What to Do When Receiving Radiation Therapy to the Pelvis

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "What to Do When Receiving Radiation Therapy to the Pelvis"

Transcription

1 What to Do When Receiving Radiation Therapy to the Pelvis UHN For patients with gynecological cancer Learn the main steps in planning radiation treatment and how to manage side effects during radiation treatment. Table of Contents Patient Education Improving health through education What You Need to Know About Your CT Planning Appointment... 2 What You Need to Know About Your Radiation Treatment Appointments... 3 Side Effects You May Experience... 5 What to Expect After Radiation Treatment... 8 Things That May Happen After Radiation Therapy... 9 Learn More with These Resource... 9 Introduction Many patients find pelvic radiation treatment to be quite easy. Many have only minor side effects. Some patients may have more side effects. How you will react to radiation treatment is impossible to predict before it happens. You may be able to prevent or reduce some of the side effects during radiation treatment if you use the information. in this booklet. Your radiation oncologist, oncology nurse and radiation therapists will provide you and your family with care, support, and information throughout your treatment. Please visit the UHN Patient Education website for more health information: University Health Network. All rights reserved. This information is to be used for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult your health care provider for advice about a specific medical condition. A single copy of these materials may be reprinted for non-commercial personal use only. Author: Angela Cashell, Radiation Medicine Program Created: 11/2004 (02/2012) Form: D-5050 C034-D

2 This booklet provides you with general information. If you have more questions: Ask your radiation therapist when you go in for treatment. If they can t answer your question they will find someone who can. Ask your oncologist or oncology nurse at your weekly review appointment. If you have any questions about your appointments please call (416) ext 6483 Let us know as soon as possible if you prefer to speak in a language other than English. The hospital can arrange for an interpretation service for you. What You Need to Know About Your CT Planning Appointment Where do I go for this appointment? Your CT planning appointment will be at Princess Margaret Hospital. Check in at the Reception Desk on level 1B (1 below the main floor) when you arrive. Your picture will be taken to help us identify you while you are receiving radiation treatment. How long is this appointment? You should plan to be at the hospital for 1 to 2 hours, although the time needed to complete the procedure is usually much less. Do I need to prepare before coming to this appointment? You may need to empty your rectum before the visit. You may also need to have your bladder comfortably full. Your oncology nurse will let you know if you need to do this before your CT planning appointment. He or she will give you an instruction sheet, Getting Ready for your CT Planning Scan and Treatments that will teach you how to do this. If you have not been asked to do anything to prepare, you should continue to eat and drink normally. You should also continue to take all medicines that have been prescribed by your radiation oncologist or other doctors. 2

3 Do not use vaginal tampons during your CT planning appointment or during your radiation treatments. What will happen at the appointment? A. The goal of this visit is to have a CT or MRI scan of your pelvis to plan your treatment. These pictures will provide your radiation oncologist and other members of the treatment team with the information they need to plan your radiation treatment. The CT or MRI scan pictures will show the radiation oncologist and other members of the treatment team what areas need to be treated with radiation. They will also be able to see what normal organs they will need to protect during your treatment. B. Marks will be placed on your skin after the scans have been completed. This is done so that the radiation treatment can be given to you in the same way each day. These marks need to stay on your skin throughout treatment. To make sure your marks stay visible, small permanent tattoos, the size of a freckle, are used to mark the spot so that they cannot be rubbed or washed off. The tattoos will be done by your radiation therapists, using a small sterile needle. Your radiation therapists will explain the procedure to you ahead of time. After your planning visit is complete, your treatment team will continue to work behind the scenes to prepare a treatment plan that is tailored for you. What You Need to Know About Your Radiation Treatment Appointments Where do I go for my radiation treatment appointments? Your radiation treatment will be at Princess Margaret Hospital. Check in at the Reception Desk on level 2B (2 below the main floor) when you arrive. Can I schedule my radiation treatment appointments at times that are convenient for me? Unfortunately, because of the large number of patients that need to be treated every day we can t guarantee specific appointment times. However, your radiation therapists will try to help you out if there are special circumstances. 3

4 How long will radiation treatment take each day? You should plan to be at the hospital for 1 hour each day, although the time needed for your treatment is usually 15 to 20 minutes. Your first treatment may take longer because your radiation therapists will be checking all the information before giving you your treatment. On the first day, they may also take some more x-ray pictures just before your treatment starts to confirm that it matches what your radiation oncologist planned. Each day, including the first day, a Cone Beam CT scan ( mini CT ) will be taken of the treatment area. This is done to check that you are in the correct position before you are treated. The pictures do not give any information about how your tumor is responding to treatment. How many radiation treatments will I receive each day? Most patients receive one (1) radiation treatment each day. However, due to statutory holidays or machine availability, some women may need two (2) treatments on some days. Your treatment team will tell you if this is necessary for you. Do I need to prepare before coming for the radiation treatment appointment? You need to prepare for your radiation treatment appointments the same way that you prepared for your CT planning appointment. This means that if you were asked to have an empty rectum and comfortably full bladder for your planning appointment, you will have to do the same thing for all your radiation treatment appointments. You will receive an instruction sheet to teach you how to do this. It is called, Getting Ready for your CT Planning Scan and Radiation Treatments prior to your CT planning scan if you need to prepare your rectum and bladder. If you have not been asked to do anything to prepare you should continue to eat normally. If you are taking medicines, continue to take all medicines that have been prescribed by your radiation oncologist or other doctors. Do not use vaginal tampons during your CT planning appointment or during your radiation treatments. 4

