Arizona is Ari. Earthquake. Country. Country. Down

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Arizona is Ari. Earthquake. Country. Country. Down"

Transcription

1 Arizona is Ari zona is Earthquake Country Country 21 Down -toearth

2 Any use of trade, product, or firm names in this publication is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the State of Arizona. Printed by the Arizona Geological Survey 2012 Manuscript approved for publication in September For an electronic copy of this publication: M. Lee Allison, Ph.D, PG, State Geologist and Director Arizona Geological Survey Arizona Is Earthquake Country, 2012, Arizona Geological Survey staff. Down-to-Earth #21, 44 pages. Contributors: Arizona Geological Survey Michael Conway, Jeri Young, Phil Pearthree, and Lisa Linville. Production, design, and illustration by: Arnie Bermudez and Michael Conway. Other illustrators as noted in the text. Acknowledgments We drew heavily from California, Utah and Nevada earthquake preparedness publications, e.g., Putting Down Rts in Earthquake Country and Living on Shaky Ground, for the structure and content of this bklet. We thank Lori Dengler of Humboldt State University for graciously providing illustrations. Thanks, t, to the Utah Geological Survey and Utah Seismic Safety Commission for graciously allowing us to use the Seven Steps to Earthquake Safety portion of their Putting Down Rts in Earthquake Country: Your Handbk for Earthquake Hazards in Utah. Pioneers in earthquake preparedness literature, including Lucy Jones (U.S. Geological Survey) and Mark Benthien (Southern California Earthquake Center), among others, blazed the trail that we followed. Our thanks to all of them. Thanks, t, to Darlene Trammell, Gregory Roybal and Judy Kioski of the Arizona Division of Emergency Management for their comments and constructive criticism. Financial Support provided by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) through the National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP). Disclaimer: The suggestions and illustrations included in this document are intended to improve earthquake awareness and preparedness; however, they do not guarantee the safety of an individual or a structure. The Arizona Geological Survey and its staff do not assume liability for any injury, death, property damage, or other effect of an earthquake. Prepared by staff of the Arizona Geological Survey.

3 Contents Arizona has earthquakes What can I do? Arizona is earthquake country Earthquake faults Earthquakes Aftershocks Foreshocks What we don t know about earthquakes What is your risk from a damaging earthquake? Measuring earthquake size The seven steps to earthquake safety Active faults in Arizona Some prominent Arizona faults Hurricane fault Algodones fault Santa Rita fault Big Chino fault Lake Mary fault Safford fault Three earthquakes & one quake swarm Sonoran Earthquake Imperial Valley, California 1940 Flagstaff, Arizona ca Sunset Crater, Arizona Halloween 2009 Earthquake hazards Ground shaking and cascading events Earthquake-related cascading events Disrupted infrastructure Damaging fires Landslides Rock fall Seiche Hazardous materials Liquefaction Dam failure Monitoring earthquake in Arizona U.S. Geological Survey shake map A role for citizen scientists in seismology Earthquake resources Sources of earthquake information Modified Mercalli scale Intensity Scale Glossary

4 Arizona has earthquakes? Each time an earthquake occurs in Arizona, the news media and public asks, Does Arizona have earthquakes?. Short answer: yes! In comparison with California, Nevada, and Utah, major earthquakes in Arizona are infrequent. But each year, Arizona Broadband Seismic Network (ABSN) seismometers record hundreds of earthquakes in Arizona. And Arizona is not immune to the effects of earthquakes that originate in California, Utah, and Mexico, t. Yuma, in Arizona s far southwest corner, is prone to earthquakes originating in southern California and Baja California, Mexico. But earthquakes occur throughout Arizona and communities in central and northern Arizona have recorded damaging earthquakes. Taking steps now to prepare your family and home will help mitigate the effects of moderate to severe earth shaking. Sa n Fau as dre An lt Sa na nd r ea s ult Fa Figure 1- Tectonic map of western North America showing major seismic zones in the western U.S. 2

5 What can I do? This handbk will help you prepare for earthquakes and their aftermath. While damaging earthquakes are unusual in Arizona, they do have the potential for causing damage wherever you live. It is important that you be aware of how to prepare for an earthquake; it costs little and requires only several hours to earthquake prf your home. Getting ready in advance can save you and your family from injury, minimize damage to your home or business, and allow you to recover quickly. The Seven steps to earthquake safety section on page 11 provides detailed information on what you can do to prepare for earthquakes. 3

6 Civil authorities, government agencies, and emergency organizations cannot protect you from the next earthquake. It could be hours or days before help arrives. In the meantime, we each bear responsibility for taking care of the needs of our families and neighbors. The steps you take now to prepare will stand you in gd stead in the event of a damaging earthquake or other natural hazard -- fire or fld. Being informed and taking modest action protects you and your family, reduces loss, and assures a rapid recovery. Arizona is earthquake country Earthquakes in Arizona are not as common as in California where the San Andreas fault forms the boundary between the North American and Pacific tectonic plates (Fig. 1). From fault locations and earthquake records, we know some areas of Arizona are more susceptible to earthquakes than others. The northwestern part of the state has the highest concentration of active faults and seismicity, while Yuma on the California-Arizona-Mexico border has repeatedly experienced ground-shaking and damage from quakes originating in California and Baja California, Mexico (Fig. 2). Although these areas are more likely to suffer from earthquake activity, no Arizona community is wholly immune to earthquakes. Northern Arizona is part of a seismically active region in the Western U.S. referred to as the Intermountain Seismic Belt (ISB), which includes Utah, Nevada, New Mexico, and eastern California. There are numerous active faults in the ISB capable of producing moderate and, less frequently, large magnitude earthquakes. The Northern Arizona Seismic Belt, which extents from the Arizona-Utah border south-southeast of Flagstaff, is a particularly seismically active region (Fig. 1). To the south and west, Arizona s Transition Zone -the backbone of Arizona - forms a formidable boundary of rugged terrain between the Colorado Plateau to the north and the Basin and Range Province further south and west (Fig. 2, inset). Faults in the Transition Zone are capable of causing moderate earthquakes ranging from magnitude (M) 3 to as much as M7. Further south, faults of the Basin and Range Province of southern and western Arizona and northern Sonora, Mexico, are capable of moderate to large magnitude earthquakes as well. Forces at work in the Earth s crust of Arizona s Basin and Range Province require tens of thousands of years to accumulate sufficient stress to generate large earthquakes, accounting for the infrequency of damaging temblors here. Yuma, Wellton, Somerton and other communities in southwestern Arizona are likely to be impacted by earthquakes from faults comprising or related to the North American Pacific plate boundary. This includes the San Andreas fault system, a complex network of faults that 4

7 Figure 2- Quaternary faults (blue) and historic earthquake epicenters (green circles, larger circles represent larger earthquakes) of Arizona and environs. Only earthquakes of magnitude 3 or greater are displayed. Inset: physiographic provinces of Arizona. extends for more than 810 miles (1,300 km) from north of San Francisco southeast-ward to the Salton Trough (Fig. 1). South of the Trough, the Imperial fault, a splay of the San Andreas fault, crops out just 45 miles west of Yuma. Like other fault segments along the plate boundary, the Imperial fault is capable of producing a M7 earthquakes or greater. The Elsinore fault zone, the westward arm of the San Andreas fault, extends south into Baja California, Mexico, becoming the Laguna Salada fault. In April 2010, a M7.2 temblor from near the Laguna Salada fault was felt widely in southern California and southwestern and central Arizona. 5

