STUDENT AFFAIRS LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA (858)

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "STUDENT AFFAIRS LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA 92093-0015 (858) 534-4370 vcsa@ucsd.edu"

Transcription

1 OFFICE OF THE VICE CHANCELLOR 9500 GILMAN DRIVE STUDENT AFFAIRS LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA (858) To: Chancellor Pradeep Khosla From: Alan Houston, Interim Vice Chancellor Student Affairs Re: Final Report of the Sun God Festival Health and Safety Task Force Date: 31 August 2014 Introduction In fulfillment of our charge, we submit the following final report of the Sun God Festival Health and Safety Task Force. 1 Given the breadth and depth of our activities, we have broken this report into seven sections: I. Background... 1 II. Goals... 2 III. Interventions... 3 IV. Data and Observations... 9 V. Post-Festival Student Survey VI. Budget VII. Recommendations Appendices provide key documents as well as examples of our initiatives and programs. I. Background Sun God Festival (hereafter, Sun God ) is one of UC San Diego s most visible traditions. Occurring each year near the end of spring quarter, it enjoys strong student support. However, health and safety problems associated with Sun God have increased significantly in the last two years, with marked increases in students entering the on-campus detox center and being transported to area hospital emergency departments. Alcohol abuse seems to be either cause or correlate of the overwhelming majority of the health and safety problems associated with Sun God. The Sun God Festival Task Force was convened to review, recommend and implement actions intended to improve student health and safety at Sun God. The full task force held monthly meetings from August 2013 through July Workgroups focusing on specific areas of concern (education; logistics; conduct) met as often as once per week. Task force members include nine students (the Presidents of Associated Studies [AS] and the Graduate Students Association [GSA], representatives of each of the six undergraduate colleges, and the AS Vice President for Concerts and Events) and sixteen faculty and staff with essential experience and content knowledge, including 1 Our charge letter is contained in Appendix A; our preliminary report of 1 November 2013 is presented as Appendix B. Page 1

2 the Resident Deans of The Village and ERC, the Executive Director of Student Health and Wellbeing, a Professor of Emergency Medicine and a captain in the UC San Diego Police Department. An internationally recognized expert on alcohol abuse among college students, Dr. Kim Fromme, Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin, served as the task force consultant (Appendix C). Dr. Fromme spent two full days on campus (September 2013, February 2014), and provided frequent remote consultations to members of the committee. All task force meetings were open to the public, and key documents, including minutes, were posted to a task force web site. 2 II. GOALS 3 Our primary goal was to reduce risky drinking behavior. We hoped to move those who consume dangerous amounts of alcohol toward a less critical level of drinking. If student chose to drink at Sun God, we wanted them to drink safely and in moderation. We considered setting the goal of reducing the number of students sent to detox. But as noted in our preliminary report of 1 November 2013, this might unintentionally increase risks to our students. While we prefer students not consume alcohol to the point of needing detox, it is important to present detox as a safe place to be until the student is sober again. Instead, our interventions were intended to reduce the number of students sent to hospital emergency departments for medical care secondary to alcohol use. We also sought to reduce physical altercations, sexual assaults, vandalism, and other behaviors associated with alcohol use and abuse. Our focal point was Sun God. But high-risk drug and alcohol use is not unique to the festival. An important point of reference for the task force was the similarity of UC San Diego student drug and alcohol use with national norms: Item American College Health Association: National College Health Assessment Data (Spring 2013) [N=123,078] UCSD Student Health and Wellbeing Survey (Spring 2014) 4 [N=967] Used Alcohol in last 30 Days 65% 70% Binge Drinking at least one time in 33% 30% last 2 week 5 Used marijuana in the last 30 days 17% 17% Used Cocaine in last 30 days 1% 1% Used methamphetamine in last 30 days 0.2% 0.3% Used Sedatives in last 30 days 2% 1% Used Hallucinogens in last 30 days 1% 1% Used MDMA (ecstasy) in last 30 days 1.6% 2.8% 2 The official Sun God web site, which includes significant health and safety information, is: https://sungodfestival.ucsd.edu/. 3 Working with Dr. Fromme we developed a more robust set of indicators of success (Appendix D). 4 Random sample of 967 graduate and graduate students conducted by Student Health and Well-being in Spring Binge = 5+ standard drinks in one sitting. Page 2

3 III. Interventions A. Education The education subcommittee was responsible for coordinating a large number of related educational campaigns on campus. There were many entities involved in providing education on this topic. One of our goals was to avoid duplication of messages or efforts; a second was to engage the entire campus. We believed that an integrated approach would be more potent than a series of independent efforts. Coordinating messages helped to reduce one off programs. It recognized people on campus with content expertise to help shape messages and other staff members for getting the messages broadly disseminated. Students, in particular, played a key role honing messages and sharing information with fellow students. This experience provided a good foundation to continue alcohol and drug related education into the fall 2014 quarter and beyond. Messages were delivered by various staff and students and were abundant on campus. Here is a summary of the educational efforts. 6 1) AS campaign to promote understanding of past problems at Sun God and to promote student responsibility. The phrase Our Choices, Our Traditions, Our Sun God Festival served as a mantra for the educational campaign. Several student messages were created in print-based and electronic form [Appendix D]. They discussed data regarding student risk including detox statistics and other safety concerns. They called on current students to take action to keep the tradition of the Sun God Festival safe. 2) Sun God Myths and Outreach a) Social Media. The Health Promotion Department reached out to students with a variety of health messages through social media this year. Social Media platforms included Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr and Instagram. Spring Quarter Messaging was heavily focused on Sun God Health and Safety i) Facebook Facebook Posts People Reached #MythBusterMonday (9 posts, 3 Sun God related) 1,695 #FriskyFriday (10 posts, 2 Sun God related) 20,510 The Perfect Buzz (1 post) 500 #mysungodplan Album (1 post) 64 photos with user generated content 276 Tritons Party Safer: Countdown to Sun God (10 days before, 1 new post every day) 1,313 ii) Tumblr: 128 views iii) Instagram: 52 posts, 464 likes, 12 comments b) Workshops. Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug (ATOD) staff co-presented the Floatie training workshops with SARC staff. Additionally 13 other ATOD outreaches were held just during spring quarter with a total of 537 students attending. These outreaches typically included information on what constitutes a standard drink, how to calculate Blood Alcohol Content (BAC), the time it takes to sober up, protective strategies when drinking, ways to refuse a drink and how to help a friend (recognizing alcohol poisoning). 6 Key educational materials, from the Our Choices, Our Traditions, Our Sun God Festival series of cards and posters to bulletin boards and pamphlets, is presented in Appendix E. Page 3

4 c) Bulletin Boards. A system was created for campus partners to preview and request Sun God Health and Safety bulletin boards. Three boards were available (Don t Miss the Music, Alcohol 101, and S.A.V.E. Sun God) either in hard copy or digitally [Appendix E]. The bulletin board request form was sent to the six colleges, the Campus Community Centers, and key departments; a total of 80 requests were received, many for all 3 of the boards. d) Tabling. ATOD Staff and trained students are a regular presence at most of the big festivals and events on campus (Bear Gardens, Hullabaloo, The Good Life Festival, etc.). Students who participated in alcohol education activities were eligible to receive the popular Sun God Says t-shirt. This year 2,000 Sun God Says t-shirts were given away, with 850 of them during spring quarter tabling events. T-shirt messages included: Sun God Says Do the Ride Thing (promoting AS Safe Rides), and Sun God Says, Size Matters (showing the difference between drink size for hard liquor/beer/wine) [Appendix F]. e) Posters. Five hundred alcohol poisoning posters, showing how to recognize and what to do, were placed on bathroom doors by Housing-Dining-Hospitality the week prior to Sun God. Price Center staff also placed 20 posters in bathrooms during the Wednesday through Saturday of Sun God weekend. f) Individual educational materials. Cards and pamphlets were passed out during outreaches and trainings, and available to RAs/HAs to give their residents, also available in the clinic and various campus community centers and the Zone. Six hundred cards were distributing with content that included Don t Miss the Music (protective strategies, how to be a good friend, and campus resources), Read Before Drinking (professionally developed, from ETR, but personalized with our Campus, resources). Pamphlets emphasized the Tritons Party Safer campaign, and highlighted safe party hosting tips, protective strategies when drinking, recognizing alcohol poisoning, campus resources. g) Videos. AS Concerts and Events produced a series of health and safety videos, which were then posted on the main Sun God web site. Topics ranged from Seeking Help and Driving Responsibly to Bust a RAP, which explained the Responsible Action Protocol. Additionally, students were required to view a health and safety video prior to registering for a wristband. 7 h) Guardian publications. Throughout the year educational advertisements were printed in the Guardian. The week of Sun God an editorial essay by IVCSA Houston, out-going AS President Andy Buselt, and incoming AS President Robby Boparai, was published in the Guardian. 8 3) Floaties (Peer-based bystander intervention training to intervene in alcohol situations) 9 Using the UCSD Bystander Intervention Techniques model as a launching point, the Floaties program trained students in the areas of alcohol education ( perfect buzz, protective strategies, Sun God myths) and bystander intervention techniques specifically for application to the Sun God Festival. Students interested in being a Floatie attended a 90-minute workshop to build BIT skills, learn about high risk drinking (HRD), campus resources (Responsible Action Protocol [RAP], Student Health Services [SHS], Counseling and Psychological Services [CAPS], Sexual Assault and Violence Prevention Resource Center [SARC]), and receive tools to help keep their friends stay safe during Sun God. During the week of Sun God wristband distribution, registered Floaties received a Keeping Friends Afloat kit. The kit included: resource information, key tags, temporary tattoos with emergency phone numbers, tips/reminders, a vendor food coupon, and a variety of other tools. 7 A list of videos, with links, is contained in Appendix F. 8 The editorial is presented as Appendix G. 9 A detailed Floatie program proposal is contained in Appendix H. Page 4

