1. INTRODUCTION 4 2. STRATEGIC APPROACH TO TRANSPORTATION PLANNING REGIONS 13

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "1. INTRODUCTION 4 2. STRATEGIC APPROACH TO TRANSPORTATION PLANNING REGIONS 13"

Transcription

1

2 DISCLAIMER This document is the product of a project financed in part by the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and Federal Transit Administration (FTA). The contents of this document reflect the views of the Puerto Rico Department of Transportation and Public Works (DTPW) and the Policy Committee of the Puerto Rico Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) for the Transportation Planning Regions Urbanized Areas (TPR-UZAs). The authors are responsible for the facts and accuracy of the data presented herein. The PUERTO RICO 2032 FIVE TRANSPORTATION PLANNING REGIONS-UZAS LONG RANGE TRANSPORTATION PLAN (PR 2032 FIVE TPR-UZAS LRTP) is a revised version of the 2030 Long Range Transportation Plan and the actualizations, for the Five TPR-UZAs identified as: North, East, South East, South and Southwest. This document includes a revised Financial Constraint Analysis (Chapter 3), and revised project lists constructed or in process and programmed for short, intermediate and long range. This 2032 Plan will be submitted for the corresponding approval by the members of the MPO. The Chapter 3: Financial Constraint Analysis was revised based on the financial status of the Department of Transportation and Public Works and the Puerto Rico Highway and Transportation Authority (PRHTA). The content of the PR 2032 FIVE TPR- UZAs LRTP not necessarily reflects the official views or policies of the U.S. Department of Transportation. This report does not constitute a standard, specification, or regulation. [1]

3 1. INTRODUCTION The Context and Importance of the Regional Plans Overview of the TPR and Legal Basis Actualization for Transportation Planning Regions The Vision Actualization of the TPR Population Characteristics STRATEGIC APPROACH TO TRANSPORTATION PLANNING REGIONS Strategies for Integrated Planning Criteria for Transportation Supportive Land Use Planning Policy guidelines Strategies for Public Transportation: Rehabilitate, Expand and Develop Provide Enhanced and Improved Público Service Provide New Inter Community Express Transit Services Policy Guidelines Strategies for Roadway Network: Improve and Maintain Existing Facilities Identify and Program Improvement and Maintenance of Existing Facilities Complete Key Components of the Strategic Roadway System Policy Guidelines Strategies for Non-Motorized Modes In The TPR: Improve, Expand, Maintain, And Extend Improve Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities Expand Pedestrian and Bike Access Policy Guidelines Strategic Approach for Ports, Airports and Freight Policy Guidelines FINANCIAL CONSTRAINT ANALYSIS Existing Financial Conditions in the Transportation Sector in Puerto Rico The Puerto Rico Highway and Transportation Authority (PRHTA) Sources of PRHTA Revenues Revenue Sources Comprising Dedicated Revenues Gasoline Tax Revenues Diesel Oil Tax Revenues Motor Vehicle License Fee Revenue Toll Revenues Petroleum Tax Revenues 43 [2]

4 3.3 Projections for vs assumptions and tendencies Federal Funds Borrowing Assessment of Current Revenue Sources Forecast Growth in Dedicated Revenues Forecast Growth in Federal Funds Action Plan for Financing the Regional Transportation System 50 TECHNICAL ADDENDUM 53 I. LRTP Technical Approach and Methodology 53 A. Overview of Technical Approach 53 B Network Testing and Analysis 58 D Recommendations 71 E. PR 2032 FIVE TPR-UZAs LRTP 71 [3]

5 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 THE CONTEXT AND IMPORTANCE OF THE REGIONAL PLANS Transportation systems, interacting with the land use and socioeconomic activity systems determine traffic and transit flows, which in turn determine many aspects of daily life and impact the built and natural environments. The movement of goods and resources, essential to economic activity, occurs in many of the same facilities that serve general traffic and transit operations. Highways, roads and especially local streets, all basic elements of the transportation system, also constitute critical elements of urban public spaces, were people interact and generate social dynamics and a sense of identity and place. This becomes clear when we recognize that the users of roads and streets include not only drivers of automobiles and trucks, but also cyclists and pedestrians. Indeed, the increasingly popular concept of livable communities requires that pedestrian needs be addressed and protected, and transit alternatives developed to ensure that people have the opportunity of going about their daily lives, at the local and regional levels, without being forced to use the automobile. Long term transportation planning aims to address all of these issues in an informed and inclusive participation process that lead serving a vision of the type of community, city, and region which has been adopted by the citizens. The institutions called for to develop transportation system planning include local governments, various agencies and public corporations, and even major transit and freight operators. These various groups must work together to find solution to the transportation problem faced on the island. For that reason, since 1973 the Federal Government has been legislating, through Authorization Acts approved every six years, requirements for a continuous, cooperative and comprehensive transportation planning process. To comply with that requirement, a Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) must be organized and designated by Governors and local elected officials for each urbanized area, as defined by the most recent decennial population census. The MPO thus serves as a forum for discussion among the many public and private actors in the region, with the responsibility (among others) of developing long range multimodal transportation plans and short range multimodal transportation improvement programs for implementing them in compliance with all applicable federal and local legislation. The 49 CFR, Chapter Vi, Subpart B- Metropolitan Transportation Planning and Programming establishes that the regulation in 23 CFR part 450, subpart C, shall be followed in complying with the requirements of this subpart 23 CFR part 450, subpart C requires a metropolitan planning organization (MPO) be designated for each urbanized area and that the metropolitan area have a continuing, cooperative and comprehensive transportation planning process that results in plans and programs that consider all transportation modes. These plans and programs shall lead to [4]

6 the development of an integrated intermodal metropolitan transportation system that facilitates the efficient, economic movement of the people and goods. In Puerto Rico there is one MPO for two Transportation Management Areas (TMA) Aguadilla and San Juan. However, there are three Policy Committees. After each new Census urbanized areas has been redefined, all Governors and local officials, since this requirement has been in place, have designated the Commonwealth s Department of Transportation and Public Works (DTPW) as the operating arm of the MPO for all urbanized and metropolitan areas, providing the staff for the MPO. The DTPW, being an umbrella for a number of agencies and public corporations, uses the technical resources of the Puerto Rico Highways and Transportation Authority (PRHTA) to conduct studies and develop plans and programs that are presented for consideration and adoption by the MPO. In considering these plans and programs, and to comply with the federal requirement of providing a forum for achieving consensus, the MPO acts through Policy Committees that include (as voting members) the Mayors of all municipalities included in the urbanized or metropolitan area, as well as the heads of public agencies and corporations with direct responsibilities over land use planning, environmental protection and transit or traffic operations. Three such Policy Committees are currently in operation: one for the San Juan Urbanized Area (SJUA), or San Juan Transportation Management Area (SJTMA): (encompassing 38 [5]

7 municipalities and over 1 million inhabitants), another for the Aguadilla Urbanized Area (AUA) or Aguadilla Transportation Management Area (ATMA): (11 municipalities and over 200,000 inhabitants), and a third for the other nine urbanized areas (UZA: with populations between 50,000 and 200,000), grouped into five Transportation Planning Regions (TPR). These are: North TPR, East TPR, South TPR, South-East TPR and South- West TPR. A Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP) must be prepared and adopted for each the SJUA, the AUA and each TPR at least every five years, with a 20 year (minimum) planning horizon. Based on these plans, every year the MPO then defines the use of yearly federal funding allocations through a Transportation Improvement Programs (TIP) for the SJTMA, another for the ATMA and another for the UZA s. In general, without an appropriate, actualized LRTP for each region, no federal funds may be programmed for improvements to its transportation system. Currently, Federal Regulations (specifically in 23 CFR, Part 450) require a long range transportation plan actualized in accordance with the cycles defined in (c), for all urbanized areas as defined by the most recent decennial census. In order to continue in compliance with the above mentioned regulations, but even more so, to comply with public transportation policy, this document, PUERTO RICO 2032 FIVE TRANSPORTATION PLANNING REGIONS-UZAS LONG RANGE TRANSPORTATION PLAN (PR 2032 FIVE TPR-UZAS LRTP) actualizes information, analyses, and recommendations made in the document approved on 2006 and 2009, so that both the MPO and the federal government may continue to serve the public interests with programs and projects addressing the needs of the TPR. Currently, these activities are severely curtailed by a major reduction in the revenues and financial capacity of the Authority, as will be discussed in the Financial Constraint Analysis for each region. This further increases the importance of good planning process. Once adopted by the MPO, this Cost Feasible Plan, named PR 2032 FIVE TPR-UZAS LRTP will serve as the actualized to previous 2030 Long Range Transportation Plans for each one of the five TPR-UZAs regions. Along with anticipated amendments, will remain valid and in effect through OVERVIEW OF THE TPR AND LEGAL BASIS As explained in the Introduction, the 2000 Census resulted in new boundary definitions for the Urbanized Areas in Puerto Rico. Some existing urban areas were consolidated, others were subdivided, and new ones were defined. As result, definition of urbanized areas for Puerto Rico greatly expanded the extent of area on the island that is considered by the census bureau to be urbanized, and increased the number of such areas. The 2000 area definitions include areas that are urban in the traditional sense, such as the core population [6]