5 Who should I talk to if I have questions or develop side effects? Your radiation therapists will try to answer your questions every day when you come for treatment. If they cannot answer your question, they may refer you to other members of your health care team. During your treatment, you will be scheduled to see your radiation oncologist or another doctor that works with your radiation oncologist once each week. This appointment is to make sure that your radiation treatment is going as planned. They will also make sure that any side effects you may be feeling are treated. You will have the chance to ask the doctor and oncology nurse questions at this appointment. Side Effects You May Experience Side effects from radiation are different for everyone. The type of side effect and how much it will affect you depends on: The parts of the body being treated The type of radiation used The amount of radiation given The person s general health Other factors that cannot be predicted A. Tiredness Some patients may feel more tired than others. Tiredness often begins 2 to 3 weeks after you start radiation treatment. This may be made worse by poor sleep, emotional stress, and daily travel to the hospital for treatment. What you can do: Stay physically active but pace your activities Don t expect too much of yourself Continue activities that you enjoy such as short walks, music, reading and other hobbies Ask family or friends to help you with household chores and other commitments Eat snacks often throughout the day. Keep ready-to-eat foods with you all the time. Drink plenty of fluids Get enough sleep 5

6 B. Loss of Appetite You may lose interest in food while receiving radiation treatment, but it is important that you try to keep eating normally during your treatment. What you can do: Do some light exercise Get some fresh air Eat small meals often Eat foods that you enjoy Make your food interesting and appealing Drink plenty of fluids A dietitian can give you advice about what foods to eat. He or she will also be able to tell you what nutrients your body needs. Your radiation therapists or oncology nurse can schedule an appointment for you and your family with a dietitian. C. Bowel cramping (stomach ache) and diarrhea You may feel cramping in your bowel (stomach ache) or diarrhea. These feelings can begin as early as the 1st week of treatment. The feelings are usually mild and can be treated. What you can do: Continue with what you would normally eat until you feel cramping or diarrhea Eat food that are low in fiber Eat foods that are low in fat Avoid milk products (lactose) Avoid caffeine and/or spices Eat 5 or 6 smaller meals instead of 3 larger meals each day Drink 8-10 cups of liquids each day to prevent dehydration if you have diarrhea Medicines, such as Imodium, may be needed to help control cramping or diarrhea. For more information, ask your radiation therapists or oncology nurse for the Eating Hints for People with Diarrhea information booklet. You can also ask your radiation therapists or oncology nurse to book an appointment for you and your family to see a dietitian. A dietitian can give you advice about your diet and nutritional needs. 6

7 D. Frequent urination and painful urination You may feel the need to urinate often or feel pain when you urinate. You may also feel cramps in your bladder. You may be feeling these symptoms because of the radiation therapy or a bladder infection. What you can do: Drink plenty of fluid during the day. Do not drink as much water or fluid starting an hour or two before you go to bed. This will help reduce how often you need to urinate during the night. Avoid drinks with caffeine such as coffee, tea, and cola. Speak to your radiation oncologist, oncology nurse or radiation therapist if these symptoms continue. They may check to see if you have a bladder infection. There may be some medicine you can take to help you feel better. E. Changes in your blood Radiation treatment to the pelvis usually does not cause big changes in your blood. However, if you are also receiving chemotherapy, there may be some changes in your blood such as lower amounts of: red blood cells white blood cells platelets Your healthcare team may ask you to have regular blood tests if you are receiving chemotherapy. They may also ask you to have a blood test for other reasons. F. Warm, Dry, Itchy and Red Skin During radiation treatment, your skin may turn red in the treatment area, for example: the groin the area between the thighs the area around the anus These areas may feel warm, dry and itchy. If you have hemorrhoids, they may get worse during radiation treatment. 7

8 What you can do: Keep the area clean and continue to bathe or shower. Use a mild soap. Pat the skin dry with a soft towel. Do not rub the skin. Keep the area dry. Expose the area to air whenever you can. Wear loose cotton underwear, (such as boxer shorts). Do not wear tight-fitting clothing such as nylon panty hose. Do not use feminine hygiene sprays. Take a Sitz bath. Sitz baths may help the skin around the groin area feel better. It may also prevent hemorrhoids from getting worse Ask your radiation therapists or oncology nurse for the Sitz Bath information booklet. You can keep taking Sitz baths for a few weeks after your treatment is finished. It may help with your skin side effects. Speak to your radiation oncologist or oncology nurse if these side effects do not go away. There may be some medicine you can take to help you feel better. G. Sexuality Cancer and cancer treatment can affect your desire for sex. It can also affect your sexual functioning. Talk to your radiation oncologist or oncology nurse if you or your partner has any questions about how the treatment affects your sexuality. H. Other side effects It is possible that you will have other side effects that are not described above. The side effects you learn about in this booklet are the most common. Talk to your treatment team if you experience other symptoms during your treatment. Sometimes the tumor and the treatment can cause very similar symptoms. What to Expect After Radiation Treatment The side effects that you feel from the treatment are temporary. You will start to feel better about 1 to 2 weeks after your treatment is finished. Near the end of your radiation treatment, you will be given a booklet What to Do When Finishing Radiation therapy. You will meet with a radiation oncologist on the last week of your treatment. He or she will then give you the final review of your treatment. You can prepare a list of questions and bring it to this appointment. After your final review appointment, you will be scheduled for a follow-up appointment at Princess Margaret Hospital. This is usually planned for 1 to 3 months after your treatment is finished. At this appointment, you will find out how you have responded to the treatment and the team will make sure that your side effects have gotten better. 8