5 From April 10- May 8, 10 trainings of one and a half hours each were conducted. A total of 281 students from all six colleges were trained. Salient characteristics included: 38% were at least 21 years old; 70% lived on campus; 35% had not previously attended Sun God. Trainees cited helping their roommates and friends as the most common reason for wanting to be a Floatie. 4) Parent education B. Logistics Parents received three communications regarding alcohol use and the Sun God Festival. The November 2013 Triton Family Connection newsletter included information about alcohol use and campus resources for students in need. In March 2014, just before Spring Break, the Interim Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs and the President of AS sent a letter to parents informing them about Sun God and providing guidance on how to discuss alcohol issues with their student. Similarly structured conversations between parents and students have been shown to reduce binge drinking among college students. Finally, in the May 2014 Triton Family Connection newsletter parents were reminded of Sun God and encouraged to talk to their student about safety plans for Sun God. 10 The logistics subcommittee was responsible for identifying and implementing changes to Sun God at the venue, across campus and in the community that promised to reduce health and safety risks. Among the most important were: 1) Establishment of a resident-only policy at The Village and Eleanor Roosevelt College. 11 The Council of Resident Deans (CORD) developed a Residential Area Guest Visitation/Responsible Host Policy that was in effect from 8:00 pm on the Thursday prior to the Friday of the Sun God Festival, through 8:00 am on the Saturday following the festival. The policy prohibited residents from hosting non-affiliate guests (e.g. someone not currently registered as a student at UC San Diego) in their residence. The policy also addressed concerns about the high numbers of visitors who have historically gathered at The Village or ERC/I-House during the festival. In response, the policy delineated a residents-only approach in these two neighborhoods. During the time period set forth in the policy, only residents currently assigned to living spaces in The Village and ERC/I-House were allowed in these respective neighborhoods. Additionally, the policy reiterated existing protocols relating to responsible hosting of gatherings. Residents were responsible for ensuring that attendance at a gathering did not exceed two (2) guests per resident of the room/apartment, regardless of whether alcohol was present. Hosting of multiple room gatherings or where people move from one room to another was closely monitored. The day before the festival colored wrist bands were issued to the residents as a convenient form of identification. A combination of fencing, event security staff and police officers were used to enforce the policy. Security cameras were installed on North Campus to monitor activity on walkways and respond to incidents. 2) Discontinue the sale of festival wristbands to non-affiliates. 12 A disproportionate number of health and safety problems occur among non-affiliates. For example, in % of wristband holders were non-affiliates, yet non-affiliates constituted 31% of the people 10 All three messages to parents are contained in Appendix I. 11 The policy, drafted by CORD with assistance of OSC, is presented as Appendix J. 12 Prior to registering students were required to watch a health and safety video (link in Appendix F). Screenshots of the wristband registration site, which included a wealth of health and safety information, is presented in Appendix K. Page 5

6 admitted to detox. Non-affiliates are not subject to the student conduct process, and in comparison to students they do not appear to have either the same stake in the continuation of the festival or the same sense of responsibility to the UCSD community. To address this challenge wristband distribution was limited to current UC San Diego students. To prevent the transfer of student wristbands to non-affiliates, wristband with barcodes were used. A web-based application permitted students to reserve their wristband in advance. This application linked students PID to their wristband barcode, enabling the university to confirm if a holder of the wristband was the person who registered for it. The website contained warnings about the consequences of transferring a wristband. The website worked effectively; in the first hour of activating the site, 5,000 students registered for wristbands. 3) Ensure students living off campus have safe transportation options. Most students who live off-campus are of the legal age to drink alcohol. To ensure students living off campus traveled safely to and from campus, AS Concerts and Events promoted alternatives to driving to campus including UCSD Shuttles, Lyft, Uber and AS Safe Rides. As a safety measure, Community Service Officers were stationed at the shuttle stops where students from off campus disembarked. It was not possible to establish a DUI patrol because of the impact the fires in the county had on law enforcement staffing. The local Alcoholic Beverage Control was notified by the UCSD Police Department of the day of the festival and requested to monitor alcohol sales at local retailers. 4) Schedule start time of the festival to encourage class attendance and discourage drinking during the day. In recent years, the festival began at 3 p.m. (2013) and 2 p.m. (2012). Later start times are meant to minimize disruption of class attendance; earlier start times are thought to decrease pre-event drinking. This year the festival started at 2 p.m. 5) Provide ample water and healthy food inside the venue. AS Concerts and Events (ASCE) made adjustments in response to the heat wave the week of festival. In the past, as a way of reducing paper waste, ASCE did not charge for water to students who brought their own container but did charge for students requiring a container. This year, ASCE waived this practice and provided free water to all students. ASCE distributed over 20,000 cups of water on the festival grounds. Most were refilled more than once. In addition, a student organization collaborated with ASCE to distribute water bottles at shuttle stops where students from off campus arrive. 5) Ensure EMT service providers and UCSD police jointly review established protocols governing transportation of students to hospital for emergency department for monitored medical care. Through conversations with the Special Events Medical Services Manager of Rural/Metro ambulance service, an approach to provide Student Health Services detailed information about medical transports was identified. For the first time, the university will have a demographic profile of students who were transported to the hospital. This information will be helpful in fine tuning educational messages to students in the future and hopefully reducing medical transports. 6) Communicate with apartment managers and alcohol vendors in the vicinity of campus to alert them to Sun God, inform them of our efforts to improve health and safety, and provide contact information for both San Diego Police and campus administrators A copy of the letter sent to apartment managers is presented in Appendix L. Page 6

7 C. Conduct The Conduct and Discipline Subcommittee was charged with reviewing and discussing the applicable policies, protocols, and programs related to student conduct for the campus as a whole and as applied to the Sun God Festival. We were also charged with determining which new and/or amended policies, protocols and programs would be most effective in reducing alcohol abuse among UC San Diego students. 1) Greater consistency in the enforcement and application of policies across the campus. During its initial meetings, the sub-committee perceived inconsistency in how policies are enforced in the residential areas. We received anecdotal information that some residential areas strictly enforce the Housing and Residential Life Policies while others enforce only the most egregious violations. Members of the committee noted that it was common knowledge that on the day of Sun God, the residential areas on the outer rim of campus (e.g. Warren, Revelle, and Sixth) more strictly enforce policy than residential areas closer to the venue (e.g. Roosevelt & The Village. Uneven enforcement was partly a consequence of workload; the number of violations in areas close to the venue was so great that staff and police were only able to respond to the most serious problems. 14 It was also a matter of how policies are interpreted and enforced. To alleviate these concerns, the Office of Student Conduct (OSC) worked with the Council of Resident Deans to ensure that policy violations were handled in a uniform and consistent manner. OSC provided training to resident advisors on how to enter incidents into the Advocate student conduct database and reiterated best practices for documenting incidents. OSC also met with professional staff from the residential areas to ensure common reporting and case processing practices. 2) Increased and more effective communication regarding key policies a) We had a Responsible Action Protocol (RAP) (e.g. medical amnesty policy) as a pilot program beginning with the 2012 Sun God Festival and after approval by Chancellor Khosla in March 2014, it is now a permanent campus policy. We are the only campus in the University of California system or San Diego area with such a policy. Nearly 30 students qualified for RAP in and another 46 students qualified in (including six during Sun God Festival weekend). The policy provides that students receiving medical assistance in an alcohol or controlled substance related emergency and students initiating medical assistance are not sent through the student conduct process. Instead, the students meet with their Dean of Student Affairs to discuss the incident and determine a mutually agreed upon educational program for the student to attend (e.g. CARRS, Pro-SAFE, etc.). Such a policy is considered a best practice and many institutions have adopted similar policies, including the University of Florida, Boston College, Yale University, and Loyola Marymount University. Based on our recommendations, the Associated Students developed a short video, entitled Bust a RAP, to increase awareness about the policy. Alongside students, Muir College Dean of Student Affairs Patty Mahaffey and Director of Student Conduct Ben White appeared in the video to provide information about the policy. b) The AS Office of Student Advocacy and five college judicial boards collaborated on a joint Sun God Know Your Rights campaign to increase awareness about key policies. (One judicial board held its own independent events.) The advocacy office passed out nearly 8000 door hangers apprising students of their rights and responsibilities for the Responsible Action Protocol, the student conduct process and interactions with police. The judicial boards tabled in their college areas to create greater awareness of 14 To address this problem we increased the number of police officers and StaffPro on the day of Sun God. For details, see section V of this report. Page 7

8 applicable policies. We hope these campaigns and events will continue in the future, especially ones involving college judicial boards. c) The Office of Student Conduct focused its Spring Quarter Workshop for Student Conduct Officers and related college/residential life staff on Getting Ready for Sun God. This afforded the opportunity to get key personnel on the same page prior to the event. The workshop, held on May 6, 2014 with about 30 people in attendance, focused on the following topics: Guest and Hosting Policies; Responsible Action Protocol; Floaties program; Sanctioning (festival venue exclusions, sanctions for graduating seniors, offcampus jurisdiction, and detox sanctions) 3) Leverage existing structures more intentionally Rather than significantly changing student conduct procedures or sanctions, our committee recommended leveraging existing structures more intentionally. Specifically, Section XV, Letter D (6) of the UC San Diego Student Conduct Code provides that a possible sanction for violating the Code is an Exclusion from Areas of the Campus or from University-Supported Activities. In the case of the Sun God Festival, a student who is removed from the venue or documented for an egregious Code violation inside the venue could be excluded from the next year s festival. We defined behavior necessitating an exclusion sanction as actions that put oneself, others, or the event itself at risk. Such actions include, but are not limited to, physical assault, threats to others or property, use of controlled substances (e.g. LSD, cocaine, mushrooms) and drug distribution. While an exclusion from the next year s event would not be effective for graduating seniors, we determined that sanctions for graduating seniors committing egregious violations inside the event could include taking away their ability to participate in commencement or suspending them for a quarter (which would effectively delay their degree). The Office of Student Conduct incorporated these sanctions into the non-academic sanctioning baselines to cover situations where egregious behavior, as delineated above, is engaged in inside and adjacent to the event. The student conduct office did not receive any reports where students were removed from the venue for egregious violations and therefore, did not assign these sanctions to any students. IV. Data and Observations 1) Attendance Despite the availability of 3,000 tickets previously sold to non-affiliates, student attendance remained constant: students 16,636 16,317 16,290 non-affiliates n.a. 3,000 3,000 total 16,636 19,317 19,290 2) Student Conduct Violations a) In comparison with 2013, the overall number of student conduct violations during Sun God weekend decreased in absolute numbers, but remained constant when calculated per 1,000 attendees: Page 8

