contribution of the Upper Otter Tail River Watershed September 2010 Flood Flow Contribution of the Upper Otter Tail River Watershed September 2010 DNR Ecological & Water Resources DNR Information Center Twin Cities: (651) 296-6157 Minnesota Toll Free: 1-888-646-6367 (or

More information

USA - EVOLUTION OF POLICY ON FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT CASE #86

USA - EVOLUTION OF POLICY ON FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT CASE #86 USA - EVOLUTION OF POLICY ON FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT CASE #86 This case describes integrated floodplain strategies in the US, involving the participation of three levels of government and the private sector.

More information

2D Modeling of Urban Flood Vulnerable Areas

2D Modeling of Urban Flood Vulnerable Areas 2D Modeling of Urban Flood Vulnerable Areas Sameer Dhalla, P.Eng. Dilnesaw Chekol, Ph.D. A.D. Latornell Conservation Symposium November 22, 2013 Outline 1. Toronto and Region 2. Evolution of Flood Management

More information

REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE

REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE US Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center Status of HEC Next Generation Software Development Project June 1996 Approved for Public Release. Distribution Unlimited. TP-156 REPORT DOCUMENTATION

More information

A Statewide Assessment

A Statewide Assessment ARTIFICIAL RECHARGE OF GROUND WATER IN COLORADO Environmental Geology 13 Ralf Topper Peter E. Barkmann David A. Bird Matthew A. Sares With contributions from: Genevieve B.C. Young John W. Keller Harvey

More information

Fort Dodge Stormwater Master Planning. Prepared By: Ralph C. Stark, Jr., P.E., C.F.M. Joel N. Krause, P.E., C.F.M.

Fort Dodge Stormwater Master Planning. Prepared By: Ralph C. Stark, Jr., P.E., C.F.M. Joel N. Krause, P.E., C.F.M. Fort Dodge Stormwater Master Planning Prepared By: Ralph C. Stark, Jr., P.E., C.F.M. Joel N. Krause, P.E., C.F.M. Project Location Project Background Flooding History Localized flooding and storm sewer

More information

Post-Flood Assessment

Post-Flood Assessment Page 1 of 7 Post-Flood Assessment CHAPTER 4 AGENCY COORDINATION Agency coordination is an essential element for the operation of the flood management systems in the Central Valley. Due to the nature of

More information

Plan Groundwater Procurement, Implementation and Costs, prepared for the Brazos River Authority, July 2005.

Plan Groundwater Procurement, Implementation and Costs, prepared for the Brazos River Authority, July 2005. 6 Conjunctive Use 6.1 Lake Granger Augmentation 6.1.1 Description of Option Rapid population growth and development in Williamson County require additional water supplies throughout the planning period.

More information

7.0 Stream Restoration

7.0 Stream Restoration 7.0 Stream Restoration 7.1 Issue Statements One of the primary concerns of residents in the Bassett Creek watershed is the maintenance of the natural beauty of the creek in residential and recreational

More information

1.7.0 Floodplain Modification Criteria

1.7.0 Floodplain Modification Criteria 1.7.0 Floodplain Modification Criteria 1.7.1 Introduction These guidelines set out standards for evaluating and processing proposed modifications of the 100- year floodplain with the following objectives:

More information

Hydrologic Engineering Center Planning Models

Hydrologic Engineering Center Planning Models US Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center Hydrologic Engineering Center Planning Models December 1983 Approved for Public Release. Distribution Unlimited. TP-92 REPORT DOCUMENTATON PAGE

More information

5.0 OVERVIEW OF FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION MEASURES

5.0 OVERVIEW OF FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION MEASURES 5.0 OVERVIEW OF FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION MEASURES Flood damage reduction consists of two basic techniques structural and non-structural. Structural methods modify the flood and take the flood away from people

More information

CHAPTER II SURFACE WATER MANAGEMENT ELEMENT

CHAPTER II SURFACE WATER MANAGEMENT ELEMENT CHAPTER II TABLE OF CONTENTS Objective 1-Master Stormwater Management Plan Implementation... 1 Objective 2- Meeting Future Needs... 5 Objective 3- Concurrency Management... 6 Objective 4- Natural Drainage