8 Earthquake faults Earthquakes occur when rocks making up the Earth s crust strain and rupture. The rupture occurs on planes of weakness comprising crushed and broken rock that geologists refer to as faults (Fig. 3). Arizona possesses dozens of young, active faults; mostly normal faults that accommodate extensional forces that slowly stretch and crack the Earth s upper crust (Fig. 4). When an earthquake occurs on a fault, rocks on one side of the fault slip with respect to rocks on the other side. Faults range widely in length from inches to 100s of miles; the lives of longer faults can be measured in millions or 10s of millions of years. Our knowledge of fault locations is supported by several lines of evidence. First, we find rocks juxtaposed that used to be further apart. Second, faults are accompanied by a surface rupture or fault scarp (Fig. 5). Third, while modern seismic networks often do not pin an earthquake directly on a fault, they do provide information on fault motion, from which we infer approximate fault location. Undoubtedly, there exist a number of potentially active faults that go overlked because the rocks along the fault are prly exposed, or because the fault lacks either historic activity or any telltale surface expression from prehistoric activity. Figure 3. Fault types: reverse (left), normal (center), strike-slip (right). (Figure courtesy of the USGS.) Figure 4. Geometry and features of a normal fault. See the glossary for precise definitions. 6

9 Figure 5. Fifteen ft fault scarp that formed on the Piticaychi fault as a result of the 1887 Sonoran earthquake (image courtesy of the National Information Service of Earthquake Engineering, University of California, Berkeley). Earthquakes There is much that we know about earthquakes. For instance, we know that most earthquakes, but certainly not all, occur along the boundaries of tectonic plates, such as the tectonic boundary of the North American and Pacific tectonic plates (Fig. 1). We know that tectonic forces stress and strain (deform or bend) the rocks of the Earth s crust, breaking and displacing those rocks. At the instant when the rock breaks, energy is released and radiates outward. The geometry of the fault, the nature of the rupture, and the properties of the surrounding rock and soil greatly influences the propagating energy wave and the amount of ground-shaking an area will experience. As seismic waves race through the Earth s interior, they are refracted and reflected upon encountering rocks of different physical properties. We can model the velocity and direction of the propagating waves and trace their paths through the Earth s interior. We know large earthquakes release far more energy and are felt over correspondingly larger areas than small earthquakes. Earthquake waves diminish in intensity the further they travel, so the further you are from the epicenter (the point on the Earth s surface where the earthquake wave first strikes) the less intense is the shaking from the earthquake. Most of the damage from earthquakes is associated with the side-to-side shaking that accompanies surface waves. 7

10 Aftershocks. The main shock or earthquake is always accompanied by aftershocks. Sometimes by thousands of aftershocks! And an earthquake that is sufficiently large to cause moderate to substantial damage is likely to be followed within minutes or hours by felt aftershocks. The January 17, 1994, M6.7 Northridge, California, earthquake was accompanied by more than 13,700 aftershocks, including two M6.0 events that followed within minutes to hours of the main event. Following a large magnitude earthquake, be prepared for aftershocks and avoid damaged structures as they may be prone to collapse. And remember, aftershocks can occur for weeks, months, even years after a large earthquake as the Earth s crust slowly returns to a state of rest. Foreshocks. Sometimes the main earthquake event is preceded by one or more smaller earthquakes. Geologists refer to these as foreshocks. If all large earthquakes were preceded by signature foreshocks, then we could use the smaller events to forecast large events. Unfortunately, this is rarely the case. What we don t know about earthquakes There is much we don t know about earthquakes. The intricacies of precisely when, where, and how large the next earthquake will be escapes us. Nonetheless, it is possible to approximate the likelihd and magnitude of earthquakes for portions of the southwestern U.S., including Arizona. These approximations take the form of probabilities of an event; earthquake probability models are mathematical approximations derived from our understanding of the historic and prehistoric activity along well-studied faults. Of course, faults for which there is no historic record and no surface expression do not figure into our probability models. They are wild cards. What is your risk from a damaging earthquake? The western United States is particularly prone to earthquake hazards (Fig. 6). The U.S. Geological Survey s (USGS) online tl, 2009 Earthquake Probability Mapping, can help you determine the likelihd of a damaging earthquake near where you live. To get started, go the 2009 Earthquake Probability Mapping (https:// geohazards.usgs.gov/eqprob/2009/) and simply enter your zip code, a time span in years (25 years might be a gd starting point), and a magnitude. A M6.0 earthquake is likely to cause damage, so you might start there. Smaller magnitude events are more likely to occur, but they are less likely to cause extensive damage. 8

11 Figure 6. U.S. Geological Survey seismic hazard map for continental U.S. and Hawaii. Red, orange and yellow represent the zones of highest earthquake hazard. Applying the USGS probability mapping tl to downtown Tucson, Arizona (zip code 85701), the probability of an M6.0 earthquake occurring within 25 years and 50 kilometers (31 miles) is about 1 percent. Measuring earthquake size Taking the measure of an earthquake - how much energy is released and the earthquake s impact on human society - is of paramount importance. Each earthquake is associated with a single magnitude and with a range of intensities. Moment magnitude (M) is a measure of the energy released by an earthquake and provides the basis for comparing earthquakes; all M4.0 earthquakes, for example, release the same amount of energy. With each increase in unit of magnitude, say from a M5.0 to M6.0, there is a 32- fold increase in energy release; from M5.0 to M7.0, the total increase in magnitude is about 1000-fold (32 * 32); from M5.0 to M8.0, energy release increases nearly 33,000-fold! An increase in magnitude corresponds to an increase in the size of the area impacted, the duration of shaking, and the potential for damage. Intensity, on the other hand, is a measure of local ground shaking, which directly impacts human society (Modified Mercall Scale page 42). Proximity to the earthquake source, population density, building styles, and environmental setting greatly influence the intensity of an earthquake, making it difficult to compare the intensity of one 9

12 event, say in an area where building standards are lax, with an area that requires strict adherence to safe building codes. The Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale (MMI), p. 42, enumerates in Roman numerals the 12 intensity steps. For instance, an MMI value of 3 is felt locally and may cause hanging objects to swing to and fro; an MMI value of IX, on the other hand, is accompanied by violent shaking, general panic, and damage to masonry buildings and underground pipes. The photograph below shows damage to a building in Calexico, California, resulting from earth shaking during the 4 April 2010, M7.2 El Mayor- Cucapah earthquake. (Image courtesy of Adam Dubrowa FEMA.) 10

13 The Seven Steps to Earthquake Safety Earthquakes in Arizona are inevitable, but damage from them can be reduced. Steps you can take before, during, and after earthquakes will help make you and your family safer and reduce your injuries, damage, and losses. First and foremost, plan for the personal safety of you and your family. Lk into the safety of your home, workplace, and child s schl. Don t forget to think about likely economic impacts to you and your family from a major quake. Follow these seven steps to prepare for earthquakes: BEFORE A QUAKE: DURING A QUAKE: AFTER A QUAKE: STEP 1. Identify potential hazards in your home and fix them (p ). STEP 2. Create a disaster-preparedness plan (p ). STEP 3. Prepare disaster supply kits (p ). STEP 4. Identify your building s potential weaknesses and begin to fix them (p ). STEP 5. Protect yourself during earthquake shaking (p ). STEP 6. After the earthquake, check for injuries and damage (p ). STEP 7. When safe, continue to follow your disaster-preparedness plan (p ). 30 Suggestions to make your house earthquake safe (p. 26.) 11