9 Things That May Happen After Radiation Therapy A. New Symptoms The radiation treatment side effects mentioned above are temporary. They should start to get better 1 to 2 weeks after your radiation treatment is done. You can start some of your normal routines at this time. Sometimes, people will develop new side effects after their radiation treatment is finished. Talk to your radiation oncologist or oncology nurse if you develop new symptoms after your radiation treatment is finished. B. Brachytherapy Some people may need internal radiation treatment right after completing external radiation treatment. This is called brachytherapy. Your radiation oncologist will let you know if you need brachytherapy. They will talk to you about this before your last day of external radiation. C. Narrowing of the Vagina Sometimes radiation treatment to the pelvis can cause the vagina to narrow. Your treatment team will let you know what you can do to help reduce the chance that this will happen. You may need to use a vaginal dilator if the team expects that your vagina may narrow. Your treatment team will tell you how to use the dilator correctly. You should use the dilator for 3 to 6 months, or as recommended by your radiation oncologist. Sometimes you may even need to use it for longer. Your radiation oncologist can teach you how to use the dilator at your regular clinic visits after your radiation treatment is finished. Learn More with These Resources Find these pamphlets at the Patient & Family Library (Main Floor), and the Patient Family Resource Centres located in the waiting rooms on Levels 1B and 2B. Your Radiation Therapy at The Princess Margaret Hospital (2011) Radiation Therapy and You. (2006) Canadian Cancer Society What you need to know about antioxidants and your Radiation Therapy pamphlet (2010) Guidelines for Managing Gas pamphlet (2010) Eating Hints For People with Diarrhea pamphlet (2010) Having a Sitz Bath at Home pamphlet (2011) Contact or visit the Patient & Family Library to find more information: 9

10 Location: Princess Margaret Hospital, Main Floor Telephone: (416) ext Website: You can also visit the University Health Network Patient Education website at Find information about all the UHN Patient Patient & Family Library & Resource Centres at Write Your Notes Here: 10

What to Expect While Receiving Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

What to Expect While Receiving Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer What to Expect While Receiving Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer Princess Margaret Information for patients who are having radiation therapy Read this pamphlet to learn about: The main steps in planning

More information

The following document includes information about:

The following document includes information about: Patient information WHAT TO EXPECT WHILE RECEIVING RADIATION THERAPY FOR PROSTATE CANCER Oncology Vitalité Zone : 1B 4 5 6 Facility : Dr. Léon-Richard Oncology Centre The following document includes information

More information

What to Expect While Receiving Radiation Therapy for Breast Cancer

What to Expect While Receiving Radiation Therapy for Breast Cancer What to Expect While Receiving Radiation Therapy for Breast Cancer Princess Margaret Information for patients who are having radiation therapy Read this pamphlet to learn about: The main steps in planning

More information

What to Expect While Receiving Radiation Therapy to the Chest

What to Expect While Receiving Radiation Therapy to the Chest What to Expect While Receiving Radiation Therapy to the Chest Princess Margaret Information for patients who are having radiation therapy Read this pamphlet to learn about: The main steps in planning radiation

More information

Managing Acute Side Effects of Colorectal & Anal Radiation Therapy

Managing Acute Side Effects of Colorectal & Anal Radiation Therapy RADIATION THERAPY SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT Managing Acute Side Effects of Colorectal & Anal Radiation Therapy In this booklet you will learn about: Common side effects when you receive radiation therapy to your

More information

Managing Acute Side Effects of Pelvic Radiation for Gynaecological Cancers

Managing Acute Side Effects of Pelvic Radiation for Gynaecological Cancers RADIATION THERAPY SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT Managing Acute Side Effects of Pelvic Radiation for Gynaecological Cancers In this booklet you will learn about: Common side effects when you receive radiation therapy

More information

What to Expect While Receiving Radiation Therapy for Thyroid Cancer

What to Expect While Receiving Radiation Therapy for Thyroid Cancer What to Expect While Receiving Radiation Therapy for Thyroid Cancer Princess Margaret Information for patients who are having external beam radiation therapy to the thyroid Read this pamphlet to learn

More information

Why is radiation therapy used to treat prostate cancer? Is there anything that I have to do before my treatment planning appointment?

Why is radiation therapy used to treat prostate cancer? Is there anything that I have to do before my treatment planning appointment? 2015 Information for Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy: External Beam Treatment for Prostate Cancer Why is radiation therapy used to treat prostate cancer? Prostate cancer may be treated with a combination

More information

Managing Acute Side Effects of Prostate Radiation Therapy

Managing Acute Side Effects of Prostate Radiation Therapy RADIATION THERAPY SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT Managing Acute Side Effects of Prostate Radiation Therapy In this booklet you will learn about: Common side effects when you receive radiation therapy to your prostate

More information

What to Expect While Receiving Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer

What to Expect While Receiving Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer What to Expect While Receiving Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Princess Margaret Information for patients who are having radiation therapy Read this pamphlet to learn about: The main steps in

More information

Information for Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy: Brain Tumours. Why is radiation therapy used to treat brain tumours?