9 Number Per 1, b) Approximately 85% of all Sun God incidents involve alcohol. Almost half (48.6%) involve the student being admitted to our on-campus detox centers. Around 13% of all academic year incidents occur during Sun God weekend. 3) Detox centers 15 a) In previous years the University has administered an ambulatory detox center in RIMAC. Staffed by volunteers from SARC, OSC and the colleges, detox has provided students the opportunity to recover from overdrinking in a safe place. Individuals who were not ambulatory were medically transported to regional hospitals. This year we added a second facility, level 2 detox, which provided medically monitored care for students who were not ambulatory but did not require hospitalization. This new facility was also staffed by volunteers, but included physicians from UC San Diego Health System and members of SHW. The number of individuals per 1,000 attendees in level 1 detox in 2014 was significantly lower than in either 2013 (-35%) or 2012 (-13%). The number of high-risk (non-ambulatory) cases decreased slightly from 2013 (-8%) but was still significantly higher than 2012 (+209%). As a direct consequence of the creation of level 2 detox, the number transported to hospitals and thus the demand on local emergency rooms was significantly lower than in 2013 (-49%); it was, however, slightly higher than in 2012 (+116%). b) Level 1 detox (ambulatory) total per c) Level 2 detox (non-ambulatory, medically monitored) total 21 n.a. n.a. treated on-site 17 transported to hospital 5 per d) Hospital transports total from level 2 detox 5 from other campus locations 16 per Complete detox statistics are presented in Appendix M. Page 9

10 Students seen in level 2 detox in 2014 would have been medically transported in Thus the best direct comparison is between (medical transports + level 2 detox) in 2014 and (medical transports) in The number of students needing medical attention decreased 8% from 2013, but was still double that of total treated in level 2 detox transported to hospital from level 5 2 detox transported to hospital from other 16 campus locations per e) Non-affiliates In years prior to 2014, approximately one-third of individuals admitted to detox were non-affiliates. In % of those admitted to detox were non-affiliates. Detox Level 1 Detox Level 2 Total Students Non-affiliates f) Other changes Consistent with previous years, approximately 57% of those admitted to detox were male. This pattern was reversed for level 2 detox, where over half of all who were admitted were female. In the three years prior to 2014, approximately 33% of students seen in detox lived on campus; in 2014, this figure rose to 58%. Additionally, four-fifths (80%) of all students admitted to level 2 detox were residential, while just under half (49%) admitted to level 1 detox were residential. 4) Drug Arrest and Citation Data a) There were ten drug related arrests and citations: Charge Note (A) HS possess of mushrooms jail HS 13777(A) 2 suspected ecstasy tables pending crime lab test (A) HS under influence of MDMA jail HS (A) single green ecstasy pill pending crime lab test HS (A) 5 hydrocodone pills pending crime lab test HS (A) 7 ecstasy pills pending crime lab test less than 1 ounce marijuana HS (A) 2 orange ecstasy pills pending crime lab test (A) HS possession of 2 MDMA pills jail (A) HS under influence of CNS stimulate, possibly citation cocaine Page 10

11 b) One student died of a drug overdose in the early morning hours after the Sun God Festival ended. According to the Medical Examiner s report, Ricardo Ricky Ambriz died at 2:31 a.m. on Saturday, May 17, The official cause of death was acute 5-APB intoxication; the manner of death was ruled an accident. 16 5) Police and Security a) Increases in police staffing raised the potential of detecting more instances of unlawful behavior than previous years. This was not the case. The number of police contacts at North Campus and RIMAC declined even when factoring differences in attendance between the 2014 and 2013 festivals. Total number of police contacts including drunk detox, drunk jail, alcohol in public, marijuana possession, controlled substance, under 21 possession (excludes medical transports) North North RIMAC RIMAC Campus Campus Per 1, b) The requirements for competent event security staffing exceeded what the security contractor, Staff Pro, could provide. In 2014, 400 event security personnel were on site compared to 280 in Residential Life staff reported instances of event security sleeping on the job or drinking alcohol with students. More of a logistical concern, the grounds of The Village lacked directional signage to the event venue which confused students. 6) Transportation Most students who live off-campus are of the legal age to drink alcohol. In 2013, two-thirds of students admitted to detox lived off campus. In 2014, 41% of students admitted to level one detox lived off campus. To ensure students living off campus traveled safely to and from campus, AS Concerts and Events promoted alternatives to driving to campus including the UCSD Shuttle, AS Safe Rides, Uber and Lyft. When asked in the Sun God Assessment survey how they traveled to and from campus, the respondents indicated they used the following forms of transportation: Form of transportation Percentage of respondents UCSD Shuttle 65% Uber 10% Lyft 6% AS Safe Rides 5% Total 86% 16 Ambriz was well-known and well-liked; the impact of his death on the campus community is described in Appendix N. Page 11

12 7) Event access / non-affiliate policy The use of barcoded wristbands was effective but did not prevent some non-affiliates from attending the festival. Altogether, five of the 74 people admitted to detox were non-affiliates. That is significant reduction from thirty in 2013, but optimally the number should be zero. In addition, two non-affiliates were found intoxicated and taken to jail. As many as 15 people were observed entering Sun God by jumping the fence on the eastern edge of the venue where the food vendors were located. Though some students listed their wristbands for sale on Craigslist and Facebook, anecdotal observations suggests that the total number was significantly less than in recent year. 8) Academic impact Faculty teaching classes on the day of the Sun God Festival have been surveyed by AVC Gary Ratcliff each of the last three years. Two key questions suggest a slight decrease in the adverse impact of Sun God on classroom attendance: a) Compared to the average student attendance in your course, select the response that best reflects attendance on the day of the Sun God Festival : % Much lower than normal % Somewhat lower than normal % Normal % Somewhat higher than normal % Much higher than normal % Don t know b) Please select the response that best reflects attendance to your class on the day of the Sun God Festival compared to previous years : % Improved significantly % Improved % Remain about the same % Worsened % Worsened significantly ) Noise complaints Sun God 2014 occurred at the tail end of a strong Santa Ana weather event. One of the unanticipated outcomes of the dry heat was a dramatic increase in the number of noise complaints, with some coming from as far away as eight miles from the campus. According to the National Weather Service, the weather created the optimum condition for long distance transmission of sound waves. In keeping with past practice, complaints were addressed by reducing the overall volume and by lowering the bass frequencies, which travel furthest, by more than 10 decibels. Unfortunately, this does not appear to have significantly reduced experienced noise levels in affected neighborhoods. 10) Student Disruptions Off Campus Page 12

13 Off-campus parties on the day of Sun God have been a traditional concern. In previous years, neighbor complaints have been filed. This year, the property managers of 24 apartment and condominium complexes near campus were notified about the date of the Sun God Festival and the steps the university had taken to curb binge drinking. A follow-up letter was sent to the property managers after the festival. The letter asked for information about disturbances. None were reported. The UCSD Police Department did not receive any alerts from the San Diego Police Department the day of the festival. V. Post-Festival Student Survey In the weeks after the Sun God Festival we conducted a survey of students who had registered for a wristband. 1) Survey demographics SunGod Survey Sample (N=3951) 17 UCSD Undergraduates 18 (N=23,805) Age mean(sd) (2.1) Not available % >=21 years old 42% Not available Gender (%female) 58.7% 48% College Eleanor Roosevelt 15.9% 16% John Muir 17.3% 17% Revelle 16.9% 16% Sixth 16.5% 16% TMC 15.3% 16% Earl Warren 18.1% 18% Living on Campus 62.1% 45% 2) Some basic findings: a) Almost half (48%) of respondents said that this year s Sun God was better than the previous year. b) The majority of students (83%) felt safe or very safe the day/evening of the Sun God Festival. c) Two-thirds of respondents entered the festival between 4:00 and 6:00 p.m. d) 38% chose not to drink alcohol the day of the festival. The majority of those who consumed alcohol had their first drink during the day: 20% before 11:00 a.m., 32% between 11:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m., and 37% between 2:00 and 5:00 p.m. 17 This sample represents about 20-25% of Sun God attendees. While respondents were evenly distributed between the colleges and other characteristics may be representative of UCSD students, this is not necessarily a representative sample of the entire undergraduate student population. Generally, volunteers who complete surveys with health related items may engage in healthier lifestyle choices. These data should be interpreted with the recognition that they may not be generalizable to the whole undergraduate student body at UCSD. This self-selection bias exists in all self-report health survey data. 18 Information from the UCSD Student Digest, Enrollment and Academic Performance Statistics. Page 13

14 3) Alcohol education and safety campaigns were widely seen by survey respondents: Alcohol poisoning prevention cards or posters (78%) Our choices, our traditions, our Sun God (67%) IDEAS bystander intervention techniques (41%) Info from your College Council/Res Life staff about alcohol safety (67%) Information about how to make a plan for a safe SunGod (65%) Bulletin boards about SAVE Sun God, Don t miss the music, Alcohol 101 (77%) Know your rights (77%) Residential Policies: ERC/I-House, Village and host responsibility for all of campus (55%) Students living on campus were more likely to endorse seeing education efforts in this category (p<.001) Bust a RAP video (70%) Sun God Festival website (93%) Sun God says: e.g. size matters, don t miss the music, tritons party safer etc. (69%) 4) The impact of these messages was smaller. Twenty-three percent of respondents reported that alcohol education and safety campaigns influenced their choices to drink more safely. 5) Students reported using one or more safe drinking practices on the day of the Sun God Festival: Did not drink (33%) Paced my drinks (60%) Made a Floatie plan (13%) Made plans to drink responsibly (65%) Chose to be a responsible bystander (57%) Chose not to use any drugs (80%) Did not engage in drinking games (67%) Decided ahead of time how many drinks I would have (40%) Kept track of how many drinks I had (61%) Made a point of drinking water and staying hydrated (92%) Made a point of eating throughout the day (80%) Made arrangements for a designated driver (37%) Talked to friends about watching out for each other (72%) Made a point to stay with friends (88%) Asked friends to let me know if I had too much to drink (37%) Was a Floatie for my group (8%) 6) Those students who drank reported the following consumption: 14% drank mostly beer 3% drank mostly wine 41% drank mostly liquor 28% drank mostly mixed drinks 7) Students reported having one or more of the following consequences of drinking: Vomit from drinking alcohol (5.6%, n=124) Did something you later regretted (3.7%, n=81)) Ended up in UCSD on-campus detox (0.4%, n=9) Forgot where you were or what you did (5.6%, n=125) Page 14

