How was it for you? Consumer engagement in the post office closure programme

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "How was it for you? Consumer engagement in the post office closure programme"

Transcription

1 How was it for you? Consumer engagement in the post office closure programme Andy Burrows and Colin Griffiths February 2010

2 About Consumer Focus Consumer Focus is a statutory body that champions the needs of consumers across England, Wales, and Scotland and, for postal services, Northern Ireland. We operate across the whole of the economy, persuading businesses and public services to put consumers at the heart of what they do. Our public services work seeks to improve provision by promoting high quality engagement in design and delivery of services. Consumer Focus has the power to take action where markets are failing consumers and to ensure a fair deal for all especially the vulnerable and disadvantaged. We want to see consumers central to business and Government decision-making, and we work at the European level, too, to make sure consumers needs are heard in Brussels. We don t just draw attention to problems we use a strong evidence base and work with a range of organisations to champion creative solutions that improve consumers lives. consumerfocus.org.uk 02 How was it for you?

3 Introduction consumerfocus.org.uk 03 How was it for you?

4 In May 2007, the Government announced that Post Office Ltd (POL) would close 2,500 post offices, and establish 500 new outreach services. The closure programme was part of a wider package designed to restructure the post office network and return it to a stable financial footing. It was clear from the outset that the closure programme was going to prove a difficult time for consumers: the post office network is a lifeline service for vulnerable consumers, including the elderly, those on low incomes and consumers in rural areas, where the post office is often colocated with the last retail facility in a village. Post offices are used by 23 million people each week to undertake essential transactions, including accessing pensions and benefits; accessing cash; undertaking postal transactions; and making bill payments. With the post office closure programme now over, Consumer Focus, the statutory watchdog for post office consumers, commissioned research to assess the effectiveness of POL s consultation processes. During the closure programme, POL consulted on each of its closure and outreach proposals for a six-week period, as specified by Government, and bundled proposals together to form area plans drawn from multiple parliamentary constituencies. Public consultations followed an eleven-week period in which local authorities and our predecessor body, Postwatch, had the opportunity to scrutinise and seek changes to POL s proposals. In seeking to better understand the consumer experience of the post office closure programme, Consumer Focus commissioned this research to explore the following key questions: zhow effectively did POL promote awareness of its closure proposals? zto what extent did POL encourage, and actively enable, consumers to respond to the consultations with evidence about the likely impacts of proposed closures? zwere consumers fully able to take part in the consultation process, and if not, what prevented them from doing so? zdid POL do enough to: - ensure consumers understood what was proposed - make sure consumers knew how proposals could affect them - promote awareness - offer suitable means to inform POL s final decision making? zwhat lessons can be learnt to ensure POL communicates and consults more effectively with its customers, including in the event of future or ongoing changes to the network? zwhat lessons can be learnt for other providers proposing changes in the provision of essential services more widely? The research consisted of the following strands: a telephone survey of over 1,200 consumers, focus groups in eight locations across the UK, and twenty in-depth interviews with key stakeholders including MPs, councillors and local authorities. consumerfocus.org.uk 04 How was it for you?

5 Key findings consumerfocus.org.uk 05 How was it for you?

6 Consumer engagement with the closure programme was significant, with 2.7 million consumers making their views known Post Office Ltd has previously reported that it received 190,000 formal responses to its consultation, with our predecessor body Postwatch receiving another 15,000 submissions. Our research suggests wider consumer engagement with the programme was significantly higher than this, with an estimated 2.7 million consumers making their views known, through a number of means including: zsigning petitions zattending public meetings zresponding to newspaper campaigns zwriting to MPs and other elected officials The post office closure programme received an unprecedented response for a consultation exercise in recent years. The research suggests that six per cent of consumers included in the survey made their views known about closure proposals in some form. This is particularly striking given that POL reports that only 8.3 per cent of the population saw the branch they used most often close as a result of the closure programme. It is, of course, encouraging albeit not surprising that such a high degree of consumer engagement with the programme was reported. This reflects the importance of the post office network as a means of providing essential services to a wide range of consumer groups, including elderly consumers and those in rural and deprived urban locations. The post office closure programme was also a totemic issue for many consumers who were directly affected by closure proposals, and for those who invested a strong emotional attachment in keeping post office branches open, even if these consumers were not directly dependent on post offices to access key services. POL s consultation and communications strategy was poor: communications were treated as a necessary evil POL had a crucial communications role to play during the programme, in ensuring that: zconsumers were aware of each of its closure proposals zconsumers knew how to respond to the public consultation for each proposal zcustomers affected by each proposed change had sufficient information to determine how it would likely affect their future ability to access post office services z consumers were aware of the framework for the programme, its timings, and the specifications laid down by the Government in respect of implementing closure decisions consumerfocus.org.uk 06 How was it for you?

7 At the start of the closure programme, POL committed to a number of improvements to how they communicated with consumers compared to the previous Urban Reinvention closure programme. For example, POL committed to providing information on its closure proposals via its website, and consulted on the basis of once over the ground in each area that is to say, that each area would be subject to a single consultation period which enabled consumers to consider the impact of the closures in their areas during a single, consolidated period. However, our research found that consumers were strongly dissatisfied with how POL communicated information about the public consultations and closures: in our telephone survey, the average score given by respondents for POL s communications strategy was only 4.2 out of 10, with almost one in five of respondents (17 per cent) being totally dissatisfied with POL s communications strategy, awarding a score of zero. Throughout the closure programme, both our predecessor body, Postwatch, and the Business and Enterprise Select Committee repeatedly expressed concerns about the quality of POL s consultation materials, and how poorly POL consulted with its consumers. This research suggests that even at the end of the closure programme, POL had failed to develop a sufficiently rigorous communications and consultation strategy which incorporated the concerns of the Select Committee and other stakeholders, and had a built-in set of consumer-focused communications materials at its centre. Consumer awareness of and engagement with the closure programme was undoubtedly weakened as a result of POL s unwillingness to incorporate feedback from consumers, and to refine its communications materials accordingly. This resulted in a number of specific concerns, as outlined below. Despite high levels of consumer engagement, only limited activity translated into formal responses to POL s consultation As the clear experts on their communities, consumers were best placed to assess the impact of POL s proposals, and to provide the necessary evidence to determine whether closure proposals should go ahead. Despite the high level of overall engagement in response to closure proposals, it is concerning that only a relatively small proportion of wider consumer activity translated into formal submissions to POL s consultations: this is on the basis that evidence-based submissions to POL were arguably the most effective means for consumers to influence the final decisions on whether closures went ahead. As focus group recipients told us: I didn t know about the [formal consultation process] and now I do; I get the impression they deliberately did it badly so they didn t have to listen (Wrexham) consumerfocus.org.uk 07 How was it for you?