8 and employment centers and developed areas of cities and towns, areas that are more suburban in nature and adjacent exurban territory as well. The San Juan area in particular covers a considerable extent that is beyond what is considered as the city of San Juan, and includes suburbs, small towns and adjacent areas with little settlement. The San Juan urbanized area definition covers most of the eastern portion of the island. The definition of the urbanized areas of Ponce, the second largest city on Puerto Rico and the largest city on the South, and that of Mayagüez, the third largest city in the western part of the Island, have not been expanded significantly. However, the urbanized area of Aguadilla, a once relatively small town, has been expanded significantly and includes sparsely settled semi-rural areas well beyond the limits of the actual town center. The change in the urbanized area of Aguadilla is so significant that it is now classified as a Transportation Management Area (TMA) and requires its own transportation plan. For purposes of the elaboration of the 2030 Long Range Transportation Plan for Puerto Rico and regions, and based on the 2000 Census data, the DTPW redefined the Transportation Planning Regions; two of them San Juan and Aguadilla classified as Transportation Management Areas (TMAs) and the five remained as Transportation Planning Regions (FIVE TPR-UZAs, for purposes of this document). Transportation Plans for San Juan and Aguadilla are each a separate document. These regions continue valid to for this 2032 Plan. [7]

9 1.2 ACTUALIZATION FOR TRANSPORTATION PLANNING REGIONS As mentioned previously, the San Juan and Aguadilla TMAs plans and their updates were each elaborated in separate documents. For the other five TPRs, separate documents were elaborated. Nevertheless, due to similarities in changes related to the characteristics and facts for these TPRs the actualization for those plans were all incorporated into this document. This document presents an actualization for the five TPRs-UZAs: North, East, South East, South and Southwest THE VISION The vision for the TPR Transportation Plans remains the same from the very beginning of the planning process for the elaboration of the 2030 Long Range Transportation Plan. The Vision was established by analyzing the key factors affecting travel and the expected future conditions. The Vision thus took into consideration, among others, the following issues: Automobile dependency and frequency of use Reducing this problem implies promoting multimodal options, prioritizing functional transit alternatives, developing pedestrian and cycling options, as well as making better use of the existing highway and street facilities. Increasing urban traffic congestion Attacking congestion at its roots means improving coordination of land use and transportation planning; focusing on public transportation; optimizing non-motorized modes (pedestrian, cycling); utilizing congestion management techniques; improving deficient intersections; and controlling illegal parking. Extensive urban sprawl and loss of rural lands - Reducing urban sprawl also involves coordinating transportation improvements with land use planning; applying a regional approach to planning of both public and private transportation; making viable the densification and rehabilitation of urban areas by means of improved transit systems; and minimizing or eliminating road projects that stimulate urban sprawl. Inadequate accesses to ports and airports Addressing this problem implies increasing the capacity of existing seaports and airports; designing complementary installations; improving access to both labor force and freight; and establishing efficient route management programs for freight transportation. Negative transportation impacts on the natural and cultural environments To minimize these impacts several issues must be addressed, such as mitigating negative impacts to environmental, community, and cultural resources in the design, construction, and operation of transportation facilities; constraining the development of transportation facilities, especially roadways in areas identified for conservation; avoiding negative [8]

10 impacts on communities in compliance with local and federal regulations; protecting ecological areas of value; encouraging the use of recycled materials during the construction, operations, and maintenance of transportation facilities; reducing dependency on fuels and non-renewable resources through the promotion of alternative fuel technologies and by providing tax breaks for using recycled materials and alternative fuels; taking measures to reduce negative impacts to places of ecological, historic, cultural, architectural, and agricultural value; and protecting the installed capacity of the transportation system. The combination of these concepts and their discussion in multiple public meetings throughout Puerto Rico resulted in the Vision for 2030; this vision continues valid to this 2032 Plan: the transportation system in Puerto Rico will meet the needs of all sectors of society, providing mobility for all, and easy access to all destinations. The system will promote the efficient use of resources including energy, land, existing facilities, and funding. It will support and protect the natural and man-made environments, respecting the structure of society and cultural resources. It will support economic development strategies. All aspects of the transportation system will be designed to enhance the quality of life and promote safety and security. From this vision statement, a specific set of goals and related objectives were developed. For each goal, a fundamental objective was then defined, followed by more specific objectives that are applicable by mode, geographic scope, or other consideration applicable in the long range plan. In particular, they also guide this Plans Transportation Planning Regions. Goal 1: Address the Transportation Needs of All Sectors of Society by Improving Accessibility, Mobility and Public Involvement FUNDAMENTAL OBJECTIVE: Provide and properly maintain the means to interconnect all destinations and to obtain necessary goods and services - homes, workplaces, recreation, education, and special destinations so that they are accessible at a reasonable cost in time and through convenient modal options, and in ways responsive to the expressed needs and preferences of the population being served Goal 2: Promote a More Efficient Use of Resources, Including Energy, Land, Existing Facilities, and Funding FUNDAMENTAL OBJECTIVE: Focus on conservation of capital, energy, and natural resources in the planning and design of transportation facilities. Goal 3: Protect the Natural and Manmade Environments FUNDAMENTAL OBJECTIVE: Consider the effects of transportation decisions on the social, economic, environmental, developmental, and energy components of the regions, cities, and towns, in adhering to a policy of sustainable development strategies. [9]

11 Goal 4: Support Economic Development Strategies FUNDAMENTAL OBJECTIVE: Design the transportation system in concert with the Commonwealth s important new development and redevelopment strategies, so as to provide opportunities for additional and improved housing, jobs, and goods and services. Goal 5: Promote Transportation Safety and Security FUNDAMENTAL OBJECTIVE: Consider transportation improvements as quality of life enhancements, designed to respect and complement their surroundings and to improve the everyday life of residents, including their safety and security. These Vision and Goals set the guiding structure for the strategic approach used to develop the 2030 LRTP. The strategic approach, as particularized for each mode, will help identify specific projects, within the regions, that appropriately address improvements to the highway system, public transportation, and non-motorized modes (bicycles and pedestrian), as well as improving on safety and expanding freight capacity, as needed ACTUALIZATION OF THE TPR POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS SAN JUAN AND AGUADILLA TMAS AND THE FIVE TPR-UZAS Demand for transportation relates not only to the pattern and extent of land use development, but also to the sheer number of people and the demography, or defining characteristics, of the population. This section looks at population growth, along with a variety of factors expected to affect the need for transportation services of various types throughout the Commonwealth. According to the U.S. Bureau of the Census, the resident population of Rico was 3,808,610 in the year 2000, and, according to the 2030 Island wide LRTP was anticipated to increase by 11.8 percent to 4,257,151 by the year This is an increase of 448,541 persons between 2000 and 2030, which directly translates into increased travel demand for work, school, shopping, and other activities within the Island. The subsequent increase in the demand for consumer goods will also require additional importation services from outside the island. Table 2-1 Population 2000, 2010, 2020, 2030 (and Percent change from year 2000) Location Aguadilla Urbanized Area 358, ,361/ +8.5% 404,875/ +12.8% 411,890/ +14.7% San Juan Urbanizad Area 2,253,130 2,381,381/ +5.7% 2,466,248/ +9.5% 2,519,394/ +10.6% Puerto Rico 3,808,610 4,030,154/ +5.8% 4,172,243/ +9.5% 4,257,151/ +11.8% [10]