Information for Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy: Brain Tumours. Why is radiation therapy used to treat brain tumours? Information for Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy: Brain Tumours Why is radiation therapy used to treat brain tumours? Brain tumours may be treated with a combination of treatments such as surgery,

More information

CyberKnife planning and treatment for prostate cancer

CyberKnife planning and treatment for prostate cancer CyberKnife planning and treatment for prostate cancer Please bring this handout with you to all of your radiation appointments. Appointments If you take pain or anti-anxiety medication, please bring it

More information

Managing Changes in Your Bladder Function After Cancer Treatment

Managing Changes in Your Bladder Function After Cancer Treatment Managing Changes in Your Bladder Function After Cancer Treatment Information for cancer survivors UHN Read this resource to learn: What a urinary problem is What causes it What you can do to improve your

More information

Managing Bowel Problems after Cancer Treatment

Managing Bowel Problems after Cancer Treatment Managing Bowel Problems after Cancer Treatment UHN Information for cancer survivors Read this pamphlet to learn: What bowel problems are What causes bowel problems What you can do to manage your bowel

More information

Radiotherapy to the female pelvis

Radiotherapy to the female pelvis The Clatterbridge Cancer Centre NHS Foundation Trust Radiotherapy to the female pelvis Radiotherapy A guide for patients and carers Contents Introduction... 1 Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) in gynaecological

More information

Radical lung radiotherapy

Radical lung radiotherapy Radical lung radiotherapy This information booklet is about radiotherapy for lung cancer. If you have any questions, or would like more advice, please ask a member of your treatment team. The team consists

More information

Radiation Therapy for Palliative Treatment at The Carlo Fidani Peel Regional Cancer Centre

Radiation Therapy for Palliative Treatment at The Carlo Fidani Peel Regional Cancer Centre Radiation Therapy for Palliative Treatment at The Carlo Fidani Peel Regional Cancer Centre Introduction...2 Patient Education and Information...2&3 Treatment Planning...3&4 Your Appointments...5 Radiation

More information

Radiotherapy for Cancer of the Uterus (Womb) Cancer Services Information for Patients

Radiotherapy for Cancer of the Uterus (Womb) Cancer Services Information for Patients Radiotherapy for Cancer of the Uterus (Womb) Cancer Services Information for Patients i introduction When your consultant talked to you about the treatment options available, the side effects of radiotherapy

More information

Your Radiation Therapy at the Princess Margaret Hospital

Your Radiation Therapy at the Princess Margaret Hospital Your Radiation Therapy at the Princess Margaret Hospital *This document was developed by a multidisciplinary team within the Radiation Medicine Program PMH Introduction Radiation therapy* is one treatment

More information

Right or Left Hemicolectomy

Right or Left Hemicolectomy Right or Left Hemicolectomy UHN Information for patients and families Read this booklet to learn: what a right or left hemicolectomy is how to prepare how to take part in your care in hospital and at home

More information

After Your Gastrectomy

After Your Gastrectomy After Your Gastrectomy UHN Information for patients and families Read this information to learn: what a gastrectomy is how to care for yourself what problems to look out for who to call if you have any

More information

Information for Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy: Breast Cancer or Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS) of the Breast

Information for Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy: Breast Cancer or Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS) of the Breast Information for Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy: Breast Cancer or Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS) of the Breast Why is radiation therapy used to treat breast cancer or DCIS? Breast cancer or DCIS

More information

GYNECOLOGIC CANCERS Facts to Help Patients Make an Informed Decision

GYNECOLOGIC CANCERS Facts to Help Patients Make an Informed Decision RADIATION THERAPY FOR GYNECOLOGIC CANCERS Facts to Help Patients Make an Informed Decision TARGETING CANCER CARE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR RADIATION ONCOLOGY FACTS ABOUT GYNECOLOGIC CANCERS Gynecologic cancers

More information

Radiotherapy for vulval cancer

Radiotherapy for vulval cancer This information is an extract from the booklet Understanding cancer of the vulva. You may find the full booklet helpful. We can send you a copy free see page 6. Contents External radiotherapy Internal

More information

Managing your Symptoms of Menopause after Cancer Treatment

Managing your Symptoms of Menopause after Cancer Treatment Managing your Symptoms of Menopause after Cancer Treatment Information for women who have finished treatment UHN Read this handout to learn about: What are the symptoms of menopause? Will my periods come

More information

Radiotherapy to the Bowel (Colo-Rectal Tumours) Information for patients. Northern Centre for Cancer Care Freeman Hospital

Radiotherapy to the Bowel (Colo-Rectal Tumours) Information for patients. Northern Centre for Cancer Care Freeman Hospital Radiotherapy to the Bowel (Colo-Rectal Tumours) Information for patients Northern Centre for Cancer Care Freeman Hospital Introduction Your oncologist has advised you to have a course of radiotherapy to

More information

Radiation Therapy To the Arms or Legs

Radiation Therapy To the Arms or Legs Radiation Therapy To the Arms or Legs You will be receiving two to six weeks of radiation to the arms or legs. It will describe how your treatments are given. It will also describe how to take care of

More information

Information for patients receiving short-term hormone treatment and radiotherapy for prostate cancer

Information for patients receiving short-term hormone treatment and radiotherapy for prostate cancer Information for patients receiving short-term hormone treatment and radiotherapy for prostate cancer Northern Centre for Cancer Care (NCCC) Freeman Hospital Introduction This leaflet has been written to

