FloodRisk II Further steps for future implementation strategies towards an integrated flood risk management. English Short Report

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "FloodRisk II Further steps for future implementation strategies towards an integrated flood risk management. English Short Report"

Transcription

1 FloodRisk II Further steps for future implementation strategies towards an integrated flood risk management English Short Report

2 Copyright: Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, Environment and Water Management Overall Lead Dr. Jochen Bürgel, Austrian Environmental Agency Technical Lead Prof. Dr. Helmut Habersack, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna Coordination Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, Environment and Water Management Dr. Heinz Stiefelmeyer, DI Drago Pleschko, DI Maria Patek, DI Dr. Florian Rudolf-Miklau Coordination Federal Ministry of Traffic, Innovation and Technology MR Dr. Leo Grill Cover picture Flood 2005 in Nederle (Paznaun valley), Tyrol (BBA Imst) Vienna, June 2009

3 FloodRisk II Further steps for future implementation strategies towards an integrated flood risk management English Short Report written by Prof. DI Dr. Helmut Habersack Dr. Jochen Bürgel Prof. Dr. Arthur Kanonier 3

4 4

5 Index 1. Introduction Project organisation projects Meteorology/Hydrology TP1.2 Climate change impact on runoff formation based on variable snowmelt and direct rainfall contribution TP1.3 Flood warning system flooded area prognosis TP1.4 HOPWAP: Analysis and modelling of the effect of forest cover on the 2005 flood event in the Paznaun valley (Austria) TP1.5 Effects of surface sealing on runoff in torrential rain results from investigations in intensively settled areas of the Salzkammergut district in Upper Austria TP1.6 Dynamic of design parameters and consequences climate Geomorphology TP2.1.1 Illustration of the impacts of changes in the sediment budgtet and the river morphology on the flood-runoff and damage pattern (with consideration of the impact of the vegetation for the interaction flood-morphodynamic) TP2.1.2 Analysis of the sediment budget and river morphology of selected Austrian rivers (sediment deficit, sediment surplus, development(actual-state of the river morphology, trends) in connection with floods TP2.2 Effects of sustainable bed load management on flood discharge focussing on the integrated river engineering project (Danube) TP2.3 Preventive strategies to reduce the risk of woody debris Economy TP3.1 An economic assessment based on hazard zone plans for a design event TP3.2.1 Economical importance of flood protection measures and the impact of natural hazards on regionsl economic sectors TP3.2.2 An economic assessment of torrent and avalanche control measures TP3.3 Documentation of floods central event capture and analysis Ecology TP4.1 Woody plants on flood protection levees TP4.2 Vegetation and floods concerning hydraulics and ecology TP4.3 Ecology flood protection (EU-National) effects of the water framework directive TP4.4 Flood Plain Invenvory Flood Management TP5.1 Hazard zone map, HZM: estimation of the risk potential of land slides and slope movements based on an example in Gasen/Haslau (Austria) TP5.2 Development of standards and approaches for the inventory and condition assessment (condition monitoring) of torrent control measures TP5.3 Local structural protection measures options and limitations

6 TP6.1 Reconstruction measures and integrated flood risk management TP6.3 Action plan against floodings in Radkersburg (Austria) TP6.4 Evaluation of mobile flood protection systems related to flood risk management. Objective assessment of frequently used mobile flood protection systems TP6.5 International comparison of administrative structures in regard of the organisationi of integrated flood risk management TP7.1 Maintenance of embankment dams model for monitoring and safety concept Spatial Planning TP8.1 Awareness raising in relation to the natural hazard water TP8.2 Guidance paper: Public participation within flood risk management projects TP9.1.1 An evaluation of transnational and national projects with the subject integrated flood management TP9.1.2 Strategic spatial development plan for flood protection TP9.2 Comparison of existing instruments und directives within the disciplines spatial planning and water management in Austria with the aim of ensuring areas (basic study) TP9.1.3 Implementation of future strategies concerning risk-reducing land uses Part: relocation 33 TP9.3.2 Implementation of future strategies concerning risk-reducing land uses Part: intercommunal cooperation TP9.4 Integrated River Development and Inter-communal Burden Sharing Land Demand and compensation in Terms of Flood protection (Flood Retention and Minimization of Damages), Rural development and Ecology (WFD) TP9.5 Agriculture and Flooding Legal Aspects TP10.1 The effect of the EU-Flood Directive on the Austrian legislature TP10.2 Flood protection on the basis of the Austrian water law TP10.3 Hazard areas/hazard zones seen from an legal perspective TP10.4.a Legal dealings with contruction and dedication stock, property protection TP10.4.b Legal aspects in the building law for post protection measures of existing buildings in flood prone areas TP10.5.a Questions of liability with reference to natural hazard management (cities and communities) TP10.5.b Questions of liability with reference to natural hazard management (authorised experts) 41 TP10.6 Questions with regard to law of property and liability concerning the erection of constructions agains natural dangers (floods, mudflow, avalanches, rock falls, land slides,..) 42 TP10.7 Legal aspects with regard to dispossession and compensation concerning flood protection Desaster protection Management TP11.1 Regorganisation of the crisis and disaster protection management in Austria

7 TP11.2 Desaster protection management systems for municipalities participating organisations

8 1. INTRODUCTION After the extreme flood of 2002 in 2005 another catastrophic flood occured in the Western, Alpine are of Austria and 2006 a large flood affected the March river. Although many suggestions of the project FloodRisk I were already implemented, missing aspects in relation to the analysis existed as well as further thematic fields. The focus on these lead to the project FloodRisk II, which is presented in this synthesis report. The project FloodRisk II Intensification and integration of future oriented implementation strategies for the integrated flood management consists of 45 sub projects, which are summarized in 8 work packages. The project FloodRisk II contains essential suggestions in all areas of the integrated flood management. The analysis of possible effects of climate change on flood management showed, that the reduction of uncertainty of data is more important. As new instrument for flood management and catastrophe management the so called lamella prognosis is suggested. For small to medium floods the positive effect of forest cover and the minimization of sealing could be demonstrated. A minimum spatial demand of river was defined a 1 to 3 times the river bed width on both sides of the river bank, where no high value usages should be place. The consideration of the long-term development of the river morphology and especially the sediment regime as well as sediment continuum is essential, since most of the Austrian rivers show river bed degradation tendencies und thus increasing flood risk. The spatially differentiated vegetation management allows to regard safety aspects in settlements and a dynamic vegetation development in the reaches in between, contribution there also to a flood retention. From an ecological perspective the river-aue area has to be seen as a unit, where especially the near river inundation areas are important for the ecological status and where also synergies with the flood retention are given. Within the theme flood management suggestions concern the preservation and restoration of floodplains, the monitoring and improvement of dams and torrent control structures, the use of object protection and mobile flood protection as well as relief measures during and immediately after the flood event. Both for river and torrent control the economical importance of flood protection and also the trend towards a renovation, reconstruction of measures could be shown. Spatial planning was again identified as key player in integrated flood management and FloodRisk II suggests important possibilities for improvement in planning instruments, intercommunity cooperation, settling out and local and regional spatial planning. Besides ecology a new theme in FloodRisk II is law. There suggestions for the implementation of the EU floods directive are given by detailed paragraph formulations with respect e.g. to summation effects. Furthermore questions related to endangered construction land and the relation of building law to flood protection are answered. A special focus is also given to liability at various 8

9 aspects of the flood management. Finally FloodRisk II contains a detailed implementation strategy including a discussion of the so far realized measures as a consequence of FloodRisk I as well as the demand for further improvements and new suggestions in all aspects of integrated flood management. 9

10 2. PROJECT ORGANISATION Project structure FloodRisk II Process of FloodRisk II: from Workpackage to implementation strategy 10

11 Overall Lead Dr. Jochen Bürgel, Austrain Environmental Agency Technical Lead Prof. DI Dr. Helmut Habersack, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna Steering Committee SC DI Wilfried Schimon, Department VII, Water, Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, Environment and Water Management SC DI Gerhard Mannsberger, Department IV, Forestry, Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, Environment and Water Management MR Dr. Leo Grill, Department IV Rail, Water Transport and Transport Labour Inspectorate (W3), Federal Ministry of Traffic, Innovation and Technologie Workpackage Leader Meteorology/Hydrology: DI Reinhold Godina, Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, Environment and Water Management Geomorphology: DI Dr. Michael Hengl, Inst. of Hydraulik Engineering and Hydrometric Testing, Federal Institute for Water Management Economy: M. Litt. Mag. Dr. Prettenthaler Franz, Joanneum Research GmbH Ecology: Prof. Dr. Mathias Jungwirth, Institute of Hydrobiology and Aquatic Ecosystem Management, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna Flood Management: DI Dr. Heinz Stiefelmeyer, Head VII/5, Flood Protection, Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, Environment and Water Management DI Maria Patek, Head IV/5, Avalanche and Torrent Control, Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, Environment and Water Management Spatial Planning: HR Dr. Friedrich Mair, Head of Spatial Planning, Provincial Government of Salzburg Legal Aspects: Ass.Prof. DI Dr. Arthur Kanonier, Department of Spatial Development, Infrastructure and Environmental Planing, Technical University of Vienna 11

12 3. PROJECTS 3.1. Meteorology/Hydrology TP1.2 Climate change impact on runoff formation based on variable snowmelt and direct rainfall contribution Lead: Prof. Dr. Holzmann, Mag. Dr. Herbert Formayer, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna Climate models indicate a continuous change in air temperature and seasonal precipitation even for Austria during the current century. At four spatially distributed Austrian catchments the effects of climate change on the runoff situation have been investigated. The study areas were Bregenzer Ache / gauge Mellau, Lavant / gauge Fischering, Traisen / gauge Lilienfeld and Salzach / gauge Mittersill. For this analysis the climate change scenarios A1B and B1 of the regional climate model REMO of Max-Planck-institute-Hamburg have been adapted to Austria. By means of a stochastic weather generator daily timeseries of air temperature and precipitation have been generated. As present status climate the period of 1961 to 1990 was used and for the average future change the period of 2070 to 2100 was selected. By using a rainfall-runoff model from the temperature and precipitation input daily timeseries of runoff were created. As a result the changes in flood formation, snow cover and the monthly balances in precipitation and runoff were documented. The results showed strong regional differences. For alpine catchments the effects especially in terms of snow accumulation and snow melt will be rather strong. The tendency of the decrease of snow accumulation and earlier snow smelt caused by higher air temperature and a higher rate in liquid precipitation could be demonstrated. This leads to more runoff in winter time and less in summer time. In areas with a lower altitude like the Traisen catchment the low flow periods are higher affected. Here a clear increase in days of low flow was observed, which is contrary to the alpine catchments. Eventually there is an overall trend toa seasonal change in flood appearance. Scenario B1 causes a shift to autumn, whereas scenario A1B causes a shift to spring. In both cases, scenario B1 and A1B, the number of floods in summertime will decrease. The amount of the seasonal shift varies from area to area. TP1.3 Flood warning system flooded area prognosis Lead: DI Christoph Braunsteiner, ARGE Kamp NEK The project presents flooded areas, which are derived from hydraulic calculations based on constantly increasing discharges. Hence, emergency forces dispose of a concrete flooding scenario (i.e. flooded area) to be expected enabling them to optimally allocate their resources. The project s 12

13 main objective is to check upon the accuracy and plausibility of the used methodology. Furthermore, the model will be analyzed with respect to its general applicability to different river basins in Austria. TP1.4 HOPWAP: Analysis and modelling of the effect of forest cover on the 2005 flood event in the Paznaun valley (Austria) Lead: Dr. Berhard Kohl, BFW The impact of changes in forest cover on the flood event of the River Trisanna in the Paznaun valley in August 22rdand 23rd, 2005 has been investigated by means of process-oriented hydrological modelling. The effect and influence of different forest cover configurations (status 1950 and 2005) was analysed. Based on qualitative and quantitative aerial image interpretations hydrological response units (HRU) attributed with hydrological parameters for modelling (initial abstraction and water storage, surface runoff coefficient and surface roughness) were derived. Field investigation data (forest site and stand characterisation on approx points within the Paznaun valley) were used for calibration and verification of these parameters. Detailed hydro-geological survey and discharge measurements formed the base for hydrological modelling. Differences in land use could be identified clearly within and outside the forest cover. Increase of forest cover and hydrologically effective changes in forest stand characteristics have been detected and evaluated. The impact of these changes on the flood event of august 2005 is shown quite clearly regarding subcatchments of the Paznaun valley according to the degree of variation. The hydrological modelling of the August 23rd, 2005, event in the whole Paznaun valley showed only negligible differences between scenario 1950 and The so disappeared effects of forest cover are due to the specific peculiarities of this event, such as an enormous amount of rain during the period before the event, the areal rain distribution, the duration of the event as well as the event type in general. The verifiably protection effects of forest cover on floods in general were overstrained by this extraordinary event. TP1.5 Effects of surface sealing on runoff in torrential rain results from investigations in intensively settled areas of the Salzkammergut district in Upper Austria Lead: Mag. Klaus Kleebinder, BFW The increasing amount of surface runoff due to soil surface sealing forms a factor which is successively leading to increase of runoff freight in torrents and receiving water courses. Surface sealing does not only rise runoff freight, but also means an increase of surface runoff velocity and a decrease of concentration time. The consequences are intensification of flooding events and higher risk potential for downstream riparian settlements. The question of surface sealing has been investigated in a co-operation between WLV - Section Upper Austria and BFW in the Upper Austrian Salzkammergut. A code of practice for assessment 13