14 Follow the seven steps to Earthquake safety Identify Potential Hazards in Your Home and Begin to Fix Them Hanging objects Art and other heavy objects hung on walls may fall, and glass in pictures and mirrors may shatter. Check the bubbles! Place only soft art, such as unframed posters or rugs and tapestries, above beds or sofas. Hang mirrors, pictures, and other hanging objects on closed hks. STEP 1 Objects on open shelves and tabletops Collectibles and other lse objects can become dangerous projectiles. Secure them with removable putty or other adhesives. Furniture Tall, top-heavy furniture, such as bkcases and entertainment centers, may fall and injure you. Store heavy items and breakables on lower shelves. Secure both top corners of tall furniture into a wall stud, not just to the drywall. Flexible-mount fasteners, such as nylon straps, allow furniture independent movement from the wall, reducing strain on studs. 12 BEFORE A QUAKE

15 Check the bubbles! Water and gas pipes Water or gas pipes anywhere in your home can break. Water leaks can cause extensive damage, and gas leaks are a major fire hazard. What should I do? In the kitchen Glassware and china may crash to the flr if cabinet drs are unsecured. Gas appliances can shift, rupturing their gas connections. Unsecured water heaters may fall over, rupturing rigid water and gas connections. Have a plumber evaluate, replace, and properly secure rusted or worn water and gas pipes. If not already done, have a plumber replace rigid gas connections to water heaters, stoves, dryers, and other gas appliances with flexible (corrugated) stainless-steel gas connectors (see below). Excess-flow gas-shutoff valves for individual appliances, which stop gas flow in case of a catastrophic leak, are also now available for use with flexible connectors. Water heaters Water heaters should be anchored to wall studs or masonry with metal straps and lag screws. Kits are available at hardware stores and home centers. If not already done, have a plumber install flexible (corrugated) copper water connectors. For more information on making your home safer in earthquakes go to: Flexible water connectors Flexible gas connector Secure all cabinet drs, especially those overhead, to help prevent contents from falling out during quakes. Use latches designed for childprfing or earthquake or boat safety. Secure refrigerators and other major appliances to walls using earthquake appliance straps. Garage or utility rm Items stored in garages and utility rms can fall, causing injuries, damage, and hazardous spills or leaks. Move flammable or hazardous materials to low areas that are secure. Ensure that items stored above or beside vehicles cannot fall, damaging or blocking them. Home electronics Large electronic devices may fall, causing injuries and damage. They are also costly to replace. Secure TVs, stereos, computers, and microwave ovens with flexible nylon straps and buckles for easy removal and relocation. BEFORE A QUAKE 13 STEP 1

16 Follow the seven steps to earthquake safety Identify Potential Hazards in Your Home and Begin to Fix Them Check the bubbles! Prepare now for an earthquake by constructing a disaster-preparedness plan. Make everyone in your family aware of it and how to behave in the event of an earthquake. Plan NOW to be safe during an earthquake In a strong earthquake, individual survival skills will be crucial: Practice DROP, COVER, AND HOLD ON. (See STEP 5, page 20) Identify safe spots in every rm, such as under sturdy desks and tables. Learn how to protect yourself no matter where you are STEP 2 Plan NOW to respond after an earthquake Doing the following will enable you to help your family and others after a strong quake: Keep shoes and a working flashlight next to each bed. Teach everyone in your household to use emergency whistles and (or) to knock three times repeatedly if trapped. Rescuers searching collapsed buildings will be listening for sounds. Identify the needs of household members and neighbors with special requirements or situations, such as use of a wheelchair, walking aids, special diets, or medication. Take a Red Cross first aid and CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) training course. Learn who in your neighborhd is trained in first aid and CPR. Know the locations of utility shutoffs and keep needed tls nearby. Know how to turn off the gas, water, and electricity to your home. Only turn off the gas if you smell or hear leaking gas. (See STEP 6, page 22) Get training from your local fire department in how to properly use a fire extinguisher. Install smoke alarms and test them monthly. Change the battery once a year, or sner if the alarm emits a chirping sound (low-battery signal). Check with your fire department to see if there is a Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) in your area. If not, ask how to start one. 14 BEFORE A QUAKE

17 Follow the seven steps to earthquake safety Plan NOW to communicate and recover Check the bubbles! after an earthquake Don t wait until the next earthquake to do the following: Locate a safe place outside of your home for your family to meet after the shaking stops. Establish an out-of-area contact person who can be called by everyone in the household to relay information. Provide all family members with a list of important contact phone numbers. Determine where you might live if your home cannot be occupied after an earthquake or other disaster (ask friends or relatives). Learn about the earthquake plan developed by your children s schl or day care, and keep your children s schl emergency release cards current. Keep copies of insurance policies, financial records, and other essential documents in a secure location, such as with your household disaster kit. Include a household inventory (a list and photos or video of your belongings). STEP 2 Your family may be sleeping when the next strong quake hits Arizona. After the shaking stops, the lights may be out and broken glass and other dangerous debris may litter the flr, making it unsafe to walk bareft. Keep a flashlight and a pair of sturdy shoes secured to or within reach of everyone s bed. A gd way to do this is to use a drawstring bag tied to a bedpost at the head of the bed for each occupant. (Photo courtesy USGS) BEFORE A QUAKE 15

18 What should I do? Prepare Disaster Supply Kits Personal disaster kits Everyone in your family should have their own personal disaster kits. These kits are collections of supplies they may need when a quake strikes. Personalize these kits and keep them where they can easily be reached at home, in the car, at work or schl. A backpack or other small bag is best for these kits so that they can be easily carried in an evacuation. Include the following items: Check the bubbles! STEP 3 Medications, a list of prescriptions, copies of medical insurance cards, doctors names and contact information. Medical consent forms for dependents. First aid kit and handbk. Spare eyeglasses, personal hygiene supplies, and sturdy shoes. Bottled water. Whistle (to alert rescuers to your location). Emergency cash. Personal identification. List of emergency contact phone numbers. Snack fds high in calories. Emergency lighting light sticks and (or) a working flashlight with extra batteries and light bulbs (hand-powered flashlights are also available). Comfort items, such as games, crayons, writing materials, and teddy bears. A Special Note About Children Before the next earthquake, spend time with your kids to discuss what might occur. Involve them in developing your disaster plan, preparing disaster kits (ask them what game or toy they want to include), and practicing DROP, COVER, AND HOLD ON. In the days after a quake, kids need extra contact and support. They may be frightened and under great stress, and aftershocks won t let them forget the experience. Parents may have to leave children with others in order to deal with the emergency, and this can be scary. Whenever possible, include your children in the earthquake recovery process. 16 Resources for kids to learn about disaster preparedness: BEFORE A QUAKE

19 Check the bubbles! What should I do? Household disaster kit Electrical, water, transportation, and other vital systems can be disrupted for several days or more after a large earthquake. Emergency response agencies and hospitals will likely be overwhelmed and unable to provide you with immediate assistance. To help your family cope after a strong earthquake, store a household disaster kit in an easily accessible safe location. This kit, which complements your personal disaster kits, should be in a large portable watertight container and should hold at least a 3- to 5-day supply of the following items: Drinking water (minimum one gallon per person per day). First aid supplies, medications, and essential hygiene items, such as soap, tthpaste, and toilet paper. Emergency lighting light sticks and (or) a working flashlight with extra batteries and light bulbs (hand-powered flashlights are also available). A hand-cranked or battery-operated radio (and spare batteries). Canned and packaged fds and cking utensils, including a manual can opener. Items to protect you from the elements, such as warm clothing, sturdy shoes, extra socks, blankets, and perhaps even a tent. Heavy-duty plastic bags for waste and to serve other uses, such as tarps and rain ponchos. Work gloves and protective goggles. Pet fd and pet restraints. Copies of vital documents, such as insurance policies and personal identification. Note: Replace perishable items like water, fd, medications, and batteries on a yearly basis. STEP 3 For more information on safety, preparedness, and disaster kits, go to: Ready (Photo courtesy of American Red Cross) BEFORE A QUAKE 17