15 Got a DUI (0.2%, n=4) Got transported to the hospital (0.1%, n=2) Got transported to jail (0.3%, n=7) Someone had sex with me without my consent (0.4, n=8) Had sex with someone without their consent (0.2, n=4) Had unprotected sex (2.1%, n=46) Physically injured yourself (2.4%, n=54) Physically injured another person (0.5, n=10) Seriously considered suicide (0.5%, n=12) Other (2.9%, n=58) VI. Budget 1) Expenditures In previous years Sun God has been funded by AS, using a combination of student fees and revenue from non-affiliate ticket sales. To ensure that the quality of Sun God was not diminished during this transitional year, the IVCSA agreed, on a one-time basis, to both backfill lost revenue from the elimination of nonaffiliate tickets and to underwrite additional security measures in north campus. In addition, the IVCSA sponsored several key educational campaigns. Thus the full cost of Sun God 2014, combining AS and VCSA expenditures, was $869, a) AS Concerts and Events Category Note Cost Artist Artist fees for the sun god stage, dance stage & midway $9, Venue SFO staffing, parking costs, waste management, portable $74, toilets, etc. Production Lights, sound, video, staging, power, equipment rentals, $296, labor, etc. Catering & Artist catering, hospitality, accommodations, etc. $15, accommodations Marketing Webmaster, banners, signage, promotional items, etc. $7, Safety and security Staff pro, rural metro and ucsd pd $181, Box office Marshall field box office infrastructure, equipment & staffing $10, North campus Infrastructure, security & post-event cleaning $2, Administration Student wristbands, credentials, university overhead fee, etc. $23, Personnel Stagehands, stage managers, crew & volunteer food, etc. $34, total $657, b) Office of the Vice Chancellor Student Affairs Category Note Cost Tickets Backfilling lost revenue from elimination of 3,000 non-affiliate $165,000 tickets Fencing and security Infrastructure to enforce no-guest policy 30,000 Page 15

16 Consulting services Dr. Kim Fromme 4,500 Floatie Program Floatie pack supplies, t-shirts 4,650 Educational materials pamphlets, posters, cards, t-shirts, etc. 7,000 Post-event Student Incentives to respond 1,000 Survey total $212,150 2) Staff Time a) Police b) StaffPro c) Colleges d) Detox We received assistance from 15 law enforcement agencies, both regional and mutual aid. Prior to 2014, most police resources were focused in and immediately around the venue, and housing areas were served primarily by Residence Security Officers (RSOs). This year additional staffing permitted two officers per police car, and two officers in each housing area (with six at ERC and eight at The Village) Officers Hours served In 2013 we deployed 280 StaffPro personnel; in 2014 we hired 400 StaffPro, a 43% increase. The primary use of additional StaffPro was enforcing the no-guest policies at ERC and The Village. Student Affairs and Residence Life staff at each college support the Sun God Festival in a variety of ways: Category Note Avg. Time (hrs) Student Conduct cases Process, meetings, follow-up 24 Meetings and staff training Coordinating with Student Conduct; 20 training RAs and interns; etc. Resident education Know Your Rights; student org advising; 24 etc. Presence during Festival in residential community, at festival, and 24 in detox total per college / The Village 92 total for all residence communities 644 Detox is administered by staff volunteers. In the recent past about 27 people were required; this year, because of the creation of level 2 detox, we needed an additional 23 volunteers Level 1 volunteers hours Level 2 Page 16

17 volunteers 23 n.a. n.a. hours 156 n.a. n.a. Total volunteers hours VII. Recommendations Level One We recommend that a new committee be charged to assess its future, as well as to address the broader concern of drug and alcohol use on campus. This year s task force launched many innovations in education, logistics and conduct. The immediate impact of these changes can be seen in the data and observations recorded above. Some areas, such as the number of students seen in detox, showed marked improvement; others, such as the number of student conduct violations, did not. Many effects, such as making a durable change in campus culture concerning drugs and alcohol, will depend on continued educational efforts and may not be visible for some time. This report provides the foundation for a more fine-grained assessment of these issues. Level Two We believe that three key programs and initiatives launched by the task force should be maintained, regardless of the future of the Sun God Festival. 1) Institute a systematic and comprehensive drug and alcohol education program The task force developed and implemented comprehensive alcohol education programming focused on safety, harm reduction and responsible behavior. Given the health and safety problems that we see over the course of the year, we support further development of an integrated and comprehensive drug and alcohol program designed to reduce risky behavior and the assaults and other crimes that accompany it. Specifically, we would like to see: revisions to the Alcohol Issues and Trends Committee that would enable it to comprehensively address drug as well as alcohol use and prevention; sustained funding and support for the Floaties program and other alcohol and drug intervention efforts; and greater involvement by students, especially Greek Council, AS, GSA and the College Councils, in addressing the campus culture around drug and alcohol use. 2) Review and revise the University Alcohol Policy The current University Alcohol Policy (PPM 510-1, Section XIII) is not widely known or understood by the campus community. As stated in our initial report, it has an obscure title ( Consumption of Alcohol or Malt Beverages Policy) and is generally inaccessible to students and staff. Most importantly, it has not been updated since Similar to the 2010 revision of the Free Speech and Advocacy Policy (PPM 510-1, Section IX), a revised University Drug and Alcohol Policy would create greater awareness of campus drug and alcohol policy. 3) Continued publicity and promotion of the Responsible Action Protocol The Responsible Action Protocol has had an extremely positive effect over the past two years, culminating in its adoption as a permanent campus policy. We recommend that the Office of Student Page 17

18 Level Three Conduct work with AS and other groups to facilitate ongoing campus communications via social media and traditional communication vehicles to better inform the campus community about the protocol. Drawing on the experience of Sun God 2014, we recommend that if Sun God is to be held again, the following policies and procedures should either be sustained or re-evaluated: 1) Continue to close Sun God to non-affiliates. In previous years the behavior of non-affiliates has strained resources and created problems. The rate of admission to detox for non-affiliates was more than double that of students. We continue to support excluding non-affiliates from the festival. Three aspects of the policy, however, need attention. First, the definition of a non-affiliate needs to be carefully reviewed. Second, better monitoring at the gate is needed to ensure that wristbands are used by the students who registered for them. Finally, though graduate student fees are not used to support Sun God, graduate students ought to have the option of purchasing tickets. 2) Anecdotal evidence suggests that the residents-only policy at The Village and ERC resulted in a noticeable reduction in behavioral problems in these areas. This policy, along with the no-host and guest visitation policies for the rest of campus should be reviewed and, where appropriate, sustained. 3) The management of level 1 and level 2 detox should be reassessed. In previous years detox was managed by SARC and OSC, and staffed by volunteers from various Student Affairs offices and College Deans offices. With the advent of the Level 2 Detox this year, staffing broadened to include physicians and nurses from the UC San Diego Health System as well as Student Health and Well-being. Given the increased health and liability issues around the event and managing the center, we recommend that staff volunteers be under the overall direction of medical professionals. Page 18

19 Appendices Final Report of the Sun God Health and Safety Task Force 31 August 2014 Table of Contents A. Charge letter B. Preliminary Report (1 November 2013) C. Kim Fromme (professional biography) D. Indicators of success E. Exemplary educational materials F. ASCE Videos (links) G. Guardian editorial H. Floatie Program I. Messages to parents J. Sun God Residence Hall Policy K. Wristband registration site (screenshots) L. Community message M. Detox statistics, N. Campus impact of student death Page 19

20 Appendix A Page 20

21 Appendix A Page 21

22 Appendix B OFFICE OF THE VICE CHANCELLOR STUDENT AFFAIRS UC SAN DIEGO LA JOLLA, CA (858) To: Chancellor Pradeep Khosla From: Sun God Festival Task Force Re: Preliminary Report Date: 1 November 2013 In keeping with our charge of 16 June (Appendix A), we submit the following preliminary report. After briefly sketching the background to the committee s work, this report focuses on four interrelated areas of concern: logistics and event planning; conduct and discipline; education; and communication. In each area we recommend actions that we believe will reduce the health and safety risks associated with the Sun God Festival. I. BACKGROUND Sun God Festival (hereafter, Sun God ) is one of UC San Diego s most visible traditions. Occurring each year near the end of spring quarter, it enjoys strong student support. Health and safety problems associated with Sun God have increased significantly in the last two years, however, with marked increases in students entering the on-campus detox center and being transported to area hospital emergency departments. Appendix B presents compelling data concerning recent trends: In 2012 a total of 65 students were seen in the on-campus detox facility; in 2013 this increased by 46% for a total of 95 students seen in detox. In 2012 there were 21 recorded medical transports, both inside and outside the venue; in 2013 this increased by 129% for a total of 48 recorded medical transports. In 2012 there were 48 student conduct violations during Sun God; in 2013 this increased by 55% for a total of 90 student conduct violations. In 2012 there were a total of 95 arrests at Sun God; in 2013 this increased by 54% and a total of 146 were arrested at Sun God. Alcohol abuse is either cause or correlate of the overwhelming majority of the health and safety problems associated with Sun God. We note at the outset that the binge drinking rate among UC San Diego students is about the same as the national average (Appendix C), and that the health and safety problems associated with binge drinking are not unique to Sun God. The Sun God Festival Task Force was convened to review and recommend actions that will ensure that student well-being is not compromised by Sun God. The full task force has held monthly meetings since August; workgroups focusing on specific areas of concern have met much more frequently. Both the task force and the workgroups will continue to meet throughout the year as we refine and implement the recommendations presented below. Sun God Festival Task Force / Preliminary Report / Page 1 of 10 Page 22

23 Appendix B Task force members include nine students (the Presidents of AS and GSA, representatives of each of the six colleges, and the AS Vice President for Concerts and Events) and sixteen faculty and staff with essential experience and content knowledge (from the Resident Deans of The Village and ERC to the Director of Student Health and Wellbeing, and from a Professor of Emergency Medicine to a captain in the UC San Diego Police Department). An internationally recognized expert on alcohol abuse among college students, Dr. Kim Fromme, Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin, is serving as the task force consultant. Dr. Fromme spent a full day on campus in late September, and is scheduled to return in February. II. GOALS 1) Our overall goal should be to reduce the most risky drinking behavior. We should focus on moving those who drink dangerous amounts of alcohol toward a less critical level of drinking. We want students to learn how to drink safely and in moderation, if they choose to drink. 2) Our recommendations are intended to reduce the number of students who are sent to hospital emergency departments for medical care secondary to alcohol use. We also seek to reduce physical altercations, sexual assaults, vandalism etc. associated with alcohol use. 3) We do not consider the number of students sent to detox as an appropriate measure of success. While we prefer students not consume alcohol to the point of needing detox, it is important to present detox as a safe place to be until the student is sober again. Detox reduces harm or potential negative consequences such as sexual assault, continued drinking to the point of needing medical transport, robbery, physical altercations, etc. Interventions that (unintentionally) reduce students likelihood of bringing drunken friends to detox may increase risks described above and possibly encourage students to take care of their friends in their residences thereby increasing the risk of death. If students think we need to decrease the number of students at detox to save Sun God, then we may unintentionally increase the risk to our student body. III. LOGISTICS AND EVENT PLANNING The following recommendations are grouped in terms of potential impact. Level one recommendations are judged to have the greatest potential to reduce binge drinking the day of the festival. Level two recommendations are deemed to have an impact but to a lesser degree. Compared to the level one recommendations, level two recommendations focus more on education and less on logistics and event planning. In addition to these two sets of recommendations, we identified a handful of additional strategies that have the potential to reduce binge drinking. These are noted, but not recommended, because they pose logistical challenges to holding the festival or because they may unintentionally lead to in more binge drinking rather than less. Lastly, we note that additional resources will be required to fund many of these recommendations. To secure these resources, we suggest that Associated Students Concerts and Events establish a safety fee Sun God Festival Task Force / Preliminary Report / Page 2 of 10 Page 23