More information

Levees in Louisiana & Certification

Levees in Louisiana & Certification Levees in Louisiana & Certification What is the NFIP? What is Levee Certification? Who Certifies levees? Larry Ardoin DOTD Division of Public Works January, 2010 Mississippi River Basin Basin Facts Drains

More information

New challenges of water resources management: Title the future role of CHy

New challenges of water resources management: Title the future role of CHy New challenges of water resources management: Title the future role of CHy by Bruce Stewart* Karl Hofius in his article in this issue of the Bulletin entitled Evolving role of WMO in hydrology and water

More information

Basin-Scale Stream-Aquifer Modeling of the Lower Arkansas River, Colorado

Basin-Scale Stream-Aquifer Modeling of the Lower Arkansas River, Colorado Hydrology Days Basin-Scale Stream-Aquifer Modeling of the Lower Arkansas River, Colorado Enrique Triana 1 Graduate Research Assistant and PhD candidate, Civil Engineering Department, Colorado State University,

More information

10/5/2015. The Coming Flood of 2D Models. 1D Modeling Review

10/5/2015. The Coming Flood of 2D Models. 1D Modeling Review The Coming Flood of 2D Models Mitch Blum, HDR Engineering Inc. Outline 1D Modeling 2D Modeling Motivation for Advancement in Modeling HEC-RAS 2D Modeling Flood of 2D Models Regulatory Implications 1D Modeling

More information

City of London Climate Change Adaptation Strategy Dealing with Extreme Rainfall Events

City of London Climate Change Adaptation Strategy Dealing with Extreme Rainfall Events City of London Climate Change Adaptation Strategy Dealing with Extreme Rainfall Events May 29, 2014 Presented by: Berta Krichker M.Eng., FEC, P.Eng. Manager of Stormwater Unit Environmental and Engineering

More information

WATER STORAGE, TRANSPORT, AND DISTRIBUTION Multi-Dam Systems and their Operation - J.J. Cassidy MULTI-DAM SYSTEMS AND THEIR OPERATION

WATER STORAGE, TRANSPORT, AND DISTRIBUTION Multi-Dam Systems and their Operation - J.J. Cassidy MULTI-DAM SYSTEMS AND THEIR OPERATION MULTI-DAM SYSTEMS AND THEIR OPERATION J.J. Cassidy Consulting Hydraulic and Hydrologic Engineer, Concord, California, USA Keywords: Dams, reservoirs, rivers, water storage, dam safety, floods, environment,

More information

Development and Utilization of a Customized Model for Evaluating Performance of the Calumet, Mainstream and Des Plaines Tunnel and Reservoir Systems

Development and Utilization of a Customized Model for Evaluating Performance of the Calumet, Mainstream and Des Plaines Tunnel and Reservoir Systems Development and Utilization of a Customized Model for Evaluating Performance of the Calumet, Mainstream and Des Plaines Tunnel and Reservoir Systems Ann Gray, P.E. Associate Civil Engineer Areas Served

More information

Flood Information Session

Flood Information Session KOLAN RIVER, GIN GIN CREEK & GIN GIN TOWNSHIP Flood Information Session Dwayne Honor, Manager Design, BRC Dan Copelin, Civil Engineer, GHD Overview Background on Studies; State Government Funding; GHD

More information

TENNESSEE GAS PIPELINE COMPANY, L.L.C.

TENNESSEE GAS PIPELINE COMPANY, L.L.C. TENNESSEE GAS PIPELINE COMPANY, L.L.C. HYDROLOGIC & HYDRAULIC CALCULATIONS FOR WATERBODIES CROSSED BY CONNECTICUT PIPELINE EXPANSION PROJECT CONNECTICUT LOOP Submitted by: Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company,

More information

Swannanoa River Flood Risk Management Study

Swannanoa River Flood Risk Management Study Swannanoa River Flood Risk Management Study Measures Evaluated to Reduce Future Flood Damages City of Asheville U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Flooding History Part of the 132 square mile Swannanoa River

More information

Flood Plain Reclamation to Enhance Resiliency Conserving Land in Urban New Jersey