14 of runoff disposition before sealing and a calculation tool, which shall serve for calculation of ruoff increases due to sealing and for quantification of different prevention measures, are presented as the first results of the project. TP1.6 Dynamic of design parameters and consequences climate Lead: Prof. Dr. Günther Blöschl, Technical University Vienna The aim of this study is to assess whether design floods in Austria need to be adapted due to changed climate conditions. A review of the literature suggests that the future evolution of climate extremes cannot be assessed reliably on the basis of current knowledge. Credible forecasts of changes in the flood regime are hence not possible at this stage. To obtain an indication of the spectrum of potential evolutions of the flood regime, if-then scenarios were analysed. The idea is to estimate changes in the flood discharges, given plausible but hypothetical changes in the climate variables. The if-then scenarios hence need to be interpreted in the context of the assumptions on the climate variables and are no forecasts. As the Austrian Alps are a climatic divide, two example catchments were examined, one north of the Alps (the Pielach catchment), and one south of the Alps (the Gail catchment). The following assumptions were made: higher rainfall in winter, lower rainfall in summer; higher variability of within-event precipitation due to increased convection; shift in high runoff generation conditions in the spring due to earlier snow melt and higher evaporation in summer. The assumptions differ to some degree between the two catchments in accordance with the respective flood producing processes. Simulations indicate that, in the northern catchment, the one hundred year flood does not change while, in the southern catchment, there is a 10% increase given the assumptions made on rainfall and runoff generation. The seasonal analysis gives a more complex pattern. In winter, simulated flood peaks at the northern site are +32% higher than under current conditions, at the southern site they are +14% higher. The spring floods indicate an increase of 2% at the northern site and 4% at the southern site, while the summer floods indicate a 9% decrease and a 2% increase, respectively. Simulated autumn floods indicate +8% and 14% increases at the northern and southern sites, respectively. To put the if-then scenarios into the context of the natural variability, flood data in Austria were analysed. The focus was on understanding the information inherent in the observed flood peak time series in terms of estimating the design flood (e.g. the one hundred year flood) and the associated uncertainty. The analyses of the data indicate that the natural variability is enormous. The accuracy of the estimates strongly depends on the properties of the flood peak sample (sample size, data quality, occurrence of big floods). Specifically, there exist flood decades and decades with much smaller floods. This finding is consistent with trend analyses of flood data from the literature which suggest that there are no conclusive indications of climate induced changes. However, clustering of floods has existed throughout the centuries. 14

15 Against the backdrop of the flood data analyses, the if-then scenarios need a subtle interpretation. The combined evidence suggests that the enormous natural variability in the past will also dominate design flood estimation in the future and the potential changes of the if-then scenarios are small relative to this variability. Design flood estimation needs to account for the clustering of events and the uncertainty should be reduced by using expanded information. The focus in design flood estimation hence needs to be on maximising the data base used, as this will likely reduce the uncertainty of design flood estimates more significantly than will the use of climate related trends Geomorphology TP2.1 Morphology of the Austrian rivers: sediment budget morphology flooding (Prof. Dr.Helmut Habersack, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna) TP2.1.1 Illustration of the impacts of changes in the sediment budgtet and the river morphology on the flood-runoff and damage pattern (with consideration of the impact of the vegetation for the interaction flood-morphodynamic) TP2.1.2 Analysis of the sediment budget and river morphology of selected Austrian rivers (sediment deficit, sediment surplus, development(actual-state of the river morphology, trends) in connection with floods Changes in river morphology can be long term or develop in the course of flood events. In the present study the immediate morphologic river changes as well as the long-term trend of rivermorphological development is discussed. Different morphological processes were identifiedbased on vertical aerial photographs and visual documentation. The geometry of the morphological changes was measured and analyzed with hydraulic parameters using hydrodynamic-numerical models. The correlations of the specific stream power, the Froude number and the flow area with the width changes during the flood in August 2005 were investigated. When comparing the average values of hydraulic parameters, correlations with the width changes were found for the Bregenzerach and Lech. The values correlated well where width changes up to a factor of 1.8 occurred. This is due to the fact that up to these values of width changes, a large portion (approx. 90%) of the cross sections was found. For larger width changes the number of profiles was not sufficient. This led to a larger fluctuation range. The specific stream power was used as a hydraulic parameter to investigate relationships between long-term morphological developments as well as event-related morphological changes. Generally in literature different thresholds of specific stream power exist to distinguish between morphologically stable and unstable areas. At the same time however the restrictions of this application and the complexity of the relationships were discussed. 15

16 The analysis of morphological changes during flood events showed that the specific stream power as a single parameter is not sufficient to predict morphological changes. Influences of various kinds (in particular the bedload budget and the resistance by constructions, etc.) affect the values and reduce the quality of the relationship. Furthermore the Bregenzerach, Lech, Trisanna and Kamp River were analyzed based on longitudinal sections. The influencing factors and process areas during the floods were illustrated. It became clear, that especially during the floods of 2005 river sections with higher slopes as well as areas which had material inputs through a tributary or a land slide upstream tended to show morphological changes. When analysing the relation of the specific stream power with long-term morphologic development of 8 rivers in Austria (Bregenzerach, Aist, Waldzeller Ache, Drau, Mur, Lech, Danube and Kamp River) only limited correlations could be found. Studies on the discharge pattern showed, however, that taking them into account helps to analyze the development of the channel. The discharge pattern was calculated at the gauging stations through the ratio of MJHQ (mean annual flood) and MJNQ (mean annual low flow). The minimum space demand of rivers covers areas, which are or may be affected by erosion or aggradations during extreme flood events. The minimum morphological space demand of rivers is defined as a minimum safety distance to the river to minimize the potential damage during future flood events. In this area no buildings, infrastructure and highervalue use should be allowed, since erosion during larger flood events may occur there. In settlement areas and in relation to anthropogenic use outside settlement areas, according to the results of this study a minimum safety distance (minimum morphological space demand of rivers) has to be kept free. The minimum morphological space demand of rivers is in total 3-7 TP2.1.1 und TP times the width (actual bankfull width) and thus 1-3 times the width away of each river bank as a minimum safety distance. Settlements, infrastructure, bridge foundations, canals, culverts, trade and industry buildings may only be built outside of this safety distance. Outside of settlement areas additionally to the minimum morphological space demand of rivers (related to the distance of uses) the hydrologic-hydraulic space demand is to aspire, which covers the HQ100 (HQ300 related to increased risk) inundation area. These floodplains should be protected or restored to accomplish the necessary contribution to the reduction of the overall flood risk. If possible outside of settlement areas (use) additionally the maximum morphological space demand of rivers, which corresponds to the space extension of the riparian forest (river type specific space extension of the aue area) (FloodRisk II - TP4.3) should be strived (the preservation of existing riparian forests or restoration). Major objectives of future river management measures should be the design and implementation of measures to improve the sediment balance as well as to minimize the river bed erosion, in order to maintain or achieve the good ecological status (according to the Water Framework Directive) and to ensure flood protection. To achieve these goals improvements in the field of sediment continuum (conservation or re-establishment) and hydromorphology are essential. The initiation of river morphological dynamics according to the river type (bank erosion, morphodynamics etc.) is necessary. 16

17 TP2.2 Effects of sustainable bed load management on flood discharge focussing on the integrated river engineering project (Danube) Lead: Dr. Roland Schmallfuß, DonauConsult In this subproject the relevant effects of river bed erosion during the last decades and also of planned measures for bed load management within the framework of the Integrated River Engineering Project (river bed stabilization, river bank restoration and side arm re-connection) will be analysed and quantified. One-dimensional hydraulic models (HEC-RAS) developed during the general design stage are the basis for these calculations. The relevance of integrated hydraulic engineering and ecologic design processes for integrated flood management is discussed within the strategic chapters focussing on the Integrated River Engineering Project (Danube). TP2.3 Preventive strategies to reduce the risk of woody debris Lead: Prof. Dr. Johannes Hübl, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna The project aims to find sustainable and effective solutions to reduce woody debris. General guidelines for torrent control management with reference to woody debris will be created based on a review of the literature and analysis of case studies. This study addresses the opportunities and contribution of soil bioengineering, forestry management and technical options to minimise the risk of woody debris. All forest and bioengineering processes, such as disposition, urgent measures and maintenance, will be discussed in detail aiming for a code of practice Economy TP3.1 An economic assessment based on hazard zone plans for a design event Lead: Dr. Franz Prettenthaler, Joanneum Research The project calculates the maximum damage potential for floods in Austria using the national risk zoning tool HORA and compares it for selected Austrian regions to the maximum damage potential calculated on basis of the more accurate local hazard mapping. The results show that for many uses, HORA is a sufficiently accurate tool for damage potential estimation. 17

18 TP3.2.1 Economical importance of flood protection measures and the impact of natural hazards on regionsl economic sectors Lead: Dr. Franz Prettenthaler, Joanneum Research This project quantifies the macroeconomic impacts of yearly flood protection-investments in Austria regarding value added and employment. For this, a thorough analysis of input patterns on a projects scale has been carried out in order to obtain high resolution data for the analysis with the multiregional macroenonometrc model MULTIREG. TP3.2.2 An economic assessment of torrent and avalanche control measures Lead: Dr Franz Sinabell, WIFO The management of natural hazards has to be organized according to three phases: before, during, and after an event. The implementation of preventive measures is among the most important objectives of efficient risk management. During the phase when a natural disaster occurs, damage mitigation measures have to be employed and after an event the victims of a disaster have to be compensated at conditions that have been agreed upon prior to the event. This is a case study of the Austrian way to manage hazards that are typical for a mountainous country. It analysis the first two phases of the following hazards: torrents, avalanches, land slides, mudflows, rockfalls, and erosion. An organizational unit of the federal administration (Wildbachund Lawinenverbauung, constituted by the Forest Act 1973) has the responsibility to mitigate these hazards and carries out the following activities: development of hazard maps, planning and construction of dams and other preventive constructions, carrying out measurements of events and their consequences. Floods have caused major damages in Austria n recent years. In this study the economic consequences of floods in 2002 and 2005 are analyzed using a multi-sectoral and multi-regional model of the Austrian economy. The results show that the negative consequences of floods outweigh positive ones like a more modern capital stock and positive value added ef-fects due to reconstruction. A detailed view at the tourist sector shows that potential negative consequences have been contained because reconstruction was initiated swiftly after the damages occurred. The same model was used to quantify the economic effects of public investments in torrent- and avalanche control measures. The results show that jobs and value added is generated even in regions where no measures are taken (in the capital Vienna). 18

19 A unique data set was established during the project period which allows to evaluate hazard maps that are available for almost the whole territory for which Wildbach- und Lawinenver-bauung is responsible. The data show that - relatively - few objects (houses with valid addresses) are in zones with high risks due to torrents and avalanches. This is remarkable because generally it is the case that a large share of objects is situated in zones with high flood risks. Econometric methods were employed to evaluate the effectiveness of measures to control torrents and avalanches. The data support the view that the activities of Wildbach- and Lawinenverbauung are in fact effective. However, further research efforts are necessary to analyze the economic efficiency of the measures taken. Such an analysis seems to be urgently needed. Estimates of the capital stock and depreciation of torrent- and avalanche control constructions shows that currently investments are only high enough to allow a replacement of assets but no further provision of prevention. TP3.3 Documentation of floods central event capture and analysis Lead: Prof.Dr. Helmut Habersack, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna Based on the experience of existing flood documentations a methodology as well as the content concerning what has to be documented is presented in this study. Through definition of the methodology a basis for national standardised flood documentations in the responsibility of the Flood Control Management Division will be provided. Three phases of the flood documentation are suggested: Phase 1 Event survey Phase 2 Event documentation Phase 3 Event analysis Contents of this guide are the phase 2 - event documentation and phase 3 - event analysis. In this study the individual procedures of documentation are described and processes are characterized. In case of a flood event it makes sense to have a "documentation-kit" available. Survey sheets, which include the basic parameters to support a uniform and complete documentation, were prepared. Furthermore the setup and content of future flood documentation reports are defined in detail and the content is described. In the context of event analysis flood events should be analysed in order to make improvements in the field of flood event management as well as flood prevention. The existing crisis management and available prevention tools are discussed. 19

20 3.4. Ecology TP4.1 Woody plants on flood protection levees Lead: Prof. Dr. Florin Florineth, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna Recent floods have once again drawn attention to the stability and maintenance of levees. Specifically, the focus is on the relationship between vegetation and the structural integrity of lev-ees. Current standards regard dense turf to be the safest vegetation cover and many guidelines ban woody vegetation from levees. Many assumptions are based on experience involving prob-lematic and maladjusted woody vegetation (e.g. single trees, groups of trees) and case reports rather than scientific studies. Standards are justified by an absence of data which would clearly establish the relationship between woody vegetation and the structural impairment of dikes. Hence, the effects of small to medium growing, flexible woody plants on structural integrity and maintenance on levees are investigated in a project, funded by the Austrian Federal Ministry of Transport, Innovation and Technology, the Austrian Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, Environment and Water Management and the Provincial Government of Lower Austria. Within the frame of FLOODRISK II a comprehensive literature research, supplemented with field stud-ies on levees at the river March was carried out. The report deals with levee structure, damaging factors leading to levee failures and treats the controversial issue of woody plants on levees. TP4.2 Vegetation and floods concerning hydraulics and ecology Lead: Prof. Dr. Helmut Habersack, Kamp-team (NEK) The reaction of people after floods and the conflicts between flood protection and protection of nature concerning vegetation along rivers as well as the often improper discussion about risk potential of vegetation in case of floods show that an objective view of this issue considering hydraulic and ecological conditions is essential. 20

21 Within the project Nachhaltige Entwicklung der Kamptal-Flusslandschaft extensive analysis about the impact of vegetation varying in width and density were accomplished (physical models tests, numerical simulations). Thereby information about the variation of water levels in case of corresponding slope and discharge could be gathered. Basis was the development of a vegetation management concept, which distinguished three areas: Sensitive areas (vegetation management and maintenance necessary) Transition areas (limited vegetation management and maintenance necessary) Vegetation-dynamic areas (no maintenance) In general, the scope for vegetation in settlement areas is limited because of the sensitivity concerning water levels, while in floodplains the advantage for natural retention exists (increased roughness and retention). Within the project FloodRisk II an evaluation of the adaptability and a proposal for the transfer of the Kamp-concept on other rivers (different dimension, slope, flow velocity, geomorphology ) and an improvement was carried out. Four rivers (Lech, Rosanna, Trisanna, Bregenzerach), selected because they were strongly affected by the floods in 2002 and 2005, were surveyed for this study. Based on results of model analysis and numerical simulations extra- and interpolation for selected river types were done. Furthermore an analysis of the situation relating vegetation and floods on basis of available flood documentations were carried out. Besides hydraulic impacts the discussion of the ecological importance of vegetation is substantial. The results of this study showed that the concept of spatial varying vegetation management is adaptable on other rivers. The division of a river into the before mentioned three sections with corresponding vegetation management is, for flood-oriented and ecological purposes, reasonable and necessary and should be implemented in practise. TP4.3 Ecology flood protection (EU-National) effects of the water framework directive Lead: Prof. Dr. Susanne Muhar, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna Based on status quo analyses of the large Austrian rivers (53, catchment area > 500 km2) the morphological river type of these rivers will be analysed, which have been representative for the Austrian river-landscapes and which have been impacted and altered dramatically. Additionally those human uses within the valley bottom are identified, which are in conflict with an ecological intact river floodplain system. A detailed spatial data analysis at six rivers delineates the remaining potential of floodplain areas both for flood retention and the implementation of restoration programmes at the reach and section scale. 21