24 Appendix B to be paid by each student attending the festival. We also recommend seeking support from the Vice Chancellors for Business Affairs, Resource Management and Planning, and Student Affairs. Level One Recommendations 1) In the past two years, the North campus has become the focal point for partying on campus the afternoon of Sun God. In 2013, 54 police contacts occurred on North Campus. Initial waves of detox and medical transports occurred around 5:00 p.m., well before attendance at the festival peaked. a) Establish a no-guest policy the day of the festival in all of the residences of The Villages and the residences along I-Walk at Eleanor Roosevelt College. Only residents of The Village will be able to access Village facilities. Inform residents of this policy and the rationale for it months in advance. As late as the night before the festival install fencing around the residence halls to restrict access and have ID scanners and security screening residents at each entrance. b) To better identify and assist students who are visibly intoxicated and need assistance, increase the number of trained staff on the North Campus, specifically The Village, ERC, and Marshall College, and install cameras on major walkways. c) Communicate to North Campus residents relevant residential policies, alcohol-related laws and their consequences, including city noise ordinances. d) Develop and implement a peer bystander intervention program that trains students on how to intervene in circumstances when they are making unsafe judgments about alcohol consumption. Provide students an incentive to participate, and particularly target residents in The Village and I-House. e) Instruct security and police officers staffing the event entrance near The Village to prevent students from using the entrance as an exit. 2) One third of the people admitted to detox are non-affiliates yet they constitute only 15% of the wrist bands issued. a) Discontinue sales of wrist bands to non-affiliates. b) Institute controls to discourage non-affiliates from buying students wrist bands or making counterfeits. Among options to consider are: i) Check students IDs at the entrances. This is a low-cost but effective approach that would slow lines, require additional staffing, and will have instances where students cannot enter the festival because they do not have their ID. ii) Use a barcode wristband system and link the barcode to the student s PID. Develop a system that immediately pulls up students campus ID photo when the barcode is scanned at the entrance. iii) Check students IDs at the entrance and use a radio frequency wrist band system (RFID) to track who bought the wrist bands. (a) Both the barcode wristband and the RFID system are equally effective in deterring counterfeiting and scalping. The RFID system costs significantly more ($30,000 plus $1.25 per wristband and $1 activation fee per wristband). 3) Two thirds of the students admitted to detox live off-campus. Sun God Festival Task Force / Preliminary Report / Page 3 of 10 Page 24

25 Appendix B a) Assign CSOs, student leaders, and water stations to campus shuttle stops where most students disembark (i.e., Mandeville and Price Center turnarounds). b) Provide ample water stations and healthy food inside the venue. Enable students to use meal points to purchase food. c) Continue DUI police patrol on the roadways along the perimeter of the campus. Promote use of AS Safe Rides. d) Collaborate with the management of apartment and condo complexes in the UTC area with high concentrations of UC San Diego students to communicate with their residents about the consequences of violating of alcohol and noise regulations. e) Use shuttle bus LED screens to remind students of the risks of alcohol abuse. Level Two Recommendations 4) Alcohol sales at local shopping centers and retail establishments increase substantially the week of Sun God. a) Work with UCSD PD, Alcohol Beverage, and local retail establishments that sell beer, wine and spirits (e.g., CVS, Ralphs, Vons, St. Germain) to post point-of-sale messages about penalties for violating alcohol laws, responsible consumption, and importance of making Sun God safer and healthier for our students. 5) Students are not always well-informed about the risks associated with alcohol abuse. a) Establish key touch points to educate students. Use the Sun God website and wrist band pickup sites to remind students of the need to keep Sun God healthy and safe, as well as inform them of some of the consequences of alcohol abuse. Recruit Student Legal Services to educate students about the penalties for violating alcohol laws. 6) In some instances, police officers and EMT personnel have different perspectives as to the threshold of intoxication warranting medical transport to the hospital. a) EMT/Paramedics and campus police should jointly review established protocols governing transportation of students to a hospital emergency department for monitored medical care. Alternative Approaches Requiring Further Consideration 7) Some universities hold their major festival on a Saturday or Sunday rather than Friday, in order to minimize impact on classes. a) This may unintentionally lead to greater health and safety risks. Moving the festival to a Saturday or Sunday may extend the party time of students who choose to drink heavily. And it would make it more difficult to secure festival volunteers and staffing if the festival is held on a Saturday or Sunday. 8) Start Sun God earlier in the day, and end it earlier in the evening. a) In recent years the festival has started at 1:00 p.m., 2:00 p.m., and 3:00 p.m. Later start times were intended to minimize impact on classes, but may have unintentionally increased drinking before the festival begins. This needs careful study. b) Examine the option of concluding the festival earlier than midnight but be careful to avoid a scenario where students return to their residences and party. Sun God Festival Task Force / Preliminary Report / Page 4 of 10 Page 25

26 Appendix B 9) In an attempt to regulate conduct, some festivals do not permit students to leave and reenter. a) We urge caution; a no-reentry policy may prompt students to drink more, and more heavily, before coming to Sun God. 10) Use random Breathalyzer testing as a deterrent to coming to Sun God intoxicated. a) In light of the legal and logistical challenges this option would pose, we recommend against it. IV. CONDUCT AND DISCIPLINE After reviewing and discussing applicable policies, protocols, and programs related to student conduct for the campus as a whole and as applied to the Sun God Festival, we make the following recommendations: Primary Recommendations 11) Strive for greater consistency in the enforcement and application of alcohol policies across campus. a) Within campus residential areas, there are perceived inconsistencies in how policies are enforced. Some residential areas strictly enforce the Housing and Residential Life Policies while others enforce only the most egregious violations. Members of the committee noted that it is common knowledge that on Sun God, the residential areas on the outer rim of campus (e.g. Warren, Revelle, and Sixth) more strictly enforce policy than residential areas closer to the venue (e.g. Roosevelt & The Village). Further away from the venue, there appear to be fewer issues, mainly because the Residential Life staffs in these areas have a strong presence and document issues as they come up. However, we also recognize that in the areas closer to campus, more staff may be needed to handle the increasing number of incidents. b) San Diego State University used to have significant issues related to overconsumption of alcohol on its campus. Over the past couple of years, they have focused on maximum enforcement of campus policies at the beginning of the year to let students know that policies will be enforced. This policy has led to a decrease in alcohol abuse and the health and safety risks associated with it. We recommend analyzing whether such a strategy would be effective here at UC San Diego. c) The seven Housing and Residential Life offices need to adequately train professional and paraprofessional staff to handle policy violations in a uniform and consistent manner so that issues are handled similarly across the residential areas. To accomplish this, some areas (including ERC and The Village) may need additional staffing during peak times of the year, especially during the Sun God Festival. 12) Increased and more effective communication regarding key policies. a) We have had a Responsible Action Protocol (e.g. medical amnesty policy) as a pilot program since the 2012 Sun God Festival. Nearly 30 students qualified for the RAP in This policy provides that students receiving medical assistance in an alcohol related emergency, and students initiating medical assistance for others, are not sent through the student conduct process. Instead, the students meet with the Dean of Student Affairs to discuss the incident and determine a mutually agreed upon educational program for the student to attend (e.g. CARRS, Pro-SAFE, etc.). Such a policy is considered a best practice and many institutions have adopted Sun God Festival Task Force / Preliminary Report / Page 5 of 10 Page 26

27 Appendix B similar policies, including the University of Florida, Boston College, and Loyola Marymount University. i) We need to more effectively educate students about RAP. There is some confusion about the name of the policy and how it applies to alcohol-related incidents. Associated Students Council and college councils should take the lead in fostering student initiated conversations about the policy. We also recommend using social media to alert and inform students. b) We also recommend developing and implementing a short online module for students to complete before receiving their Sun God wrist bands. It is essential that students understand key policies and the consequences for violating them prior to the festival. c) The current University Alcohol Policy (PPM 510-1, Section XIII) is neither widely known nor well understood by the campus community. It is difficult to access, has an obscure title ( Consumption of Alcohol or Malt Beverages Policy), and has not been updated since i) Similar to the 2010 revision of the Free Speech and Advocacy Policy (PPM 510-1, Section IX), a revised University Alcohol Policy could create greater awareness of what is allowed/not allowed on campus related to alcohol use. Additionally, the Responsible Action Protocol could be incorporated into a revised policy. Therefore, we recommend reviewing, revising, and repackaging this policy to make it more accessible, understandable, and effective. 13) Visibly and intentionally leverage existing policies and procedures. a) Rather than significantly change the existing student conduct code, we recommend leveraging existing policies and procedures more intentionally. Three important areas to focus on are: a) Exclusion from University Activities (e.g. Sun God and other events), b) housing contract cancellations, and c) off-campus jurisdiction. b) Section XV, Letter D (6) of the UC San Diego Student Conduct Code provides that a possible sanction for violating the Code is an Exclusion from Areas of the Campus or from University- Supported Activities. In the case of the Sun God Festival, a student who is removed from the venue or documented for an egregious Code violation inside the venue could be excluded from next year s festival. We defined behavior necessitating an exclusion sanction as actions that put oneself, others, or the event itself at risk. Such actions include, but are not limited to, physical assault, threats to others or property, use of controlled substances (e.g. LSD, cocaine, mushrooms) and drug distribution. i) While an exclusion from next year s festival could be effective with continuing students, many incidents involve graduating seniors. For these students appropriate sanctions might be taking away their ability to participate in commencement or one quarter of suspension (which would delay awarding their degree). ii) As with all student conduct cases, the assignment of sanctions is not automatic and must be decided on a case-by-case basis. We recommend that the Office of Student Conduct utilize these sanctions only in those cases where egregious behavior, as delineated above, is engaged in inside and/or adjacent to the event. Prior to the event, clear communication regarding the possibility of these sanctions will be essential. c) For issues occurring within the campus residential areas, the Housing and Residential Life offices may cancel students housing contracts for egregious violations and major disruptions to the residential community. We recommend that the Housing and Residential Life offices continue to consider using housing contract cancellations for such incidents. We also recommend that this Sun God Festival Task Force / Preliminary Report / Page 6 of 10 Page 27