20 Follow the seven steps to earthquake safety Identify your building s potential weaknesses and begin to fix them Is your house, condo, or apartment strong enough to withstand an earthquake? Use the following quiz to see if your home is likely to be so badly damaged in a future earthquake that people might be injured or that it would be unsafe to occupy. If your home scores above 17 on the quiz, you probably should have a structural engineer evaluate it unless it has been strengthened in the last few years. The engineer will check to see if your home is strong enough to keep you and your family reasonably safe in an earthquake by lking for the following: STEP 4 Is your house properly connected to the foundation? Is there plywd on the exterior walls of your house? Are there anchors attaching the rf and flr systems to the walls? Is your house constructed out of unreinforced masonry? Do you have large openings like a garage dr that may require better bracing? The following quiz will help you to determine the adequacy of your house in resisting a seismic event. Once you have identified the areas requiring retrofitting, prioritize how and when to fix them, and get started. Local building departments are excellent resources. 18 BEFORE A QUAKE

21 Follow the seven steps to earthquake safety Structural-safety quiz for homes and other buildings Check the bubbles! 1. When was your home built? Before 1970 = 6 points = 3 points After 1980 = 1 point 2. How many stories and what style is your home? 2 or more stories above grade with stepped flrs, split levels, or large openings in flrs = 5 points 2 or more stories above grade with flat flrs, no steps in the flr, and no large openings in flrs = 3 points 1 story rambler above grade = 1 point 3. What is the construction material of the exterior walls? Unreinforced masonry bearing walls = 7 points Wd or reinforced masonry with full height brick veneer = 3 points Wd or reinforced masonry = 1 point 4. What are the foundation walls constructed from? Stacked rock or brick, with basement = 5 points Stacked rock or brick, no basement = 3 point Concrete, with or without basement = 1 point Slab on grade, no basement = 0 points 5. Where is your house located? (see map, page 8) STEP 4 Total points = If your home scores 17 or more points on the quiz, you probably should have an engineer, architect, or contractor evaluate it. EXAMPLES: , 1 story, unreinforced masonry, concrete foundation, Flagstaff: = , 2 story (flat), wd (brick veneer), concrete foundation, Yuma: = , 2 story (large openings), wd, slab on grade, Tucson: = 10 BEFORE A QUAKE 19

EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS

EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS STEP 1. IDENTIFY POTENTIAL HAZARDS IN YOUR HOME AND BEGIN TO FIX THEM. Earthquake safety is more than minimizing damage to buildings. We must also secure the contents of our buildings

More information

I D E N T I F Y P O T E N T I A L H A Z A R D S I N Y O U R H O M E A N D B E G I N T O F I X T H E M.

I D E N T I F Y P O T E N T I A L H A Z A R D S I N Y O U R H O M E A N D B E G I N T O F I X T H E M. I D E N T I F Y P O T E N T I A L H A Z A R D S I N Y O U R H O M E A N D B E G I N T O F I X T H E M. Earthquake safety is more than minimizing damage to buildings. We must also secure the contents of

More information

Staying Safe Where the Earth Shakes San Diego County Edition

Staying Safe Where the Earth Shakes San Diego County Edition Staying Safe Where the Earth Shakes San Diego County Edition Developed by: Earthquake Country Alliance California Earthquake Authority California Governor s Office of Emergency Services San Diego County

More information

Factors to Consider When Developing an Evacuation Plan

Factors to Consider When Developing an Evacuation Plan The following should be viewed only as suggestions: Factors to Consider When Developing an Evacuation Plan 1. You must identify your document with a specific title and explanation. Example: Evacuation

More information

7 STEPS TO EARTHQUAKE SAFETY

7 STEPS TO EARTHQUAKE SAFETY 7 STEPS TO EARTHQUAKE SAFETY IDENTIFY POTENTIAL HAZARDS IN YOUR HOME AND BEGIN TO FIX THEM. Earthquake safety is more than minimizing damage to buildings. We must also secure the contents of our buildings

More information

EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES

EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES Emergency Telephone Numbers Life Threatening Emergency................................. 911 Local Police............................. Local Fire and Paramedics.................

More information

Earthquake Preparedness Tips & Strategies

Earthquake Preparedness Tips & Strategies Earthquake Preparedness Tips & Strategies What to Do BEFORE an Earthquake What to Do DURING an Earthquake BE PREPARED! For more information, log onto: www.gema.ga.gov www.ready.ga.gov www.geophysics.eas.gatech.edu

More information

EARTHQUAKES AND PREVENTIVE MEASURES

EARTHQUAKES AND PREVENTIVE MEASURES EARTHQUAKES AND PREVENTIVE MEASURES by K. C. Makropoulos Human rights in Disasters: Search and Rescue Operations in disasters especially for vulnerable people Hotel Electra, 5-6 November 2009 INSTRUMENTS

More information

EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS

EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS Dr. A. S. M. Maksud Kamal Urban Risk Reduction Specialist, CDMP Earthquake Vulnerability of Bangladesh Earthquake is a sudden movement of the earth's crust caused by the release

More information

To help test your earthquake readiness, see if you can answer yes to the following six questions:

To help test your earthquake readiness, see if you can answer yes to the following six questions: Ministry of Justice EARTHQUAKE: Be Ready WE LIVE IN an earthquake zone where over 1200 small earthquakes are recorded each year. There is a real risk that one of these could be the big one. It could happen

More information

earthquake safety basic steps to take before, during and after an earthquake

earthquake safety basic steps to take before, during and after an earthquake earthquake safety basic steps to take before, during and after an earthquake Contents What you should know about earthquakes 1 Earthquakes and natural gas 2 Knowing what to do 2 How to prepare for an earthquake

More information

FACT SHEET: HAZARDOUS MATERIALS ACCIDENTS

FACT SHEET: HAZARDOUS MATERIALS ACCIDENTS FACT SHEET: HAZARDOUS MATERIALS ACCIDENTS A hazardous materials accident can occur anywhere. Communities located near chemical manufacturing plants are particularly at risk. However, hazardous materials

More information

Household Preparedness Guide

Household Preparedness Guide PreparedBC: Household Preparedness Guide A guide for protecting your family PreparedBC HOUSEHOLD PREPAREDNESS GUIDE Earthquakes, tsunamis, floods and wildfires are just some of the potential hazards in

More information

Earthquake Safety Checklist

Earthquake Safety Checklist Earthquake Safety Checklist FEMA 526 / August 2005 FEMA Important Numbers and Addresses Call 911 for emergencies Your family may not be together when an earthquake strikes, so use the spaces below to

More information

The operator will take brief details of your emergency and our call manager will be paged. The manager will call you back as soon as possible.

The operator will take brief details of your emergency and our call manager will be paged. The manager will call you back as soon as possible. 24 HOUR ANSWERING SERVICE The regular office hours at our firm are 9:00 am to 5:00 pm Monday to Friday. After these regular hours, the same telephone number is answered by a Telephone Answering Service,

More information

Emergency Management is responsible for coordinating the City of Houston s preparation for and response to emergency situations.