22 Beside the Austrian wide overview case studies will be used for specific analyses: (1) effects of high flood events on river floodplains, in particular on nutrient dynamics (2) differences and synergies of Water Framework Directive, Flood Directive and Natura 2000 (3) documentation of the legal framework and methodological approaches for the development of reference conditions/guiding views (Austrian Danube River). TP4.4 Flood Plain Invenvory Lead: Dr. Martin Götzl, Austrian Environmental Agency, Vienna Goal of the project: Flood plains are described and evaluated regarding their typology, machrocore, hydrological aspects, utilization, covered area and habitat characteristics. Main tasks: Complete capture, characterisation and evaluation of the flood plains in Carinthia and Styria, minimum area 3ha<, scale 1:10:000 Basic capture for total Austria, minimum area 20ha<, scale 1:10:000 Analysis of literature and data from the provinces as well as field work Flood Management TP5.1 Hazard zone map, HZM: estimation of the risk potential of land slides and slope movements based on an example in Gasen/Haslau (Austria) Lead: Dr. A. Kociu, BFW, Austria 1) Combining available data to mass movement in the region of Gasen and Haslau (based on those gathered in the flood event of 2005 by various institutions) 2) Evaluation of the Data (each institution is validating their set of data in reference to the other sets and conducts the appropriate corrections if necessary) 3) Definition of possible need for collecting new data 4) Modelling (statistic evaluation) of the mass movement data to obtain the necessary parameter combination for the potential of mass movement. 5) Evaluation of the area in regard of its potential of mass movement and the effects of spatial relevant areas within the HZM of Gasen und Haslau. 6) Combining available data to mass movement in the region of Gasen and Haslau (based on those gathered in the flood event of 2005 by various institutions) 7) Evaluation of the Data (each institution is validating their set of data in reference to the other sets and conducts the appropriate corrections if necessary) 8) Definition of possible need for collecting new data 22

23 9) Modelling (statistic evaluation) of the mass movement data to obtain the necessary parameter combination for the potential of mass movement. TP5.2 Development of standards and approaches for the inventory and condition assessment (condition monitoring) of torrent control measures Lead: DDI Jürgen Suda, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna Torrent protection structures constitute one of the most important elements of the measures undertaken for the safety of alpine habitats against natural hazards. As with any other structure or building, regular inspections, as well as maintenance and keeping in good repair are a basic requirement for structural safety and usability; in other words, a lasting protective effect generally depends on the fulfilment of these requirements. The inspection and maintenance of structures and buildings in the engineering sector is as a rule well developed. Methods and models for maintenance management are available inter alia in structural engineering as well as for road and bridge construction. Ideally, maintenance management involves an integrated system of routine inspections and checks, regular maintenance cycles, targeted maintenance measures and database-supported documentation. The aim is to develop a cost calculation system that is applicable to the whole life cycle of a particular structure or building (Life Cycle Costing / LCC). In the domain of structural protection against natural hazards, which includes preventive structures for torrent control, it has up to now not been possible to develop, or implement, any comparable models. This backlog with respect to other engineering disciplines becomes understandable when viewed in the light of the extreme environmental conditions and the decentralised locations of torrent protection structures. Maintenance management in torrent catchments is thus extremely complex and difficult to standardise. On the other hand, the safety of human lives or, in any case, the future existence of important material assets may depend on the operability of protective structures. Furthermore, of the almost unmanageable stocks of protective structures which have been built in Austria over the last few decades, those of the first generation will soon reach the limits of their life span. The responsibility for the maintenance of protective structures is distributed among a large number of public and private organisations (public authorities, administration, private legal entities), and the tasks and duties are often unclear or not sufficiently known to the parties concerned. In addition, relevant standards and basic training for qualified staff necessary for regular inspections have been missing up to now. For these reasons, there have been initiatives in several alpine countries in the past few years to provide a systematic basis for maintenance management of torrent protection structures. In Austria, the standards required were developed by the Austrian Lebensministerium [Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, Environment and Water Management] (Wildbach- und Lawinenverbauung [torrent and avalanche control]), in collaboration with the Institute of Structural Engineering of the Vienna 23

24 University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences and the working group (protection structures for torrent control) at the Austrian Standards Institute. The results of this extensive work have been summarised in the project reports at hand. Thus a broad basic knowledge, which corresponds to state-of-the-art technology, can be made available to engineers in practice for maintenance management and status assessments (damage evaluation) in future. The results were also used as a basis for the preparation of the ONR Schutzbauwerke der Wildbachverbauung: Betrieb, Überwachung und Instandhaltung [protective structures for torrent control: operation, inspection and maintenance] (publication, January 2008, Austrian Standards Institute), the first standard rules and regulations in this area in the German speaking world. The present publication is intended for all experts in science and practice, with the aim to give them overall support in complying with the responsibilities of maintenance management and status assessment. The guidebook, however, does not replace any adaptations of the methods suggested, should they be needed in the individual case in question. It is up to the expert to select those methods and data that he believes to be adequate for the relevant case at hand. On the part of the contracting party, the outstanding achievements of the authors, notably project participant DDI Jürgen Suda, should be mentioned and valued as forward-looking in many fields within Austria and beyond. A large number of related publications in relevant technical journals (Bautechnik/D [structural engineering, Germany], Wasser-Energie-Luft/CH [water-energy-air, Switzerland], Structure and Infrastructure Engineering/USA, Österreichische Wasserwirtschaft [Austrian water management], Wildbach- und Lawinenverbau [torrent and avalanche control], Österreichische Forstzeitung [Austrian Journal of Forest Sciences], Kommunal [local paper]) bear witness to the quality of the work accomplished. Without the support of many colleagues working in torrent and avalanche control both at home and abroad such a huge accumulation of knowledge would not have been possible, which is why our thanks go to all those whose names are not listed here and who have contributed to the success of this work. We hope that with this guidebook we have paved the way to comprehensive management of torrent control in Austria, and that collaboration between science and practice, for the purpose of safety from natural hazards, will continue to thrive in future. TP5.3 Local structural protection measures options and limitations Lead: Prof. Dr. Johannes Hübl, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna During the last decades, settlement activities increased in European mountain regions. Due to the scarceness of areas suitable for development, residential estates were extended into areas endangered by natural hazards such as mass movements. These settlements generally show a considerable vulnerability to tangible assets. Integral risk management strategies to reduce the vulnerability to tangible assets are presented for 24

25 the assessment of such endangered areas. According to the natural hazard process of static and dynamic (flash) floods with fluvial sediment transport and various structural elements of buildings, a catalogue of local structural measures is presented with respect to occurring proc-ess impacts and protection objectives. Thereby, different local structural measures are classi-fied and recommended according to a possible implementation for newly-erected buildings and for upgrading existing buildings, respectively. Based on these recommendations, future needs for a sustainable and comprehensive reduction of risk in settlement areas endangered by floods are outlined. TP6.1 Reconstruction measures and integrated flood risk management Lead: Prof. Dr.Helmut Habersack, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna In this study the emergency measures which serve to repair an recover damages after floods are analyzed and suggestions to improve designs and implementation are elaborated. An important goal is the development of measures which provide a sustainable improvement of the flood protection under consideration of the river morphology and ecology. In a problem analysis, the deficiencies are identified and potential for optimization are highlighted. Today emergency measures must be planned and implemented under great time pressure. Therefore, it would be useful to have data bases and / or designs in case of emergency prepared. The flood event 2005 made clear that capacity limits in engineering companies as well as in the administration can lead to problems. If emergency measures are carried out immediately after or during the flood event as part of the disaster management coordinated by the local administration consideration of the flood control management division is imperative. For the design of sustainable flood protection measures the availability of land is often problematic. The morphologic space demand of a river shall be specially considered. This allows the energy transformation in controlled areas, leading to a minimization of the potential damage. The morphologic space demand of a river should be considered as a minimal space demand of the river for morphologic changes in the technical guidelines and the land use planning law. Through information and awareness raising in the population and / or the land-owners the willingness to provide areas for river management measures (flood protection) would be better achievable. For the purposes of sustainable flood protection a comprehensive compilation of river development concepts, including designs for emergency measures, taking into account the morphological space demand of rivers should be aspired. Up to date databases (hydraulic, hydrological, ecological and morphological data) are required. In morphologically sensitive areas (eg, bridges, material input, settlement areas, etc.) a comparison of scenarios should be done. 25

26 Existing hydrodynamic numerical models should be enhanced and explained to the students. The consideration of sediment transport and morphodynamics at runoff studies should be promoted (mobile bed simulation). For the implementation of emergency measures a manual with "best-practice examples would be useful to assist the engineers and to define a standard in the design of emergency measures. TP6.3 Action plan against floodings in Radkersburg (Austria) Lead: Prof. Dr. Günther Heigert, Technical University, Graz, Austria The goals of the project were: The increase of public awareness in regard of floods in the region Radkersburg Improvement of the information available regarding floods Action plan to minimize the damage potential due to flooding For the whole region Radkersburg three topics were dealt with: Flood prevention (e.g. building adjustments according to risk of flooding, flood warning) Active flood protection (e.g. dams) Water retention potentials TP6.4 Evaluation of mobile flood protection systems related to flood risk management. Objective assessment of frequently used mobile flood protection systems Lead: DI Christoph Hauer, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna The catastrophic floodings of 2002 and 2005 exhibited that the need for sustainable flood protection is increasing caused by rising population density and concentration of valuables in low lying inundation areas. Therefore, the demand of technical protection is growing as well. This report investigates and summarizes the role of mobile flood protection system in relation to flood risk analysis and management. Caused by dense use of inundation areas mostly little space for permanent protection schemes like dikes is given. But, before an application and practical use of mobile flood protection systems, other issues should be mentioned, which are ranked as having higher priority related to sustainable flood risk management. Displacement of settlements, management of inundation areas for flood water retention and vegetation management (only major points exemplarily highlighted) are some issues which should be preferred by stakeholders and policy makers as favoured management options. Furthermore, mainly for practical purposes, the report discusses the benefits and weaknesses of different flood protection systems (e.g. container systems, mass systems, flap systems, wall systems) and presents an objective decision guide for the use of mobile structures. For selecting the appropriate system various quantitative and qualitative criteria have to 26

27 be considered. Hence, a evaluation matrix, which is presented in the report, can act as a valuable decision tool for choosing the most suitable mobile flood protection system for a specific site. TP6.5 International comparison of administrative structures in regard of the organisationi of integrated flood risk management Lead: Prof. Dr. Helmut Habersack, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna This project is a comparative study of international administration bodies in relation to integrated flood management. Parts of this study have been taken over from the Interreg III project Flussraum Agenda Alpenraum Vergleichende Studie über die Organisation der Wasserwirtschaft und die Gewässerplanungsinstrumente im Alpenraum, as well as internet search and questionnaires respectively. The following countries were surveyed: Germany (Bavaria, Baden Württemberg, Saxony), France, Austria, Switzerland, Italy (South Tirol), England, Hungary, Czech Republic, Slovakia. The objective of this study is the analysis of national and international administration bodies concerning water management. Referring to this, different key aspects are evaluated, as the appropriation of sovereign duties, analysis of spatial references, discussion of the implementation of integrated water management, exposure of guidelines authority as well as the operative business of planning and implementation flood protection measures. The results of this study show that in all studied countries flood management is the duty of the ministry, the competence for guidelines in all studies countries is situated at ministerial level, there exists no spatial disconnection in all reviewed countries, in all western countries the implementation of integrated water management is realized. Important is that in none of the investigated countries a border of competence within a catchment exists, as it is in Austria currently. On basis of these results general recommendations for the restructuring of the flood management in Austria can be formulated. The international accepted integrated water management (use water, protect water and protection from water) should be kept in Austria. Furthermore, an overall view of river basins without spatial boundaries of competence should be present. Sovereign duties within flood management as well as the authority for guidelines should be in the area of ministerial operations. Beyond, the restructuring should take the international standards into account. 27

28 TP7.1 Maintenance of embankment dams model for monitoring and safety concept Lead: Prof. Dr. Heinz Brandl, Technical University Vienna In the years 2002 and 2006 numerous longitudinal river dikes were heavily damaged by floods or they even failed. Consequently, this has required a local rehabilitation of damaged areas and also, a global risk evaluation was needed to minimize further damages of flood protection fill dams. Embankment dams (dikes) along rivers have been built for flood protection of settlement areas over decades and centuries. To provide a high stability and functional capability of the protective structures, the embankments have to be periodically checked and also maintenance measures have to be performed. This inspection procedure can be provided as a permanent or periodical monitoring. However, it should be distinguished between the first-time checking of the current state and the dam monitoring. A global assessment of the situation is mostly provided without any accurate knowledge of dam and subsurface properties, whereas monitoring is based on a periodical registration and observation of change processes and long-term behaviour. With regard to the general condition exploration of embankments in terms of the current-state assessment, there are primarily geotechnical investigation concepts used. These require a direct as well as an indirect soil identification/exploration with a subsequent classification of specific soil properties in the laboratory. The collected data and information allow in dependence to the number of investigation points and the variation of individual techniques a very detailed, but only punctual assessment. Therefore, geophysical methods are used as an additional technique for a better interpretation and spatial underground description. Moreover, they are also suitable as an instrument for dam monitoring. Geophysical methods need to be always calibrated on direct geotechnical investigation. The informational value and the accuracy of the results strongly depend on the exploration method, on the equipment as well as on the geological and hydrological conditions of the underground. A general comparison of individual methods and techniques is difficult to perform; it is possible only with regard to the specific properties. A selection concept as a decision guidance has been set up for a systematic application of these methods. This concept depends on the different physical principals on which the methods are based and it defines their application limits as well as the approach for a dam evaluation or exploration respectively. Permanent monitoring systems were developed for leak detection location and identification of structure s deformations primarily for tailing dams. Today, similar systems are used also for flood protective structures (embankment dams). These methods are still costly and timeconsu ing, but they can be systematically applied for safety-related embankment dam sections. Anyway, the periodical monitoring should be still a part of a superior monitoring and safety concept. 28