More information

In-Patient Radioactive Iodine ( 131 I) Treatment

In-Patient Radioactive Iodine ( 131 I) Treatment In-Patient Radioactive Iodine ( 131 I) Treatment Information for patients and families Princess Margaret Read this booklet to learn: what radioactive iodine treatment is what to expect instructions to

More information

Preparing for your Breast Tomosynthesis

Preparing for your Breast Tomosynthesis Preparing for your Breast Tomosynthesis For patients at the Rapid Diagnostic Centre UHN Read this resource to learn: How to prepare What to expect during breast tomosynthesis What questions to ask your

More information

Discharge Instructions. Chemotherapy

Discharge Instructions. Chemotherapy Discharge Instructions Chemotherapy . TABLE OF CONTENTS Whom to call for problems --------------------------------------- 1 During business hours ---------------------------------------- 1 After hours

More information

CT Scan UHN. Information for patients and families

CT Scan UHN. Information for patients and families CT Scan UHN Information for patients and families Read this information to learn: what a CT scan is how to prepare for the scan what to expect who to contact if you have any questions Joint Department

More information

Radiation Therapy and Caring for Your Skin

Radiation Therapy and Caring for Your Skin Patient Information Radiation Therapy and Caring for Your Skin Comments, Feedback? Contact Patient and Professional Education 519-685-8742 Email: lrcpeducation@lhsc.on.ca Reviewed by the LRCP Patient Education

More information

Prostate Brachytherapy - Seed Implant

Prostate Brachytherapy - Seed Implant Prostate Brachytherapy - Seed Implant In this guide, you will find information about: What is brachytherapy? Important dates for your treatment. How to prepare for your implant. Possible side effects.

More information

RADIATION THERAPY AUCKLAND CITY HOSPITAL

RADIATION THERAPY AUCKLAND CITY HOSPITAL RADIATION THERAPY AUCKLAND CITY HOSPITAL What is Radiation Therapy? Radiation Therapy is the use of radiation to treat cancer and some non-malignant growths. A machine, called a linear accelerator, is

More information

FOLFOX Chemotherapy. This handout provides information about FOLFOX chemotherapy. It is sometimes called as FLOX chemotherapy.

FOLFOX Chemotherapy. This handout provides information about FOLFOX chemotherapy. It is sometimes called as FLOX chemotherapy. FOLFOX Chemotherapy This handout provides information about FOLFOX chemotherapy. It is sometimes called as FLOX chemotherapy. What is chemotherapy? Chemotherapy is a method of treating cancer by using

More information

Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) Prevention Checklist

Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) Prevention Checklist Use this checklist to make sure that supporters and individuals take actions necessary to prevent a UTI. When reviewing prevention steps for a specific person, you may record your answers to the questions

More information

Uterine Artery Embolization

Uterine Artery Embolization Uterine Artery Embolization UHN Information for patients and families Read this information to learn: what uterine fibroids are how uterine artery embolization can help how to prepare for the procedure

More information

Manage cancer related fatigue:

Manage cancer related fatigue: Manage cancer related fatigue: For People Affected by Cancer In this pamphlet: What can I do to manage fatigue? What is cancer related fatigue? What causes cancer related fatigue? How can my health care

More information

BCG Bladder Therapy UHN. Information for patients. What is BCG Bladder therapy? Cystoscopy Clinic Toronto General Hospital

BCG Bladder Therapy UHN. Information for patients. What is BCG Bladder therapy? Cystoscopy Clinic Toronto General Hospital BCG Bladder Therapy UHN Information for patients Cystoscopy Clinic Toronto General Hospital 416-340-3882 Your doctor has decided that BCG Therapy is the best therapy for your bladder cancer. Read this

More information

BOWEL RESECTION. Date of Surgery. Please bring this booklet the day of your surgery. QHC#383

BOWEL RESECTION. Date of Surgery. Please bring this booklet the day of your surgery. QHC#383 BOWEL RESECTION Date of Surgery Please bring this booklet the day of your surgery. QHC#383 What is a Bowel Resection? A Bowel Resection is a surgical procedure in which a part of the large or small intestine

More information

PET/CT Scan UHN. Information for patients and families

PET/CT Scan UHN. Information for patients and families PET/CT Scan UHN Information for patients and families Read this information to learn: what PET/CT scan is how to prepare what to expect who to call if you have any questions Your PET/CT Scan has been scheduled

More information

Preparing for your Ultrasound-Guided Core Biopsy

Preparing for your Ultrasound-Guided Core Biopsy Preparing for your Ultrasound-Guided Core Biopsy UHN For patients at the Rapid Diagnostic Centre Read this resource to learn: How to prepare What to expect during the biopsy What you need to do after When

More information

Colon Cancer Surgery and Recovery. A Guide for Patients and Families

Colon Cancer Surgery and Recovery. A Guide for Patients and Families Colon Cancer Surgery and Recovery A Guide for Patients and Families This Booklet You are receiving this booklet because you will be having surgery shortly. This booklet tells you what to do before, during,

More information

RADIATION THERAPY FOR BLADDER CANCER. Facts to Help Patients Make an Informed Decision TARGETING CANCER CARE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR RADIATION ONCOLOGY

RADIATION THERAPY FOR BLADDER CANCER. Facts to Help Patients Make an Informed Decision TARGETING CANCER CARE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR RADIATION ONCOLOGY RADIATION THERAPY FOR Facts to Help Patients Make an Informed Decision TARGETING CANCER CARE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR RADIATION ONCOLOGY FACTS ABOUT The bladder is located in the pelvis. It collects and stores