Emergency Management is responsible for coordinating the City of Houston s preparation for and response to emergency situations. CITY OF HOUSTON Office of Emergency Management October 2004 Emergency Management is responsible for coordinating the City of Houston s preparation for and response to emergency situations. Houston is exposed

More information

TOWN OF HARRISBURG FIRE DEPARTMENT 6450 Morehead Road, Harrisburg North Carolina 28075 Phone: 704 455 3574 Fax 704 455 6391 www.harrisburgfd.

TOWN OF HARRISBURG FIRE DEPARTMENT 6450 Morehead Road, Harrisburg North Carolina 28075 Phone: 704 455 3574 Fax 704 455 6391 www.harrisburgfd. FLOOD FACTS AND SAFETY TIPS Floods are one of the most common hazards in the United States. Flood effects can be local, impacting a neighborhood or community, or very large, affecting entire river basins

More information

Earthquakes. What to Do Before an Earthquake

Earthquakes. What to Do Before an Earthquake EARTHQUAKES Earthquakes What to Do Before an Earthquake Earthquakes strike suddenly, violently and without warning. Identifying potential hazards ahead of time and advance planning can reduce the dangers

More information

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS REQUIREMENTS: Wind makes kites fly, fire can keep us warm, and rain helps the flowers and plants to grow. But sometimes the wind can blow too hard, fires can get too big or it can

More information

Family Emergency Preparedness Plan

Family Emergency Preparedness Plan Family plan should address the following: Evacuation routes Family communications Utility shut-off and safety Insurance and vital records Evacuation plan Caring for animals Evacuation routes Draw a floor

More information

Important safety tips for Electric and Gas Safety. Source: PSEG Hurricane Irene Web site on InfoCentral

Important safety tips for Electric and Gas Safety. Source: PSEG Hurricane Irene Web site on InfoCentral Hurricane Readiness Important safety tips for Electric and Gas Safety Source: PSEG Hurricane Irene Web site on InfoCentral For updates on PSE&G outage information, please visit: www.twitter.com\psegoutageinfo

More information

There to help when you need us most.

There to help when you need us most. There to help when you need us most. Preparing your home and family for the unthinkable. Disaster can strike anywhere, anytime with little or no warning. Are you really prepared? Disaster can strike quickly

More information

Home English> Services> Disaster Services> Earthquakes

Home English> Services> Disaster Services> Earthquakes American Page 1 of2 flsubscribe For News, Safety Tips and Disaster Updates [SEARCH SITE + American Blackouts Chemical Emergencies Drought Earthquakes Fires Home English> Services> Disaster Services> Earthquakes

More information

EARTHQUAKE SAFETY IN THE WORK PLACE

EARTHQUAKE SAFETY IN THE WORK PLACE EARTHQUAKE SAFETY IN THE WORK PLACE COMPANY PLANS All companies have an obligation to their employees to maintain a disaster plan. An emergency evacuation area must be designed, a nearby safe area, preferably

More information

When 911 is called, the person making the call will stay on the phone until the dispatcher hangs up and all questions have been answered.

When 911 is called, the person making the call will stay on the phone until the dispatcher hangs up and all questions have been answered. Emergency Preparedness Plan In all scenarios below, the situation, with specific details, will be documented in the client s file. The client s case management agency and client s family/representative

More information

Helping Children Cope with Disaster

Helping Children Cope with Disaster Helping Children Cope with Disaster This booklet offers parents, caregivers, and other adults suggestions on how to help children cope with the effects of disaster, as well as how to be prepared before

More information

SHELTER-IN-PLACE OR EVACUATE

SHELTER-IN-PLACE OR EVACUATE SHELTER-IN-PLACE OR EVACUATE WOULD YOU KNOW WHAT TO DO? A PREPAREDNESS GUIDE FOR THE HOME No matter where you live, your community may experience a natural or man-made disaster a tornado, floor, winter

More information

SELF-STUDY SERIES. UNDERSTANDING THE REGULATIONS: What Alaskan Foster Parents Need to Know. Updated January 2013. 1.0 Hour Training Credit

SELF-STUDY SERIES. UNDERSTANDING THE REGULATIONS: What Alaskan Foster Parents Need to Know. Updated January 2013. 1.0 Hour Training Credit SELF-STUDY SERIES UNDERSTANDING THE REGULATIONS: What Alaskan Foster Parents Need to Know UNIT #10: Fire Safety, First Aid and Emergency Preparedness in the Foster Home Updated January 2013 1.0 Hour Training

More information

WHAT TO DO IF THE LIGHTS GO OUT. PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF OKLAHOMA

WHAT TO DO IF THE LIGHTS GO OUT. PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF OKLAHOMA WHAT TO DO IF THE LIGHTS GO OUT. PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF OKLAHOMA We all take reliable electric service for granted. Flip a switch, push a button, turn a knob; the lights come on; the home computer powers

More information

DISASTER DO S AND DON TS CONTENTS DO S AND DON TS ON EARTHQUAKE 1 DO S AND DON TS ON STORM/CYCLONE 4 DO S AND DON TS ON FLOOD 5

DISASTER DO S AND DON TS CONTENTS DO S AND DON TS ON EARTHQUAKE 1 DO S AND DON TS ON STORM/CYCLONE 4 DO S AND DON TS ON FLOOD 5 DISASTER DO S AND DON TS CONTENTS DO S AND DON TS ON EARTHQUAKE 1 DO S AND DON TS ON STORM/CYCLONE 4 DO S AND DON TS ON FLOOD 5 DO S AND DON TS ON FIRE 6 DO S AND DON TS ON EARTHQUAKE Earthquakes : Preparedness

More information

1-800-927-4357. www.insurance.ca.gov. Earthquake. Insurance. California Department of Insurance

1-800-927-4357. www.insurance.ca.gov. Earthquake. Insurance. California Department of Insurance 1-800-927-4357 www.insurance.ca.gov Earthquake Insurance California Department of Insurance Table of Contents Page 2 Before You Buy Earthquake Insurance 4 Basic Earthquake Insurance 6 What Earthquake Insurance

More information

Sound Shake. Facilitating Earthquake Preparedness: A Workplace Guide

Sound Shake. Facilitating Earthquake Preparedness: A Workplace Guide Sound Shake Facilitating Earthquake Preparedness: A Workplace Guide Introduction Thank you for taking the time to better prepare your business or organization for the potential impacts of an earthquake

More information

Chippewa County Courthouse Security Emergency Procedures. Dial 9 9 1 1 FIRE POLICE AMBULANCE

Chippewa County Courthouse Security Emergency Procedures. Dial 9 9 1 1 FIRE POLICE AMBULANCE Chippewa County Courthouse Security Emergency Procedures Dial 9 9 1 1 FIRE POLICE AMBULANCE Table of Contents Introduction... 2 Explosion... 3 Civil Disorder/Threat to Personal Safety... 4 Chemical Spill...