29 The basis for a periodical monitoring is a visual inspection of the dikes by experts or skilled personal. During this inspection the main focus should be given to the current state of the embankment dam. Especially, the zones with surface erosion and indications to inner erosion are of high importance. The assessment of the dam conditions and near-surface layers can be provided by the combination of multi functional exploration techniques based on principles of geophysics. Similar, as for the visual inspection for monthly control, geoelectrics can be used not only for extraordinary purposes, but also as a state of the art method extensive periodical monitoring. The guidelines presented in this report give an overview of existing investigation methods in form of a tabular decision matrix. Primarily, the advantages and disadvantages are systematically discussed and classified regarding to their suitability as a monitoring system. This approach will enable experts and representatives of water authorities etc. to quickly decide which methodology is most suitable under certain conditions Spatial Planning TP8.1 Awareness raising in relation to the natural hazard water Lead: Christine Radler, WWF Austria The research focussed on availability, quality, quanity and usage of school material deal-ing with natural hazards, flooding, revitalisation. In this connection we investigated projects which are available for schools as well as the experience of the execution. 38% of the people who sent the questionnaire back told us, that they are working with schools. 43 % would have the possibility to go to schools, if materials ready for use would exist. 38 % of the people we asked have special contact persons for the schools. Most of the projects we found are in the category of information due to the model of Fien et. al (see page 9). Many areas have a lack of projects in the category education and capacity building. Based on the results we developed some strategic planning, which led to a first measure: the installation of an information platform. The research was not only about school education, but also about adult education. Adult education provides at the moment only a very limited offer and should be developed fur-ther. 51 % of the people we asked told us, that they have contacts to the local population mostly by lectures and 36 % have developed own materials. A big part of the existing projects we can find in the category 29

30 information and not in the categories education and capacity building. Some ideas for adult education are mentioned in this paper TP8.2 Guidance paper: Public participation within flood risk management projects Lead: Dr. Therese Stickler, Austrian Environmental Agency, Vienna Integrated flood risk management is a very complex and complicated matter -Legal aspects, technical requirements, ecological, economical and spatial planning aspects are to be considered as well as political demands. Additionally, decisions should be made in a participatory way, including either representatives of the public or the public at large. The European Water Framework Directive demands the integration of water users; participation is also a basic rule of sustainable development. Administrators, politicians on the national, regional and local level, representatives of farmers, hunting, fishery and tourism, NGOs, land owners, energy suppliers and ordinary people: all of these should be integrated into a project partnership. As the legal and technical requirements for integrated flood risk management are often complicated, possibilities for such a partnership sometimes arise only when taking a closer look. But as shown by the examples of the projects mentioned in the annex of this handbook, it is possible to find and use a scope for public participation also in such complex technical matters if there is a suitable intention on the part of the project leaders. This handbook contains a selection of materials and instruments showing the benefits but also the limits of public participation within flood risk projects and is designed to give support for planning such processes. A short overview of the legal framework, the intensity and depth of participation, a tool for analysing the context and the parties (or stakeholders) to be involved in a project is followed by an overview of different methods for public participation. A short chapter about potential conflicts and a glossary conclude this part of the guidebook on methodology. Additionally, eleven good practice examples of participation processes in flood risk projects in Austrian regions show how the public can be involved in such processes. TP9.1.1 An evaluation of transnational and national projects with the subject integrated flood management Lead: DI Klaus Michor, Revital-Ecoconsult In the last years Austria handled several EU-Projects and national projects with the subject integrated Floodmanagement. These Projects worked on new strategies and scenarios within an integrated risk management in alpine countries (Interreg IIIB-Projects; FLUSSRAUM AGENDA, ILUP, SUMAD). Also national projects (such as LIFE) are providing interesting aspects to the subject of 30

31 floodmanagment. Based on a short description of interesting national and international Projects and the resulting international cooperation, the main projects are combined to an Austrian conclusion. With the methods of interviews and inquests die main aims and results of the pieced projects have been filtered. The main focus of each project und the resulting synergies und problems are shown in the next step. Integrated Floodmanagement wants to achieve the common aim - the flood-safeness - through a reasonable coaction of different arrangements. This aim has been traced from all projects, nevertheless there have been different circumstances. Hydraulic engineering for flood protection has been a key point within the most projects, but was never considered as a stand alone aim. Precaution (in form of spatial planning) and sensitization of the people are established criteria now. Altogether the analyzed projects had the common aim of a lasting flood protection. Integrated risk management can not solve all problems but it gives the frame for practicable planning in the future. If it s possible to enhance the synergies between the different special planning fields, problems concerning the use of space in river areas can be solved more efficiently. As a part of this, flood management needs PR-work in every case of planning. Austria is a good exemplar for a new integrated Floodmanagement because of its experiences in the past. If this way will be continued in future, problems concerning floods will be reduced dramatically. TP9.1.2 Strategic spatial development plan for flood protection Lead: DI Verna Manhart, Revital-Ecoconsult Spatial planning strategies are getting more and more important within the integrated risk management. Lots of flood protection measures require space for their realization, which is coordinated with other utilisations and is assured in a long run. Measures as well for active as for passive flood protection are affected. Furthermore ecological and social aspects (according to the EU Water Framework Directive) have to be fulfilled. Therefore the protective water management spatial development plan ( Schutzwasserwirtschaftliche Raumentwicklungsplan, short: SREP) was designed on two rivers (Möll and Gurk). The requirements of local and regional spatial planning and these of the protecitve water management are compared, current and potential conflicts are analysed and based on default rules dissolved. The outcome of this process is the SREP, which displays the space needed by the protective water 31

32 management and coordinated with the spatial planning. The great benefit of the SREP compared to hazard maps is, that not only the existing risks are represented, but also the required space for the planning of the measures is considered providently. The SREP is seen as an addition to the hazard strategies, which should not be replaced, but supplemented. To create such a spatial development plan several basics (finalized planning of measures, zoning plans, hazard zone plans etc.) have to be given. It is recommended to develop the SREP in the course of Gewässerentwicklungskonzepten and the results or this progress should be implemented into the tolls of spatial planning. It is an interesting approach to develop a higherranking, strategic planning level to connect and coordinate the needs of different disciplines acting in the areas near the rivers (cp. strategic environmental audit, SUP ). Summing up great importance is attached to the cooperation of spatial planning and water management concerning their planning processes und requirements within the area and catchment of the river. This cooperation should be accompanied by continuous participation of the local population. TP9.2 Comparison of existing instruments und directives within the disciplines spatial planning and water management in Austria with the aim of ensuring areas (basic study) Lead: Mag. Mario Lumasegger, Revital-Ecoconsult In this basic study existing instruments and directives within the disciplines spatial planning and water management with the aim of ensuring areas in river regions are analyzed. The focus is set to the instruments of spatial planning. This study may be the base for future developments of instruments or recommendations concerning the area management in river regions. After a short description of the existing instruments a matrix has been developed with all comparable directives for spatial planning set by law in the Austrian provinces. For analyzing the execution of these directives und the general problems between spatial planning and water management leading people from several spatial planning departments in Austrian provinces have been interviewed. Because of this information, it was possible to check the interface between spatial planning and water management (communals and provinces) and to highlight the main problems for every province and for the whole country. The main needs for action in this area of conflict are described as follows: The possibilities set by law are used in different ways in the Austrian provinces. It is in the mind of the professionals to protect the areas but the implementation is not guaranteed. Floodlines are not available or not updated in some areas. 32

33 Cooperation between communals, provinces and neighbour countries in causes of spatial planning is often not implemented In most cases not enough restriction is given by the available instruments. Participation of local population in the process of planning is not guaranteed. Coordination between spatial planning and water management is essential, but often the communication process does not work TP9.1.3 Implementation of future strategies concerning risk-reducing land uses Part: relocation Lead: Prof. Dr. Walter Seher, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna Relocation of floodprone objects and villages is an instrument aiming at a permanent reduction of potential flood damages. Relocation is also suitable in developing new retention areas and wetlands and therefore a contribution to the goals of the EU Water Framework Directive. For the people affected relocations lead to decisive changes in their lifes. Besides personal aspects like fear of changes or stress within the family, additional financial and social burdens like loosing the neighbourhood have to be beared. Based upon a relocation project in Upper Austria and other comparable projects recommendations are presented regarding a socially acceptable design and implementation of relocation processes. These recommendations aim at public relation, communication, transparency, safety of financing, adapted scheduling and understanding the situation of the people involved. Furthermore the relocation issue is linked with aspects of water management, ecology, law and spatial planning. Being responsible for local land use planning the municipalities are important in allocating new building sites for the people relocated especially regarding site layout and provision of service facilities. TP9.3.2 Implementation of future strategies concerning risk-reducing land uses Part: intercommunal cooperation Lead: Prof. Dr. Walter Seher, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna The European Union Water Framework Directive as well as the EU Directive on the Assessment and Management of Flood Risks request a regional catchment related access in flood risk prevention. In Austria there are hazard informations available on a regional level, regional planning aiming at a reduction of damage potential and or conservation of retention areas is currently little developed. The instruments of planning at a supra-local level allow treating natural hazards but respective regulations are no core element of regional and sectoral programms. An alternative access in flood risk prevention is municipal cooperation. Using a stakeholder and process related research approach the framework of municipal cooperation was analysed in the case study region Aist in Upper Austria. Analyse results show that these cooperations develop as direct reactions to recent flood events. Important requirements are existing hazard expertise, the initiative and the commit- 33

34 ment of individual stakeholders and a solidary attitude of municipalities involved. The current functions of municipal cooperations in flood risk prevention lie within selection of sites for retention basins, conservation of regionally important retention areas and awareness raising for protective measures on a regional level. Possible functions can be regarded within developing common planning strategies in catchment areas and implementing compensation measures. Regarding these functions there is a clear preference for formal highly institutionalised types of cooperation. Formal cooperation with an influence on local land use planning is able to conserve the areas necessary for regionally effective flood retention. Should flood risk prevention be carried out preemptively without recent cases of flooding zoning instruments within regional planning in order to conserve regionally important retention areas are recommended. TP9.4 Integrated River Development and Inter-communal Burden Sharing Land Demand and compensation in Terms of Flood protection (Flood Retention and Minimization of Damages), Rural development and Ecology (WFD) Lead: Dr. Jürgen Eberstaller, Eberstaller-Zauner-Büros Due to flood protection measures for highly valuable properties and land resources retention volume is lost. According to the Austrian Technical Guidelines for Flood Protection Projects ( RIWA- T ) it is mandatory to compensate for any lost flood retention volume. If this is not feasible within the boundaries of the municipality which implements a flood protection scheme, compensatory measures have to be taken in a neighbouring community within the same watershed. However this might reduce the potential for development of this municipality. Within this current project a model was developed to provide basic data to start negotiations with the surrounding municipalities. The model offers possibilities to provide compensations for economically weaker up-stream communities for allocating the required retention volume. In return the further down-stream economically more developed municipalities are able to use the potential for economic development more generously. By means of this model the first steps of the potential economic development of a community can be mapped. Further more the economic and socio-economic interdependence between municipalities will be considered. The potential advantage of the up-stream communities on further economic development of communities further down-stream as well as supra-local (trans-regional) functions will be accounted for. With relatively little computational efforts using a down-to-earth approach and concentrating on the most relevant parameters a first offer for compensation can be calculated which will function as an acceptable basis for further negotiations with all involved communities. The model s ease to use and practicability will be tested with three adjoining municipalities along the River Traisen in Lower Austria and the results will be checked for plausibility. TP9.5 Agriculture and Flooding Lead: Dr. Klaus Wagner, AWI 34

35 On the one hand, agriculture contributes to the emergence of floods by way of the land cultivation and management practices in use. On the other hand, agricultural lands also serve as water retention areas, resulting in damages commensurate with the extent of flooding. In recent years, an increase in extreme weather incidents and the associated magnitude of damages have generated an ongoing discussion in Austria regarding adapted forms of land use and compensation payments. Because suitable spatial-planning bases for agricultural lands are thus far not available, one part of the Spatial Planning work package of the project Flood Risk II deals with the interactions between agriculture and flooding. Building on a functional evaluation system for agricultural lands as developed within the Interreg project ILUP, the subproject Agriculture and Flooding has as its goal to classify the flood-protection contribution and flood sensitivity of agricultural lands. This, in turn, enables the recommendation of targeted measures for potentially improving flood situations, as well as an estimate of their implementation costs. In addition to the digital soil map, other fundamental sources used for the project are the digital flood risk map, IACS land-use data and works by the Institute for Land and Water Management Research. Reference values and marginal returns sourced from the Federal Institute of Agricultural Economics also flow into the cost estimates for the recommended combination of measures. A natural contribution of agricultural lands to flood prevention exists due to the land s natural spatial conditions: Soil characteristics, climatic conditions and topology determine the extent of surface run-off, while the latter is also influenced by management (type of crop, type of cultivation, work processes). GIS overlays of the useable field capacity and of the erosion risk associated with agricultural use enable the classification of lands according to their contribution to flood prevention. A high flood-prevention contribution exists when, for example, a level land surface with waterretentive soil and favourable precipitation is used as grassland. At the same time, crop lands generally exhibit higher surface run-off values, and the risk of a high surface run-off is greater for certain types of row crops in particular: e.g., crops for which the soil remains uncovered for long periods, but also for crops with a late harvest, for which the intermediate green covering of fields becomes more difficult. The evaluation of flood sensitivity takes equally into account the flood frequency to identify those areas that are especially at risk, as it is primarily the latter that should be adapted in their use to keep potential damage in the case of floods low. The relevant literature, as well as research and evaluation reports on agri-environmental measures, suggest that there are measures available for improving both soil and water retention on agricultural lands. Depending on such factors as crop yield, producer prices, the business situation and work processes used, farmers may experience various disadvantages from flood-prevention related changes in land use. However, changes in cultivation must not always be accompanied by higher costs and, in fact, may instead lead to lowered costs, e.g., changing from autumn ploughing without a green cover to direct seeding in temporary winter green cover. 35