More information

High Dose Radioactive Iodine (I-131) Therapy for Treatment of Thyroid Cancer

High Dose Radioactive Iodine (I-131) Therapy for Treatment of Thyroid Cancer 12 High Dose Radioactive Iodine (I-131) Therapy for Treatment of Thyroid Cancer Please arrive 15 minutes early to allow for parking and registration. If you have questions or need to cancel your appointment

More information

Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer Introduction Cancer of the prostate is the most common form of cancer that affects men. About 240,000 American men are diagnosed with prostate cancer every year. Your

More information

Brachytherapy: High Dose Rate (HDR) Radiation Interstitial Implant

Brachytherapy: High Dose Rate (HDR) Radiation Interstitial Implant Brachytherapy: High Dose Rate (HDR) Radiation Interstitial Implant Goal of the procedure Brachytherapy, or internal radiation therapy, is a way of giving a higher dose of radiation to a tumor area while

More information

PATIENT INFORMATION. Brachytherapy for Cancer of the Cervix

PATIENT INFORMATION. Brachytherapy for Cancer of the Cervix PATIENT INFORMATION Brachytherapy for Cancer of the Cervix Cancer Therapy Centre Locked Mailbag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1871 Telephone: 8738 5180 Facsimile: 8738 5188 August 2013 1. Introduction Radiotherapy

More information

Radiation Oncology Patient information. Radiation Therapy for breast cancers

Radiation Oncology Patient information. Radiation Therapy for breast cancers Radiation Oncology Patient information Radiation Therapy for breast cancers Radiation Therapy for breast cancers 1 Radiation therapy for breast cancer Radiation therapy plays a vital role in treating and

More information

Radiation Therapy. What to expect

Radiation Therapy. What to expect Radiation Therapy What to expect This booklet was made possible through the generosity of BC Cancer Foundation donors. The BC Cancer Foundation is the fundraising partner of the BC Cancer Agency, supporting

More information

Information for patients receiving CyberKnife treatment to the spine

Information for patients receiving CyberKnife treatment to the spine Information for patients receiving CyberKnife treatment to the spine Please bring this handout with you to all of your radiation appointments. Appointments If you take pain or anti-anxiety medication,

More information

Managing Constipation

Managing Constipation Managing Constipation The following information is based on the general experiences of many prostate cancer patients. Your experience may be different. If you have any questions about what prostate cancer

More information

A guide for patients receiving Intra-Uterine Brachytherapy

A guide for patients receiving Intra-Uterine Brachytherapy A guide for patients receiving Intra-Uterine Brachytherapy Delivering the best in care UHB is a no smoking Trust To see all of our current patient information leaflets please visit www.uhb.nhs.uk/patient-information-leaflets.htm

More information

Preparing for Your Chemotherapy Treatment

Preparing for Your Chemotherapy Treatment Preparing for Your Chemotherapy Treatment Princess Margaret For patients receiving chemotherapy at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre Read this resource to learn about: What to expect during your appointments

More information

Prepare to return to work after treatment for cancer

Prepare to return to work after treatment for cancer Prepare to return to work after treatment for cancer For people who have had treatment for cancer Princess Margaret Read this resource to learn: Common concerns about returning to work How to prepare for

More information

RADIATION THERAPY guide. Guiding you through your treatment

RADIATION THERAPY guide. Guiding you through your treatment RADIATION THERAPY guide Guiding you through your treatment 2013_RADIATION_GUIDE_6PG.indd 1 Before Treatment Consultation with the Radiation Oncologist During your first visit with the radiation oncologist,

More information

Hand Hygiene at UHN. Information for patients, families and visitors

Hand Hygiene at UHN. Information for patients, families and visitors Hand Hygiene at UHN UHN Information for patients, families and visitors Read this pamphlet to learn about: What you can do to stop the spread of germs What UHN is doing to protect you Where to find more

More information

Taking Care of Your Skin During Radiation Therapy

Taking Care of Your Skin During Radiation Therapy Taking Care of Your Skin During Radiation Therapy Princess Margaret Information for patients who are having radiation therapy Read this pamphlet to learn about: What a radiation skin reaction is How to

More information

METASTASES TO THE BONE

METASTASES TO THE BONE RADIATION THERAPY FOR METASTASES TO THE BONE Facts to Help Patients Make an Informed Decision TARGETING CANCER CARE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR RADIATION ONCOLOGY WHAT ARE BONE METASTASES? Cancer that starts

More information

Anorectal, Abcess, Pilonidal Sinus, Fissure, Fistula or Hemorrhoid surgery

Anorectal, Abcess, Pilonidal Sinus, Fissure, Fistula or Hemorrhoid surgery Anorectal, Abcess, Pilonidal Sinus, Fissure, Fistula or Hemorrhoid surgery TWH For day surgery patients going home after anal surgery Read this pamphlet to learn about: How to take care of yourself at

More information

PATIENT INFORMATION. A guide to your HDR brachytherapy for cancer of the cervix THE OTTAWA HOSPITAL CP 85 B (08/2010)

PATIENT INFORMATION. A guide to your HDR brachytherapy for cancer of the cervix THE OTTAWA HOSPITAL CP 85 B (08/2010) PATIENT INFORMATION A guide to your HDR brachytherapy for cancer of the cervix CP 85 B (08/2010) THE OTTAWA HOSPITAL Disclaimer This is general information developed by The Ottawa Hospital. It is not intended