8 the fact that people responded to the consultation but felt their submissions weren t influencing anything, I think it made people a bit cynical about consultation (Belfast) Clearly, POL should therefore have done more to issue guidance to opinion formers and elected officials on the most effective means to channel consumer responses to the programme. For example, while POL were made fully aware of the strength of feeling indicated by local petitions or signature drives they received, as the consultation did not operate on the basis of who shouts loudest, such types of campaigning activity were always likely to be less effective than producing detailed and written submissions. Consumers and stakeholders did not necessarily understand this during the consultation and therefore may not have put forward evidence in the format that could have most successfully influenced POL s decision whether to proceed with a closure proposal. POL should therefore have provided guidance to stakeholders and opinion formers on the optimum forms of responding to the consultations, including the format and type and information most likely to affect its decision making in respect of each proposal. For example, POL should have developed best practice guidelines for stakeholders undertaking petition drives. These guidelines could usefully have suggested that petitions were more likely to be effective where they incorporated evidence-based submissions, in addition to signatory lists. POL should consider whether a template response document could have assisted consumers in generating more effective responses to its public consultations. For example, the Public Accounts Committee (2009) identifies that the most common reason for overturning a closure decision had been fresh information about transport links 1. More consumers could have highlighted pertinent evidence in this respect had they been provided with a template or checklist of factors they could usefully have considered when developing their consultation response. Instead, it was left to other stakeholder organisations, including Help the Aged and the Plunkett Foundation, to produce practical guidance to assist consumers and stakeholder bodies in developing their consultation responses. For example, Help The Aged developed a briefing pack for its membership base on how the closure programme would operate, and how local campaigners should most effectively respond 2. The Plunkett Foundation worked with our predecessor body, Postwatch, to produce guidance materials for communities that were considering mitigating against closures through community-based initiatives. Postwatch, also worked with members of its Post Office Advisory Group to develop guidance for local stakeholder groups responding to consultations. 1 House of Commons Public Accounts Committee (2009) Oversight of the Post Office Network Change Programme, p12. Nov Fifty-third report of session Help The Aged (2007) The Post Office Closure Programme: Briefing Pack for Local Campaigners consumerfocus.org.uk 08 How was it for you?

9 Strong consumer awareness of proposals did not translate into awareness of consultation mechanisms Our research confirms that while there was a strong level of consumer awareness that closures were being proposed, this failed to translate into a high level of consumer awareness about these proposals being subject to consultation, or how to respond. According to our findings, while 85 per cent of respondents had been aware of closure proposals in their area, only around a quarter of respondents (28 per cent) knew that POL s proposals would be subject to consultation that was open for them to respond to. This indicates that while POL worked reasonably effectively to raise awareness of closures, there was a significant failure to promote consumer awareness of the consultations on each closure, or how to best respond. While the strength of feeling about post office closures meant that many consumers and opinion formers were able to identify that a consultation was taking place, and to respond directly to POL to set out their concerns, many more consumers were unaware that each proposal was subject to a formal consultation to which they could provide input. As one focus group participant reported: Half of that information I didn t even know about [the consultation processes]. The only thing I remember is that before they actually chose the post office, the branch had a Save Our Post Office Campaign which we all signed. That was the level I saw (Dumfries) Of course, Consumer Focus cannot predict whether increased awareness of consultations would have encouraged a significant increase in the formal response rate. Neither can we suggest that an increase in awareness would have generated additional evidence that could potentially have led to different closure decisions being made. However, it is no surprise the majority of consumers who made their views known about closure proposals did so through mass-organised means, for example through signing a petition, rather than submitting evidence directly in response the consultation because POL s failure to communicate the best methods effectively meant that the majority of consumers were simply not aware this was an option available to them. consumerfocus.org.uk 09 How was it for you?

10 Recommendations consumerfocus.org.uk 10 How was it for you?

11 Specific improvements should be made to POL s consultation and communications materials for ongoing changes to the PO network Even though the closure programme has finished, changes to the post office network continue to take place, for example in the event that a subpostmaster decides to retire or POL proposes to relocate a specific post office branch. It is therefore important that POL agrees to integrate a series of recommendations to improve its standard consumer-facing materials, drawing on the comments of consumers incorporated in this research. As the National Consumer Council (NCC) noted: by getting the mechanisms wrong or closing down one or another channel organisations run the risk of shutting down user voice 3. Specific recommendations include: zpol should commit to a re-design of its standard set of communication and consultation materials, seeking guidance from consumer bodies on content and presentation za Crystal Mark for Plain English should be sought to ensure that POL s communications materials effectively reach the range of consumer groups who rely on and regularly access the post office network. As one stakeholder participant told us, the language of some of the material produced by Post Office Ltd was not exactly accessible zpol should agree to involve consumers from the outset in designing its standard communications materials, and should test the materials out prior to use, using focus groups and other research strategies to refine as appropriate. One focus group participant told us, all right, they might say they put a notice up, but it s in such small print you don t even notice zconsumers should be able to respond to consultations through a range of convenient means, including by telephone using a freephone number if they choose to do so, with the range of consultation channels actively promoted on POL s set of standard consultation materials zpol should explore whether it could develop a toolkit for consumers that offers appropriate guidance to assist consumers in developing effective consultation responses POL should provide consumers with feedback on how their views were taken into account, and how this evidence informed closure decisions It was perhaps inevitable that consumer perception of the closure programme would be driven largely by the outcome of the consultation rather than by the process itself. The reality was that the closure programme was driven by an existing decision that up to 2,500 post offices would close, meaning that the basis of consultation was to determine which, not whether, branches would shut. This was not made clear to consumers. On this basis, it was entirely foreseeable that many consumers would express concern about whether the consultation exercise could be meaningful when there was only limited scope to reduce the overall number of closures in each area. It is therefore surprising that POL failed to take sufficient steps to build awareness of and confidence in the robustness of the consultation process, including widely communicating its rationale for closure decisions. Many focus group respondents felt that the closure programme was a fait accompli: 3 NCC (2007) Our Say: User Voice and Public Service Culture consumerfocus.org.uk 11 How was it for you?

12 it s a sham the consultation period, you know: what are your views, thanks very much, we are closing it anyway. They have gone through the process and gone through the sham, but they listened to no-one because they had already made their mind up (Dumfries) it was quite a difficult process in that the consultation and the closure process had been set up with little room for manoeuvre [...] there was a general consensus this was a fait accompli (Devon) This view was also widely expressed by elected representatives, for example Richard Bacon MP (South Norfolk), who responded to the Public Accounts Committee report with the concern that: because the number of closures had already been fixed, the few people who knew about the consultation period saw it as little more than giving the closure programme a thin veneer of legitimacy While POL prepared a decision document that set out its rationale for proceeding with its closure decisions, and made this available online and to key stakeholders after these decisions were announced, it is disappointing that this was not issued as a matter of course to consumers who had formally responded to the consultation, or to those who had organised or attended public meetings. Many consumers were therefore unaware how and consequently whether POL had taken account of the evidence received during the consultation, and how this evidence was used to reach its eventual decision. As one stakeholder told us: it s good practice in consultation work to go back to respondents and explain how their key points have been followed through one way or another. However, we got no detailed feedback at all, and at the very end of the process, when we were consulting on one specific branch, I didn t know they had decided not to close the branch until I read it in the local newspaper. Given that we had put a lot of work into making a submission and so on, that was poor. consumerfocus.org.uk 12 How was it for you?