More information

Family Disaster Plan and Personal Survival Guide

Family Disaster Plan and Personal Survival Guide Family San Diego Disaster County Plan Office and Personal of Emergency Survival Services Guide Family Disaster Plan and Personal Survival Guide I. PREPARATION Family Disaster Plan and Personal Survival

More information

Pima County Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security

Pima County Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security Pima County Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security A Neighborhood Guide for Emergency Preparedness The events of September 11, 2001 and subsequent bioterrorism acts have reminded us of the

More information

Emergency Planning Guideline

Emergency Planning Guideline www.hh.net.nz Essential Emergency and Security Systems Supporting and Complimenting the Home s Fire Evacuation Scheme POLICY: To optimise emergency readiness REFERENCE: NZS 8143: 2002 NB: Management is

More information

After a Fire or Flood

After a Fire or Flood After a Fire or Flood Some help and advice Advice after a Fire Your property is your responsibility when the firefighters leave. If you intend to leave your property unattended: Lock all windows and doors,

More information

Emergency Planning Template. A Guide for Family and Large Family

Emergency Planning Template. A Guide for Family and Large Family Emergency Planning Template A Guide for Family and Large Family Child Care Homes Emergency Planning Template: A Guide for Family and Large Family Child Care Homes June, 2009 The purpose of this template

More information

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS FOR SENIORS WHAT WE CAN DO TO SAVE OUR LIVES COUNTY OF SUSSEX DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES DIVISION OF SENIOR SERVICES

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS FOR SENIORS WHAT WE CAN DO TO SAVE OUR LIVES COUNTY OF SUSSEX DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES DIVISION OF SENIOR SERVICES EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS FOR SENIORS WHAT WE CAN DO TO SAVE OUR LIVES COUNTY OF SUSSEX DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES DIVISION OF SENIOR SERVICES SUSSEX COUNTY DIVISION OF SENIOR SERVICES One Spring Street,

More information

Landslides. Landslides-1. March 2007

Landslides. Landslides-1. March 2007 Landslides Learn if landslides, including debris flows, could occur in your area by contacting local officials, your state geological survey or department of natural resources, or the geology department

More information

Severe Weather Safety Resources to help weather the storm

Severe Weather Safety Resources to help weather the storm Severe Weather Safety Resources to help weather the storm Hurricanes: By the Basics What: A Hurricane is a severe weather system that brings high winds, torrential rain, storm surges, and flooding. Hurricanes

More information

KCC Event Brief: 2014 La Habra Earthquake

KCC Event Brief: 2014 La Habra Earthquake KAREN CLARK & COMPANY KCC Event Brief: 2014 La Habra Earthquake June 2014 2 COPLEY PLACE BOSTON, MA 02116 T: 617.423.2800 F: 617.423.2808 Overview On Friday, March 28, 2014 at 9:09pm, a magnitude 5.1 earthquake

More information

GET READY IN 5 EASY STEPS HURRICANE SEASON

GET READY IN 5 EASY STEPS HURRICANE SEASON HURRICANE SEASON GET READY IN 5 EASY STEPS It s true, major hurricanes don t hit the U.S. every year. But if you live on or near the coast, someday you may have to face a Category 3, or worse. Could be

More information

Preparing Your Business for a Flood

Preparing Your Business for a Flood CHECKLISTS Before a Flood Stay in touch with what s happening and listen for warnings and advisories through the media or through local community messaging. A flood watch means flooding is possible. A

More information

DISASTER PLANNING Self-Assessment Guide for CHILD CARE CENTERS and FAMILY CHILD CARE HOMES

DISASTER PLANNING Self-Assessment Guide for CHILD CARE CENTERS and FAMILY CHILD CARE HOMES Child Care Advocate Program California Department of Social Services DISASTER PLANNING Self-Assessment Guide for CHILD CARE CENTERS and FAMILY CHILD CARE HOMES COMMUNITY CARE LICENSING DIVISION Promoting

More information

Shaking It! Students build a room in a shoebox and test it on an earthquake simulator. Science Topics Earth science Earthquakes Earthquake safety

Shaking It! Students build a room in a shoebox and test it on an earthquake simulator. Science Topics Earth science Earthquakes Earthquake safety Shaking It! Students build a room in a shoebox and test it on an earthquake simulator. Grade Levels K 8 Science Topics Earth science Earthquakes Earthquake safety Time Required Key Science Skills Investigating

More information

How to Prepare for and Survive a Disaster in Rancho Palos Verdes

How to Prepare for and Survive a Disaster in Rancho Palos Verdes How to Prepare for and Survive a Disaster in Rancho Palos Verdes Is Your Home Ready? It s not the will to survive, but the will to prepare to survive that makes the difference. This brochure provides clear

More information

CITY OF HUMBLE OFFICE OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT. 110 W. Main St. Humble, Tx. 77338 ph. 281 446 4928 Email; cjohnson@cityofhmble.net

CITY OF HUMBLE OFFICE OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT. 110 W. Main St. Humble, Tx. 77338 ph. 281 446 4928 Email; cjohnson@cityofhmble.net CITY OF HUMBLE OFFICE OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 110 W. Main St. Humble, Tx. 77338 ph. 281 446 4928 Email; cjohnson@cityofhmble.net Emergency Management Director: Mayor Donnie McMannes Emergency Management

More information

Preparation. Preparation. Step 2 Prepare an emergency kit. Step 1 Prepare your emergency plan. Step 4 Tune into warnings

Preparation. Preparation. Step 2 Prepare an emergency kit. Step 1 Prepare your emergency plan. Step 4 Tune into warnings This emergency toolkit provides you with steps to take before and during emergencies to protect you and your property. The Victoria State Emergency Service (SES) is a volunteer organisation dedicated to

More information

FLOOD DAMAGE PRECAUTIONS

FLOOD DAMAGE PRECAUTIONS FLOOD DAMAGE PRECAUTIONS 1. Prepare for flood events: Know how to shut off the electricity and gas to your house in a flood event. Make a list of emergency numbers and identify a safe place to go make

More information

Landslides & Mudflows

Landslides & Mudflows 1 2 - What is a Landslide? - Geologic hazard Common to almost all 50 states Annual global Billions in losses Thousands of deaths and injuries 3 1 - What is a Landslide? - Gravity is driving force Some

More information

A L A B A M A A & M U N I V E R S I T Y RESIDENCE HALL EMERGENCY GUIDELINES

A L A B A M A A & M U N I V E R S I T Y RESIDENCE HALL EMERGENCY GUIDELINES RESIDENCE HALL EMERGENCY GUIDELINES EMERGENCY INFORMATION In the event of hazardous weather or other natural emergencies, medical alerts, or campus closing or delays student should check their university

More information

Earthquake Safety Checklist

Earthquake Safety Checklist Earthquake Safety Checklist FEMA B-526 / March 2010 FEMA Important Numbers and Addresses Call 911 for emergencies Your family may not be together when an earthquake strikes, so use the spaces below to

More information

HURRICANE EVACUATION GUIDE

HURRICANE EVACUATION GUIDE booklet-final 6/30/00 9:41 AM Page 1 E M E R G E N C Y P R E P A R E D N E S S HURRICANE EVACUATION GUIDE Vital information you need to know in case of a hurricane evacuation. Information brought to you

More information

EARTHQUAKE MAGNITUDE

EARTHQUAKE MAGNITUDE EARTHQUAKE MAGNITUDE Earliest measure of earthquake size Dimensionless number measured various ways, including M L local magnitude m b body wave magnitude M s surface wave magnitude M w moment magnitude

More information

Chapter 7 Earthquake Hazards Practice Exam and Study Guide

Chapter 7 Earthquake Hazards Practice Exam and Study Guide Chapter 7 Earthquake Hazards Practice Exam and Study Guide 1. Select from the following list, all of the factors that affect the intensity of ground shaking. a. The magnitude of the earthquake b. Rather