36 Within the sample community of Seitenstetten, water catchment areas exhibiting either a low contribution to flood prevention or high flood sensitivity were identified as relevant areas for the application of measures. The GIS generated land use balances permit ascertaining on how much land within the catchment areas, and also on which land specifically, changes in use would seem advisable. The measures to be set are in accordance with the evaluation ofindividual lands. Thus, for example, areas exhibiting high flood sensitivity shall have stronger measures applied than those with only a medium sensitivity. In sum, the resulting changes for Seitenstetten would be a conversion from silage corn to grassland on 110 ha, a conversion from grain corn to feed grain with temporary cover crops on 22 ha and intermediate cover crops on 44 ha of arable fields. The costs for converting to the above types of cultivation amount to an approximate total of 44,000 annually. The basic results developed within the sub-project Agriculture and Flooding will flow into the overall project Flood Risk II, while furthermore contributing to an understanding of the multifunctionality of agricultural lands Legal Aspects TP10.1 The effect of the EU-Flood Directive on the Austrian legislature Lead: Prof. Dr. Helmut Habersack, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna The project presents a study on the possible consequences of the EU directive on the assessment and management of floods (2007/60/EG) on Austrian law. An essential basis for the discussion of the legal questions and problems is given by the projects TP 10.2 and TP The main part of this report is dealing with suggestions for the implementation of the EU directive on the assessment and management of floods and for the improvement of the flood relevant paragraphs in the Austrian water law. The existing water law is oriented towards structural flood protection measures. Non structural measures and especially the preservation and restoration of inundation areas is not sufficiently regarded in the water law. Thus, the priority of non structural measures should be integrated into the water law as principle aim. Since the flood directive puts more weight on inundation areas and flood retention this fact should be reflected in the implementation into the Austrian water law. The water law should give more attention to the preservation and restoration of inundation areas. A clear regulation is needed with respect to existing buildings in inundation areas. The use of inundation areas is often not possible because of settlements, even if of low density. In these cases economic benefits must be given to leave such inundation areas and to allow again flooding to reduce flood risk. With respect to integrated flood risk management an important problem is the summation effect. 36

37 Changes in the flood water levels, which are according to the existing water law below a certain significance level, must (of course if no other public interests or third party rights are negatively influenced) be permitted. It could be taken into consideration (instead of taking a significance level) to forbid any negative modification of the flood situation, which cannot be compensated by certain additional requirements. As detailed text suggestion in 105 WG the following modification could be made: a negative influence of the flood propagation on the basis of a catchment wide inundation area register.. Already based on basic legal considerations a state protection obligation against flood hazard is given. According to the existing Austrian law the planning and realization of flood protection measures is allowed but not an obligation. In this respect it would be good to discuss whether an obligation for the planning and implementation of flood protection measures should not be incorporated into the Austrian water law. At the moment only the catastrophe management laws of the individual states contain the possibility to evacuate settlements temporarily. The problem of a permanent dislocation of settlements out of the inundation area is not included in the Austrian law so far. In the long-term concepts should be developed, how necessary and permanent dislocations should be planned and administrated. Concerning an extension of the permit necessity in the inundation area only 38 of the Austrian water law has to be modified. There, instead of the 30 year flood the 100 year flood should be taken as value. Further suggestions for modification regard the necessity for maintenance, permit withdraw, last measures to restore natural conditions, problem of space availability and water rights of fishing permits. Concerning the application of force the introduction of a paragraph concerning an evaluation comparison is suggested. Further improvements are related to the water management planning unit. As essential point would be the creation of a homogeneous, uniform flood protection law. As optimal variant the introduction of a specific new chapter in the water law would be essential. A split implementation is not suggested. Within a compact section in the water law pointers to other chapters and mechanisms outside could be set. Not only a modification of the water law is essential, also the adaptation of the specific paragraphs in the forest law and torrent and avalanche control law is necessary. Suggestions are made with respect to the forest law, torrent and avalanche control law, hydraulic engineering funding law and a unification of the competences during the catastrophe. Concerning spatial planning laws of the states it is to be assumed, that the flood directive is nationally not primarily a subject of the states, but the implementation of specific planning to avoid water hazards, and thus a competence of the federal state. Since the flood directive contains beside documentation also a planning mechanism, many points 37

38 of interaction with significant demand for integration and synergies are given. On the one hand the flood directive intends to capture intensive usage related information and measures which influence spatial planning measures as an information and planning basis. On the other hand legally binding sectoral planning of the federal state can lead to decisions in usage, which have to be regarded in community and regional spatial planning. Furthermore beside legal regulations in the water law spatial planning measures contribute substantially to the reaching of the goals of the flood directive, especially by limited use of inundation areas, which restrict construction in inundation areas. TP10.2 Flood protection on the basis of the Austrian water law Lead: Prof. Dr. Doris Hattenberger, University of Klagenfurt The legal requirements of the Austrian laws pertaining to water are in a constellation of tensions on the one hand to the meaning of art 2 ECHR regarding the state s liability for the precaution regarding natural hazards and on the other hand the provisions of the directive 2007/60/EC on the assessment and management of flood risks, which provide for first a liability of states for the precaution with respect to natural hazards and second a priority to non-structural measures of protection. These requirements meet with needs of the implementation of of norms regarding flood risk. To implement these regulations and to force the efficiency of the regulations of the Austrian law pertaining to water some measures have to be implemented and deliberated. This package of measures should embrace the integration of the flood plain as an independent category of measure of protection, a regulation which enables to mandate restrictions in the management of these flood plains and the possibility to reserve flood plains. To implement state s liability for the precaution with respect to natural hazards an intensified involvement of the Bundeswasserbauverwaltung should be deliberated. The efficiency of flood risk protection measures could be enforced by integrating a norm providing for the appreciation of values, the possibility to rule conditions which modify the applied project, an accentuation of the definition of the public interest on an unaffected flood water flow, the change of the regulations regarding the repair of flood risk protective structures and an express norm with respect of the return of a consent. TP10.3 Hazard areas/hazard zones seen from an legal perspective Lead: Prof. Dr. Karl Weber, University of Innbruck The flood risks directive as a comprehensive and integrative work of regulations tries to realize preventive flood protection as uniform as possible in all Member States. This is realized in a stepped procedure containing an extensive inventory, the determination of hazard zones and packages of measures. The transposition of the flood risks directive first faces intranationally the problem of the non- 38

39 existence of a homogeneous definition of natural hazard, this term is used in a different way in each law. The flood risks directive s definition of natural hazard is binding for the harmoniza-tion of the different definitions in national law. The transposition of the flood risks directive into Austrian law first has to take the provisions of constitutional law into consideration. In the first place the federal poly-level system is to consider here. Measures of flood protection fall in the field of various competence areas of Art 10 B-VG, as they do in the field of provincial and municipal competence areas. So far aspects of constitutional rights concerning flood protection have not been well enough perceived yet. On the one hand the constitutional rights represent the basis of a state obligation of ensuring to protect the public against flood risks, on the other hand they represent a barrier for state measures concerning flood protection. The flood risks directive imposes a variation of planning acts which are to be supplemented with packages of measures. The current Austrian law already contains a multitude of legal instru-ments which can be adapted for the transposition of the flood risk directive. In the future the ha-zard zone plans will have to be given a legally binding character. A reorientation of the Austrian flood protection law towards a priority of non-structural initiatives to structural initiatives is indis-pensable. TP10.4.a Legal dealings with contruction and dedication stock, property protection Lead: Prof. Dr. Arthur Kanonier, Technical University, Vienna The central tasks of spatial planning include the designation of building land in suitable areas and, on the other hand, of locations which need to be kept free from development because of their risk potential. Even if designated land at risk are only sometimes expressly mentioned in the legal objectives, these altogether imply that settlements in areas at risk are contradictory to important issues of spatial planning. However, one can observe more and more often that existing buildings and building land effectively designated as such are affected by natural hazards. Designating land for building development in areas at risk tends to be inconsistent with the legal objectives of spatial planning and zoning criteria which aim to direct development away from hazard zones. In order to comply with one of the aims of settlement policy, namely to avoid development as much as possible in areas at risk, there are essentially three types of measures to deal with designated land at risk: Spatial planning measures for building land already designated as such, Legal measures for existing buildings protection of buildings and building plots (including technical improvements and re-settlement), Measures for risk reduction and delimitating areas at risk. 39

40 In the spatial planning laws of the federal provinces there are different rules specifying which areas at risk are considered relevant for spatial planning i.e. which areas at risk have to be specially designated and where building land may not be designated under the zoning plan. In the case of building land already designated in locations at risk, exemption clauses are of particular importance since in these cases the basic rule not to permit development is suspended. When designating building land, individual spatial planning laws distinguish, with a view to natural hazards, between land with and without buildings. In principle, one can assume that rules pertaining to building land in areas at risk specify obligations which merely affect land without buildings. Land with buildings is usually retained as such, with occasional specifications for the relevant plot of land in terms of building restrictions - such as specific zones for building preparation. Some spatial planning laws stipulate specific rules on how to deal with existing building land in areas at risk. Some spatial planning laws contain rules for building land in areas at risk which do not eliminate the designation as building land as such but impose additional restrictions on use and development such as building bans or specific zones for building preparation. What is noticeable with regard to spatial planning regulations for designating building land in areas at risk is the varying regulatory level in the different provinces. While for example Styria has several restriction options including building bans as well as preparation and rehabilitation areas which apply to building land in areas at risk, other provinces have considerably fewer measures or none at all. With zoning amendments in areas at risk, existing options for use and allocation may be reduced and legal planning requirements changed in such a way as to prevent future increases of the damage potential. The spatial planning laws sometimes stipulate obligations for municipal planners to amend their zoning plans for building land in areas at risk. In this respect one has to distinguish between specific regulations expressly concerned with plan amendments in areas at risk and general amendment provisions. Specific legal provisions for zoning plan amendments with regard to building land in areas at risk are in force in Carinthia and Lower Austria, and an increase of the risk potential should essentially be dealt with by re-designating building land into grassland (re-zoning). In both of the federal provinces there are specific legal regulations for general re-zoning conditions and exemptions. TP10.4.b Legal aspects in the building law for post protection measures of existing buildings in flood prone areas Lead: Prof. Dr. Karim Giese, University of Salzburg Despite appropriate restrictions in the field of spatial planning and development, there are many places with settlement areas at risk from floods. Provided that existing buildings in these settlement areas were lawfully established (e.g. on the basis of permits granted by the authorities), any official follow-up measures in the field of flood control require specific legal authorisations under both procedural and substantive law. Such authorisations (or obligations) are specified in the building regu- 40

41 lations of the federal provinces, in the general procedural law (General Administrative Procedures Act) as well as in the legal regulations for municipal corporations (municipal regulations, town statutes). These authorisations are usually linked to qualified hazardous situations (danger to life or health of those using the buildings in question; risk of severe damage for the national economy) and may, in individual cases, justify the requirement that certain structural follow-up measures (to ensure flood-adapted construction) need to be taken, or even that a building permit has to be revoked ( resettlement ). Because of the varying regulatory level of the different provincial laws (building and municipal law) it is not possible to guarantee the same high level of protection in all of Austria s federal provinces for existing buildings in settlement areas at risk from floods. TP10.5.a Questions of liability with reference to natural hazard management (cities and communities) Lead: Prof. Dr. Ferdinand Kerschner, University of Linz According to recent jurisprudence of the Supreme Court of Austria (OGH), the cities and municipalities have to meet strict obligations in the field of Spatial Planning and building law. The result is a high liability risk for the cities and municipalities associated with flood-vulnerable areas. However, in our opinion, this strict judicature is according to the current legal situation in several areas not justified. In the area of natural hazards, more and more tasks are assigned to the cities and municipalities, although they often lack the necessary material resources. But Natural hazards do not stop at administrative boundaries. Therefore supra-local measures would be much more effective in dealing with natural hazards. It would be desirable to assign more obligations to the Federal States or to provide clearer guidelines to the cities and municipalities, which they can follow. To avoid liability, municipalities and cities can generally be recommended at this stage, to fulfil scrupulously their flood-related duties as far as possible and reasonable. Finally, municipalities and cities should necessarily ensure that potential danger areas are generally recognizable for the population. Comprehensive information is necessary here. TP10.5.b Questions of liability with reference to natural hazard management (authorised experts) Lead: Prof. Dr. Ferdinand Kerschner, University of Linz Cities and municipalities very often consult the plans and opinions of an expert for the assessment of issues related to natural hazards. If these reports, information or plans of the experts prove false or flawed afterwards, we are confronted with questions of liability in case of damage. For the issue of liability in connection with natural hazards management, it is essential to differ be- 41

42 tween the so-called Amtssachverständigen (= official experts ) and nichtamtlichen Sachverständigen (= non-official experts ) within the meaning of 52 AVG. If an Amtssachverständiger ( official expert ) fulfils sovereign tasks when he furnishes an opinion, his acting will be attributed to the legal entity (eg municipality, city, Federal State) he ( functionally ) worked for (the legal entity which obtained the expert opinion). Within the limit of administrative assistance the experts generally execute sovereign tasks. If experts give advices or informations within the private sector ( non-souvereign task ), claims for damages pursuant to the General Civil Code (ABGB) against these experts themselves come into question. According to the jurisprudence of the Supreme Court of Austria (OGH), so-called nichtamtliche Sachverständige ( non-official experts within the meaning of 52 AVG) are liable to an injured party directly and personally, because they are no Organe (= institutions, bodies ) within the meaning of the legal requirements of the Austrian law pertaining to public liability). In our opinion, this point of view of the Supreme Court of Austria is highly questionable. Careful approach when furnishing an opinion can generally be recommended. In addition, the expertise should contain an indication of potential risks. To meet the interest of injured parties to enforce their claims, the legal entities (eg municipality) should, if they have no official experts (Amtssachverständige) available, only appoint non-official experts (nichtamtliche Sachverständige) with a sufficient indemnity insurance. TP10.6 Questions with regard to law of property and liability concerning the erection of constructions agains natural dangers (floods, mudflow, avalanches, rock falls, land slides,..) Lead: Prof. Dr. Ernst Karner, University of Vienna Whereas land owners are in principle not answerable for damage resulting from the impact of a purely natural phenomenon ( act of God ), neither under the law concerning the respective interest of neighbours nor under the law of damages, the state s liability comes into question not only in the event of damage caused by a positive act but also where measures to avert a danger are lacking. The building and operating of structures for the protection against torrents, avalanches and falling rocks raises several liability issues. As regards liability for protective structures, obligations to make land or premises safe for persons or vehicles are of prime relevance and incumbent on anyone creating a hazard, or allowing it to persist on his property. Apart from the liability for buildings as specified in section 1319 of the General Civil Code of Austria (ABGB) and the path keeper s liability as stipulated in section 1319a of the General Civil Code of Austria (ABGB), in particular section 50 (6) of the Austrian Water Act has to be considered as a basis of liability, since it regulates the maintenance obligations for preventive hydraulic engineering and channelisation structures. In so far as no other party has a legally valid obligation, the obligation to maintain and keep in good or- 42