13 In the event of future closures, POL needs to change this approach. Consumers may still disagree with the decision to close, but are more likely to understand and adjust to those decisions if it is clear that the consultation process to determine this decision was sufficiently robust, and if the rationale by which the decision was reached is explained clearly to them. A comprehensive summary of POL s decisions should made available to consumers in branches, rather than having to access POL s decision document online. At the very least, this would promote confidence in the robustness of POL s consultation process, as well as allowing the 40 per cent of households that do not currently have internet access 4 to access the information. A summary of how POL reached its decision should be made available to every consumer who responds to the consultation; be issued to attendees at public meetings; and also form part of the in-branch communication materials used to communicate the closure. In the event of a future closure programme, the length of consultation should reflect the needs of communities Before the closure programme, our predecessor body Postwatch argued strongly for a twelve week public consultation period. While it agreed to work within, and to do the best it could to promote consumer engagement within the six week period decided by Government, our research confirms that a significant proportion of consumers (48 per cent) felt six weeks was an insufficient period to respond to the consultation as effectively as they would have liked. According to the research, 53 per cent of respondents consider that between 11 and 12 weeks is the optimum period for consumers to be consulted on closure proposals, with 20 per cent favouring a consultation period of between eight and 10 weeks. Only one per cent of respondents favoured consultations lasting only six weeks. The six week period for consultations during the closure programme underlined the importance of POL deploying effective communications materials, to ensure consumers readily understood the closure proposals and could make the most of the six week period to prepare their response. POL s failure to do so therefore exacerbated the problems caused by a limited consultation period. As stakeholder participants told us: it was a challenging timescale, which meant that the consultation was curtailed we have a monthly schedule of meetings and the consultations normally go the full council meeting. If the consultation had come in say the week before, it would have missed our deadline for the agenda going out, and then it would have been the following month 4 House of Commons Business and Enterprise Committee: Post Offices Securing Their Future. June P.4 consumerfocus.org.uk 13 How was it for you?

14 Consumer Focus has two concerns about the length of the consultation period: firstly, that a six-week period risked consumers believing that decisions had been taken in advance, and that the consultation was not being undertaken in good faith. Secondly, six weeks was undoubtedly a challenging timeframe for consumers and stakeholder groups to respond, particularly those who intended to submit the detailed submissions which were more likely to result in changes to POL s proposals. Consumers needs should have primacy in determining the appropriate length of consultation on proposed changes to the post office network. In the event of a future closure programme of such scale and complexity, Consumer Focus therefore strongly believes that a consultation period of longer than six weeks and ideally 12 weeks is necessary for consumers to plan and prepare an effective consultation response. The framework of the programme was sound, but the purpose of and changes achieved during the pre-consultation phase should be communicated more effectively There were several stages to the post office closure programme, with local authorities and our predecessor body having the opportunity to scrutinise POL s proposals and seek changes as part of an eleven-week period prior to public consultation. Over 240 of POL s original proposals were changed during the pre-consultation phase as a direct result, the proposals entering public consultation had consequently already been amended in the consumer interest. For example, many proposals were withdrawn, or POL agreed to undertake capacity or accessibility improvements at other nearby post offices if closure proposals went ahead. The framework of the programme, with the pre-consultation period designed to ensure the optimum plans entered public consultation, arguably led to better decisions being taken, but equally restricted the scope for widespread changes as a result of public consultation. Our research suggests that stakeholders welcomed the introduction of an information gathering stage prior to the public consultations getting underway, but consumers were cynical about whether this meant that POL s decisions had already been taken before public consultation had started. In the event of a future closure programme, and to avoid the concerns expressed by the Public Accounts Committee (2009) that the whole process of consultation will be brought into disrepute if key questions [such as the total number of closures] have already been determined 5, POL could seek to better communicate the purpose of and changes made in the pre-consultation phase at the constituency level, in order to: zincrease understanding of and support for the pre-consultation process zreduce consumers concerns about the value of the consultation process zencourage responses during public consultation to be focused on the specific proposals, rather than on the perceived shortcomings of the programme as a whole POL should have also communicated more effectively the consequences of a closure decision being overturned: that is to say, that it was possible that another post office could be proposed for closure in its place. Many consumers were not immediately clear of this from the outset, and this consequently damaged the perception and standing of the closure programme. 5 House of Commons Public Accounts Committee (2009) Oversight of the Post Office Network Change Programme, p12. Nov Fifty-third report of session consumerfocus.org.uk 14 How was it for you?

15 Outreach consultations must be consistent and detailed In the early stages of the closure programme, POL consulted on the principle of installing outreach post offices, but failed to provide key operational details for example, the opening hours, location, and range of services to be provided. Following the intervention of our predecessor body, and on the basis that it was important consumers fully understood the changes POL proposed to make, POL consulted on specific proposals instead. Our research finds that since POL has moved to consulting on specific proposals, consumer understanding and awareness of outreach services has increased significantly, with 39 per cent of respondents aware of outreach services, compared to only 17 per cent of respondents when Postwatch undertook similar research earlier in the closure programme. In the event that further outreaches are deployed in response to ongoing changes in the network, it is clearly important that POL makes further improvements to its consultation materials, which in turn will allow consumers to engage much more effectively in the development of these services. Consumer Focus therefore calls on POL to assess the effectiveness of the outreach consultation materials as part of its wider examination of the introduction of outreach services. It is encouraging that a number of stakeholders interviewed for the research reported that consultation in respect of outreach proposals proved to be genuinely constructive: I think that [a number of the villages which were proposed to get an outreach service] were to have a twice weekly mobile van, and that is another thing... the Post Office and Postwatch turned up at one village... and they said, oh we will park the van at such and such a place, and local people said you can t park it there, it s a bus stop!. Well. We will park it across the road then... you can t park it there, that s parking for the council houses... There was a certain value in that just for the Post Office turning up and hearing local people say well you can t do that, you can t do that. They listened and I have no complaints about that Wider lessons for consultations on the delivery of essential community services The consumer experience of the post office closure programme represents an important opportunity to identify improvements in the event of future consultations on proposed changes to the post office network. It should also be used in respect of consultations on other proposed changes to the delivery of essential community services. It is seemingly inevitable that severe pressures on the public purse will translate as cuts to public services in the coming years. It is therefore vital that the consumer voice is both present and listened to in any debate over the nature and level of cuts, especially in decisions over how and where changes will be made at the local level. Our findings offer important and timely lessons in this respect, and offer a number of lessons for effective large-scale consumer engagement. consumerfocus.org.uk 15 How was it for you?

16 Consultations on future changes to service delivery should be designed to channel consumer views effectively consumers should have the chance to respond on the issues that matter to them The post office closure programme operated on the basis that the Government had already consulted on proposals that up to 2,500 post offices were to close. As such, the purpose of local consultations was to determine where as opposed to whether closures would take place, and to ensure that POL could implement these changes with consumer detriment being minimised. However, it was clear that many consumers would inevitably respond to closure proposals in their area on the basis of wanting to contest the principle of the decision, rather than the basis of consultation as set out by POL. The effectiveness and consumer experience of consultations would likely be weakened as a result. In the event of a future closure programme, or other proposed changes in service provision, the Government and/or service provider should ensure that the design of local consultations reflects and is fully geared towards the range of consumer responses that are likely to be generated by the consultation taking place. As public consultations during the post office closure programme set out only to capture responses on the impact of discrete proposals, rather than the principle of whether these closures should happen the starting point for many consumers there was always bound to be some disconnect between the design of the consultation and the range of responses this was likely to generate. Indeed, in its report into the handling of the post office closure programme, the Public Accounts Committee (2009) concluded: one of POL s aims in the consultation had been to establish that the facts on which it had based closure proposals were correct [...] If respondents showed that the proposals were based on factually incorrect information, then changes were made to the plans. However, while much of the campaigning had been made about the principle of closing post offices at all, the consultation had been around whether the facts on which individual decisions had been made were correct 6. 6 House of Commons Public Accounts Committee (2009) Oversight of the Post Office Network Change Programme, p12. Nov Fifty-third report of session consumerfocus.org.uk 16 How was it for you?