More information

Preparing for A Flood

Preparing for A Flood Preparing for A Flood 1. Know if you are in a flood prone area. 2. Each year, update flood procedures to be followed by your company, employees and tenants: Including Emergency Contacts Evacuation Plans

More information

Landslides & Mudslides

Landslides & Mudslides Landslides & Mudslides Landslides, also known as mudslides and debris flow, occur in all U.S. states and territories. In snowy mountainous areas winter snow landslides are called avalanches. Landslides

More information

Earthquake: A vibration caused by the sudden breaking or frictional sliding of rock in the Earth. Fault: A fracture on which one body of rock slides

Earthquake: A vibration caused by the sudden breaking or frictional sliding of rock in the Earth. Fault: A fracture on which one body of rock slides Earthquake: A vibration caused by the sudden breaking or frictional sliding of rock in the Earth. Fault: A fracture on which one body of rock slides past another. Focus: The location where a fault slips

More information

Arizona Health Care Association DISASTER PLANNING AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT GUIDE POST INCIDENT DAMAGE ASSESSMENT CHECKLIST

Arizona Health Care Association DISASTER PLANNING AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT GUIDE POST INCIDENT DAMAGE ASSESSMENT CHECKLIST It is essential to perform a Basic Damage Assessment (BDA) following an adverse event to help ensure the safety of building occupants as well as prevent additional losses from occurring. This checklist

More information

Preparing Your Business for a Flood

Preparing Your Business for a Flood This document was generated in part from the excellent work done by EPICC (Emergency Preparedness for Industry and Commerce Council). Please refer to EPICC s website http://www.epicc.org/ to learn more

More information

RETURNING HOME SAFELY AFTER FLOODING. Keep yourself safe and healthy, with these simple checklists.

RETURNING HOME SAFELY AFTER FLOODING. Keep yourself safe and healthy, with these simple checklists. RETURNING HOME SAFELY AFTER FLOODING Keep yourself safe and healthy, with these simple checklists. BEFORE RETURNING HOME Do not return home until your local municipality and/or authorities announce you

More information

BEFORE AN EARTHQUAKE OCCURS

BEFORE AN EARTHQUAKE OCCURS Did you know that your chances of being injured or killed are greater if you try to flee from a building while it is shaking? It's true. Thousands of earthquake victims have been hurt because they fell

More information

Glossary. continental crust: the sections of crust, the outermost layer of the earth, that include the continents

Glossary. continental crust: the sections of crust, the outermost layer of the earth, that include the continents aftershock: an earthquake that follows a larger earthquake or main shock and originates in or near the rupture zone of the larger earthquake. Generally, major earthquakes are followed by a number of aftershocks

More information

Stay safe this storm season

Stay safe this storm season Stay safe this storm season Be prepared Horizon Power is committed to providing the safest and most reliable power supply to customers and we work hard to safely and quickly restore power supplies when

More information

1130 K Street Building - Sacramento Emergency Procedures

1130 K Street Building - Sacramento Emergency Procedures 1130 K Street Building - Sacramento Emergency Procedures EMERGENCY PHONE NUMBERS IN CASE OF EMERGENCY (Fire Ambulance Police) 911 EMERGENCY USING CELL PHONE (916) 732-0100 Building Security Lobby: (916)

More information

PERSONAL PREPAREDNESS TIPS FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES. Establish a Personal Support Network

PERSONAL PREPAREDNESS TIPS FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES. Establish a Personal Support Network Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General Provincial Emergency Program PERSONAL PREPAREDNESS TIPS FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES This fact sheet is designed to provide a checklist for activities for

More information

Workplace Fire Safety

Workplace Fire Safety Teaching Guide Workplace Fire Safety for staff Seattle Fire Department Fire Prevention Division Workplace Fire Safety Instructor Outline Introduction Goals: To ensure that employees are knowledgeable in

More information

4.6 GEOLOGIC AND SEISMIC HAZARDS

4.6 GEOLOGIC AND SEISMIC HAZARDS 4.6 GEOLOGIC AND SEISMIC HAZARDS This Section describes the current conditions relating to the geologic and seismic characteristics of the City of Cypress. This Section concludes with an analysis of geologic

More information

Hurricane Preparedness Checklist www.hcoem.org

Hurricane Preparedness Checklist www.hcoem.org Hurricane Preparedness Checklist DISASTER. It strikes anytime, anywhere. It takes many forms -- a hurricane, an earthquake, a tornado, a flood, a fire or a hazardous spill, some are natural, some are man-made.

More information

Emergency procedures instructions to farm staff

Emergency procedures instructions to farm staff Emergency procedures instructions to farm staff The first priority in the event of an emergency is for the safety of all people present. Emergency phone numbers Dial 111 for Fire/Police/Ambulance 1. Tell

More information

They are inexpensive and are widely available where survival products are sold. To see examples, visit http://tiny.cc/5duqdw.

They are inexpensive and are widely available where survival products are sold. To see examples, visit http://tiny.cc/5duqdw. January 17 was the 18th anniversary of the 1994 Northridge Earthquake, so it was a great opportunity to kick off our Year of Emergency Preparedness in Los Angeles. As Chair of the Public Safety Committee,

More information

Evacuation Planning Form for Child Care Emergency/Disaster Preparedness

Evacuation Planning Form for Child Care Emergency/Disaster Preparedness (R.8/12) COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY Cabinet for Health and Family Services Department for Community Based Services Division of Child Care N Evacuation Planning Form for Child Care Emergency/Disaster Preparedness

More information

National Flood Safety Awareness Week is March 16-20, 2015

National Flood Safety Awareness Week is March 16-20, 2015 Armond Budish Cuyahoga County Executive FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Media Contacts: Christopher Harris: (216) 443 7157 or cbharris@cuyahogacounty.us Rich Luchette: (216) 698 5637, (216) 797 0931, or rluchette@cuyahogacounty.us

More information

Magnitude 7.2 GUERRERO, MEXICO

Magnitude 7.2 GUERRERO, MEXICO A powerful magnitude-7.2 earthquake shook central and southern Mexico on Friday. The earthquake occurred at a depth of 24 km (15 miles). Its epicenter was in the western state of Guerrero, near the seaside

More information

Earthquakes: Risk & Insurance Issues

Earthquakes: Risk & Insurance Issues Earthquakes: Risk & Insurance Issues An earthquake is a sudden and rapid shaking of the earth caused by the breaking and shifting of rock beneath the earth s surface. This shaking can sometimes trigger

More information

EMERGENCY PROCEDURES

EMERGENCY PROCEDURES EMERGENCY PROCEDURES In an Emergency Call 911 Using County Telephone System Call 9-911 Fresno County Sheriff 600-3111 Fresno County Security 600-6785 TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction 3 Accidents 4 Serious

More information

Staying Safe Where the Earth Shakes Statewide Edition

Staying Safe Where the Earth Shakes Statewide Edition Staying Safe Where the Earth Shakes Statewide Edition Developed by: Earthquake Country Alliance California Earthquake Authority California Governor s Office of Emergency Services No matter where you live

More information

Drop, Cover, and Hold On Earthquake Drill Manual for K 12 Schools Revised November 2010

Drop, Cover, and Hold On Earthquake Drill Manual for K 12 Schools Revised November 2010 Drop, Cover, and Hold On Earthquake Drill Manual for K 12 Schools Revised November 2010 The Great Central U.S. ShakeOut is a multi state partnership to increase earthquake awareness and preparedness at

More information

emergency action guide

emergency action guide emergency action guide IN THE EVENT OF LIFE-THREATENING OR EXTREME EMERGENCY CALL 911 FIRST. Central Campus Public Safety Dial 6666 from campus phone or call 215.641.6666 West Campus Public Safety Dial

More information

Oregon Department of Transportation. Employee & Family Disaster Preparedness Guide

Oregon Department of Transportation. Employee & Family Disaster Preparedness Guide Oregon Department of Transportation Employee & Family Disaster Preparedness Guide A Message from ODOT Director Bruce Warner A disaster can strike anytime, anywhere, and generally without warning. It can

More information

Power Problems? Let Us Know!