12 In the Year 2000 sixty percent (60%) of the Population was located in San Juan TMA (SJ- TMA); eight percent (8%) in the Aguadilla TMA and thirty two percent (32%) was distributed in the remaining TPR. This distribution is responds in great way to the amount of municipalities that are included in each region. Nevertheless, Aguadilla TMA (A-TMA) and South TPR have the same amount of municipalities; the South TPR had 4% more population than A-TMA. For the 2010 this tendency continues; although it is observed that for the South TPR it decreased one percent, whereas for the A-TMA it increases one a percent. Puerto Rico: Transportation Management Regions 2000 Census Population Data A-TMA 8% South 12% North 8% South West 7% SJ-TMA 60% South East 3% East 2% Puerto Rico: Transportation Management Regions 2010 Census Population Data A-TMA 9% South 11% North 8% South West 7% SJ-TMA 60% South East 3% East 2% [11]

13 It is important to emphasize that there is a negative difference between 2000 and 2010 population. According to the 2010 Census, the percent of change in Puerto Rico s population was estimated in The Regions with greater loss in the population were the SJ-TMA with 32,630 and the South TPR with 27,978. It has to be brought out that the South East TPR had a slight increase in population and the North TPR did not suffer any changes in its population. One of the causes for this slight change in population between the regions can be attributed to mobility issues. It is important to emphasize that these population changes and the analyses made on these matters by the Federal Government can result in changes to the Transportation Regions compositions as established. The 2040 Transportation Plan, under development, will take these and other variables under consideration. Puerto Rico: Transportation Management Regions Census Population Differences 5, ,000 South East North A-TMA South West East South SJ-TMA -10,000-7,490-7,641-7,696-15,000-20,000-25,000-30,000-27,978-35,000-32,630 [12]

14 2. STRATEGIC APPROACH TO TRANSPORTATION PLANNING REGIONS The development of the 2030 Puerto Rico LRTP was based upon a strategic planning approach that focused on making those improvements to the transportation system that will enhance the quality of life on the island. This approach continues valid to for the PR 2032 Five TPR-UZAs LRTP; but in the development of 2040 Plan this issue will be attended more thoroughly. This quality of life strategy includes controlling urban sprawl, addressing environmental issues, maintaining rural areas, and promoting sustainability. It recognizes the importance of integrating transportation planning with land use planning and focuses on the maintenance and improvement of existing transportation facilities as a more desirable alternative to major investments in new infrastructure. It emphasizes the role of public transportation and non-motorized modes as alternatives to congestion and pollution, and as a means of providing access that reduces the need for trips by private automobiles. This plan considered among the goals of the MPO the provision of an efficient, safe, fiscally constrained, and sustainable transportation system. The priorities set forth by the MPO with regard to the transportation system (highways, publico service, non-motorized pathways, etc.) that will link the different areas of the TPR, include the access to cargo and passenger ports (both sea and airports), education and employment centers, emergency services, and other facilities. These would require, among other efforts, the completion of the Strategic Highway Network (STRAHNET), the improvement and when necessary, the provision of new accesses and/or connections to that network, and the further integration of the multi-modal transportation system. Among the goals of the present document are the provisions of an efficient, safe, fiscally constrained, and sustainable transportation system. Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) are required to consider the elements now commonly known as the eight (8) SAFETEA-LU planning factors within their multi-modal long-range transportation plans and programs. These Eight (8) SAFETEA-LU Planning Factors, which are consistent with our goals, are: 1. Support the economic vitality of the Metropolitan Area, especially by enabling global competitiveness, productivity and efficiency. 2. Increase the safety of the transportation system for motorized and non-motorized users. 3. Increase the security of the transportation system for motorized and non-motorized users. 4. Increase the accessibility and mobility options available to people and for freight. [13]

15 5. Protect and enhance the environment, promote energy conservation, improve the quality of life and promote consistency between transportation improvements and state and local planned growth and economic development patterns. 6. Enhance the integration and connectivity of the transportation system, across and between modes, for people and freight. 7. Promote efficient system management and operation. 8. Emphasize the preservation of the existing transportation system. These factors were developed for each TPR and are included as appendices identified as Appendix A (1-5), Eight (8) SAFETEA-LU Planning Factors. The public policy contained in the 2030 Puerto Rico LRTP, also valid for this 2032 Plan, represents a shift in strategy by those responsible for mobility and development in the Commonwealth. While the commitment to complete the STRAHNET remains a priority, there will be very few new major roads constructed in the foreseeable future. Instead, there will be a commitment to the maintenance of existing facilities and improved operation techniques for the current infrastructure, including low cost improvements, protection of the environment and expansion of both existing and planned transit. In concord with the MPO members and in consultation with all interested parties a Public Participation Plan had been developed. It defines the participation process, providing, the reasonable opportunity to be involved in the transportation planning process. The Public Participation Plan also promotes the continued emphasis on public involvement in the implementation of plans, programs, and projects. For more details, see Appendix B. The PR 2032 FIVE TPR-UZAS LRTP provides policy guidelines based on the goals, objectives, and strategies set forth for the 2030 LRTP. The intent is to determine the projected needs of current and future generations and to provide a strategic approach to implementing projects to satisfy these needs, within the fiscal limitations of public agencies responsible for the systems development and maintenance. Others major public policy documents, considered are the following: Objectives and Public Policies of the Land Use Plan for Puerto Rico ( Objetivos y Políticas Públicas del Plan de Uso de Terrenos de Puerto Rico ), 1995 Strategic Model for a New Economy ( Modelo Estratégico para una Nueva Economía ), adopted by the Government of Puerto Rico, September Law No. 550, October 3 rd., 2004 to create the Land Use Plan for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico Land Use and Transportation Plan for the San Juan Metropolitan Region, adopted by the Puerto Rico Planning Board in 1982, as amended [14]

16 Transportation Plan: Document of Public Policy and Strategy for the Development of the Transportation System of Puerto Rico (DTPW, 1991) Land Use Plans adopted by Municipalities recognized as autonomous by Law No. 81 of August 30 th, 1991 The Safe, Accountable, Flexible and Efficient, Transportation Equity Act a Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU), Public Law ; Title 23 United States Code Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 23, Part 450 and CFR 49, Part 613 The 2030 Puerto Rico LRTP and this 2032 Plan, aims to consider public policy established by these and various other sources, in order to guide the implementation of transportation projects so that they reflect the needs of the community and incorporate all aspects that may affect quality of life. A primary focus of public policy related to transportation is the relationship of transportation projects and land use. Other significant issues include sustainability, intermodalism, connectivity, safety, comfort and aesthetics, environmental justice and transportation management. The Government of Puerto Rico is not alien to the fact that the earth is experiencing a longterm warming trend; human-caused increases in atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs) are the accepted predominant reason for this situation. To Puerto Rico s corresponding responsibility in this matter and its commitment is specifically evidenced in the concerted efforts to achieve attainment in the former PM-10 non-attainment area of Guaynabo. There are no, nor has there been any, GHG-related non-attainment area in Puerto Rico. However, the TRP-UZAs has strategies, including its coordination of transportation and land use planning and its endorsement of non-motorized facilities; do serve to reduce GHG emissions. Policy guidelines have been structured to mirror the strategic approach and are incorporated into each. 2.1 STRATEGIES FOR INTEGRATED PLANNING The quality of life strategy emphasizes the critical interrelationship between planning for transportation and land use planning. Well planned communities with compact cores, mixed land uses, walkable environments, and an integrated approach to housing, employment, goods and services, education, recreation, and government, can reduce the need for automobile travel and resist the pressures of sprawl. The redevelopment of core areas and infill of vacant areas can also help to contain the effects of sprawl and reduce the propensity to use the automobile. Cities and towns in which the use of public transportation is encouraged through community planning have a reduced need for [15]