17 In the event of future closures or changes to service provision, the Government and/or service provider should therefore consider how it could ensure that there are at the very least better linkages between an initial consultation to determine a policy decision, for example the principle and scope of service cuts at UK level, and subsequent consultation at local level to determine how that policy should be implemented. While the Government can legitimately argue that consumers had the opportunity to comment both on the policy decision to proceed with the post office closure programme, through the 12- week national consultation run by the Department for Trade and Industry (DTI), as well as to respond to the proposals to implement service changes at a local level, the fact remains that the final local consultations took place up to 18 months after the original UK-wide policy consultation had finished. It was therefore inevitable that there would be at least a partial disconnect between the basis for local consultation, and the range of consumer responses received during each of these exercises. In the event of future changes in service delivery, the Government and/or service provider will therefore need to determine the optimal means through which consumers can effectively engage with both the decision to proceed, and the local implementation of, service cuts. As a minimum, the Government should look to involve consumers more effectively in the consultation on the principle, as well as local implementation of these changes. The big question for involving consumers in determining the shape of future cuts in the coming years is this: are consumers consulted at national level on the severity, scope and strategic direction of cuts (other than through the ballot box), or only in relation to how Whitehall s decisions are implemented and impact services at the local level? Consultations should be designed to deliver the optimum consumer outcome service providers need to stand ready to engage on this basis The National Consumer Council (2008) rightly noted that by engaging local people, service providers can get buy-in to tough decisions. Effective consultation allows decisions to be taken in a way that: identifies and anticipates strong views, draws on expert insight into the reality of how services are delivered, and provides a new challenge to accepted wisdom on how things are done 7. In the event that future changes to the delivery of essential community services are proposed, the Government and/or service providers should therefore consider whether the design of each consultation maximises the opportunity to influence and optimise the outcome of that exercise for consumers. The design of the consultations during the post office closure programme enabled POL to compile the necessary evidence to determine whether it should proceed with its proposals, but neither the framework for the programme nor the timescales attached to it realistically allowed for the widespread development of more imaginative or alternative solutions to closures. 7 National Consumer Council (2008) The Changing Role of Public Services: Why Should Scrutiny Engage Service Users? Speech by Philip Cullum to the London Scrutiny Network consumerfocus.org.uk 17 How was it for you?

18 As the Public Accounts Committee (2009) rightly notes: in the event of future managed closures, the Government and POL should carry out consultation early enough in the decision making process for the public s view to have a real influence on outcomes, rather than make simply minor adjustments to details of implementation 8. In the event of future consultations, the Government and/or service provider should therefore explore whether a more imaginative basis for consultation could instead be deployed. One option could see the service provider consult with stakeholders on how best it could deliver necessary cost savings, with both stakeholders and consumers involved in the active development of specific proposals from the outset. This is in contrast to the experience of the PO closure programme, in which stakeholders had only a limited opportunity to shape or respond to a specific set of pre-determined proposals, and in which the only options were to support the closure, retention or modification of existing services. If a service provider were to adopt such an imaginative framework, in which it provided the timescales, willingness and scope to develop more creative solutions other than outright closure or retention. This could enable decisions to be taken that enabled the necessary cost savings to be achieved, while at the same time drawing on significant consumer and stakeholder willingness to develop alternative proposals that could better meet the community s needs. The advantages of building a consultation framework which was necessarily rigorous in order to ensure due consistency of approach, and yet also allowed for a more creative, flexible approach to consultation seem clear: zdecisions on local service provision could be reached taking account of the available funding and consumer needs, but also the willingness and local demand to support more innovative forms of service provision eg co-location of services and/or local authority backing for financial assistance schemes zconsumers would be more likely to engage with and accept the funding realties that may necessitate change: this would promote better understanding of the issues and a more pragmatic consumer and stakeholder response. As the NCC noted (2008): consumers are remarkably good at taking tough decisions if [engagement exercises] tee up issues in the right way. This in turn can change perceptions about service provision and the people delivering them 9 It therefore seems likely that a higher standard of engagement, and potentially a better set of end outcomes, could result. 8 House of Commons Public Accounts Committee (2009) Oversight of the Post Office Network Change Programme, p5. Nov Fifty-third report of session National Consumer Council (2008) The Changing Role of Public Services: Why Should Scrutiny Engage Service Users? Speech by Philip Cullum to the London Scrutiny Network consumerfocus.org.uk 18 How was it for you?

19 Case study: Devon County Council The example of Devon County Council highlights precisely the type of engagement which can deliver better outcomes for consumers than would otherwise have been achieved. The Council was able to secure significant change to the outreach proposals in its area: it did this through developing practical strategies to support its economic and strategic objectives for rural areas, and furthering these through enacting an effective dialogue with POL which was sensitive to the funding and pragmatic realities of the Government framework for the Post Office closure programme. Devon County Council successfully managed to seek a delay to POL s decisions on outreach proposals in its area while it discussed with POL whether alternative forms of outreach provision based out of retail premises, which it felt would better meet the needs of its rural communities, could be implemented alongside its own associated funding and diversification packages for these premises. In the event of future changes to service provision more widely, service providers should look to learn lessons from the Devon example: in particular, they should consider how they can more effectively engage with local stakeholders, including councils, to develop more creative solutions other than consulting on simply whether to proceed with a closure proposal or not. Both POL and Devon County Council should be commended for their cooperation in seeking the optimum solution for consumers in the county. However, POL should have proactively facilitated and identified opportunities for more creative engagement not just in Devon, but across the UK. consumerfocus.org.uk 19 How was it for you?

20 How was it for you? Consumer engagement in the post office closure programme Andy Burrows and Colin Griffiths Copyright: Consumer Focus Published: February 2010 If you require this publication in Braille, large print or on audio CD please contact us. Deaf, hard of hearing or speech impaired consumers can contact Consumer Focus via Text Relay: From a textphone, call From a telephone, call Consumer Focus 4th Floor Artillery House Artillery Row London SW1P 1RT Tel: Fax: Media Team: / 8005 / 8006 ISBN:

Northern Ireland Assembly Rating Policy Division Consultation for a Small Business Rate Relief Scheme

Northern Ireland Assembly Rating Policy Division Consultation for a Small Business Rate Relief Scheme Northern Ireland Assembly Rating Policy Division Consultation for a Small Business Rate Relief Scheme Written Response from the National Federation of SubPostmasters 1 The National Federation of SubPostmasters

More information

Middlesbrough Manager Competency Framework. Behaviours Business Skills Middlesbrough Manager

Middlesbrough Manager Competency Framework. Behaviours Business Skills Middlesbrough Manager Middlesbrough Manager Competency Framework + = Behaviours Business Skills Middlesbrough Manager Middlesbrough Manager Competency Framework Background Middlesbrough Council is going through significant

More information

Performance Detailed Report. May 2008. Review of Performance Management. Norwich City Council. Audit 2007/08

Performance Detailed Report. May 2008. Review of Performance Management. Norwich City Council. Audit 2007/08 Performance Detailed Report May 2008 Review of Performance Management Audit 2007/08 External audit is an essential element in the process of accountability for public money and makes an important contribution

More information

The Scottish referendum. Response to consultations

The Scottish referendum. Response to consultations The Scottish referendum Response to consultations March 2012 1 Translations and other formats For information on obtaining this publication in another language or in a largeprint or Braille version please

More information

GETTING IT RIGHT FOR CONSUMERS

GETTING IT RIGHT FOR CONSUMERS GETTING IT RIGHT FOR CONSUMERS SECTION 1: OPENING Getting it right for consumers is something we all probably subscribe to but what does it mean for a Central Bank, particularly one with a statutory responsibility

More information

Improving information to support decision making: standards for better quality data

Improving information to support decision making: standards for better quality data Public sector November 2007 Improving information to support decision making: standards for better quality data A framework to support improvement in data quality in the public sector Improving information

More information

Appendix 1: Performance Management Guidance

Appendix 1: Performance Management Guidance Appendix 1: Performance Management Guidance The approach to Performance Management as outlined in the Strategy is to be rolled out principally by Heads of Service as part of mainstream service management.