43 der and repair any preventive hydraulic engineering and channelisation structure pursuant to section 50 (6) of the Austrian Water Act is incumbent on the owner of a protective structure, whereas it is specified in sections 1319 and 1319a of the General Civil Code of Austria (ABGB) that the person who is in possession of a structure or the keeper of a path is liable. The classification of preventive hydraulic engineering and channelisation structures under property law which is relevant for liability pursuant to section 50 (6) of the Austrian Water Act is based on the general rules of civil law, which is why in principle, ownership of a building or construction ensues from ownership of land ( superficies solo cedit ). The scope of obligations to make land or premises safe for persons or vehicles is determined by the reasonableness of such obligations, while at the same time the status of the goods at risk, as well as the nature and condition of the construction, the recognisability of danger and the group of persons who may be affected have to be considered. A mere warning is in principle only sufficient if it is not possible or reasonable to secure or remove a hazard. If it is a question of creating or tolerating a hazard, it should be noted that there may be a liability towards persons intruding upon land without lawful authority. Such constellations may of course, according to section 1304 of the General Civil Code of Austria (ABGB), reduce claims for damages on the grounds of contributory negligence; the same applies if the injured party has contributed, through some other act of carelessness, to the damage he has suffered. TP10.7 Legal aspects with regard to dispossession and compensation concerning flood protection Lead: Dr. Michael Hecht, Fellner, Wratzfeld and Partners This study was conducted during the preparation of a law work package as part of the FloodRisk II project. Rather than dogmatic considerations, practical experience has shaped the subject matter and its delineation; experience which, in the last few years, has shown that the relationships between locus standi, claims for damages und procedural issues arising during the planning and realisation of restoration measures, as well as the creation of retention areas, release drainage and comparable projects are extraordinarily complex and present themselves time and again in different forms. A few central thematic areas have therefore been selected in this context and solution approaches have been considered. However, because of the aforementioned complexity, the intention of this study is not to provide a final assessment of these issues, nor has it been possible to provide an exhaustive review of the whole thematic area within the scope of this project Desaster protection Management TP11.1 Regorganisation of the crisis and disaster protection management in Austria Lead: Mag. Siegfried Jachs, Austrian Ministry of the Interior 43

44 Within this project the further development of the crisis and desaster protection management, on the basis of the central government, the provincial governments, as well as in the European and international context after the flood desaster protection in central Europe in 2002 will be analysed. Besides developments resulting directly from the event (e.g. improvement in the meteorological early warning and prevention) the developments in this field without direct connection to the 2002 event (e.g. improvement of the strategic coordination, the harmonisation of management aspects in an event or the further development in transnational cooperation) will be shown. TP11.2 Desaster protection management systems for municipalities Lead: Dr. Herbert Wimmer Municipality of Perg, Upper Austria Desaster Protection Management Manuals (DPMM) The development and the running actualisation of the desaster protection management manuals is very time consuming. Municipalities as well as higher authorities lack sometimes the man power so that their CMMs do not fulfill the legal requirements. In case of an event this can lead to severe legal consequences as there is a legal norm for the production of CMMs. Another problem is that in an event the necessary information is not readily available so that they do not provide the information when it is needed most. Desaster protection Management System (DPMS) With an appropriate system the requirements for the municipalities as mentioned above are fulfilled. A CMS has to include the following: basic data hazard analysis catastrophy support emergency plans contact data hardcopy of the CMM documentation of the event support functions By collecting relevant basic data the already available address data building registries can already be incorporated. Conduction the hazard analysis the hazard potentials are evaluated and their impact on the present situation in the municipality can be analysed. Therefore it is possible to specifically get the emergency plan needed according to the expected desaster. Another benefit is that the CMM can be printed as a whole and therefore a complete compendium is available. So therefore even in case of lack of electronic support the complete information is at hand. An important tool is the printable documentation of the event as this gives on the one hand the possibility to analyse the actions taken but also gives legal security. Furthermore all necessary legal documents are included in the CMM and are therefore immediately available in case of an event. 44

45 45

46 4. PARTICIPATING ORGANISATIONS FloodRisk II: Participation Organisations (www.die.wildbach.at).at

47 FloodRisk II: Participation Organisations Österreichischer Gemeindebund

48 FloodRisk II: Participation Organisations

Methods for Determination of Safe Yield and Compensation Water from Storage Reservoirs

Methods for Determination of Safe Yield and Compensation Water from Storage Reservoirs US Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center Methods for Determination of Safe Yield and Compensation Water from Storage Reservoirs October 1966 Approved for Public Release. Distribution Unlimited.

More information

Hydrologic Engineering Techniques for Regional Water Resources Planning

Hydrologic Engineering Techniques for Regional Water Resources Planning US Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center Hydrologic Engineering Techniques for Regional Water Resources Planning October 1969 Approved for Public Release. Distribution Unlimited. TP-17

More information

Catchment Scale Processes and River Restoration. Dr Jenny Mant Jenny@therrc.co.uk. The River Restoration Centre therrc.co.uk

Catchment Scale Processes and River Restoration. Dr Jenny Mant Jenny@therrc.co.uk. The River Restoration Centre therrc.co.uk Catchment Scale Processes and River Restoration Dr Jenny Mant Jenny@therrc.co.uk The River Restoration Centre therrc.co.uk 3 Main Catchment Elements Hydrology Energy associated with the flow of water affects

More information

NATIONAL REPORT AUSTRIA

NATIONAL REPORT AUSTRIA 26th Session of the EFC Working Party on the Impact of Climate Change on Natural Hazards in Austria NATIONAL REPORT AUSTRIA Seite 1 16.04.2009 Global increase of temperatures: between 1.8 C and 4.0 C (IPCC

More information

FLOOD DAMAGES AND TOOLS FOR THEIR MITIGATION Lenka Camrova, Jirina Jilkova

FLOOD DAMAGES AND TOOLS FOR THEIR MITIGATION Lenka Camrova, Jirina Jilkova FLOOD DAMAGES AND TOOLS FOR THEIR MITIGATION Lenka Camrova, Jirina Jilkova University of Economics, Prague, 2006, pp. 418. ISBN: 80-86684-35-0 English Summary In 1997 and 2002 the Czech Republic was heavily

More information

Rural Flooding: The Potential Role of Forestry

Rural Flooding: The Potential Role of Forestry Rural Flooding: The Potential Role of Forestry Nadeem Shah, Tom Nisbet, & Huw Thomas Centre for Forestry and Climate Change Structure Background Woodland and Flood Alleviation The Theory. Studies on Woodland

More information

Origins and causes of river basin sediment degradation and available remediation and mitigation options. Feedback from the Riskbase workshop

Origins and causes of river basin sediment degradation and available remediation and mitigation options. Feedback from the Riskbase workshop Origins and causes of river basin sediment degradation and available remediation and mitigation options Feedback from the Riskbase workshop Corinne Merly 1, Olivier Cerdan 1, Laurence Gourcy 1 Emmanuelle

More information

INDONESIA - LAW ON WATER RESOURCES,

INDONESIA - LAW ON WATER RESOURCES, Environment and Development Journal Law LEAD INDONESIA - LAW ON WATER RESOURCES, 2004 VOLUME 2/1 LEAD Journal (Law, Environment and Development Journal) is a peer-reviewed academic publication based in

More information

DREAM Danube River REsearchAnd Management

DREAM Danube River REsearchAnd Management DREAM Danube River REsearchAnd Management Helmut Habersack presented by Christine Sindelar Christian Doppler Laboratory for Advanced Methods in River Monitoring, Modelling and Engineering, Institute of

More information

GLOSSARY OF TERMS CHAPTER 11 WORD DEFINITION SOURCE. Leopold

GLOSSARY OF TERMS CHAPTER 11 WORD DEFINITION SOURCE. Leopold CHAPTER 11 GLOSSARY OF TERMS Active Channel The channel that contains the discharge Leopold where channel maintenance is most effective, sediment are actively transported and deposited, and that are capable

More information

Annex 6 Recommendation on Safety Requirements for Contaminated Sites in Flood Risk Areas

Annex 6 Recommendation on Safety Requirements for Contaminated Sites in Flood Risk Areas Support for the Extension of Accident Risk Spots Inventory and Preventive Measures / Final Report Annex 6 Recommendation on Safety Requirements for Contaminated Sites in Flood Risk Areas Final Draft International

More information

London Borough of Waltham Forest LOCAL FLOOD RISK MANAGEMENT STRATEGY. Summary Document

London Borough of Waltham Forest LOCAL FLOOD RISK MANAGEMENT STRATEGY. Summary Document LOCAL FLOOD RISK MANAGEMENT STRATEGY Summary Document October 2013 Local Flood Risk Management Strategy Summary 1 Introduction 2 Partner responsibilities 3 What do we know about flooding in the borough?

More information

A. Flood Management in Nevada

A. Flood Management in Nevada Nevada Division of Water Planning A. Flood Management in Nevada Introduction Flooding has been a concern for Nevada communities since the first settlers moved to the territory in the mid-1800 s. Fourteen

More information

Guideline for Stress Testing the Climate Resilience of Urban Areas

Guideline for Stress Testing the Climate Resilience of Urban Areas Netherlands Ministry of Infrastructure and Environment Delta Programme Urban Development and Reconstruction Guideline for Stress Testing the Climate Resilience of Urban Areas Extended summary Version 1.0

More information

University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences Vienna Ecology, Navigation and Sustainable Planning in the Danube River Basin 25. 6.

University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences Vienna Ecology, Navigation and Sustainable Planning in the Danube River Basin 25. 6. Ecology, Navigation and Sustainable Planning in the Danube River Basin BOKU - Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna Institute of Water Management, Hydrology and Hydraulic Engineering H. HABERSACK

More information

1 Introduction. 1.1 Key objective. 1.2 Why the South Esk

1 Introduction. 1.1 Key objective. 1.2 Why the South Esk 1 Introduction 1.1 Key objective The aim of this study is to identify and assess possible options for improving the quality of the river channel and habitats in the River South Esk catchment whilst helping

More information

Floodplain Connectivity in Restoration Design

Floodplain Connectivity in Restoration Design Floodplain Connectivity in Restoration Design 2015 Symposium on Restoration in a Contaminated Environment: Lessons Learned and Challenges in Moving Forward Part II April 2015 Karin Boyd Applied Geomorphology,

More information

CITY UTILITIES DESIGN STANDARDS MANUAL

CITY UTILITIES DESIGN STANDARDS MANUAL CITY UTILITIES DESIGN STANDARDS MANUAL Book 2 (SW) SW9 June 2015 SW9.01 Purpose This Chapter provides information for the design of open channels for the conveyance of stormwater in the City of Fort Wayne.

More information

Programme for Flood-Safe Development in Settlement Area

Programme for Flood-Safe Development in Settlement Area Programme for Flood-Safe Development in Settlement Area - 1 - CONTENTS 1 REGULATION...3 2 COMMENTS...7 2.1 Introduction...7 2.2 Minimizing the risk associated with flood events by spatial planning measures

More information

Flash Flood Science. Chapter 2. What Is in This Chapter? Flash Flood Processes

Flash Flood Science. Chapter 2. What Is in This Chapter? Flash Flood Processes Chapter 2 Flash Flood Science A flash flood is generally defined as a rapid onset flood of short duration with a relatively high peak discharge (World Meteorological Organization). The American Meteorological

More information

6.11.2007 Official Journal of the European Union L 288/27 DIRECTIVES

6.11.2007 Official Journal of the European Union L 288/27 DIRECTIVES 6.11.2007 Official Journal of the European Union L 288/27 DIRECTIVES DIRECTIVE 2007/60/EC OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL of 23 October 2007 on the assessment and management of flood risks

More information

IUCN Guidelines to Avoid Impacts of Water Resources Projects on Dams and Other Water Infrastructure

IUCN Guidelines to Avoid Impacts of Water Resources Projects on Dams and Other Water Infrastructure IUCN Guidelines to Avoid Impacts of Water Resources Projects on Dams and Other Water Infrastructure (December 2013) IUCN does not engage in projects which involve the design, construction or rehabilitation

More information

Interim Technical Guidelines for the Development of Environmental Management Plans for Underground Infrastructure Revised - July 2013.