More information

Total Skin Electron Beam Radiation, TSEB

Total Skin Electron Beam Radiation, TSEB Total Skin Electron Beam Radiation, TSEB What is Total Skin Electron Beam Radiation, or TSEB? TSEB is used to treat Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma. TSEB delivers a specific amount of radiation beam to all of

More information

Get the best from your chemotherapy and hormone therapy

Get the best from your chemotherapy and hormone therapy Get the best from your chemotherapy and hormone therapy For men who have advanced prostate cancer Princess Margaret Read this resource to learn: Why you should get chemotherapy and hormone therapy at the

More information

Preparing for your Surgery:

Preparing for your Surgery: Preparing for your Surgery: Information for Patients Undergoing a: UHN Minimally Invasive Radical Hysterectomy Possible removal of one or both ovaries and tubes Possible removal of pelvic lymph nodes Patient

More information

Endoscopic Ear Surgery

Endoscopic Ear Surgery Endoscopic Ear Surgery UHN Information for patients and families Read this booklet to learn: how to prepare for endoscopic ear surgery what you can expect how to care for yourself when you get home when

More information

After Your Uterine Artery Embolization UHN

After Your Uterine Artery Embolization UHN After Your Uterine Artery Embolization UHN Information for patients and families Read this information to learn: how you can expect to feel what you can do when you get home common side-effects what problems

More information

Urinary Incontinence. Patient Information Sheet

Urinary Incontinence. Patient Information Sheet Urinary Incontinence Patient Information Sheet What is urinary incontinence (UI)? UI happens when you are not able to control when you urinate and you wet yourself. How common is urinary incontinence?

More information

December Is Cancer-Related Fatigue Awareness Month

December Is Cancer-Related Fatigue Awareness Month December Is Cancer-Related Fatigue Awareness Month What Is Cancer Related Fatigue? Cancer related fatigue is a constant feeling of tiredness from cancer or cancer treatment. The tiredness may prevent you

More information

Quick Facts about Appendix Cancer

Quick Facts about Appendix Cancer Quick Facts about Appendix Cancer What is the appendix? The appendix is a pouch-like tube attached to the first part of the large intestine (cecum). The appendix is about 10 centimetres long and has no

More information

Going home after an AV Fistula or AV Graft

Going home after an AV Fistula or AV Graft Going home after an AV Fistula or AV Graft TGH Information for patients and families During your hospital stay, your surgeon created an: AV Fistula AV Graft Read this booklet to learn: how to care for

More information

Dealing with Erectile Dysfunction During and After Prostate Cancer Treatment For You and Your Partner

Dealing with Erectile Dysfunction During and After Prostate Cancer Treatment For You and Your Partner Dealing with Erectile Dysfunction During and After Prostate Cancer Treatment For You and Your Partner The following information is based on the general experiences of many prostate cancer patients. Your

More information

Short Course, Pre-operative Radiotherapy for Bowel Cancer

Short Course, Pre-operative Radiotherapy for Bowel Cancer Short Course, Pre-operative Radiotherapy for Bowel Cancer Patient Information Introduction This leaflet tells you about short course, pre-operative radiotherapy for the treatment of bowel cancer. It explains

More information

Clostridium difficile (C. difficile)

Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) UHN Information for patients and families Read this resource to learn about: What is C. difficile How people get infected with C. difficile Treatment and medicine How

More information

Pilonidal Sinus. Information for patients

Pilonidal Sinus. Information for patients Pilonidal Sinus Information for patients Information for patients 2 What is a pilonidal sinus? A pilonidal sinus is a small hole or tunnel in the skin, usually at the top of the cleft between the buttocks.

More information

Laparoscopic Nephrectomy Surgery

Laparoscopic Nephrectomy Surgery Laparoscopic Nephrectomy Surgery What is a laparoscopic nephrectomy? Nephrectomy surgery removes all or part of a kidney. The adrenal gland may also be removed. This is done for many reasons such as an

More information

After Your Abdominal Surgery

After Your Abdominal Surgery UW MEDICINE PATIENT EDUCATION After Your Abdominal Surgery Self-care and follow-up You recently had abdominal surgery. This handout explains what to expect during your recovery. Please read these instructions

More information

es of Urinary Incontinence:

es of Urinary Incontinence: Reversible Cause Urinary incontinence is a loss of control over the passing of urine. Urine loss can occur in very small amounts (enough only to dampen underwear) to very large amounts (requiring a change

More information

Caring for Yourself After the Loss of Your Baby

Caring for Yourself After the Loss of Your Baby Patient Education Caring for Yourself After the Loss of Your Baby Emotional and physical healing The days after the loss of your baby can be difficult. This handout is to help you understand the changes

More information

External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to secondary bone cancer

External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to secondary bone cancer The Clatterbridge Cancer Centre NHS Foundation Trust External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to secondary bone cancer Radiotherapy A guide for patients and carers Contents What is secondary bone cancer?...1

More information

Femoral artery bypass graft (Including femoral crossover graft)

Femoral artery bypass graft (Including femoral crossover graft) Femoral artery bypass graft (Including femoral crossover graft) Why do I need the operation? You have a blockage or narrowing of the arteries supplying blood to your leg. This reduces the blood flow to