More information

Strategic plan. Outline

Strategic plan. Outline Strategic plan Outline 1 Introduction Our vision Our role Our mandate 2 About us Our governance Our structure 3 Context Our development Camden 4 Resources Funding Partners 5 Operating model How we will

More information

Oversight and confidence strategy 2014/15 2016/17 and 2014/15 action plan

Oversight and confidence strategy 2014/15 2016/17 and 2014/15 action plan Oversight and confidence strategy 2014/15 2016/17 and 2014/15 action plan OFFICIAL Foreword In 2014/15, the IPCC will begin to take on more independent investigations into serious and sensitive allegations

More information

Research Report. Customer Perceptions Survey 2015 Fire and Rescue Authorities and Services

Research Report. Customer Perceptions Survey 2015 Fire and Rescue Authorities and Services Research Report Customer Perceptions Survey 2015 Fire and Rescue Authorities and Services Prepared for: Local Government Association (LGA) Prepared by: BMG Research Customer Perceptions Survey 2015 Fire

More information

Local and Community Development Programme

Local and Community Development Programme UPDATED TO REFLECT NEW FRAMEWORK MAY2011 Local and Community Development Programme A step by step guide to Strategic Planning for LCDP Step One - Reflection on the principles of the programme and the horizontal

More information

Welsh Government. Practice Guide. Realising the potential of pre-application discussions

Welsh Government. Practice Guide. Realising the potential of pre-application discussions Welsh Government Practice Guide Realising the potential of pre-application discussions May 2012 Digital ISBN 978 0 7504 7623 2 Crown Copyright 2012 WG 15424 (2) Table of contents 1 Introduction...3 Background...3

More information

Internal Mediation Services. Surrey County Council in partnership with South East Employers

Internal Mediation Services. Surrey County Council in partnership with South East Employers Internal Mediation Services Surrey County Council in partnership with South East Employers Introduction and Summary Surrey County Council s cultural strategy is clear it wants to create a coaching culture

More information

Sustaining sports development: A new phase

Sustaining sports development: A new phase 216 Greener by degrees: B7. Sustaining sports development: A new phase Andy Pitchford and Joby Hobbs Sports Development as a field of study is the outcome of the diversification of UK physical education

More information

Right to challenge parking policies

Right to challenge parking policies Right to challenge parking policies Traffic Management Act 2004: Network Management Duty Guidance March 2015 Department for Communities and Local Government Crown copyright, 2015 Copyright in the typographical

More information

Statement of Community Involvement (SCI) March 2016

Statement of Community Involvement (SCI) March 2016 Statement of Community Involvement (SCI) Contents Section Page No. 1.0 What is a Statement of Community Involvement?... 1 2.0 Who can get involved in the planning process?... 3 3.0 Empowering disadvantaged

More information

What is world class commissioning?

What is world class commissioning? ...? series New title The NHS and HTA Supported by sanofi-aventis What is world class commissioning? Michael Sobanja Dip HSM Dip IoD Cert HE FRSM Chief Executive, NHS Alliance For further titles in the

More information

The Value of Consulting

The Value of Consulting The Value of Consulting An analysis of the tangible benefits of using management consultancy Management Consultancies Association 2010 March 2010 2 The Value of Consulting CONTENTS Foreword 3 Executive

More information

Evaluation of the Special Educational Needs and Disability Pathfinder Programme

Evaluation of the Special Educational Needs and Disability Pathfinder Programme Evaluation of the Special Educational Needs and Disability Pathfinder Programme Thematic Report: Transition and the engagement of post-16 providers Research report August 2014 Graham Thom, Maya Agur &

More information

Do not remove this if sending to Page Title. Transparency for Roads: creating the watchdog and monitor

Do not remove this if sending to Page Title. Transparency for Roads: creating the watchdog and monitor Do not remove this if sending to Page Title Transparency for Roads: creating the watchdog and monitor October 2014 The Department for Transport has actively considered the needs of blind and partially

More information

Producing e-learning modules for high-need groups for use in a community setting - What we learnt

Producing e-learning modules for high-need groups for use in a community setting - What we learnt Producing e-learning modules for high-need groups for use in a community setting - What we learnt This post draws together the lessons we have learned from producing e-learning modules for high-need disadvantaged

More information

Breaking out: public audit s new role in a post-crash world AN ENGLISH PERSPECTIVE

Breaking out: public audit s new role in a post-crash world AN ENGLISH PERSPECTIVE Breaking out: public audit s new role in a post-crash world AN ENGLISH PERSPECTIVE About ACCA ACCA (the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants) is the global body for professional accountants.

More information

In good health. Public health teams in local authorities Year 2. February 2015

In good health. Public health teams in local authorities Year 2. February 2015 In good health Public health teams in local authorities Year 2 February 2015 Foreword The public health workforce is at the heart of both improving and protecting the public s health and as such the views

More information

upport uy in ccountable ndependent epresentative impact ower and influence Measuring the impact and success of your youth voice vehicle

upport uy in ccountable ndependent epresentative impact ower and influence Measuring the impact and success of your youth voice vehicle Measuring the impact and success of your youth voice vehicle epresentative ccountable ndependent upport uy in impact ower and influence A guide for staff, councillors and young people involved in youth

More information

Request for feedback on the revised Code of Governance for NHS Foundation Trusts

Request for feedback on the revised Code of Governance for NHS Foundation Trusts Request for feedback on the revised Code of Governance for NHS Foundation Trusts Introduction 8 November 2013 One of Monitor s key objectives is to make sure that public providers are well led. To this

More information

Annual Report. www.consumercodeforhomebuilders.com

Annual Report. www.consumercodeforhomebuilders.com 2014 Annual Report www.consumercodeforhomebuilders.com CONTENTS Foreword 1 Introduction from Chairman of the Management Board 1 Who we are and what we do 3 Market Research 5 Independent Dispute Resolution

More information

When do NHS Bodies have a legal duty of consultation?

When do NHS Bodies have a legal duty of consultation? When do NHS Bodies have a legal duty of consultation? Introduction... 2 What are the core statutory duties?... 2 A duty to consult the public... 2 New reporting duty... 3 Guidance on the section 242 consultation

More information

Water today, water tomorrow Involving customers in price setting Ofwat s customer engagement policy statement

Water today, water tomorrow Involving customers in price setting Ofwat s customer engagement policy statement Water today, water tomorrow Involving customers in price setting Ofwat s customer engagement policy statement About this document This document sets out our approach to customer engagement during the price-setting

More information

Scotland s public sector workforce. Good practice guide

Scotland s public sector workforce. Good practice guide Scotland s public sector workforce Good practice guide Prepared by Audit Scotland March 2014 Contents Introduction... 4 Purpose of the guide... 4 What s in the guide?... 4 Part 1. Good practice in workforce

More information

UK Youth Parliament Procedures Book 2013-14. Version 11

UK Youth Parliament Procedures Book 2013-14. Version 11 UK Youth Parliament Procedures Book 2013-14 Version 11 1 Contents 1. Name, status, aims and objectives... 4 2. Members of the Youth Parliament (MYPs)... 4 2.1. Membership... 4 2.2. Allocations... 4 2.3.