17 automobile use and are thus less affected by congestion, pollution and other problems resulting from automobile dependence. Fostering the interrelationship between transportation planning and land use planning has several important aspects: Support and encourage the definition of a Region-based land use plan for the TPR and specific land use plans for municipalities Encourage the development of a plan for preserving the natural environment Assist local jurisdictions to define land development regulations that require consideration of land use and transportation interrelationships Devise a system of market-based incentives and fiscal measures to bring about the kind of development and redevelopment promoted by public policies An integrated effort to define a desirable future for the TPR involves a coordinated program for land use planning that meets the needs of highly urbanized areas, suburban communities with cohesive identities, smaller towns, and rural communities within the TPR. This coordination should come from the Planning Board, working in concert with local governments and community representatives and the DTPW and PRHTA. It should link land use, environmental, and social concerns with transportation components. Such a coordinated planning process would be based on the transportation that supports the land use planning criteria discussed below. Part of the strategy could be to focus all activities related to transportation planning as a linkage that supports the interconnection and integration of the each TPR with the neighboring San Juan TMA; the Aguadilla TMA; and other TPR, their economic strategies and joint land use planning vision. Notwithstanding their municipal autonomy and different economic activities, (manufacturing, tourism, agriculture, service, etc.), these Regions could coordinate Regional and inter-regional joint efforts in such a way that one Region supports the comparative advantage of the other while receiving benefits from such support. In addition to promoting integration between modes and cooperation between municipalities, an Education Program on transportation should be coordinated with the Department of Education. The goals of the education program would be to promote pedestrian and traffic safety, especially at schools, and improve the effectiveness of the transportation system by providing continuous information to users of all ages. Multiple programs would be needed in order to educate the public, especially through driver education. Promotional materials such as brochures, public service announcements, and [16]

18 training seminars for local government staff will be needed to share information on the program. The primary messages of the public education program will be to: Promote safe interaction and shared use of roadways by cyclists and automobiles Promote pedestrian safety through programs directed at children and youngsters Encourage the use of public transportation Encourage driving behavior that increases highway capacity and safety Promote the advantages of coordinated land use and transportation improvements CRITERIA FOR TRANSPORTATION SUPPORTIVE LAND USE PLANNING In order to move toward a system in which the need for mobility via the individual automobile is reduced, communities that promote less demand for travel by the automobile should be promoted. These communities are planned and designed or have been modified over time to make it easy to meet most daily needs within a relatively compact area. They have considered the interrelationships between walking to nearby destinations and the use of public transportation. This interrelationship should produce a sustainable transportation system that supports good land planning and environmental policies, that supports economic development initiatives, and that enhances safety and security. Land use planning in the TPR that is congruent with the 2030 Puerto Rico LRTP, and for this 2032 Plan, should focus on three interrelated aspects: Reinforce the urban density and mixed uses within the region, thereby reducing transportation demand Limit the extent of sprawl Protect rural, agricultural and environmentally sensitive areas Livable communities integrating walkable communities, bike paths and transit In order to reinforce the urban density and mixed uses of TPR land use decisions, development projects, and transportation infrastructure should promote dense development and redevelopment, mixing uses and following design guidelines that are appropriate to the setting. This emphasis on context-specific design can give communities a more desirable character that helps reduce the desire to escape to the suburban fringe. This context-specific approach should promote a mix of uses, providing housing, employment, goods and services, recreation and public uses in a walkable environment. Where all of these life necessities are close together and easy to access by foot or public transportation, the need for automobile trips is reduced. [17]

19 Specific strategies should be identified to promote infill of areas passed over by the wave of suburbanization and the redevelopment of those parts of the region that have been underdeveloped, or which have deteriorated over the years. This infill can reduce the impetus to go further out into the fringes of the urban zones and can help produce communities that have more internal coherence. Emphasis should be given to providing multiple modes of mobility and access. Public transportation, using públicos, buses and taxis, is an important means of meeting this objective. A continuous and interconnected network of safe and attractive sidewalks and bikeways is equally important. The effectiveness of the public transportation and bicycle and pedestrian systems can be enhanced by controlling on-street parking in core areas. This will make sidewalks and pedestrian street crossings safer and will discourage automobile travel. Parking prices are regulated by the Department of Consumer Affairs, which has resulted in very low price for parking in most areas of the TPR. In areas served by transit, parking prices should be allowed to reflect market value thereby not favoring one mode of transportation more than another. Reinforcing the urban density and mixed uses is directly related to limiting the extent of sprawl. Sprawl may be controlled by changing the prevailing suburban paradigm for building neighborhoods. It may be necessary to redefine the desirable character of future developments to make more compact and integrated communities. Developers and consumers may be influenced to make good decisions, countervailing the trend to suburban-style products, if there are models and examples of good urban development that they can relate to. Sprawl can also be controlled by other means. One is to provide incentives for new development and redevelopment as infill to already built-up areas of cities and towns, replacing deteriorated neighborhoods and inappropriate uses, and by filling in areas that have been bypassed, as discussed above. Another means is avoiding the construction of new roads to serve anticipated developments in outlying areas. This decision to limit the extent and kind of access that will be provided in fringe areas that have been in the process of suburbanizing will depend on determination to resist influences that promote expansion. Directly related to the reinforcement of the urban density and mixed uses in the TPR, and the determination to limit sprawl, is the protection of the Region s rural and environmental areas. It is important to limit the amount and character of transportation improvements that may be programmed to serve such areas. Additionally, the means should be defined to reinforce land development procedures, restricting development in these areas. It will also [18]

20 be necessary to provide these areas with alternative means of access and mobility that do not encourage or allow for development that adversely affects their character POLICY GUIDELINES The regional transportation system must be an interconnected system that promotes multimodalism by linking strategic roadway networks, transit lines, and bicycle and pedestrian facilities with ports, regional and international airports, and urban and suburban activity centers. Transportation projects that focus on multimodalism will be priorities because they incorporate the goals of sustainability and land use compatibility. Listed below are policy guidelines as part of the strategic approach of the integrated planning. Land Use and Development Contribute to achieving the goals of the regional and municipal land use plans Establish processes and standards for the design, construction, and operation of transportation facilities. Coordinate new residential and commercial developments with the planned transportation network to coordinate programming and construction Support land use policies through design and upgrades of roadways and public transportation Include transportation enhancement programs and community improvement projects in the development of a transportation project when applicable Livable and Sustainable Communities Plan parking policies for urban and suburban areas as an integral part of the transportation system and land use plans Provide incentives to only provide minimum parking for new developments Limit parking on public areas when it interrupts the flow of vehicles and affects the safety and movements of pedestrians Identify individual problems for corridors and possible solutions through studies on parking that accompany transportation projects In areas served by transit parking prices should reflect the market value Consensus Building Build consensus on issues of regional land use and transportation planning via the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO). Consider all the users that a transportation facility may serve [19]

Examples of Transportation Plan Goals, Objectives and Performance Measures

Examples of Transportation Plan Goals, Objectives and Performance Measures Examples of Transportation Plan Goals, Objectives and Performance Measures The next step in the Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP) process is to develop goals, objectives, and performance measures.

More information

ORANGE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY. Final Long-Range Transportation Plan - Destination 2035. Attachment A

ORANGE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY. Final Long-Range Transportation Plan - Destination 2035. Attachment A ORANGE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY Final Long-Range Transportation Plan - Destination 2035 Attachment A DESTINATION 2035 DESTINATION 2035 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ATTACHMENT A Moving Toward a Greener Tomorrow

More information

Chapter 9: Transportation

Chapter 9: Transportation Chapter 9: Transportation What is this chapter about? The goals and policies in this chapter convey the City s intent to: Create a coordinated, efficient, and more affordable multimodal transportation

More information

Chapter VIII: Long-Term Outlook and the Financial Plan

Chapter VIII: Long-Term Outlook and the Financial Plan A. Long-Term Outlook Chapter VIII: Long-Term Outlook and the Financial Plan When examining the long-term outlook for transportation planning and programming over the foreseeable future, there are several

More information

Comprehensive Plan Policies that support Infill and Mixed Use

Comprehensive Plan Policies that support Infill and Mixed Use Comprehensive Plan Policies that support Infill and Mixed Use Introduction A comprehensive plan provides a broad vision for the future growth of a community. It is often formulated using community visioning

More information

VISION, DESIGN PRINCIPLES & OVERALL PLANNING STRATEGY

VISION, DESIGN PRINCIPLES & OVERALL PLANNING STRATEGY 3 VISION, DESIGN PRINCIPLES & OVERALL PLANNING STRATEGY The overall planning strategy for the Bank Street CDP is to ensure that future development is undertaken in a coordinated and planned approach, supported

More information

Technical Memorandum PERFORMANCE MEASURES. Prepared by:

Technical Memorandum PERFORMANCE MEASURES. Prepared by: Technical Memorandum PERFORMANCE MEASURES Prepared by: March 2014 TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary... 1 1. Introduction... 2 1.1 Performance Measures and the Public Sector... 2 1.2 National Focus: MAP

More information

Attachment B Policy Audit Template

Attachment B Policy Audit Template Attachment B Policy Audit Template 5 6 7 8 9 0 Provide A Variety of Transportation Choices Provide A Variety of Transportation Choices Provide A Variety of Transportation Choices Encourage transit-oriented

More information

5 Performance Measures

5 Performance Measures 5 Performance Measures This page left blank intentionally. 5 2 Moving Forward Monterey Bay 2035 Introduction The investments identified in the 2035 MTP/SCS are expected to result in significant benefits

More information

REGIONAL NON-MOTORIZED TRANSPORTATION NETWORK

REGIONAL NON-MOTORIZED TRANSPORTATION NETWORK Chapter 10 Bicycle and Pedestrian SAFETEA-LU legislation requires that non-motorized users be considered in the LRTP. The legislation allows for bicycle and pedestrian safety to be incorporated into the

More information

Goals & Objectives. Chapter 9. Transportation

Goals & Objectives. Chapter 9. Transportation Goals & Objectives Chapter 9 Transportation Transportation MISSION STATEMENT: TO PROVIDE A TRANSPORTATION NETWORK CAPABLE OF MOVING PEOPLE AND GOODS EFFICIENTLY AND SAFELY. T he transportation system

More information

Tier 1 Strategies. WV Route 14 Corridor Management Plan

Tier 1 Strategies. WV Route 14 Corridor Management Plan 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Signal timing optimization system improvements. Improve geometry traffic control at high crash intersections. Construct intersection capacity improvement projects. Widen longer sections

More information

TRANSPORTATION SERVICE STANDARDS ELEMENT GOALS, OBJECTIVES & POLICIES

TRANSPORTATION SERVICE STANDARDS ELEMENT GOALS, OBJECTIVES & POLICIES TRANSPORTATION SERVICE STANDARDS ELEMENT GOALS, OBJECTIVES & POLICIES Background One of the most critical public services provided by a community is the community s transportation system. An effective

More information

Alternatives to the Circ Project Prioritization Methodology Prepared for Circ Task Force July 28, 2011

Alternatives to the Circ Project Prioritization Methodology Prepared for Circ Task Force July 28, 2011 Alternatives to the Circ Project Prioritization Methodology Prepared for Circ Task Force July 28, 2011 CCRPC staff has developed a draft methodology described below and detailed in the attached pages for

More information

Technical Report 4: Congestion Management Process Final Plan for Adoption October 2015

Technical Report 4: Congestion Management Process Final Plan for Adoption October 2015 Long Range Transportation Plan Technical Report : Congestion Management Process Final Plan for Adoption October East Robinson Street, Suite, Orlando, FL -- www.metroplanorlando.com MetroPlan Orlando @metroplan_orl

More information

Implementation Strategy

Implementation Strategy Implementation Strategy 6 The following implementation strategy defines strategic points of intervention for complete streets programming, including visioning, goal-setting, local agency plans, coordination

More information

KENTUCKY TRANSPORTATION CABINET. Department of Rural and Municipal Aid. Office of Local Programs

KENTUCKY TRANSPORTATION CABINET. Department of Rural and Municipal Aid. Office of Local Programs KENTUCKY TRANSPORTATION CABINET Department of Rural and Municipal Aid Office of Local Programs Office of Local Programs Transportation Enhancements Safe Routes to School Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality

More information

SURFACE TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM (STP) PROCEDURES FOR THE OKLAHOMA CITY URBANIZED AREA FUNDS

SURFACE TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM (STP) PROCEDURES FOR THE OKLAHOMA CITY URBANIZED AREA FUNDS SURFACE TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM (STP) PROCEDURES FOR THE OKLAHOMA CITY URBANIZED AREA FUNDS October 2015 Background The Surface Transportation Program (STP) was originally established as Section 133 of

More information

Corridor Goals and Objectives

Corridor Goals and Objectives Corridor Goals and Objectives This chapter presents the goals and objectives, developed by the Corridor Study Committee, that serve as the purpose and intent of the Corridor Plan. This plan covers a twenty

More information

IF THEN SURVEY RESULTS

IF THEN SURVEY RESULTS IF THEN SURVEY RESULTS BUILDING TOWARDS A REGIONAL VISION Survey Summary April 2013 BACKGROUND In the spring of 2011, the Piedmont Triad undertook an ambitious, 3-year planning effort designed to strengthen

More information

Pedestrian & Bicycle Plan

Pedestrian & Bicycle Plan RAMSEY COMMUNITIES COUNTYWIDE Pedestrian & Bicycle Plan PRIMER: LEGAL FRAMEWORK PRIMER: LEGAL FRAMEWORK Walking and Biking for All e 2 CHAPTER 2: Walking and Biking for All This page intentionally left

More information

Downtown Tampa Transportation Vision

Downtown Tampa Transportation Vision Downtown Tampa Transportation Vision Executive Summary August 1, 2006 Hillsborough County Metropolitan Planning Organization County Center, 18 th Floor Tampa, Florida 33602 813-272-5940 www.hillsboroughmpo.org

More information

COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION. LINKING PLANNING and THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT GUIDANCE

COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION. LINKING PLANNING and THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT GUIDANCE COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LINKING PLANNING and THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT GUIDANCE Yates Oppermann March 2007 Introduction The purpose of this guidance is to provide the Colorado

More information

MILWAUKEE. Plan. comprehensive DEPARTMENT OF CITY DEVELOPMENT MARCH, 2010 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

MILWAUKEE. Plan. comprehensive DEPARTMENT OF CITY DEVELOPMENT MARCH, 2010 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY MILWAUKEE Plan DEPARTMENT OF CITY DEVELOPMENT MARCH, 2010 comprehensive CITYWIDE POLICY PLAN EXECUTIVE SUMMARY INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW I. OVERVIEW OF COMPREHENSIVE SMART GROWTH PLAN SERIES The series

More information

The financial plan was prepared in conjunction with the Technical Working Group. Refer to Table 3-1: Funding and Implementation Plan.

The financial plan was prepared in conjunction with the Technical Working Group. Refer to Table 3-1: Funding and Implementation Plan. 3 Financial Plan The purpose of the financial plan is to identify funding options that would be likely sources of money to advance recommendations made by this study. The Capitol Region Transportation

More information

HOW WILL PROGRESS BE MONITORED? POLICY AREA. 1. Implement the 2040 Growth Concept and local adopted land use and transportation plans

HOW WILL PROGRESS BE MONITORED? POLICY AREA. 1. Implement the 2040 Growth Concept and local adopted land use and transportation plans PERFORMANCE MONITORING APPROACH OAR 660-044-0040(3)(e) directs Metro to identify performance measures and targets to monitor and guide implementation of the Climate Smart Strategy. The purpose of performance

More information

Overview of the Travel Demand Forecasting Methodology

Overview of the Travel Demand Forecasting Methodology Overview of the Travel Demand Forecasting Methodology Prepared by the Central Transportation Planning Staff (CTPS) Authors: Scott A. Peterson, Manager Ian Harrington, Chief Planner March 29, 2008 1 OVERVIEW

More information

2 Integrated planning. Chapter 2. Integrated Planning. 2.4 State highway categorisation and integrated planning

2 Integrated planning. Chapter 2. Integrated Planning. 2.4 State highway categorisation and integrated planning 2 Integrated planning Chapter 2 Integrated Planning This chapter contains the following sections: Section No. Topic 2.1 Introduction to integrated planning 2.2 Transit s Integrated Planning Policy 2.3

More information

RPA 14/ATURA Surface Transportation Program (STP) APPLICATION FOR FUNDS

RPA 14/ATURA Surface Transportation Program (STP) APPLICATION FOR FUNDS RPA 14/ATURA Surface Transportation Program (STP) APPLICATION FOR FUNDS Please provide the following information when applying to RPA 14/ATURA for Surface Transportation Program (STP) funding for projects

More information

APPENDIX A Dallas-Fort Worth Region Transportation System Management Strategies and Projects

APPENDIX A Dallas-Fort Worth Region Transportation System Management Strategies and Projects APPENDIX A Transportation System Management Strategies and Projects Transportation System Transportation System Management Projects Management Strategies Traffic Signalization and Control New Signal Installation

More information

2010 Salida Community Priorities Survey Summary Results

2010 Salida Community Priorities Survey Summary Results SURVEY BACKGROUND The 2010 Salida Community Priorities Survey was distributed in September in an effort to obtain feedback about the level of support for various priorities identified in the draft Comprehensive

More information

28.0 Development Permit Area #2 (Neighbourhood District)

28.0 Development Permit Area #2 (Neighbourhood District) 28.0 Development Permit Area #2 (Neighbourhood District) Goals and Objectives To provide a guide for infill and new development in the Neighbourhood District. To outline the nature, form and character

More information

South Carolina Multimodal Transportation Plan Vision, Goals, Objectives, and Performance Measures

South Carolina Multimodal Transportation Plan Vision, Goals, Objectives, and Performance Measures South Carolina Multimodal Transportation Plan Vision, Goals, Objectives, and Performance Measures Prepared for: Prepared by: June 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Introduction... 1 1.1 Baseline Understanding...