Power Problems? Let Us Know! Power Problems? Let Us Know! Power Problems? Contact Us! by phone: 1-800-75-CONED, 1-800-752-6633 through the Web: www.coned.com If you have power problems, please contact us right away Con Edison is committed

More information

GEOTECHNICAL ISSUES OF LANDSLIDES CHARACTERISTICS MECHANISMS PREPARDNESS: BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER A LANDSLIDE QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSIONS

GEOTECHNICAL ISSUES OF LANDSLIDES CHARACTERISTICS MECHANISMS PREPARDNESS: BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER A LANDSLIDE QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSIONS GEOTECHNICAL ISSUES OF LANDSLIDES CHARACTERISTICS MECHANISMS PREPARDNESS: BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER A LANDSLIDE QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSIONS Huge landslide Leyte, Phillipines, 1998 2000 casulties Small debris

More information

Teacher Workbooks. Science and Nature Series Cloze Paragraphs Natural Disasters Theme, Vol. 1

Teacher Workbooks. Science and Nature Series Cloze Paragraphs Natural Disasters Theme, Vol. 1 Teacher Workbooks Science and Nature Series Cloze Paragraphs Natural Disasters Theme, Vol. 1 Copyright 2005 Teachnology Publishing Company A Division of Teachnology, Inc. For additional information, visit

More information

Protecting Your Home From Hurricane Wind Damage

Protecting Your Home From Hurricane Wind Damage T H E W I N D Protecting Your Home From Hurricane Wind Damage During a hurricane, homes may be damaged or destroyed by high winds and high waves. Debris can break windows and doors, allowing high winds

More information

Earthquakes. Earthquakes: Big Ideas. Earthquakes

Earthquakes. Earthquakes: Big Ideas. Earthquakes Earthquakes Earthquakes: Big Ideas Humans cannot eliminate natural hazards but can engage in activities that reduce their impacts by identifying high-risk locations, improving construction methods, and

More information

SAN FRANCISCO EMERGENCY INFORMATION. San Francisco Marriott Marquis. 780 Mission St. San Francisco CA 94103 T 415-896-1600, F 415-486-8101,

SAN FRANCISCO EMERGENCY INFORMATION. San Francisco Marriott Marquis. 780 Mission St. San Francisco CA 94103 T 415-896-1600, F 415-486-8101, SAN FRANCISCO EMERGENCY INFORMATION San Francisco Marriott Marquis 780 Mission St. San Francisco CA 94103 T 415-896-1600, F 415-486-8101, Table of Contents Building Description 4 Building Life Safety Features

More information

COMING HOME AFTER A DISASTER

COMING HOME AFTER A DISASTER FACILITATOR GUIDE ACTIVITY: COMING HOME AFTER A DISASTER Purpose: The purpose of this activity is to educate individuals and families about what to consider after their home has been damaged after a disaster

More information

Fire Damage. To Help Prevent. a Guide

Fire Damage. To Help Prevent. a Guide a Guide To Help Prevent Fire Damage Fire damage in your home can be costly and emotionally devastating. The damage caused by the flames and smoke can destroy a lifetime of memories in a matter of minutes.

More information

READY? are you. Become a Ready Hero and learn how to plan for emergencies.

READY? are you. Become a Ready Hero and learn how to plan for emergencies. are you READY? Become a Ready Hero and learn how to plan for emergencies. Once you have completed your readiness plan and built your emergency kit, have each family member sign the certificate (see inside

More information

Preparing for Disaster

Preparing for Disaster Preparing for Disaster Where Will You or Your Family Be When a Disaster Strikes? You could be anywhere at work, at school or in the car. How will you find each other? Will you know if your children are

More information

TRAILER TEL RV PARK A CALIFORNIA SUNSHINE FIVE STAR PARK EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS & EVACUATION PLAN FOR TENANTS

TRAILER TEL RV PARK A CALIFORNIA SUNSHINE FIVE STAR PARK EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS & EVACUATION PLAN FOR TENANTS TRAILER TEL RV PARK A CALIFORNIA SUNSHINE FIVE STAR PARK PHONE: 408-453-3535 FAX 408-453-5331 WWW.TRAILERTEL.NET EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS & EVACUATION PLAN FOR TENANTS EVACUATION ORDERS Police, Fire or other

More information

EMERGENCY PROCEDURES

EMERGENCY PROCEDURES EMERGENCY PROCEDURES Introduction Being prepared is the first step towards preventing and/or handling emergency situations. Because your safety is of utmost importance, SOLEX College has created this document

More information

Flood Evacuation Plan

Flood Evacuation Plan Former Girdlestones Site Wilford Bridge Road - Melton Flood Evacuation Plan Contents PART ONE Flood Evacuation Plan 1 Introduction 2 Flood Risk 3 Preparing for a flood 4 Flood Kit 5 Flood Response 5.1

More information

February 28 Earthquake: We got off easy

February 28 Earthquake: We got off easy February 28 Earthquake: We got off easy State Geologist John Beaulieu Lucky may not be the first word that comes to mind after an earthquake that injured more than 200 and caused more than $1 billion damage,

More information

Pennsylvania Flood Safety Awareness Week March 6-10th, 2015

Pennsylvania Flood Safety Awareness Week March 6-10th, 2015 Pennsylvania Flood Safety Awareness Week March 6-10th, 2015 David J. Nicosia Warning Coordination Meteorologist National Weather Service Binghamton, NY Flooding is a coast to coast threat to the United

More information

Girl Scouts Louisiana East Emergency Preparedness Patch program for Girl Scout Brownies Seniors

Girl Scouts Louisiana East Emergency Preparedness Patch program for Girl Scout Brownies Seniors Girl Scouts Louisiana East Emergency Preparedness Patch program for Girl Scout Brownies Seniors Are you ready if an emergency arrives? As Girl Scouts our motto is to Be Prepared but are you? The Emergency

More information

READY FREDDIE! HI I M READY. AND I M FREDDIE. CLICK!

READY FREDDIE! HI I M READY. AND I M FREDDIE. CLICK! POP! This book was developed by a steering committee of emergency preparedness public educators in King County, Washington representing the following agencies: HI I M READY. READY FREDDIE! American Red

More information

Five reasons buildings fail in an earthquake and how to avoid them

Five reasons buildings fail in an earthquake and how to avoid them Five reasons buildings fail in an earthquake and how to avoid them by Jeff White, AIA Published in Healthcare Design magazine There s a saying among seismologists: Earthquakes don t kill people. Buildings

More information

FIRE SAFETY FOR OFFICE WORKERS

FIRE SAFETY FOR OFFICE WORKERS FIRE SAFETY FOR OFFICE WORKERS This easy-to-use Leader s Guide is provided to assist in conducting a successful presentation. Featured are: INTRODUCTION: A brief description of the program and the subject

More information