More information

Performance Evaluation Report 2013 14. The City of Cardiff Council Social Services

Performance Evaluation Report 2013 14. The City of Cardiff Council Social Services Performance Evaluation Report 2013 14 The City of Cardiff Council Social Services October 2014 This report sets out the key areas of progress and areas for improvement in The City of Cardiff Council Social

More information

STATES OF JERSEY REVIEW OF THE DRAFT CHARITIES (JERSEY) LAW (S.R.7/2014): RESPONSE OF THE CHIEF MINISTER STATES GREFFE

STATES OF JERSEY REVIEW OF THE DRAFT CHARITIES (JERSEY) LAW (S.R.7/2014): RESPONSE OF THE CHIEF MINISTER STATES GREFFE STATES OF JERSEY r REVIEW OF THE DRAFT CHARITIES (JERSEY) LAW (S.R.7/2014): RESPONSE OF THE CHIEF MINISTER Presented to the States on 5th August 2014 by the Chief Minister STATES GREFFE 2014 Price code:

More information

Statistics on Housing Benefit Recoveries and Fraud, and the Abstract of Statistics on Benefits (produced by the Department for Work and Pensions)

Statistics on Housing Benefit Recoveries and Fraud, and the Abstract of Statistics on Benefits (produced by the Department for Work and Pensions) Assessment of compliance with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics Statistics on Housing Benefit Recoveries and Fraud, and the Abstract of Statistics on Benefits (produced by the Department for

More information

Planning and delivering service changes for patients

Planning and delivering service changes for patients Planning and delivering service changes for patients 1 NHS England INFORMATION READER BOX Directorate Medical Operations Patients and Information Nursing Policy Commissioning Development Finance Human

More information

school resource CREATE DEBATE THE

school resource CREATE DEBATE THE school resource CREATE THE DEBATE welcome The Create the Debate pack has been produced by Parliament s Education Service with help from the UK Youth Parliament and BBC Three s Free Speech. This easy-to-use,

More information

Post Office Numbers BRIEFING PAPER. By Chris Watson. Number CBP02585, 9 October 2015

Post Office Numbers BRIEFING PAPER. By Chris Watson. Number CBP02585, 9 October 2015 BRIEFING PAPER Number CBP02585, 9 October 2015 Post Office Numbers By Chris Watson Inside: 1. Overall network size 2. Post Office by type and region 3. Discontinuity in post office network statistics in

More information

Joint or Separate Representation of borrowers and lenders?

Joint or Separate Representation of borrowers and lenders? Joint or Separate Representation of borrowers and lenders? Submission by the Council of Mortgage Lenders to the Law Society of Northern Ireland consultation Introduction 1. The Council of Mortgage Lenders

More information

An introduction to the NHS England National Patient Safety Alerting System January 2014

An introduction to the NHS England National Patient Safety Alerting System January 2014 An introduction to the NHS England National Patient Safety Alerting System January 2014 1 NHS England INFORMATION READER BOX Directorate Medical Operations Patients and Information Nursing Policy Commissioning

More information

The future of civil society support in London

The future of civil society support in London Srabani Sen OBE & Associates The future of civil society support in London Summary Project Plan Section Page 1 Introduction 1 2 Context 1 3 The opportunity 2 4 Objectives 3 5 Outline methodology and timetable

More information

This paper describes the context for these changes, the issues and risks considered and the rationale for the decisions made.

This paper describes the context for these changes, the issues and risks considered and the rationale for the decisions made. Agenda item: 6 Report title: Report by: Considered by: Action: GMC Change Programme Susan Goldsmith, Chief Operating Officer sgoldsmith@gmc-uk.org, 020 7189 5124 Council/Performance and Resources Board

More information

Guidance on political campaigning

Guidance on political campaigning I ICO guidance Guidance on political campaigning 3 Guidance on political campaigning Data Protection Act Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations Contents Introduction... 3 A. Why comply?... 5

More information

Consultation and Engagement Strategy

Consultation and Engagement Strategy Consultation and Engagement Strategy Contents: 1. Introduction 2 2. Purpose 3 3. Aims and Objectives 4 4. Key principles 5 5. Delivery of the Strategy 6 6. Action Plan 2011-12 7 Appendix 1 Understanding

More information

Report to Cabinet 28 January 2013 Item No 16 Strong and Well: Strengthening Support for Older People in Norfolk

Report to Cabinet 28 January 2013 Item No 16 Strong and Well: Strengthening Support for Older People in Norfolk Report to Cabinet 28 January 2013 Item No 16 Strong and Well: Strengthening Support for Older People in Norfolk Report by the Director of Community Services Summary The 2011 census outlines that over 20%

More information

Communications Consumer Panel and ACOD response to Ofcom s call for inputs on consumer switching

Communications Consumer Panel and ACOD response to Ofcom s call for inputs on consumer switching Communications Consumer Panel and ACOD response to Ofcom s call for inputs on consumer switching Introduction The Communications Consumer Panel and ACOD welcomes Ofcom s call for inputs on consumer switching

More information

A view that is vital to delivering better outcomes for consumers.

A view that is vital to delivering better outcomes for consumers. The Way Ahead for Conduct Regulation: A positive partnership to deliver for consumers Tuesday 18 th September Speech by ABI Director General, Otto Thoresen Check against delivery Good morning and welcome

More information

Report of the Head of Safety Emergency & Risk Management

Report of the Head of Safety Emergency & Risk Management HERTFORDSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL COMMUNITY INFORMATION AND PROTECTION SCRUTINY COMMITTEE Agenda Item No. 5 TUESDAY 11 MARCH 2003 AT 10.30 A.M. REPORT OF THE RESPONDING TO EMERGENCIES TOPIC GROUP Report of

More information

Get in on the Act. The Care Act 2014. Corporate

Get in on the Act. The Care Act 2014. Corporate Get in on the Act The Care Act 2014 Corporate Get in on the Act The Care Act 2014 Background The Care Act was first published as a Bill in the House of Lords on 9 May 2013, following prelegislative scrutiny.

More information

HARLOW COUNCIL PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK

HARLOW COUNCIL PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK HARLOW COUNCIL PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK July 2013 1 P age Contents Page 1.0 Definition 3 2.0 Context 3 3.0 Purpose and aim of the policy 4 4.0 Policy Statement 4 5.0 Framework for Performance Management

More information

Recorded Crime in Scotland. Scottish Government

Recorded Crime in Scotland. Scottish Government Recorded Crime in Scotland Scottish Government Assessment Report 2 June 2009 Recorded Crime in Scotland June 2009 Crown Copyright 2009 The text in this document may be reproduced free of charge in any

More information

1 PURPOSE AND SUMMARY 1.1 This report seeks approval to consult on the draft 2015/16 2019/20 Revenue Financial Plan.

1 PURPOSE AND SUMMARY 1.1 This report seeks approval to consult on the draft 2015/16 2019/20 Revenue Financial Plan. ITEM NO. 11(a) 2015/1 201/20 REVENUE FINANCIAL PLAN Report by the Chief Financial Officer SCOTTISH BORDERS COUNCIL 18 December 2014 1 PURPOSE AND SUMMARY 1.1 This report seeks approval to consult on the

More information

Council Tax and Housing Benefit Overpayments Vale of Glamorgan Council

Council Tax and Housing Benefit Overpayments Vale of Glamorgan Council September 2010 Authors: Margaret Griffiths and Jayne Power Ref: 426A2010 Council Tax and Housing Benefit Overpayments Vale of Glamorgan Council Good arrangements helped the Vale of Glamorgan Council overpay

More information

England. Your project and its outcomes. Acknowledgements This booklet has been prepared for the Big Lottery Fund by Charities Evaluation Services.