More information

After your Intralesional Bleomycin Injection

After your Intralesional Bleomycin Injection After your Intralesional Bleomycin Injection UHN Instructions for patients going home Read this brochure to learn about: How to take care of yourself at home What activities are safe How to take your medication

More information

Bowel Control Problems

Bowel Control Problems Bowel Control Problems WOMENCARE A Healthy Woman is a Powerful Woman (407) 898-1500 Bowel control problems affect at least 1 million people in the United States. Loss of normal control of the bowels is

More information

Day Case Radical Orchidectomy. Department of Urology Information for patients

Day Case Radical Orchidectomy. Department of Urology Information for patients Day Case Radical Orchidectomy Department of Urology Information for patients i What is a radical orchidectomy? You and your consultant have decided that you need to have your testicle removed (radical

More information

Your Colposcopy Clinic Visit

Your Colposcopy Clinic Visit The Colposcopy Clinic Juravinski Hospital Your Colposcopy Clinic Visit Welcome to the Colposcopy Clinic. We recognize that coming to the Clinic may be very stressful. We will give you clear information

More information

CHEMOTHERAPY CHEMOTHERAPY. In this section you will learn about:

CHEMOTHERAPY CHEMOTHERAPY. In this section you will learn about: CHEMOTHERAPY CHEMOTHERAPY In this section you will learn about: What is chemotherapy Understanding your blood work Your first chemotherapy treatment Paying for your medicine Complementary and alternative

More information

Nephrectomy UHN. Information for patients who are preparing for kidney surgery. I am having this type of nephrectomy

Nephrectomy UHN. Information for patients who are preparing for kidney surgery. I am having this type of nephrectomy Nephrectomy UHN Information for patients who are preparing for kidney surgery I am having this type of nephrectomy donor nephroureterectomy radical laparoscopic partial simple I am having my surgery at

More information

Brachytherapy: Low Dose Rate (LDR) Radiation Interstitial Implant

Brachytherapy: Low Dose Rate (LDR) Radiation Interstitial Implant Brachytherapy: Low Dose Rate (LDR) Radiation Interstitial Implant Goal of the Procedure Brachytherapy, or internal radiation therapy, is a way of giving a higher dose of radiation to the tumor area while

More information

Radiotherapy to the prostate

Radiotherapy to the prostate Radiotherapy to the prostate You and your clinical oncologist have decided that a course of radiotherapy would be the appropriate way of treating your cancer. When recommending radiotherapy, your doctor

More information

Your 7 Day Infusor Pump

Your 7 Day Infusor Pump Your 7 Day Infusor Pump This pamphlet has important information about: Princess Margaret How your Infusor pump works How to care for and carry your Infusor pump Important tips for safety Important numbers

More information

Managing Urinary Incontinence

Managing Urinary Incontinence Patient & Family Guide 2016 Managing Urinary Incontinence www.nshealth.ca Managing Urinary Incontinence What is the urinary system? Urine (pee) is made in the kidneys. It flows through tubes called ureters.

More information

Radiation Therapy What It Is, How It Helps

Radiation Therapy What It Is, How It Helps Radiation Therapy What It Is, How It Helps What s in this guide If your doctor has told you that you have cancer, you may have a lot of questions. Can I be cured? What kinds of treatment would be best

More information

Urinary Indwelling Catheter. The Urinary System

Urinary Indwelling Catheter. The Urinary System Patient Education CARE AND TREATMENT Urinary Indwelling Catheter This information will help you care for a urinary indwelling catheter at home. It will answer many of your questions. Please ask your doctor

More information

Going Home after Replantation Surgery

Going Home after Replantation Surgery Going Home after Replantation Surgery TWH Information for patients and families Read this booklet to learn: how to care for yourself what problems to look out for how to take care of your wound sites who

More information

Patient Guide. The precise answer for tackling cervical cancer. Brachytherapy: Because life is for living

Patient Guide. The precise answer for tackling cervical cancer. Brachytherapy: Because life is for living Patient Guide Brachytherapy: The precise answer for tackling cervical cancer Because life is for living The aim of this booklet is to help women who have been diagnosed with cervical cancer and their family

More information

Problems of the Digestive System

Problems of the Digestive System The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ120 WOMEN S HEALTH Problems of the Digestive System What are some common digestive problems? What is constipation?

More information

However, each person may be managed in a different way as bowel pattern is different in each person.

However, each person may be managed in a different way as bowel pattern is different in each person. Department of colorectal surgery Reversal of ileostomy A guide for patients Introduction This booklet is designed to tell you about your reversal of ileostomy operation and how your bowels might work after

More information

What to expect before, during and after an angiogram

What to expect before, during and after an angiogram Angiogram What to expect before, during and after an angiogram Date and time of my angiogram: My follow-up appointment: Check in at: Toronto General Hospital Medical Imaging 1st Floor New Clinical Services

More information

Sexual Health after Testicular Cancer

Sexual Health after Testicular Cancer Sexual Health after Testicular Cancer UHN Information for cancer survivors Testicular cancer can affect people in many different ways. Sometimes it can change your ability to enjoy or have sex. Read this

More information

What to Expect During Your Stay at a Sleep Disorders Lab

What to Expect During Your Stay at a Sleep Disorders Lab What to Expect During Your Stay at a Sleep Disorders Lab Information for patients and families Read this information to learn: what a sleep study is what a CPAP titration study is how to prepare what to

More information