Interim Technical Guidelines for the Development of Environmental Management Plans for Underground Infrastructure Revised - July 2013. Interim Technical Guidelines for the Development of Environmental Management Plans for Underground Infrastructure Revised - July 2013 Rationale Underground infrastructure may be at risk from valley, streambank

More information

Discussion about the practicability of implementing flood risk. management and urban flood insurance in China. Longhua Gao, Xiaoqing Zhou

Discussion about the practicability of implementing flood risk. management and urban flood insurance in China. Longhua Gao, Xiaoqing Zhou Discussion about the practicability of implementing flood risk management and urban flood insurance in China Longhua Gao, Xiaoqing Zhou Abstract: This paper explains the flood risk management at first,

More information

Flood Risk Management

Flood Risk Management Flood Risk Management Value of Flood Risk Management Value to Individuals and Communities Every year floods sweep through communities across the United States taking lives, destroying property, shutting

More information

Flood Risk Management

Flood Risk Management Flood Risk Management Value of Flood Risk Management Every year floods sweep through communities across the United States taking lives, destroying property, shutting down businesses, harming the environment

More information

Flood Emergency Management at Morava River

Flood Emergency Management at Morava River Flood Emergency Management at Morava River an example for emergency management planning from Austria Albert SCHWINGSHANDL Markus VOLLMANN Consulting Engineers for Water Management and Environmental Informatics

More information

Stream Rehabilitation Concepts, Guidelines and Examples. Objectives. Pierre Y. Julien. Three Laws of Stream Restoration

Stream Rehabilitation Concepts, Guidelines and Examples. Objectives. Pierre Y. Julien. Three Laws of Stream Restoration Stream Rehabilitation Concepts, Guidelines and Examples Pierre Y. Julien Wuhan 2005 Objectives Part I - Stream restoration and rehabilitation: 1. Present and discuss important concepts, laws, criteria

More information

BRIDGE SCOUR INVESTIGATION: DEVELOPING A SCREENING AND HYDRAULIC VULNERABILITY RATING SYSTEM FOR BRIDGES B.HERON 1 & C.BOWE 2

BRIDGE SCOUR INVESTIGATION: DEVELOPING A SCREENING AND HYDRAULIC VULNERABILITY RATING SYSTEM FOR BRIDGES B.HERON 1 & C.BOWE 2 BRIDGE SCOUR INVESTIGATION: DEVELOPING A SCREENING AND HYDRAULIC VULNERABILITY RATING SYSTEM FOR BRIDGES B.HERON 1 & C.BOWE 2 1 O Connor Sutton Cronin Consulting Engineers, Dublin, Ireland 2 Iarnród Éireann,

More information

Appendix C - Risk Assessment: Technical Details. Appendix C - Risk Assessment: Technical Details

Appendix C - Risk Assessment: Technical Details. Appendix C - Risk Assessment: Technical Details Appendix C - Risk Assessment: Technical Details Page C1 C1 Surface Water Modelling 1. Introduction 1.1 BACKGROUND URS Scott Wilson has constructed 13 TUFLOW hydraulic models across the London Boroughs

More information

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION. Lower Carmel River Floodplain Restoration and Enhancement Project

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION. Lower Carmel River Floodplain Restoration and Enhancement Project ECONOMIC ANALYSIS FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION Lower Carmel River Floodplain Restoration and Enhancement Project I. Description of the Project and its Relationship to Other Projects in the Proposal The Lower

More information

FLOODPLAIN DELINEATION IN MUGLA-DALAMAN PLAIN USING GIS BASED RIVER ANALYSIS SYSTEM

FLOODPLAIN DELINEATION IN MUGLA-DALAMAN PLAIN USING GIS BASED RIVER ANALYSIS SYSTEM FLOODPLAIN DELINEATION IN MUGLA-DALAMAN PLAIN USING GIS BASED RIVER ANALYSIS SYSTEM Dr. Murat Ali HATİPOĞLU Fatih KESKİN Kemal SEYREK State Hydraulics Works (DSI), Investigation and Planning Department

More information

Post-Flood Assessment

Post-Flood Assessment Page 1 of 7 Post-Flood Assessment CHAPTER 4 AGENCY COORDINATION Agency coordination is an essential element for the operation of the flood management systems in the Central Valley. Due to the nature of

More information

EU China River Basin Management Programme

EU China River Basin Management Programme Ministry of Water Resources Ministry of Environmental Protection EU China River Basin Management Programme Technical Report 075 Water Resource Supply Security Strategy Analysis Ben Piper, Zhang Wang and

More information

1.7.0 Floodplain Modification Criteria

1.7.0 Floodplain Modification Criteria 1.7.0 Floodplain Modification Criteria 1.7.1 Introduction These guidelines set out standards for evaluating and processing proposed modifications of the 100- year floodplain with the following objectives:

More information

2D Modeling of Urban Flood Vulnerable Areas

2D Modeling of Urban Flood Vulnerable Areas 2D Modeling of Urban Flood Vulnerable Areas Sameer Dhalla, P.Eng. Dilnesaw Chekol, Ph.D. A.D. Latornell Conservation Symposium November 22, 2013 Outline 1. Toronto and Region 2. Evolution of Flood Management

More information

ESTIMATING THE COSTS OF EMERGENCY SERVICES DURING FLOOD EVENTS

ESTIMATING THE COSTS OF EMERGENCY SERVICES DURING FLOOD EVENTS C. Pfurtscheller R. Schwarze ESTIMATING THE COSTS OF EMERGENCY SERVICES DURING FLOOD EVENTS Funding Project Management Coordination Agenda Introduction Emergency costs State of the art Flooding of 2005

More information

River Wensum Restoration Strategy Swanton Morley Restoration Scheme Reach 14a

River Wensum Restoration Strategy Swanton Morley Restoration Scheme Reach 14a River Wensum Restoration Strategy Swanton Morley Restoration Scheme Reach 14a At a glance River restoration benefits: Improved planform, channel cross-section, flow variation and sediment process. Improved

More information

FLOOD PROTECTION AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES IN THE CHEHALIS RIVER BASIN. May 2010. Prepared by. for the. 2010 by Earth Economics

FLOOD PROTECTION AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES IN THE CHEHALIS RIVER BASIN. May 2010. Prepared by. for the. 2010 by Earth Economics FLOOD PROTECTION AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES IN THE CHEHALIS RIVER BASIN May 2010 Prepared by for the Execubve Summary The Chehalis Basin experienced catastrophic flooding in 2007 and 2009. In response, the

More information

Curriculum of the Master degree programme

Curriculum of the Master degree programme Curriculum of the Master degree programme Mountain Risk Engineering Code: 066 430 University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna Center for International Relations For legal purposes, only the

More information

PREVENTION. City of Orem FLOOD DAMAGE PREVENTION 10-1-1

PREVENTION. City of Orem FLOOD DAMAGE PREVENTION 10-1-1 City of Orem FLOOD DAMAGE PREVENTION 10-1-1 CHAPTER 10. Article 10-1. Article 10-2. Article 10-3. Article 10-4. Article 10-5. FLOOD DAMAGE PREVENTION Purposes Definitions General Provisions Administration

More information

1 in 30 year 1 in 75 year 1 in 100 year 1 in 100 year plus climate change (+30%) 1 in 200 year

1 in 30 year 1 in 75 year 1 in 100 year 1 in 100 year plus climate change (+30%) 1 in 200 year Appendix C1 Surface Water Modelling 1 Overview 1.1 The Drain London modelling was designed to analyse the impact of heavy rainfall events across each London borough by assessing flow paths, velocities

More information

WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING DESIGN LANDSCAPE ECOLOGY AND RIVER RESTORATION. www.sindlar.eu

WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING DESIGN LANDSCAPE ECOLOGY AND RIVER RESTORATION. www.sindlar.eu Geomorphological processes of watercourse development, system of typology and application of the results in practice Part 01 Analysis of geomorphological processes in watercourses Part 02 Applications

More information

Flooding Fast Facts. flooding), seismic events (tsunami) or large landslides (sometime also called tsunami).

Flooding Fast Facts. flooding), seismic events (tsunami) or large landslides (sometime also called tsunami). Flooding Fast Facts What is a flood? Flooding is the unusual presence of water on land to a depth which affects normal activities. Flooding can arise from: Overflowing rivers (river flooding), Heavy rainfall

More information

1 2 A very short description of the functional center network: regarding the Hydraulic and Hydrogeological risk, the national alert system is ensured by the National Civil Protection Department (DPCN),

More information

5.0 OVERVIEW OF FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION MEASURES

5.0 OVERVIEW OF FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION MEASURES 5.0 OVERVIEW OF FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION MEASURES Flood damage reduction consists of two basic techniques structural and non-structural. Structural methods modify the flood and take the flood away from people

More information

Integrated Water and Sediment Management of Yellow River

Integrated Water and Sediment Management of Yellow River Keeping Health Life of Yellow River: Integrated Water and Sediment Management of Yellow River Shang Hongqi Yellow River Conservancy Commission 18 March 2009 Istanbul, Turkey Outline: I. Yellow River Characteristic

More information

Disaster Mitigation of Debris Flows, Slope Failures and Landslides 639

Disaster Mitigation of Debris Flows, Slope Failures and Landslides 639 Disaster Mitigation of Debris Flows, Slope Failures and Landslides 639 Anthropogenic Caused Mass Movements and their Impact on Railway Lines in Austria Christian Rachoy 1) and Manfred Scheikl 2) 1) Dept.

More information

EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN UPDATE OF LAKE GENEVA DAM ID #617. Prepared for: LAKE GENEVA ASSOCIATION 1114 E. Geneva Drive City of DeWitt, MI

EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN UPDATE OF LAKE GENEVA DAM ID #617. Prepared for: LAKE GENEVA ASSOCIATION 1114 E. Geneva Drive City of DeWitt, MI EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN UPDATE OF LAKE GENEVA DAM ID #617 Prepared for: LAKE GENEVA ASSOCIATION 1114 E. Geneva Drive City of DeWitt, MI Modified by: WILCOX PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, LLC 111 W. Edgewood Blvd.,

More information

Riparian Ecosystems and Climate Change: the Value of Floodplains along the River Elbe

Riparian Ecosystems and Climate Change: the Value of Floodplains along the River Elbe Climate Change and Nature Conservation in Europe - an ecological, policy and economic perspective 25-27 June 2013, Bonn, Germany Riparian Ecosystems and Climate Change: the Value of Floodplains along the

More information

Title: Guiding Models and Norm Study for Water Storage: A new way of thinking?

Title: Guiding Models and Norm Study for Water Storage: A new way of thinking? Tools Title: Guiding Models and Norm Study for Water Storage: A new way of thinking? Keywords: Regional; communication; inundation; stakeholder engagement; water management; spatial planning Audience:

More information

Emergency Spillways (Sediment basins)

Emergency Spillways (Sediment basins) Emergency Spillways (Sediment basins) DRAINAGE CONTROL TECHNIQUE Low Gradient Velocity Control Short-Term Steep Gradient Channel Lining Medium-Long Term Outlet Control Soil Treatment Permanent [1] [1]

More information

Standardized Runoff Index (SRI)

Standardized Runoff Index (SRI) Standardized Runoff Index (SRI) Adolfo Mérida Abril Javier Gras Treviño Contents 1. About the SRI SRI in the world Methodology 2. Comments made in Athens on SRI factsheet 3. Last modifications of the factsheet

More information

Counter measures against extremely rapid mass movements

Counter measures against extremely rapid mass movements IRASMOS Symposium 2008 15 16 May 2008, Davos, Switzerland Counter measures against extremely rapid mass movements Markus HOLUB Institute of Mountain Risk Engineering and Applied Life Sciences Vienna, Austria

More information

Elbe flood in 2002 and 2006 in terms of emergency management

Elbe flood in 2002 and 2006 in terms of emergency management Elbe flood in 2002 and 2006 in terms of emergency management Ing. Jaroslav Pikal, Regional Authority of the Usti Region 10 Years of Transnational Cooperation in Flood Risk Management at the LABe ELbe Saxon

More information

River Basin Management in Croatia

River Basin Management in Croatia River Basin Management in Croatia 2. INTERNATIONAL RIVER BASIN MANAGEMENT HIGH LEVEL SYMPOSIUM Cappadocia/NEVŞEHİR, Turkey 16-18 April 2013 2 Water sector responsibilities are shared among: Croatian Parliament

More information

Types of flood risk. What is flash flooding? 3/16/2010. GG22A: GEOSPHERE & HYDROSPHERE Hydrology. Main types of climatically influenced flooding:

Types of flood risk. What is flash flooding? 3/16/2010. GG22A: GEOSPHERE & HYDROSPHERE Hydrology. Main types of climatically influenced flooding: GG22A: GEOSPHERE & HYDROSPHERE Hydrology Types of flood risk Main types of climatically influenced flooding: 1. Flash (rapid-onset) 2. Lowland (slow-rise) 3. Coastal (not covered here) But! Causal factors

More information

Evaluation of Open Channel Flow Equations. Introduction :

Evaluation of Open Channel Flow Equations. Introduction : Evaluation of Open Channel Flow Equations Introduction : Most common hydraulic equations for open channels relate the section averaged mean velocity (V) to hydraulic radius (R) and hydraulic gradient (S).

More information

Sediment and Dredged Material Management - Relevance and Objectives 18 September 2003

Sediment and Dredged Material Management - Relevance and Objectives 18 September 2003 - Relevance and Objectives 1. Scope of the Dutch German Exchange (DGE) The Netherlands and Germany have large river systems such as Danube, Rhine, Meuse, Elbe, Weser and Ems, which have important hydrological

More information

Burnt River Black River and Gull River Flood Contingency Plan

Burnt River Black River and Gull River Flood Contingency Plan Burnt River Black River and Gull River Flood Contingency Plan Objective: The objective of this plan is to preplan and prepare for flooding events in the Burnt River, Black River and Gull River area of

More information

CASS COUNTY COMMISSION POLICY MANUAL 38.07 ADOPTED DATE: FEBRUARY 2, 1998 PAGE 1 OF 9

CASS COUNTY COMMISSION POLICY MANUAL 38.07 ADOPTED DATE: FEBRUARY 2, 1998 PAGE 1 OF 9 CASS COUNTY COMMISSION POLICY MANUAL 38.07 SUBJECT: ORDINANCE #1998-2 (FLOOD DAMAGE PREVENTION) ADOPTED DATE: FEBRUARY 2, 1998 PAGE 1 OF 9 NORTH DAKOTA COUNTY OF CASS ORDINANCE #1998-2 Be it ordained and

More information

Experience in Wetlands restoration and conservation concerning natural water retention measures. Ministry of Environment and Water, Bulgaria

Experience in Wetlands restoration and conservation concerning natural water retention measures. Ministry of Environment and Water, Bulgaria Experience in Wetlands restoration and conservation concerning natural water retention measures Ministry of Environment and Water, Bulgaria Water management in Bulgaria - Water management in Bulgaria national

More information

Published in "Official Gazette of the Republic of Macedonia" No. 67/2004 LAW ON AMBIENT AIR QUALITY I. GENERAL PROVISIONS

Published in Official Gazette of the Republic of Macedonia No. 67/2004 LAW ON AMBIENT AIR QUALITY I. GENERAL PROVISIONS Published in "Official Gazette of the Republic of Macedonia" No. 67/2004 LAW ON AMBIENT AIR QUALITY I. GENERAL PROVISIONS Article 1 Subject of regulation (1) This Law shall regulate the measures for avoidance,

More information

Department of Planning Report for Riverstone and Alex Avenue Precincts

Department of Planning Report for Riverstone and Alex Avenue Precincts Department of Planning Report for Riverstone and Alex Avenue Precincts Post Exhibition Flooding and Water Cycle Management (incl. Climate Change impact on Flooding) May 2010 Contents 1. Background 1 1.1

More information

Climate Change Scenarios for the Prairies

Climate Change Scenarios for the Prairies Climate Change Scenarios for the Prairies David Sauchyn and Suzan Lapp Prairie Adaptation Research Collaborative, University of Regina, 150-10 Research Drive, Regina, SK S4S 7J7; Email: sauchyn@uregina.ca