England. Your project and its outcomes. Acknowledgements This booklet has been prepared for the Big Lottery Fund by Charities Evaluation Services. England Your project and its outcomes Sally Cupitt with Jean Ellis Charities Evaluation Services Acknowledgements This booklet has been prepared for the Big Lottery Fund by Charities Evaluation Services.

More information

Council Meeting, 26/27 March 2014

Council Meeting, 26/27 March 2014 Council Meeting, 26/27 March 2014 HCPC response to the Final Report of A Review of the NHS Hospitals Complaint System Putting Patients Back in the Picture by Right Honourable Ann Clwyd MP and Professor

More information

Review of Financial Planning and Monitoring. City of York Council Audit 2008/09 Date

Review of Financial Planning and Monitoring. City of York Council Audit 2008/09 Date Review of Financial Planning and Monitoring City of York Council Audit 2008/09 Date Contents Introduction and Background 3 Audit approach 4 Main conclusions 5 Financial Planning Findings 6 Financial Monitoring

More information

Developing The College of Social Work

Developing The College of Social Work Research, Policy and Planning (2010) 28(2), 129-137 Developing The College of Social Work Dorit Braun 1 and Bridget Robb 2 1 Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) 2 British Association of Social

More information

FSB Wales response to Welsh Government. Business Rate Relief for Charities, Social Enterprises and Credit Unions

FSB Wales response to Welsh Government. Business Rate Relief for Charities, Social Enterprises and Credit Unions FSB Wales response to Welsh Government Business Rate Relief for Charities, Social Enterprises and Credit Unions 28 th June 2013 Business Rate Relief for Charities, Social Enterprises and Credit Unions

More information

The Code of Good Impact Practice. June 2013

The Code of Good Impact Practice. June 2013 The Code of Good Impact Practice June 2013 Inspiring Impact The Code of Good Impact Practice has been developed through a sector-wide public consultation and the input of a working group of 17 organisations

More information

Information for registrants. Continuing professional development and your registration

Information for registrants. Continuing professional development and your registration Information for registrants Continuing professional development and your registration Contents Introduction 2 About this document 2 CPD and HCPC registration: A summary of CPD and the audit process 2 CPD

More information

Information for registrants. Continuing professional development and your registration

Information for registrants. Continuing professional development and your registration Information for registrants Continuing professional development and your registration Contents Introduction 2 About this document 2 CPD and HCPC registration: A summary of CPD and the audit process 2 CPD

More information

SUBMISSION BY COMMUNITY LEARNING SCOTLAND (CLS) Summary

SUBMISSION BY COMMUNITY LEARNING SCOTLAND (CLS) Summary SUBMISSION BY COMMUNITY LEARNING SCOTLAND (CLS) Summary Lifelong learning needs to support a social justice agenda by promoting access by the most marginalised groups in society, through appropriate support

More information

Telemarketing- Customer Satisfaction Campaigns

Telemarketing- Customer Satisfaction Campaigns Telemarketing- Customer Satisfaction Campaigns Why undertake them? An overview Insight into Customer Satisfaction Surveys Customer Satisfaction surveys are often overlooked as a core marketing activity,

More information

REFLECTING ON EXPERIENCES OF THE TEACHER INDUCTION SCHEME

REFLECTING ON EXPERIENCES OF THE TEACHER INDUCTION SCHEME REFLECTING ON EXPERIENCES OF THE TEACHER INDUCTION SCHEME September 2005 Myra A Pearson, Depute Registrar (Education) Dr Dean Robson, Professional Officer First Published 2005 The General Teaching Council

More information

A summary of the responses gathered to date is included in the report.

A summary of the responses gathered to date is included in the report. Example of report to be discussed under item 9. Report Cabinet Part 1 Date: June 2015 Item No: Subject Library Transformation Project Purpose Author Ward Summary The purpose of this report is to gain final

More information

Approaches to Consultation and Engagement by Welsh Local Authorities during the Budget-Setting Process. Good Practice Examples 2014-15

Approaches to Consultation and Engagement by Welsh Local Authorities during the Budget-Setting Process. Good Practice Examples 2014-15 Approaches to Consultation and Engagement by Welsh Local Authorities during the Budget-Setting Process Good Practice Examples 2014-15 Table of Contents Introduction... 3 Engagement... 4 Case Study 1: Carmarthenshire

More information

Policy Advisory Groups - Information for Applicants

Policy Advisory Groups - Information for Applicants Background Policy Advisory Groups - Information for Applicants National Seniors Australia provides a representative and well-informed voice on issues of concern to people aged 50 and older. The Public

More information

When children and young people want to complain about school

When children and young people want to complain about school When children and young people want to complain about school 1 Introduction The statutory remit of the Children s Commissioner includes a specific duty to investigate the availability and effectiveness

More information

Derbyshire County Council Performance and Improvement Framework. January 2012

Derbyshire County Council Performance and Improvement Framework. January 2012 Derbyshire County Council Performance and Improvement Framework January 2012 Contents 1. Introduction 3 2. About the framework 4 3. Planning 7 5. Monitoring Performance 8 6. Challenge and Review 11 7.

More information

This document gives a good practice guide for hustings events and explains the basic rules you may need to follow.

This document gives a good practice guide for hustings events and explains the basic rules you may need to follow. Situations and procedures Hustings events This document gives a good practice guide for hustings events and explains the basic rules you may need to follow. Terms and expressions we use We use must when

More information

Barking and Dagenham Partnership s response to MOPAC s consultation on a Police and Crime Plan for London 2013-2017.

Barking and Dagenham Partnership s response to MOPAC s consultation on a Police and Crime Plan for London 2013-2017. Stephen Greenhalgh Deputy Mayor for Policing and Crime City Hall The Queen s Walk London SE1 2AA Anne Bristow Corporate Director Adult and Community Services Town Hall 1 Town Hall Square Barking IG11 7LU

More information

Written Evidence for the Commission on Public Service Governance and Delivery Service Provider Consultation

Written Evidence for the Commission on Public Service Governance and Delivery Service Provider Consultation Written Evidence for the Commission on Public Service Governance and Delivery Service Provider Consultation Background The principal aim of the Welsh Language Commissioner, an independent body established

More information

Big Lottery Fund Research. Issue 72. Growing the social investment market: Investment Readiness in the UK

Big Lottery Fund Research. Issue 72. Growing the social investment market: Investment Readiness in the UK Big Lottery Fund Research Issue 72 Growing the social investment market: Investment Readiness in the UK Growing the social investment marketplace: Investment Readiness in the UK research summary Stock

More information

Symposium report. The recruitment and retention of nurses in adult social care

Symposium report. The recruitment and retention of nurses in adult social care Symposium report The recruitment and retention of nurses in adult social care Overview 1. Social care employers providing nursing care services have been raising concerns about nursing recruitment and

More information

Shropshire Highways Draft Asset Management and Communications Strategy and Implications of Department for Transport Incentivised funding

Shropshire Highways Draft Asset Management and Communications Strategy and Implications of Department for Transport Incentivised funding Committee and Date Cabinet 14 th October 2015 Shropshire Highways Draft Asset Management and Communications Strategy and Implications of Department for Transport Incentivised funding Responsible Officer

More information

The City of Edinburgh Council Business plan 2015 18. A thriving, sustainable capital city

The City of Edinburgh Council Business plan 2015 18. A thriving, sustainable capital city The City of Edinburgh Council Business plan 2015 18 A thriving, sustainable capital city Introduction This business plan sets out the strategic direction and priorities for the City of Edinburgh Council

More information

Personal current accounts in the UK

Personal current accounts in the UK Personal current accounts in the UK An OFT market study Executive summary July 2008 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Background The personal current account (PCA) is a cornerstone of Britain s retail financial system.