28 Appendix B be clearly communicated to residential communities prior to the festival, and that it be reserved for the most serious violations. d) Section IV of the Student Conduct Code allows the Vice Chancellor Student Affairs to extend off-campus jurisdiction under the Code for incidents that adversely affect the UC San Diego Community and/or the pursuit of the University's objectives. In recent years there have been an increased number of off-campus alcohol related incidents at local apartment complexes. We received anecdotal information that students would rather be cited by the police than go through the student conduct process. Given this, the possibility of extending off-campus jurisdiction for Sun God weekend cases could be a deterrent to egregious behavior. As with all proposed changes in implementation, we urge that this only be done after clear communication with students prior to Sun God. Additional Recommendation 14) Carefully analyze the impact of a no guest policy during Sun God in campus residential facilities. a) Section 15 of the Housing and Residential Life policies (Guest Visitation) provides that: Roommates/apartment-mates must approve overnight guests. No overnight guest will be allowed to stay longer than three consecutive days, and no resident may have overnight guests more than six nights in any quarter. Guests may not sleep in any of the common rooms or public spaces and must use gender appropriate restrooms or one that is approved by all roommates/apartment-mates. During the Sun God Festival and other special events, limitations and/or restrictions on guest visitation may be implemented. b) This section allows Housing and Dining and/or each residential area to place restrictions on guest visitation. Along with the exclusion of non-affiliates from attending the actual Sun God Festival, we generally support the limitation of guests in the residential areas. However, we recognize it may be difficult to enforce and administer such limitation. Therefore, further discussion around this issue is necessary. V. EDUCATION Dr. Fromme s general presentation and discussion with our subgroup underscored the importance of environmental, policy and educational/behavioral interventions. It also underscored the positive scientific evidence base for multiple intervention messages focusing on more than just increasing knowledge the usefulness of promoting parental discussions on the topic of alcohol and drugs not focusing on scare tactics because they do not work (e.g., crash scenes) We also discussed ways to conduct assessment of student drinking and related behaviors after the event. Fromme provided helpful feedback about a survey we plan to conduct in January/February. We propose a general alcohol campaign all year. The messages can be spaced throughout the year but with increasing frequency leading up to SG. The campaign will focus on: safety; harm reduction; responsible drinking behavior; not abstinence. Sun God Festival Task Force / Preliminary Report / Page 7 of 10 Page 28

29 Appendix B General themes The content of the messages and how they are delivered (mode) should be developed largely by students. We plan broad student input in the alcohol risk reduction messaging. We invite AS leaders, college councils, WCSAB, ATOD peer educators, SHS new TECHI Team (Student Health Advocates trained in social media) and other interested students to join/consult with the Education Subcommittee. We will work with students, and with AS Graphics, to leverage social media for messaging. Health Education and Associated Students serve as the clearinghouse and coordinators of educational materials and programming on this topic. Ideally the messages should be delivered by students. The messages need to be in a student voice and while some messages may be from administrators the majority of messages need to be by students and for students. Consequences need to be tied to something students care about (e.g., their academic or career trajectory or getting in trouble ). Many students in detox reported this was the first time [they] ever got in trouble and they were concerned about their professors, classmates and family becoming aware of their behavior. Intervention messages need to be specific and concrete (e.g., if your friend is doing x, y, or z take them to detox). We find that messages that give general principles are more difficult for students to put into action. Principles and goal of the messages are informed by behavioral science. Recommendations 18) Saturate the campus with common language and messaging around alcohol risk reduction all year long with a goal of shifting the culture of the event. 1 a) First message should be about the health and safety problems recently associated with Sun God. b) Additional messages about: i) Sun God Myths ( anything goes at SG, nothing bad can happen to you, no one gets in trouble on SG, It s the one day of the year you can let go ) ii) Club Drugs/RAVES iii) How consequences may impact the student s academic and career future, as well as bring financial hardship and embarrassment to their families. iv) Perfect buzz info (if one drinks, how to drink to a buzz but not drunkenness) v) Protective strategies (e.g., alternating drinks with non-alcoholic drinks, eating food with drinking, pacing drinks over time) vi) Bystander Intervention Techniques (BIT) (Adapting our very successful bystander intervention training for violence prevention to alcohol risk reduction) 1 Data regarding the people who required medical transport due to alcohol poisoning and how many people were stopped at the entrances to the festival venue because they were intoxicated are not currently available. A demographic profile of medical transports would help frame a targeted messaging campaign about the risks of binge drinking. Data on police contacts of intoxicated individuals at the entrances would provide information about the effectiveness of screening approaches and avoid conflating the data with the number of police contacts inside the venue. Sun God Festival Task Force / Preliminary Report / Page 8 of 10 Page 29

30 Appendix B vii) Responsible Action Protocol (RAP) 19) Involve parents in alcohol education with their student, using outlets for communication (the Parent and Family Programs Office, orientation, Student Health and Well-being). Research shows that this is an effective way to reduce binge drinking at the beginning of the academic year. We can include additional parental suggestions throughout the year, especially as the year gets closer to SG. 20) Consider Bear garden event adjacent to the Sun God venue (e.g., at Homeplate) where students over 21 years old could purchase beer during the event. We recognize this may be controversial, but students from the I-House/Village area gave feedback that they would consider not having parties at their residence if they knew they could drink somewhere else. They also reported that they liked the idea of keeping unwanted crashers out of their residences on the day of the event. 21) Have fun campus wide events throughout the year. Students report saving their fun for SG. Our students work very hard. Having more opportunities for big fun events throughout the year will give them more practice at having fun more safely. Also, reinforcing existing campus wide events (e.g., Hullabaloo, Meet the Beach, the Good Life Festival, and events at the Colleges) that already have a track record of being safe and fun will demonstrate that fun events do not have to include drinking alcohol. They will also contribute to the campus strategic plan goal of contributing to pride in being a UC San Diego student and a positive student experience. 22) Conduct assessment of all task force goals. Develop plans to assess all primary and secondary goals including student behavioral goals via surveys, police reports, reports from local hospitals etc. Engage Dr. Fromme to refine assessment plans. 23) Budget implications. To fulfill these recommendations we anticipate needing: a) Increase in FTEs to coordinate program (0.50 FTE Health Educator to coordinate the work) b) AS Graphics for materials development and printing c) Video and graphic arts development for social media d) Incentives for student focus groups e) Assessment costs VI. COMMUNICATION 24) Each workgroup, and the task force as a whole, consistently emphasized the importance of students to a successful communication strategy. Peer-to-peer messages concerning the risks of alcohol abuse as well as the need to reform Sun God, are essential. a) Additional messaging partners should include: Residential Life (I-House and the Village), Greek life, Student Affairs Deans, Office of Student Conduct, Community Campus Centers, Center for Student Involvement, Athletics, Grads, Parent and Family Programs, International Center, Bear Garden events etc. 25) Sun God is one of UC San Diego s great traditions, an event that provides a welcome and needed break from a rigorous academic curriculum. However, there are significant health and safety risks associated with the festival, especially with increased high risk alcohol use by students and other attendees. The increased number of alcohol-related transports, detox admissions, and overall Sun God Festival Task Force / Preliminary Report / Page 9 of 10 Page 30

31 Appendix B student conduct issues have pointed the spotlight on dangerous aspects of the festival. With this in mind, we recommend that our overall communication strategy be help keep Sun God fun, safe and healthy. VII. Next Steps Taken as a whole, these recommendations have the potential to make a significant change in the culture and conduct of Sun God. Both the task force and the workgroups will continue to meet throughout the year as we refine and implement the recommendations presented below. We are optimistic that they will reduce health and the safety risks associated with Sun God, preserving it as a vital student tradition at UC San Diego. Alan Houston, Interim Vice Chancellor-Student Affairs (Chair) Terra Bailey, Resident Dean, The Village Andy Buselt, Associated Students President Karen Calfas, Executive Director, Student Health and Well-being Emalie Chandras, Warren College Council Representative Ali Walid El Hajj-Younes, Roosevelt College Council Representative Regina Fleming, School of Medicine / UCOP Jessica Gois, Muir College Council Representative Rey Guerrero, Resident Dean, Eleanor Roosevelt College David Guss, Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine Sarah Harley, Assoc. VP for Concerts & Events, Associated Students Rahul Kapadia, President, Graduate Student Association Russell King, Assoc. Director for Strategic Initiatives, Housing-Dining-Hospitality Alex Kushner, University Events Office Diane LeGree, Dean of Student Affairs, Sixth College John Paul Lopez, Marshall College Council Representative Liza Lukesheva, Sixth College Council Representative Garry Mac Pherson, Director, Environmental Health & Safety Kyla Manawatao, Revelle College Council Representative Bess Marcus, Chair, Family & Preventive Medicine Gary Ratcliff, Assistant Vice Chancellor-Student Life David Rose, Captain, UCSD Police Department Lupe Samaniego-Kraus, Student Health Services Educator Nancy Wahlig, Director, Sexual Assault & Violence Prevention Resource Center Ben White, Director, Office of Student Conduct Sun God Festival Task Force / Preliminary Report / Page 10 of 10 Page 31

32 Appendix B OFFICE OF THE CHANCELLOR 9500 GILMAN DRIVE # 0005 LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA TELEPHONE: (858) FAX: (858) July, 2013 Alan Houston, Chair (Interim Vice Chancellor Student Affairs) Terra Bailey (Residence Dean, The Village) Andy Buselt (President of AS) Karen Calfas (Assistant Vice Chancellor Student Wellness) Diane LeGree (Dean of Student Affairs, Sixth College) Regina Fleming-Magit (Medical Director, Student Health Services) Rey Guerrero (Residence Dean, Eleanor Roosevelt College) David Guss (Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine) Sarah Hartley (Assistnt Vice President for Concerts and Events, Associated Students) Rahul Kapedia (President, Graduate Student Association) Russell King (Associate Director / Strategic Initiatives, Housing Dining Hospitality Garry Mac Pherson (Director, Environmental Health and Safety) Bess Marcus (Chair, Family and Preventive Medicine) Gary Ratcliff (Assistant Vice Chancellor Student Life) David Rose (Captain, UC San Diego Police Department) Nancy Wahlig (Director, Sexual Assault and Violence Prevention Resource Center) Ben White (Director, Office of Student Conduct) Martin Wollesen (Director, University Events Office) TBD (Marshall College Council Representative) TBD (Muir College Council Representative) TBD (Revelle College Council Representative) TBD (Roosevelt College Council Representative) TBD (Sixth College Council Representative) TBD (Warren College Council Representative) SUBJECT: Sun God Festival Health and Safety Task Force Thank you for your willingness to serve on a Sun God Festival Health and Safety Task Force. Sun God Festival is one of UC San Diego s most visible traditions, and enjoys strong student support. Health and safety problems associated with Sun God have increased significantly in the last two years, with marked increases in transports to area hospital emergency rooms related to unsafe activities the day and evening of the event. The events pose significant risks to attendees and to members of the San Diego community. The health and safety of our students is paramount. Therefore, we must make every effort to work collaboratively to ensure that student well-being is not compromised by Sun God Festival. Your study likely will include a review of the festival format and associated events, assessment of current student behaviors, relevant university Sun God Task Force / Page 1 of 2 Page 32