More information

Congestion Management Systems: A Federal Perspective. 7 Key CMS Components

Congestion Management Systems: A Federal Perspective. 7 Key CMS Components Congestion Management Systems: A Federal Perspective Brian Betlyon FHWA Resource Center brian.betlyon@fhwa.dot.gov 7 Key CMS Components 1. Area of Application 2. System Definition (modes & network) 4.

More information

12MAP-21, a funding and authorization bill to govern U.S. federal surface MONITORING IMPLEMENTATION AND PERFORMANCE

12MAP-21, a funding and authorization bill to govern U.S. federal surface MONITORING IMPLEMENTATION AND PERFORMANCE MONITORING IMPLEMENTATION AND PERFORMANCE 12MAP-21, a funding and authorization bill to govern U.S. federal surface transportation spending, creates a data-driven, performance-based multimodal program

More information

Cycle Strategy 2006 2011

Cycle Strategy 2006 2011 Cycle Strategy 2006 2011 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 INTRODUCTION... 1 2 POLICY BACKGROUND... 2 3 BACKGROUND... 6 4 MAIN OBJECTIVES... 8 5 TARGETS... 9 6 THE CYCLE NETWORK... 10 7 CONCLUSION... 13 Appendix A:

More information

INDOT 2000-2025 Long Range Plan

INDOT 2000-2025 Long Range Plan Chapter 9 INDOT 2000-2025 Long Range Plan Highway Needs Analysis Overview The statewide transportation planning process provides for the identification of highway needs through a comprehensive process

More information

Implementing Instructions - Sustainable Locations for Federal Facilities

Implementing Instructions - Sustainable Locations for Federal Facilities Implementing Instructions - Sustainable Locations for Federal Facilities Page 1 Background On October 5, 2009, President Obama signed Executive Order (E.O.) 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental,

More information

Metropolitan Setting l

Metropolitan Setting l Metropolitan Setting l GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS Los Angeles lies at the heart of one of the most complex metropolitan regions in the United States. As a major center of commerce, finance, and industry in

More information

CHAPTER 5-CMPO TRANSPORTATION VISION PLANS (2035 & BEYOND)

CHAPTER 5-CMPO TRANSPORTATION VISION PLANS (2035 & BEYOND) Regional Transportation Plan 2035 28 CHAPTER 5-CMPO TRANSPORTATION VISION PLANS (2035 & BEYOND) The Cache Transportation Vision Plan shows roadway, bicycle, transit and pedestrian projects that attempt

More information

Resolution for 2035 Transportation Commission Planning Policies

Resolution for 2035 Transportation Commission Planning Policies Resolution for 2035 Transportation Commission Planning Policies WHEREAS, the Colorado Transportation Commission ( the Commission ) has statutory authority pursuant to 43-1-106 to approve, accept, and amend

More information

14-97. 14-97.002 Definitions. For the purposes of this rule chapter the following definitions shall apply unless the context clearly shows otherwise:

14-97. 14-97.002 Definitions. For the purposes of this rule chapter the following definitions shall apply unless the context clearly shows otherwise: 14-97 14-97.001 Purpose. This rule chapter sets forth an access control classification system and access management standards to implement the State Highway System Access Management Act of 1988. The implementation

More information

Infrastructure & Growth Leadership Pillar Strategy Statements from Existing Plans Developing Florida s Strategic 5-Year Direction, 29 November 2011

Infrastructure & Growth Leadership Pillar Strategy Statements from Existing Plans Developing Florida s Strategic 5-Year Direction, 29 November 2011 Infrastructure & Growth Leadership Pillar Strategy Statements from Existing Plans Developing Florida s Strategic 5-Year Direction, 29 November 2011 Key Themes Global trade infrastructure seaports, airports,

More information

Where Do We Want to Go? How Can We Get There?

Where Do We Want to Go? How Can We Get There? Where Do We Want to Go? How Can We Get There? The BRTB has adopted nine goals, with supporting strategies, performance measures, and performance targets. Together, these goals, strategies, measures, and

More information

RESOLUTION NO. WHEREAS, the 2016-2017 City Budget Forecast estimates that housing

RESOLUTION NO. WHEREAS, the 2016-2017 City Budget Forecast estimates that housing RESOLUTION NO. WHEREAS, the 2016-2017 City Budget Forecast estimates that housing (21.6 percent) and transportation (14.9 percent) are the two largest expense categories for the typical Austin family;

More information

OVERVIEW MAJOR FEATURES OF THE MODEL. Some important features of the model set are listed below.

OVERVIEW MAJOR FEATURES OF THE MODEL. Some important features of the model set are listed below. Support to the Casey Overpass Study Central Transportation Planning Staff Support Staff to the Boston Region MPO Overview of the Regional Travel Demand Model Set May 18, 2011 OVERVIEW The model set that

More information

AIR QUALITY TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM

AIR QUALITY TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM AIR QUALITY TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM AIR QUALITY TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM GOLDEN GLADES INTERCHANGE PD&E STUDY Miami-Dade County, Florida Financial Management Number: 428358-1-22-01 Efficient Transportation Decision

More information

Appendix E Transportation System and Demand Management Programs, and Emerging Technologies

Appendix E Transportation System and Demand Management Programs, and Emerging Technologies Appendix E Transportation System and Demand Management Programs, and Emerging Technologies Appendix Contents Transportation System Management Program Transportation Demand Management Program Regional Parking

More information

2009-3. The Preservation of Local Truck Routes: A Primary Connection between Commerce and the Regional Freight Network

2009-3. The Preservation of Local Truck Routes: A Primary Connection between Commerce and the Regional Freight Network 2009-3 The Preservation of Local Truck Routes: A Primary Connection between Commerce and the Regional Freight Network July 2009 This Goods Movement Challenges and Opportunities Report was prepared jointly

More information

Schenk-Atwood Neighborhood Business District Master Plan

Schenk-Atwood Neighborhood Business District Master Plan Schenk-Atwood Neighborhood Business District Master Plan Prepared for the Schenk-Atwood Revitalization Association (SARA) and the City of Madison SCHREIBER/ANDERSON ASSOCIATES, INC. BEST Real Estate Group,

More information

Iowa Smart Planning. Legislative Guide March 2011

Iowa Smart Planning. Legislative Guide March 2011 Iowa Smart Planning Legislative Guide March 2011 Rebuild Iowa Office Wallace State Office Building 529 East 9 th St Des Moines, IA 50319 515-242-5004 www.rio.iowa.gov Iowa Smart Planning Legislation The

More information

Florida s Transportation Visioning Summit Summary

Florida s Transportation Visioning Summit Summary Florida s Transportation Visioning Summit Summary Introduction The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) convened Florida s Transportation Visioning Summit on December 17, 2014 in Lake Buena Vista.