More information

CLACKAMAS COUNTY ZONING AND DEVELOPMENT ORDINANCE

CLACKAMAS COUNTY ZONING AND DEVELOPMENT ORDINANCE 1008 STORM DRAINAGE (3/24/05) 1008.01 PURPOSE To minimize the amount of stormwater runoff resulting from development utilizing nonstructural controls where possible, maintain and improve water quality,

More information

SedAlp final conference. Bolzano, June 9 th 2015

SedAlp final conference. Bolzano, June 9 th 2015 SedAlp final conference Bolzano, June 9 th 2015 SedAlp Sediment management in Alpine basins: integrating sediment continuum, risk mitigation and hydropower Introducing the background and project SedAlp

More information

Chehalis River Basin Flood Damage Reduction 2013-2015 Capital Budget Approved by Legislature in June 2013

Chehalis River Basin Flood Damage Reduction 2013-2015 Capital Budget Approved by Legislature in June 2013 Chehalis River Basin Flood Damage Reduction 2013-2015 Capital Budget Approved by Legislature in June 2013 1. Design alternatives for large capital flood projects (basinlevel water retention and Interstate

More information

DESWAT project (Destructive Water Abatement and Control of Water Disasters)

DESWAT project (Destructive Water Abatement and Control of Water Disasters) A new national hydrological forecast and warning system is now in advanced implementation phase, within the Romanian Waters National Administration, in the framework of DESWAT project. The main objectives

More information

Assessment of hydropower resources

Assessment of hydropower resources Assessment of hydropower resources Oliver Froend Assessment of hydropower resources Relevance of surveys, data assessment and analyses to the success of the project. Required data and field survey. Key

More information

TERRITORIAL PLANNING FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF RISK IN EUROPE

TERRITORIAL PLANNING FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF RISK IN EUROPE , Territorial págs. Planning 383-388 for the Management of Risk in Europe TERRITORIAL PLANNING FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF RISK IN EUROPE Mark Fleischhauer, Stefan Greiving & Sylvia Wanczura Universität Dortmund

More information

AZ EGER-PATAK HIDROLÓGIAI VIZSGÁLATA, A FELSZÍNI VÍZKÉSZLETEK VÁRHATÓ VÁLTOZÁSÁBÓL ADÓDÓ MÓDOSULÁSOK AZ ÉGHAJLATVÁLTOZÁS HATÁSÁRA

AZ EGER-PATAK HIDROLÓGIAI VIZSGÁLATA, A FELSZÍNI VÍZKÉSZLETEK VÁRHATÓ VÁLTOZÁSÁBÓL ADÓDÓ MÓDOSULÁSOK AZ ÉGHAJLATVÁLTOZÁS HATÁSÁRA AZ EGER-PATAK HIDROLÓGIAI VIZSGÁLATA, A FELSZÍNI VÍZKÉSZLETEK VÁRHATÓ VÁLTOZÁSÁBÓL ADÓDÓ MÓDOSULÁSOK AZ ÉGHAJLATVÁLTOZÁS HATÁSÁRA GÁBOR KEVE 1, GÉZA HAJNAL 2, KATALIN BENE 3, PÉTER TORMA 4 EXTRAPOLATING

More information

Estimating Potential Reduction Flood Benefits of Restored Wetlands

Estimating Potential Reduction Flood Benefits of Restored Wetlands Estimating Potential Reduction Flood Benefits of Restored Wetlands Kenneth W. Potter University of Wisconsin Introduction Throughout the summer of 1993 a recurring question was the impact of wetland drainage

More information

Chapter 3 CULVERTS. Description. Importance to Maintenance & Water Quality. Culvert Profile

Chapter 3 CULVERTS. Description. Importance to Maintenance & Water Quality. Culvert Profile Chapter 3 CULVERTS Description A culvert is a closed conduit used to convey water from one area to another, usually from one side of a road to the other side. Importance to Maintenance & Water Quality

More information

Flooding Hazards, Prediction & Human Intervention

Flooding Hazards, Prediction & Human Intervention Page 1 of 10 EENS 3050 Tulane University Natural Disasters Prof. Stephen A. Nelson Flooding Hazards, Prediction & Human Intervention This page last updated on 19-Oct-2015 Hazards Associated with Flooding

More information

Belmont Forum Collaborative Research Action on Mountains as Sentinels of Change

Belmont Forum Collaborative Research Action on Mountains as Sentinels of Change Belmont Forum Collaborative Research Action on Mountains as Sentinels of Change 1. Background and rationale Mountains exist in many regions of the world and are home to a significant fraction of the world

More information

Prattsville Berm Removal Project. 1.0 Project Location

Prattsville Berm Removal Project. 1.0 Project Location Prattsville Berm Removal Project 1.0 Project Location The project site is located between the New York State Route 23 Bridge over the Schoharie Creek and the Schoharie Reservoir. The restoration plan encompassed

More information

Applying MIKE SHE to define the influence of rewetting on floods in Flanders

Applying MIKE SHE to define the influence of rewetting on floods in Flanders Applying MIKE SHE to define the influence of rewetting on floods in Flanders MARK HENRY RUBARENZYA 1, PATRICK WILLEMS 2, JEAN BERLAMONT 3, & JAN FEYEN 4 1,2,3 Hydraulics Laboratory, Department of Civil

More information

ROSE CREEK WATERSHED HYDROLOGIC, HYDRAULIC, SEDIMENT TRANSPORT, AND GEOMORPHIC ANALYSES TASK 1 EXISTING DATA AND INFORMATION SUMMARY REPORT BACKGROUND

ROSE CREEK WATERSHED HYDROLOGIC, HYDRAULIC, SEDIMENT TRANSPORT, AND GEOMORPHIC ANALYSES TASK 1 EXISTING DATA AND INFORMATION SUMMARY REPORT BACKGROUND ROSE CREEK WATERSHED HYDROLOGIC, HYDRAULIC, SEDIMENT TRANSPORT, AND GEOMORPHIC ANALYSES TASK 1 EXISTING DATA AND INFORMATION SUMMARY REPORT BACKGROUND The Rose Creek Watershed (RCW) consists of three planning

More information

Flood risk assessment through a detailed 1D/2D coupled model

Flood risk assessment through a detailed 1D/2D coupled model CORFU Project Barcelona Case Study Final Workshop 19 th of May 2014 Flood risk assessment through a detailed 1D/2D coupled model Beniamino Russo Aqualogy Urban Drainage Direction Introduction and general

More information

Dr. Lidija Globevnik Luka Snoj, Neven Verdnik, Peter Muck. Meta Povž

Dr. Lidija Globevnik Luka Snoj, Neven Verdnik, Peter Muck. Meta Povž The concept of ecological restoration of a sub-alpine river and its tributaries in Slovenia Suggestions for regulation of riverbed and reconstruction of hydrotechnical facilities Dr. Lidija Globevnik Luka

More information

Expert Panel Assessment. Snowy Precipitation Enhancement Trial (SPET) Executive Summary

Expert Panel Assessment. Snowy Precipitation Enhancement Trial (SPET) Executive Summary Expert Panel Assessment Snowy Precipitation Enhancement Trial (SPET) Executive Summary In Summary Snowy Hydro Ltd proposes to undertake a six year cloud seeding trial in the Snowy Mountains region of New

More information

BLACK/HARMONY/FAREWELL CREEK WATERSHED EXISTING CONDITIONS REPORT CHAPTER 12 - STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

BLACK/HARMONY/FAREWELL CREEK WATERSHED EXISTING CONDITIONS REPORT CHAPTER 12 - STORMWATER MANAGEMENT Harmony Creek subwatershed Harmony Creek subwatershed BLACK/HARMONY/FAREWELL CREEK WATERSHED EXISTING CONDITIONS REPORT CHAPTER 12 - STORMWATER MANAGEMENT April 2011 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION...

More information

General Permit for Activities Promoting Waterway - Floodplain Connectivity [working title]

General Permit for Activities Promoting Waterway - Floodplain Connectivity [working title] General Permit for Activities Promoting Waterway - Floodplain Connectivity [working title] Purpose These rules set forth the conditions under which a person may, without an individual removal-fill permit

More information

Sustainable Groundwater Management for Tomorrow s Livelihoods

Sustainable Groundwater Management for Tomorrow s Livelihoods Groundwater Resources and Management Sustainable Groundwater Management for Tomorrow s Livelihoods Strategies and Products Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR), Germany Commissioned

More information

Abaya-Chamo Lakes Physical and Water Resources Characteristics, including Scenarios and Impacts

Abaya-Chamo Lakes Physical and Water Resources Characteristics, including Scenarios and Impacts LARS 2007 Catchment and Lake Research Abaya-Chamo Lakes Physical and Water Resources Characteristics, including Scenarios and Impacts Seleshi Bekele Awulachew International Water Management Institute Introduction

More information

Habitat rehabilitation for inland fisheries

Habitat rehabilitation for inland fisheries Habitat rehabilitation for inland fisheries FAO FISHERIES TECHNICAL PAPER 484 Global review of effectiveness and guidance for rehabilitation of freshwater ecosystems Cover photos : Left: excavation of

More information

Case Studies Bridge Scour Inspection and Repair Edward P. Foltyn, P.E. Senior Hydraulic Engineer ODOT Bridge Unit

Case Studies Bridge Scour Inspection and Repair Edward P. Foltyn, P.E. Senior Hydraulic Engineer ODOT Bridge Unit Case Studies Bridge Scour Inspection and Repair Edward P. Foltyn, P.E. Senior Hydraulic Engineer ODOT Bridge Unit 2013 PNW Bridge Inspectors Conference April 2013 REFERENCES Stream Stability at Highway

More information

FLOOD HAZARD AND RISK ASSESSMENT OF HOANG LONG RIVER BASIN, VIETNAM. Da District, Hanoi, Vietnam 100000, e-mail: vuthanhtu147@gmail.

FLOOD HAZARD AND RISK ASSESSMENT OF HOANG LONG RIVER BASIN, VIETNAM. Da District, Hanoi, Vietnam 100000, e-mail: vuthanhtu147@gmail. FLOOD HAZARD AND RISK ASSESSMENT OF HOANG LONG RIVER BASIN, VIETNAM VU Thanh Tu 1, Tawatchai TINGSANCHALI 2 1 Water Resources University, Assistant Professor, 175 Tay Son Street, Dong Da District, Hanoi,

More information

REPORT TO REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY COMMISSION MEETING OF WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2013 LEECH WATER SUPPLY AREA RESTORATION UPDATE

REPORT TO REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY COMMISSION MEETING OF WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2013 LEECH WATER SUPPLY AREA RESTORATION UPDATE Making a difference... together Agenda Item #9 REPORT #RWSC 2013-17 REPORT TO REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY COMMISSION MEETING OF WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2013 SUBJECT LEECH WATER SUPPLY AREA RESTORATION UPDATE

More information

CHAPTER 3A Environmental Guidelines for STREAM CROSSING BY ALL-TERRAIN VEHICLES

CHAPTER 3A Environmental Guidelines for STREAM CROSSING BY ALL-TERRAIN VEHICLES GOVERNMENT OF NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT AND LABOUR CHAPTER 3A Environmental Guidelines for STREAM CROSSING BY ALL-TERRAIN VEHICLES WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT DIVISION Water Investigations

More information

Restoration Planning and Development of a Restoration Bank

Restoration Planning and Development of a Restoration Bank Restoration Planning and Development of a Restoration Bank Black Creek Pioneer Village, South Theatre 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Habitat Restoration and Environmental Monitoring Projects Section Restoration

More information

Neversink River East Branch

Neversink River East Branch Neversink River East Branch Management Unit 10 Summary of Post-Flood Recommendations Intervention Level Full restoration of the stream reach including the eroding bank site between Station 38380 and Station

More information

Impact of water harvesting dam on the Wadi s morphology using digital elevation model Study case: Wadi Al-kanger, Sudan

Impact of water harvesting dam on the Wadi s morphology using digital elevation model Study case: Wadi Al-kanger, Sudan Impact of water harvesting dam on the Wadi s morphology using digital elevation model Study case: Wadi Al-kanger, Sudan H. S. M. Hilmi 1, M.Y. Mohamed 2, E. S. Ganawa 3 1 Faculty of agriculture, Alzaiem

More information

Co-creation progress update and an invitation to respond. Overview of ideas from co-creation activities towards a Climate Ready UK...

Co-creation progress update and an invitation to respond. Overview of ideas from co-creation activities towards a Climate Ready UK... Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Climate Ready Co-creation progress update and an invitation to respond July 2012 Contents Overview of ideas from co-creation activities towards a Climate

More information

Documentation of the Disasters of August 2005 in Austria Caused by Floods and Slope Movements: Methods and Results

Documentation of the Disasters of August 2005 in Austria Caused by Floods and Slope Movements: Methods and Results Disaster Mitigation of Debris Flows, Slope Failures and Landslides 627 Documentation of the Disasters of August 2005 in Austria Caused by Floods and Slope Movements: Methods and Results Florian Rudolf-Miklau,

More information

The Provincial Plan (PTC) is a general spatial planning tool approved in 2002 an actually under the decennial revision set by law.

The Provincial Plan (PTC) is a general spatial planning tool approved in 2002 an actually under the decennial revision set by law. The Province of Genoa is a Public Authority acting at an intermediate level between municipalities and Liguria Region, and incorporates the territory of 67 municipalities. The main role is promoting and

More information

HYDROMETEOROLOGICAL AND MONITORING SERVICE

HYDROMETEOROLOGICAL AND MONITORING SERVICE Regional Association VI, Forum Hydrology, Koblenz May 8 10, 2012 MINISTRY OF EMERGENCY SITUATIONS OF ARMENIA ARMENIAN STATE HYDROMETEOROLOGICAL AND MONITORING SERVICE Amalya Misakyan THE STRUCTURE OF ARMSTATEHYDROMET

More information

Guideline: Works that interfere with water in a watercourse watercourse diversions. September 2014

Guideline: Works that interfere with water in a watercourse watercourse diversions. September 2014 Guideline: Works that interfere with water in a watercourse watercourse diversions September 2014 This publication has been compiled by the Department of Natural Resources and Mines. State of Queensland,

More information

STAFF REPORT TO COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE

STAFF REPORT TO COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE STAFF REPORT TO COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE DATE: November 7 2012 TO: FROM: SUBJECT: ATTACHMENT(S): COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE GINA LAYTE-LISTON, SUPERVISOR, WASTEWATER Stormwater Management Funding Strategy None

More information