More information

Appendix 10: Improving the customer experience

Appendix 10: Improving the customer experience Appendix 10: Improving the customer experience Scottish Water is committed to delivering leading customer service to all of our customers. This means we deliver the following activities: We will ensure

More information

Research report. Understanding small businesses experience of the tax system

Research report. Understanding small businesses experience of the tax system Research report Understanding small businesses experience of the tax system February 2012 This research was commissioned by the HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) Behavioural Evidence and Insight Team and Business

More information

Appendix 1 sets out three scenario s of complaints handling illustrating good and poor practice.

Appendix 1 sets out three scenario s of complaints handling illustrating good and poor practice. Review of the NHS Complaints System SEAP s Submission 17 th June, 2013 Introduction Our position as the sole provider of NHS Complaints Advocacy across the South of England since 2006 has provided us with

More information

A review of service reform in Scottish fire and rescue authorities

A review of service reform in Scottish fire and rescue authorities A review of service reform in Scottish fire and rescue authorities Key messages/prepared for the Accounts Commission March 2007 1 Key messages Introduction 1. A National Joint Council (NJC) agreement in

More information

The NHS Knowledge and Skills Framework (NHS KSF) and the Development Review Process

The NHS Knowledge and Skills Framework (NHS KSF) and the Development Review Process The NHS Knowledge and Skills Framework (NHS KSF) and the Development Review Process [This is the final draft of the NHS KSF Handbook that will be used for national roll-out if implementation of Agenda

More information

Academic perspectives on the outcomes of outward student mobility Executive summary

Academic perspectives on the outcomes of outward student mobility Executive summary Academic perspectives on the outcomes of outward student mobility Executive summary Kath Bridger BSV Associates Ltd February 2015 Introduction There has been a steady rise in the number of UK domiciled

More information

Getting funding and planning successful projects. Big Lottery Fund guide to outcomes

Getting funding and planning successful projects. Big Lottery Fund guide to outcomes Getting funding and planning successful projects Big Lottery Fund guide to outcomes Getting funding and planning successful projects: Big Lottery Fund s guide to outcomes Further copies available from:

More information

Housing Association Regulatory Assessment

Housing Association Regulatory Assessment Welsh Government Housing Directorate - Regulation Housing Association Regulatory Assessment Melin Homes Limited Registration number: L110 Date of publication: 20 December 2013 Welsh Government Housing

More information

People Strategy 2013/17

People Strategy 2013/17 D a t a L a b e l : P U B L I C West Lothian Council People Strategy 2013/17 Contents 1 Overview 2 2 Council Priorities 8 3 Strategy Outcomes 10 1 Engaging and motivating our employees 13 2 Recognised

More information

Understanding PAYE Delivery Partners

Understanding PAYE Delivery Partners Research report Understanding PAYE Delivery Partners September 2014 Contents Research requirement (background to the project) 3 When the research took place 4 Who did the work (research agency) 4 Methodology:

More information

City and County of Swansea. Human Resources & Workforce Strategy 2013-2017. Ambition is Critical 1

City and County of Swansea. Human Resources & Workforce Strategy 2013-2017. Ambition is Critical 1 City and County of Swansea Human Resources & Workforce Strategy 2013-2017 Ambition is Critical 1 Delivering quality services for a safer, greener, smarter, fairer, healthier, richer Swansea Executive Summary

More information

Community engagement: Developing a strategy

Community engagement: Developing a strategy Community engagement: Developing a strategy Some questions to help with planning... This guidance outlines some important things to consider when planning a community engagement strategy for your project

More information

How are companies currently changing their facilities management delivery model...?

How are companies currently changing their facilities management delivery model...? Interserve and Sheffield Hallam University market research 2012 Page 2 www.commercial.interserve.com How are companies currently changing their facilities management delivery model...? we have a strategy

More information

European Union Referendum Bill 2015 House of Commons Second Reading briefing

European Union Referendum Bill 2015 House of Commons Second Reading briefing European Union Referendum Bill 2015 House of Commons Second Reading briefing 9 June 2015 Introduction This briefing sets out the Electoral Commission s view on key issues arising from the European Union

More information

Chartered Engineer. Go back to www.iop.org to choose an alternative status. Write your professional review report

Chartered Engineer. Go back to www.iop.org to choose an alternative status. Write your professional review report Chartered Engineer Start your journey Chartered Engineers are characterised by their ability to develop appropriate solutions to engineering problems, using new or existing technologies, through innovation,

More information

Managing staff through change

Managing staff through change Managing staff through change Introduction Change has become a fact of working life. NHS organisations, in particular, have been undergoing rapid change with the introduction of patient choice, the transition

More information

Customer Service. 1 Good Practice Guide

Customer Service. 1 Good Practice Guide Customer Service 1 Good Practice Guide Contents Photography by OzShots Foreword 3 The application of this guide to employees in the public service 4 Core principles of customer service 4 Leading and modelling

More information

BEST PRACTICE CONSULTATION

BEST PRACTICE CONSULTATION BEST PRACTICE CONSULTATION July 2014 Introduction Of the 10 principles for Australian Government policy makers in the Australian Government Guide to Regulation, two are related to consultation: 5. Policy

More information

Applicant and Opponent Surveys 2007 Summary of Findings

Applicant and Opponent Surveys 2007 Summary of Findings Scottish Legal Aid Board Applicant and Opponent Surveys 2007 Summary of Findings Introduction 1. This paper provides a summary of findings from the 2007 Applicant and Opponent surveys. The overarching

More information

Corporate Plan 2015-19

Corporate Plan 2015-19 Corporate Plan 2015-19 i ii Serving the Australian Parliament The DPS Corporate Plan 2015-2019 This corporate plan lays out the strategic direction for the Department of Parliamentary Services for the

More information

Review of concerns and complaints handling within NHS Wales submission from the General Pharmaceutical Council

Review of concerns and complaints handling within NHS Wales submission from the General Pharmaceutical Council Review of concerns and complaints handling within NHS Wales submission from the General Pharmaceutical Council Executive summary 1. The General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC) is the regulator for pharmacists,

More information

Building Equality, Diversity and Inclusion into the NHS Board Selection Process for Non Executives and Independent Directors March 2012 Edition

Building Equality, Diversity and Inclusion into the NHS Board Selection Process for Non Executives and Independent Directors March 2012 Edition Building Equality, Diversity and Inclusion into the NHS Board Selection Process for Non Executives and Independent Directors March 2012 Edition The NHS Leadership Academy s purpose is to develop outstanding

More information

Behaviourally Based Questions

Behaviourally Based Questions Behaviourally Based Questions Index 1 HOW TO WRITE BEHAVIOURALLY BASED QUESTIONS Page 2 2 SAMPLE BEHAVIOURAL QUESTIONS Page 3 3 SAMPLE BEHAVIOURALLY BASED QUESTIONS FROM RIGHT JOB, RIGHT PERSON! CAPABILITY

More information

Guidance on the template contract for social impact bonds and payment by results

Guidance on the template contract for social impact bonds and payment by results Guidance on the template contract for social impact bonds and payment by results Introduction These guidance notes have been prepared to assist users of the Cabinet Office template contract. The guidance

More information

Assessment of compliance with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics

Assessment of compliance with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics Assessment of compliance with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics Statistics from the National Travel Survey (produced by the Department for Transport) Assessment Report 58 October 2010 Crown

More information