Flood Plain Reclamation to Enhance Resiliency Conserving Land in Urban New Jersey Flood Plain Reclamation to Enhance Resiliency Conserving Land in Urban New Jersey Rutgers Cooperative Extension Water Resources Program Christopher C. Obropta, Ph.D., P.E. Email: obropta@envsci.rutgers.edu

More information

06 - NATIONAL PLUVIAL FLOOD MAPPING FOR ALL IRELAND THE MODELLING APPROACH

06 - NATIONAL PLUVIAL FLOOD MAPPING FOR ALL IRELAND THE MODELLING APPROACH 06 - NATIONAL PLUVIAL FLOOD MAPPING FOR ALL IRELAND THE MODELLING APPROACH Richard Kellagher 1, Mike Panzeri 1, Julien L Homme 1, Yannick Cesses 1, Ben Gouldby 1 John Martin 2, Oliver Nicholson 2, Mark

More information

A Flood Warning Model for Virginia

A Flood Warning Model for Virginia A Flood Warning Model for Virginia Murari Paudel, Ph.D. Aquaveo LLC & Gamal Hassan, P.E. PLC Summary Flood Modeling Overview Methodology Model Building Results Post Processing Information dissemination

More information

R e c o v e R y P R o g R a m

R e c o v e R y P R o g R a m Missouri River R e c o v e r y P r o g r a m Missouri River Basin The Nation s River The Missouri River, the nation s longest, travels more than 2,300 miles from Three Forks, Montana, to join the Mississippi

More information

Abstract INTRODUCTION

Abstract INTRODUCTION GIS in water resources: stormwater master plan T. V. Hromadka II Senior Managing Editor, Failure Analysis Associates, Newport Beach, California, and Professor of Mathematics and Environmental Studies,

More information

FLOODPLAIN DELINEATION IN MUGLA-DALAMAN PLAIN USING GIS BASED RIVER ANALYSIS SYSTEM

FLOODPLAIN DELINEATION IN MUGLA-DALAMAN PLAIN USING GIS BASED RIVER ANALYSIS SYSTEM FLOODPLAIN DELINEATION IN MUGLA-DALAMAN PLAIN USING GIS BASED RIVER ANALYSIS SYSTEM Dr. Murat Ali HATİPOĞLU Fatih KESKİN Kemal SEYREK State Hydraulics Works (DSI), Investigation and Planning Department

More information

DRAINAGE STUDY INFORMATION FORM

DRAINAGE STUDY INFORMATION FORM Name of Development: Location of Development: HYDROLOGIC CRITERIA AND DRAINAGE MANUAL DRAINAGE STUDY INFORMATION FORM Date: a) Descriptive (Cross Streets) rth/south: East/West: b) Section: Township: Range:

More information

Henry Van Offelen Natural Resource Scientist MN Center for Environmental Advocacy hvanoffelen@mncenter.org

Henry Van Offelen Natural Resource Scientist MN Center for Environmental Advocacy hvanoffelen@mncenter.org Henry Van Offelen Natural Resource Scientist MN Center for Environmental Advocacy hvanoffelen@mncenter.org Wetland study slide Water Quality NRE goals in watershed plans Protect habitat that remains.

More information

Flooding Hazards, Prediction & Human Intervention

Flooding Hazards, Prediction & Human Intervention Page 1 of 10 EENS 3050 Tulane University Natural Disasters Prof. Stephen A. Nelson Flooding Hazards, Prediction & Human Intervention This page last updated on 19-Oct-2015 Hazards Associated with Flooding

More information

BLACK/HARMONY/FAREWELL CREEK WATERSHED EXISTING CONDITIONS REPORT CHAPTER 12 - STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

BLACK/HARMONY/FAREWELL CREEK WATERSHED EXISTING CONDITIONS REPORT CHAPTER 12 - STORMWATER MANAGEMENT Harmony Creek subwatershed Harmony Creek subwatershed BLACK/HARMONY/FAREWELL CREEK WATERSHED EXISTING CONDITIONS REPORT CHAPTER 12 - STORMWATER MANAGEMENT April 2011 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION...

More information