33 Appendix B policies and enforcement, and options to address high-risk behaviors, including development of safety education and communication strategies. Task Force members are asked to participate in monthly meetings with the whole group, and to serve on one or more subcommittees focusing on specific parts of the charge. The first meeting of the Task Force will be no later than 31 July The Task Force is asked to provide a preliminary report by 1 November 2013, and a final report by 1 June With kind regards, Pradeep K. Khosla Chancellor Sun God Task Force / Page 2 of 2 Page 33

34 Appendix B Sun God 2013 Arrests Charge Total Unk Males Females Students Non Affiliates Adult 2012 % of Chg 647(g) PC (Drunk Detox) % 647(F) PC (Drunk Jail) % 647(f/g) PC + Ecessive Alcohol Hospital ** % Sub Totals: % Alcohol Offense Citations % Drug Related Citations N/A Drug Related Offenses to Jail % Battery to Jail % Sub Totals: % Other: DUI (Including Avoid) N/A 23136(a) VC Minor > N/A Sub Totals: N/A Grand Totals: % Sworn Personnel % Sworn Hours Worked % ** = 16 are included in the 48 total "To Hospitals" in the SunGod Medical. Additional Reports Taken (not arrested) Attempt Suicide 1 Battery Report (not incl. in arrests) 3 487(C) PC Grand Theft from Person 1 288A(F) PC Oral Cop:vic Uncon Of Act 1 Page 34

35 Appendix B 2013 SUNGOD MEDICAL Change Responses Total Recorded Medical Responses % Responses in the Venue % Responses not in the Venue % Reason Intoxicated % Nausea/Vomiting % Unconscious % Unable to locate or GOA % Bleeding/Laceration % Sick % Assault 1 NR N/A To Hospitals ** Includes 16 referrals listed in arrest summary % Patient Distribution UCSD La Jolla % Scripps La Jolla % Scripps Encinitas % UCSD Hillcrest % Sharp Memorial % Kaiser 1 0 N/A Page 35

36 Appendix B Change Responses Total Recorded Medical Responses % Responses in the Venue % Responses not in the Venue % Intoxicated % Nausea/Vomiting % Unconscious % Unable to locate or GOA % Bleeding/Laceration % Sick % Assault 1 NR N/A Time Distribution < % % % % % % % NR N/A > NR N/A Dispositions To on campus Detox via UCPD % Left in care of responsible party (Release) % Signed Against Medical Advise (AMA) % No Aid Needed 4 NR N/A To hospitals % Patient Distribution UCSD La Jolla % Scripps La Jolla % Scripps Encinitas % UCSD Hillcrest % Sharp Memorial % Kaiser 1 0 N/A Page 36

37 Appendix B 2013 UCSD SUNGOD FESTIVAL Medical Activities Responses Total Recorded Medical Responses Responses in the Venue Responses not in the Venue Intoxicated NR Nausea/Vomiting 2 2 NR Unconscious 7 2 NR Unable to locate or GOA 5 2 NR Bleeding/Laceration 0 2 NR Sick 0 1 NR Assault 1 NR NR Time Distribution < NR NR NR NR NR NR NR NR NR > NR NR Dispositions To on campus Detox via UCPD 6 21 NR Left in care of responsible party (Release) 5 4 NR Signed Against Medical Advise (AMA) No Aid Needed 4 NR NR To hospitals Patient Distribution UCSD La Jolla Scripps La Jolla Scripps Encinitas UCSD Hillcrest Sharp Memorial Kaiser Page 37

38 Appendix B Student Conduct Violations During Sungod CASE TYPE Alcohol (non-sun God Detox; see below) Alcohol (Sun God Detox) Drugs (Marijuana) Noise Smoking Battery/Physical Altercation Disruptive Behavior Guest Policy Violation Public Urination Bookstore Theft Conduct Threathening Health & Safety Damage to Property Extension Academic Integrity Policy Failure to Comply Housekeeping Illegal File Sharing & Downloading Lewd Act (Sexual intercourse in public) TOTAL ALCOHOL (non-sun God Detox) Underage possession/consumption Noise + underage possession/consumption Transport to hospital Intoxication (no transport) IRC Detox Over 21 policy violation Notes from Ben White: 1. My methodology was to review each case for the respective Sun God Weekend and assign a case type to it. For example, if an RA on rounds heard loud noise from a room and documented under 21 students in that room with alcohol, I classified it as an Noise + underage possession/consumption alcohol case. If the case involved drugs and alcohol, I classified it as a Drug/Controlled Substance case because the drugs are the more serious violation. 2. Overall, we ve had a major spike in Sun God related incidents over the past three years and I think this will continue under the status quo. Additionally, the statistics in the attached summary do not take into account non affiliates, which tend to make up about a third of the people handled by police, especially with detox. Page 38

39 Appendix B Self-report alcohol use data among UC San Diego Students compared to national sample National College Health Assessment (NCHA) data collected at UCSD in 2010 (N=505), National NCHA data collected in the same time period in 2010 (N=95,712) Item 2010 (UCSD sample) (%) How often they perceived the typical UCSD student used (%) 2010 National Sample (%) Used Alcohol, Tobacco or Other Drugs at least once in last 30 days Smoked 1+ cigarettes in last 30 days Any use of marijuana in last 30 days Any use of hookah (tobacco water pipe) in last 30 days Any use of all other drugs combined in last 30 days (1) Binge drinking (5+ drinks in a sitting) at least once in last 2 weeks Used a prescription drug not prescribed to them in the last 12 months Used one or more protective drinking behaviors when they partied in last 12 months (2) Students who drank alcohol reported these negative consequences occurring in last 12 months as a result of their drinking (UCSD: 42% reported one or more of these in last 12 mos., National sample: 51% reported one or more in last 12 mos.) Did something you later regretted Forgot where you were or what you did Got in trouble with the police Had sex with someone without giving your consent Had sex with someone without getting their consent 0.6 Had unprotected sex Physically injured yourself Physically injured another person Seriously considered suicide How often they perceived the typical student used (%) (1) Includes cigars, smokeless tobacco, cocaine, methamphetamine, other amphetamines, sedatives, hallucinogens, anabolic steroids, opiates, inhalants, MDMA, other club drugs, and other illegal drugs. (Excludes alcohol, cigarettes, tobacco from a water pipe and marijuana) (2) e.g., alternate non-alcoholic with alcoholic beverages, keep track of how many drinks being consumed, pace drinks to one or fewer per hour, use a designated driver, avoid drinking games, eat before/during drinking (11 strategies total) This assessment will be repeated at UCSD in February Page 39

40 Appendix C KIM FROMME, PH.D. SAHARA LAB DIRECTOR Kim Fromme, Ph.D., is Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin and is also the Director of the Studies on Alcohol, Health, and Risky Activities (SAHARA). She received her Ph.D. from The University of Washington, and is a Fellow and former President of the Society of Addiction Psychologists (Division 50) of the American Psychological Association. Her program of research focuses on the etiology and prevention of alcohol abuse and risk-taking behaviors among adolescents and young adults. With support from a $3.2 million grant from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Dr. Fromme recently completed a longitudinal study of the alcohol use and other behavioral risks (e.g., drug use, risky sex, aggression) of a cohort of first time college students, beginning with their senior year in high school and following them for the next 6 years. This research examined individual, environmental, and social factors that influence the developmental trajectories of alcohol use and other behavioral risks among students as they progress through college and beyond. Yielding over 30 publications thus far, this research has provided new insights into the development of alcohol use patterns and behavioral risks during emerging adulthood, as well as the event-level association between alcohol intoxication, subjective responses to alcohol, and participation in other forms of behavioral risks. Dr. Fromme and Dr. Paige Harden recently received a new 5-year NIAAA grant to study the "Genetic mechanisms of change in trajectories of drinking and other deviant behaviors." This grant will allow Drs. Fromme and Harden to collect DNA on former participants in the longitudinal sample - examining how five candidate genes influence trajectories of alcohol use and other behavioral risks, such as drug use and risky sexual behaviors.participants in this new project will also complete alcohol challenges in our simulated bar laboratory. One of seven simulated bars in the country, we will be studying differences in alcohol responses and their relation to different trajectories of alcohol use and other behavioral risks. See for more information on this ongoing project.. Findings from the longitudinal and alcohol challenge studies will be used to develop and evaluate new approaches to the prevention of alcohol abuse and involvement in other potentially hazardous behaviors Principal Investigator Title: Alcohol and behavioral risks throughout college Source: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Funding: $3,326,558 Morean, M.E., Corbin, W.R.,& Fromme, K. (in press). Age of first use and delay to first intoxication in relation to trajectories of heavy drinking and alcohol-related problems during emerging adulthood. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. Schuckit, M., Kalmijn, J., Smith, T., Saunders, G., & Fromme, K. (2012) Structuring a college alcohol prevention program on the low level of response to alcohol model: A pilot study. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 36, Brister, H.A., Sher, K., & Fromme, K. (2011). 21st Birthday drinking and associated physical consequences and behavioral risks, Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 25, Quinn, P.D., & Fromme, K. (in press). Event-level associations between objective and Page 40