More information

APPENDIX E TASK 5 TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM: TRAVEL DEMAND FORECASTING PROCESS

APPENDIX E TASK 5 TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM: TRAVEL DEMAND FORECASTING PROCESS APPENDIX E TASK 5 TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM: TRAVEL DEMAND FORECASTING PROCESS INTRODUCTION The purpose of this Technical Memorandum is to describe the methodologies and assumptions used in estimating travel

More information

Department of State Development, Infrastructure and Planning. State Planning Policy state interest guideline. State transport infrastructure

Department of State Development, Infrastructure and Planning. State Planning Policy state interest guideline. State transport infrastructure Department of State Development, Infrastructure and Planning State Planning Policy state interest guideline State transport infrastructure July 2014 Great state. Great opportunity. Preface Using this state

More information

2035 FINANCIAL RESOURCES FORECAST

2035 FINANCIAL RESOURCES FORECAST 2035 FINANCIAL RESOURCES FORECAST AKRON METROPOLITAN AREA TRANSPORTATION STUDY 806 CITICENTER BUILDING 146 SOUTH HIGH STREET AKRON, OHIO 44308 December 2012 This report was prepared by the Akron Metropolitan

More information

Sustainable urban mobility: visions beyond Europe. Brest. Udo Mbeche, UN-Habitat

Sustainable urban mobility: visions beyond Europe. Brest. Udo Mbeche, UN-Habitat Sustainable urban mobility: visions beyond Europe 2 nd October 2013 Brest Udo Mbeche, UN-Habitat The Global Report for Human Settlements Published every two years under a UN General Assembly mandate. Aims

More information

Federal Requirements for Statewide Transportation Plans

Federal Requirements for Statewide Transportation Plans Federal Requirements for Statewide Transportation Plans Title 23, U.S.C. 135 - Statewide and nonmetropolitan transportation planning (a) General Requirements. - (1) Development of plans and programs. -

More information

EPA Technical Assistance for Sustainable Communities Building Blocks

EPA Technical Assistance for Sustainable Communities Building Blocks EPA Technical Assistance for Sustainable Communities Technical Assistance Tool: Complete Streets Deerfield Beach, Florida February 16, 2012 To: CC: Amanda Martinez, City of Deerfield Beach Roger Millar,

More information

Sustainable city development through smart urban planning

Sustainable city development through smart urban planning Sustainable city development through smart urban planning Agenda Summary Points Urban Planning Overview Urbanization in India Objectives of Smart Urban planning Key Focus Areas in Smart Urban Planning

More information

The Way We move. transportation master plan September 2009

The Way We move. transportation master plan September 2009 The Way We move transportation master plan September 2009 Transportation Master Plan City of Edmonton 2009 1 Summary of tmp Directions Transportation and land use integration An integrated approach to

More information

Federal Guidelines for STP-U Funding

Federal Guidelines for STP-U Funding MPC 5.f Attachment 1 STP-U Eligibility Guidelines Page 1 of 5 Federal Guidelines for STP-U Funding SURFACE TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM (STP) ELIGIBLE EXPENDITURES PERIOD AVAILABLE: FY + 3 Years FUND: Highway

More information

Congestion Management Systems: A Federal Perspective. Brian Betlyon FHWA Resource Center

Congestion Management Systems: A Federal Perspective. Brian Betlyon FHWA Resource Center Congestion Management Systems: A Federal Perspective Brian Betlyon FHWA Resource Center brian.betlyon@fhwa.dot.gov 7 Key CMS Components 1. Area of Application 2. System Definition (modes & network) 4.

More information

TITLE A CTS FOR THE NEW ROME EXHIBITION

TITLE A CTS FOR THE NEW ROME EXHIBITION CityMobil2 - Socio-economic impact study Reference Group Meeting Lausanne 23 June 2015 TITLE A CTS FOR THE NEW ROME EXHIBITION Carlo Sessa Gabriele Giustiniani, ISIS ITR 30/3/2015 1 Envisioning AUTOMATED

More information

2011 Certification Report. Miami Urbanized Area. Palm Beach, Broward, and Miami- Dade Metropolitan Planning Organizations.

2011 Certification Report. Miami Urbanized Area. Palm Beach, Broward, and Miami- Dade Metropolitan Planning Organizations. 2011 Certification Report Miami Urbanized Area Palm Beach, Broward, and Miami- Dade Metropolitan Planning Organizations Prepared by: Federal Highway Administration Florida Division Federal Transit Administration

More information

FINAL DRAFT FINAL DRAFT

FINAL DRAFT FINAL DRAFT MovingDutchess2 Figure3 1.DutchessCounty withintheregion Chapter3 RegionalPerspective DutchessCountyislocatedatthecenteroftheHudsonValley, halfwaybetweennewyorkcityandalbany.itisatthe northernreachesofnewyorkcitycommutingdistance,yet

More information

Transportation Policy and Design Strategies. Freight Intensive. Level of Freight Presence

Transportation Policy and Design Strategies. Freight Intensive. Level of Freight Presence Appendix G Transportation Policy and Design Strategies CONTEXT SENSITIVE SOLUTIONS To address the need to describe freight systems which account for the population distress which may result, an analysis

More information

Transportation Master Plan (TMP) for the City of Madison: Draft Scope of Work

Transportation Master Plan (TMP) for the City of Madison: Draft Scope of Work Transportation Master Plan (TMP) for the City of Madison: Draft Scope of Work Briefing for Madison Area TPB/MPO June 6, 2012 TMP: Overview/Purpose Help Create Walkable, Bikeable, Livable City - Strengthen

More information

Volume II Recommendations January 2006 City of Madison Comprehensive Plan

Volume II Recommendations January 2006 City of Madison Comprehensive Plan 2 LAND USE THE PLAN: GOALS, OBJECTIVES, POLICIES AND IMPLEMENTATION RECOMMENDATIONS Volume II Recommendations January 2006 TABLE OF CONTENTS Land Use Overview...2 1 Summary of Land Use Issues...2 2 Accommodating

More information

Mid-Coast Corridor Transit Project San Diego, California New Starts Engineering (Rating Assigned November 2015)

Mid-Coast Corridor Transit Project San Diego, California New Starts Engineering (Rating Assigned November 2015) Mid-Coast Corridor Transit Project San Diego, California New Starts Engineering (Rating Assigned November 2015) Summary Description Proposed Project: Light Rail Transit 10.9 Miles, 9 Stations Total Capital

More information

A Bicycle Accident Study Using GIS Mapping and Analysis

A Bicycle Accident Study Using GIS Mapping and Analysis A Bicycle Accident Study Using GIS Mapping and Analysis Petra Staats, Graduate Assistant, Transportation Policy Institute, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA pstaats@eden.rutgers.edu Summary Surveys

More information

Summary of MAP-21 Matrix

Summary of MAP-21 Matrix Summary of MAP-21 Matrix Overview On July 6, 2012, President Obama signed into law P.L. 112-141, the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21). Funding surface transportation programs

More information

Improving Access in Florida International University Biscayne Bay Campus Executive Summary

Improving Access in Florida International University Biscayne Bay Campus Executive Summary EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Improving Access in Florida International University Biscayne Bay Campus Executive Summary Prepared for: Miami-Dade County Metropolitan Planning Organization (Miami-Dade MPO) Prepared

More information

A Framework for Monitoring the Performance of Travel Demand Management and Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) Reduction Activities

A Framework for Monitoring the Performance of Travel Demand Management and Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) Reduction Activities A Framework for Monitoring the Performance of Travel Demand Management and Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) Reduction Activities WA-RD 806.1 Mark E. Hallenbeck June 2013 Orion Stewart Anne Vernez Moudon Office

More information

Arizona State Transportation Board Policies

Arizona State Transportation Board Policies Arizona State Transportation Board Policies Revised December 18, 2015 The Arizona State Transportation Board approved the following policies at their December 18, 2015 board meeting with no changes from

More information

Chapter 5 Financial Plan

Chapter 5 Financial Plan The Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA_LU) requires that the MTP incorporate a financial plan for the planning period. The MTP is required to

More information

Los Angeles Union Station, CA Sustainable Neighborhood Assessment. April 22-23, 2014

Los Angeles Union Station, CA Sustainable Neighborhood Assessment. April 22-23, 2014 Los Angeles Union Station, CA Sustainable Neighborhood Assessment April 22-23, 2014 Sustainable Neighborhood Assessment Through the Sustainable Neighborhood Assessment Tool developed by Global future development

More information

GUIDELINES FOR SACRAMENTO AREA COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS TRANSPORTATION DEMAND MANAGEMENT FUNDING PROGRAM Revised December 2009

GUIDELINES FOR SACRAMENTO AREA COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS TRANSPORTATION DEMAND MANAGEMENT FUNDING PROGRAM Revised December 2009 GUIDELINES FOR SACRAMENTO AREA COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS TRANSPORTATION DEMAND MANAGEMENT FUNDING PROGRAM Revised December 2009 INTRODUCTION In July 2002, the Sacramento Area Council of Governments (SACOG)

More information

TABLE OF CONTENTS. INTRODUCTION...1 Purpose of a Comprehensive Plan...1 McKenzie County Comprehensive Plan...1 Definitions...2 Goal...2 Vision...

TABLE OF CONTENTS. INTRODUCTION...1 Purpose of a Comprehensive Plan...1 McKenzie County Comprehensive Plan...1 Definitions...2 Goal...2 Vision... MCKENZIE COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION...1 Purpose of a Comprehensive Plan...1 McKenzie County Comprehensive Plan...1 Definitions...2 Goal....2 Vision...3 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT...4

More information

Program guidance that details the eligibility, criteria and application process. Ferry Boat Program. Ohio Department of Transportation

Program guidance that details the eligibility, criteria and application process. Ferry Boat Program. Ohio Department of Transportation Program guidance that details the eligibility, criteria and application process. Ferry Boat Program Ohio Department of Transportation TABLE OF CONTENTS Program Overview Program Administration.........2

More information

and the statewide and metropolitan transportation planning and programming process in California:

and the statewide and metropolitan transportation planning and programming process in California: Financial constraint... and the statewide and metropolitan transportation planning and programming process in California: A GUIDE TO FEDERAL AND STATE FINANCIAL PLANNING REQUIREMENTS Prepared by: Federal

More information

DELAWARE VALLEY REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION Fiscal Year 2016 Planning Work Program INTRODUCTION

DELAWARE VALLEY REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION Fiscal Year 2016 Planning Work Program INTRODUCTION DELAWARE VALLEY REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION Fiscal Year 2016 Planning Work Program INTRODUCTION The Fiscal Year 2016 Planning Work Program for the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission incorporates

More information

Trends and issues Lake Te Koutu walkway, Cambridge

Trends and issues Lake Te Koutu walkway, Cambridge 27 Trends and issues Lake Te Koutu walkway, Cambridge 3 Trends 3.1 Journey to work Over the past two to three decades there has been a significant increase in private vehicle ownership and usage and a

More information

Comprehensive Mobility Project Development Process Capital Metro ¼-Cent Fund Analysis

Comprehensive Mobility Project Development Process Capital Metro ¼-Cent Fund Analysis Comprehensive Mobility Project Development Process Capital Metro ¼-Cent Fund Analysis Transportation & Mobility projects that meet the following criteria: enhances regional mobility; supports public transit;

More information

28 CHAPTER 4 TRANSPORTATION. Chapter 4 Transportation

28 CHAPTER 4 TRANSPORTATION. Chapter 4 Transportation 28 CHAPTER 4 TRANSPORTATION Chapter 4 Transportation Introduction An efficient, safe, and connected transportation system is a key component to a vibrant, healthy city. Convenient access to jobs, schools,

More information

Corridors & Other Initiatives. Future of Florida Virtual Seminar Series

Corridors & Other Initiatives. Future of Florida Virtual Seminar Series FDOT Up-Close: Future Corridors & Other Initiatives Future of Florida Virtual Seminar Series June 6, 2012 Today s Presenters Kathleen Neill Director, Office of Policy Planning Bob Romig State Transportation

More information

Growth Management and Transportation. By Mark Hallenbeck Director, TRAC-UW

Growth Management and Transportation. By Mark Hallenbeck Director, TRAC-UW Growth Management and Transportation By Mark Hallenbeck Director, TRAC-UW Seattle Transportation Urban Planning Truism Growth is good Urban Planning Truisms There are two bad words in Urban Planning: Sprawl

More information

7.0 Transportation Management

7.0 Transportation Management 7.0 Transportation Management I. Introduction The Kansas City region has invested considerable effort and resources in the design and implementation of its regional multimodal transportation system. As

More information

IN THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA A RESOLUTION TO APPROVE A COMPLETE STREETS POLICY

IN THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA A RESOLUTION TO APPROVE A COMPLETE STREETS POLICY IN THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA A RESOLUTION TO APPROVE A COMPLETE STREETS POLICY The term " Complete Streets" describes a comprehensive, integrated transportation network with

More information

Ne w J e r s e y Tr a f f i c Co n g e s t i o n :

Ne w J e r s e y Tr a f f i c Co n g e s t i o n : Ne w J e r s e y Tr a f f i c Co n g e s t i o n : A Growing Crisis January 2008 Cover photo : Route 3, Passaic County introduction A rising tide of traffic congestion threatens to increase roadway gridlock,

More information

Citizen Advisory Group Meeting #1 December 8, 2011 6:00 p.m.

Citizen Advisory Group Meeting #1 December 8, 2011 6:00 p.m. Citizen Advisory Group Meeting #1 December 8, 2011 6:00 p.m. Meeting Agenda 1. Background Information 2. Policy Framework 3. Plan Development Process 4. Public Input Results 5. Vision Statement 6. Group

More information

Walkable Communities Florida Department of Transportation State Safety Office Pedestrian and Bicycle Program April 1995 www.dot.state.fl.us/safety Twelve Steps for an Effective Program Page 1 Twelve Steps

More information

Transportation Alternatives

Transportation Alternatives 1 Transportation Alternatives Transportation alternatives involve a variety of components: Location Alternatives - when and where service is provided - general location as well as level of service on the

More information

Federal Highway Administration 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE Washington, DC 20590 202-366-4000

Federal Highway Administration 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE Washington, DC 20590 202-366-4000 1 of 8 12/27/2013 8:21 AM U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE Washington, DC 20590 202-366-4000 MAP-21 - Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century

More information

Infrastructure and Growth Leadership Advisory Group Ideas and Approaches Survey

Infrastructure and Growth Leadership Advisory Group Ideas and Approaches Survey Infrastructure and Growth Leadership Advisory Group Ideas and Approaches Survey In its second meeting, the Infrastructure and Growth Leadership Advisory Group expanded and refined the list of approaches/ideas

More information

Commuter Choice Certificate Program

Commuter Choice Certificate Program Commuter Choice Certificate Program Current course offerings (subject to change) Core 1 Commuter Choice Toolbox Required Courses Rideshare Options Audience: This 2 credit required course is targeted to

More information

10 Aviation Element. 10.1 Introduction. 10.1.1 Purpose of Chapter

10 Aviation Element. 10.1 Introduction. 10.1.1 Purpose of Chapter 10 Aviation Element 10.1 Introduction 10.1.1 Purpose of Chapter This chapter provides the aviation element of the RFATS 2035 Long Range Transportation Plan. It describes the existing conditions and trends

More information

Surface Transportation Program (STP) Projects

Surface Transportation Program (STP) Projects Toledo Metropolitan Area Council of Governments American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (Economic Stimulus Program) Application Packet for: Surface Transportation Program (STP) Projects APPLICATIONS DUE

More information

New Jersey SRTS Travel Plan Guide

New Jersey SRTS Travel Plan Guide New Jersey SRTS Travel Plan Guide Prepared For: Funded By: Prepared By: New Jersey Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration Alan M. Voorhees Transportation Center Edward J. Bloustein

More information

CITY OF ROANOKE AND TOWN OF VINTON, VIRGINIA. RSTP Funds Joint Application FOR

CITY OF ROANOKE AND TOWN OF VINTON, VIRGINIA. RSTP Funds Joint Application FOR CITY OF ROANOKE AND TOWN OF VINTON, VIRGINIA RSTP Funds Joint Application FOR Tinker Creek Pedestrian Bridge: Tinker Creek and Glade Creek Greenways Connection Date: September 15, 2014 RSTP Project Profile

More information

Mayors Welcome Strong Surrey Votes Yes Coalition Support. Yes Vote Would Vastly Improve Transit and Transportation in Fast Growing City

Mayors Welcome Strong Surrey Votes Yes Coalition Support. Yes Vote Would Vastly Improve Transit and Transportation in Fast Growing City Mayors Welcome Strong Surrey Votes Yes Coalition Support Yes Vote Would Vastly Improve Transit and Transportation in Fast Growing City February 11, 2015 Vancouver, BC The Mayors Council on Regional Transportation

More information