41 Appendix C subjective alcohol intoxication and driving after drinking across the college years. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors. Quinn, P.D., Stappenbeck, C.A., & Fromme, K. (2011). Collegiate heavy drinking Prospectively predicts change in sensation seeking and impulsivity. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 120, Hatzenbuehler, M.L, Corbin, W.R. & Fromme, K. (2011). Discrimination and alcohol-related problems in college students: A prospective examination of mediating effects. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 3, Quinn, P.D. & Fromme, K. (2011). Alcohol use and related problems among college students and their non-college peers: The competing roles of personality and peer influence. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 72, Quinn, P.D. & Fromme, K. (2011). The role of person-environment interactions in increased alcohol use in the transition to college. Addiction, 106, PMCID: PMC ** Iwamoto, D., Corbin, W.R., & Fromme, K. (2010). Trajectory classes of heavy episodic drinking among Asian American college students. Addiction, 105: Vaughan, E.L, Corbin, W.R, & Fromme, K. (2009). Academic and social motives/behaviors and alcohol use: Differences by gender, race/ethnicity, and family history of alcohol problems. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 23, Neal, D.J. & Fromme, K. (2007). Hook em horns and heavy drinking: Alcohol use and collegiate sports. Addictive Behaviors, 32, Neal, D.J. & Fromme, K. (2007). Event level covariation of alcohol intoxication and behavioral risks during the first year of college. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 75, Fromme, K. & Corbin, W.R. (2004). Prevention of heavy drinking and associated negative consequences among mandated and voluntary college students. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 72, Fromme, K. & Orrick, D. (2004). The Lifestyle Management Class: A harm reduction approach to college drinking. Addiction Research and Theory, 12, Page 41

42 Appendix D Page 42

43 Appendix E Page 43

44 Appendix E Page 44

45 Appendix E Page 45

46 Appendix E Page 46

47 Appendix E Page 47

48 Appendix E Page 48

49 Appendix E Sun God says... Don t miss the music! I Don t be at risk... Alternate non-alcohol drinks (drink a bottle of water between alcohol drinks) Determine in advance the number of drinks, and don t exceed that! Choose not to drink alcohol Use a designated driver (someone who does not drink alcohol at all) Eat before or during an event Avoid drinking games Tell your friends to let you know when you ve had too much to drink Keep track of the number of drinks (especially the amount of liquor) One drink = 12 oz. beer, 5 oz. wine or 1.5 oz liquor Pace your drinks to one or less per hour Choose an alcohol look-alike instead Be a good friend... Use the buddy system Arrive together - leave together If your friend is unresponsive - get help If you see something shady - say something If someone looks like they re in trouble, ask if they re okay Protect your friends in large crowds If something doesn t feel right, leave and call for help Campus & Community Resources Student Health Services (858) studenthealth.ucsd.edu Counseling & Psych Svc (858) caps.ucsd.edu Sexual Assault Resource Center (858) sarc.ucsd.edu Alcoholics Anonymous aasandiego.org Smart Recovery smartrecovery.org Police (858) 534-HELP (4357) Page 49

50 Appendix E Page 50

51 Appendix E Page 51

52 Appendix E Student survey data indicate that more problems occur at off-campus student parties than any other setting. UCSD has recently been chosen as an intervention site for the Safer California Universities grant, a project which seeks to decrease alcohol consumption leading to intoxication. The focus is to create safer party environments by building a close sense of community between students and neighbors, promoting safety at parties, and increasing enforcement of alcohol related laws and policies. Through this research project, UCSD has developed a comprehensive community effort to reduce high risk alcohol consumption and thus reduce incidents that result from high-risk alcohol consumption such as violence, property damage, injury and car crashes. Visit our website: for more information or to inquire about the Tritons Party Safer packs. Instructions: cut out the card below on the dotted line and keep it in your pocket Student Health/ Health Education (858) Sexual Assault & Violence Prevention Resource Center (SARC) (858) Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) (858) SUN GOD SAYS... Supported by the Prevention Resource Center with funding from the National Institutes for Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) and assistance from our CA Safer Universities grant TRITONS PARTY SAFER! HED:pg SunGodBrochure May2009 STUDENTHEALTH.UCSD.EDU STUDENTHEALTH.UCSD.EDU Page 52

53 Appendix E Drinking should not be the primary focus of any activity. Always recognize another s right to drink or not to drink. Set a limit on your drinks and ask a friend to make sure you stick to your limit. Don t use alcohol with medications or other drugs. Drink slowly and drink water in between drinks. Try to stay at one drink per hour. Eat before you drink. Eating high protein foods like cheese and meat will slow down the alcohol absorption rate. Avoid mixing carbonated drinks with alcohol. This increases the absorption of alcohol into the bloodstream. Know what is in your drink (e.g.,1 Long Island Iced Tea can contain 5 or more ounces of liquor which is equivalent to more than 3 standard drinks). Watch your drink to keep anything from being added to it. Avoid drinking out of large, open punch bowls (e.g., jungle juice). If you go with friends to a party, always have a designated driver- who will not drink and will drive everyone home. Watch out for each other. If anyone has had too much to drink, make sure he or she gets a ride home with someone sober or find him or her a safe place to sleep. For Tritons, call A.S. Safe Ride at (619) Try to keep the party small. Make sure your guests are considerate of your neighbors and don t do things like park cars on lawns or vandalize property. Keep the party indoors to cut down on cleanup time and to reduce the amount of noise. Shut the windows and walk outside from time to time to check the noise level. DO NOT charge any kind of fees to party guests. If you are under 21, don t drink alcohol. DO NOT serve alcohol to anyone under 21. Prevent Your Party From Being Busted or Cited by Police If your neighbors call or stop by to tell you the party is too loud, listen and turn down the volume... Cooperate with police if they show up. Have a calm, sober person speak with them. If they ask you to break up the party, DO IT. It s okay to call police yourself if the party gets out of hand. If a guest has had too much to drink, don t let them drive home. Call a taxi or A.S. Safe Ride (619) (http://as.ucsd.edu/docs/ SafeRide.pdf), arrange for a ride with another guest who is sober, or invite them to stay over. Following the Party Tips will make you a good neighbor, but be sure to notify your neighbors about an upcoming party and give them a phone number so they can call you (instead of the police) if there is a problem. Keep the party restricted to your property (e.g., nobody getting sick in the neighbor s bushes) and keep the trash inside. If any trash is left outside, clean it up. Cut out the card below - keep it in your pocket. On the back are tips on how to recognize alcohol poisoning. Page 53

54 Appendix E Page 54

I. BACKGROUND. To: Chancellor Pradeep Khosla From: Sun God Festival Task Force Re: Preliminary Report Date: 1 November 2013

I. BACKGROUND. To: Chancellor Pradeep Khosla From: Sun God Festival Task Force Re: Preliminary Report Date: 1 November 2013 OFFICE OF THE VICE CHANCELLOR STUDENT AFFAIRS UC SAN DIEGO LA JOLLA, CA 92093-0015 (858) 534-4370 VCSA@UCSD.EDU To: Chancellor Pradeep Khosla From: Sun God Festival Task Force Re: Preliminary Report Date:

More information

2015-2016 Greek Risk Management Document

2015-2016 Greek Risk Management Document 2015-2016 Greek Risk Management Document On Campus Social Functions/Events Registration of Social Functions/Events: What is a Social Function/Event? Any on or off campus gathering of multiple people at

More information

Social Greek Risk Management Policy and Social Event Registration Procedures

Social Greek Risk Management Policy and Social Event Registration Procedures Social Greek Risk Management Policy and Social Event Registration Procedures For the National Pan-Hellenic Council, Interfraternity Council, and Panhellenic Council at the University of West Georgia To

More information

COASTAL CAROLINA UNIVERSITY ALCOHOL AND DRUG POLICY

COASTAL CAROLINA UNIVERSITY ALCOHOL AND DRUG POLICY COASTAL CAROLINA UNIVERSITY ALCOHOL AND DRUG POLICY I. Introduction Coastal Carolina University recognizes its responsibility for understanding how alcohol and other drug problems can present grave consequences

More information

Kennesaw State University Drug and Alcohol Policy

Kennesaw State University Drug and Alcohol Policy Kennesaw State University Drug and Alcohol Policy I. Introduction National statistics reveal that the leading causes of death among the 18-23 year-old population are alcohol-related accidents, alcohol-related

More information

McKendree University. Office of Greek Life. Risk Management Policy

McKendree University. Office of Greek Life. Risk Management Policy McKendree University Office of Greek Life Risk Management Policy I. General Policies ALCOHOL AND DRUGS A. The possession, sale, use or consumption of ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES, while on chapter premises or during

More information

Utica College Annual Notice Regarding Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Policies

Utica College Annual Notice Regarding Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Policies Utica College Annual Notice Regarding Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Policies Utica College is required by federal law to provide the following notice to all students and employees. This notice is being

More information

Not in Our House. Alcohol & Your Child. www.2young2drink.com. Facts about Underage Drinking Every Parent Should Know

Not in Our House. Alcohol & Your Child. www.2young2drink.com. Facts about Underage Drinking Every Parent Should Know Not in Our House Report Underage Drinking 1-888-THE-TABC www.2young2drink.com Alcohol & Your Child Facts about Underage Drinking Every Parent Should Know Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission www.tabc.state.tx.us

More information

EASTERN OREGON UNIVERSITY 2010 2012 Biennial Review Drug and Alcohol Programs and Policies

EASTERN OREGON UNIVERSITY 2010 2012 Biennial Review Drug and Alcohol Programs and Policies GENERAL POLICIES EASTERN OREGON UNIVERSITY 2010 2012 Biennial Review Drug and Alcohol Programs and Policies Author: Dr. Thacher Carter, Counseling and Psychological Services Eastern Oregon University s

More information

Alcohol and Drug-Free Work Place Policy

Alcohol and Drug-Free Work Place Policy Alcohol and Drug-Free Work Place Policy Cleary University, in compliance with Public Law 101-226 (Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act), presents the standards listed below to the entire University community:

More information

1. University functions at which use of alcohol is approved.

1. University functions at which use of alcohol is approved. University of Michigan-Flint Alcohol and Other Drugs (AOD) Policy 2013-2014 Introduction The University of Michigan-Flint, is committed to providing a safe, healthy learning community for all its members.

More information

Student Drinking Spring 2013

Student Drinking Spring 2013 Students Student Drinking Spring 2013 INTRODUCTION This survey, conducted by Student Affairs Research and Assessment, provides data on alcohol use and high-risk drinking behavior of undergraduate students

More information

COLLEGE STUDENT AOD USE & FSU PREVENTION. Dr. Spencer Deakin Mr. Don Swogger June 2014

COLLEGE STUDENT AOD USE & FSU PREVENTION. Dr. Spencer Deakin Mr. Don Swogger June 2014 COLLEGE STUDENT AOD USE & FSU PREVENTION Dr. Spencer Deakin Mr. Don Swogger June 2014 About FSU Rural Location in western Maryland 2 ½ hours from DC, Baltimore region 4,500 undergraduate students 2,000

More information

Source: Minnesota Student Survey, Key Trends Through 2007, Minnesota Departments of Corrections, Education, Health, Human Services and Public Safety.

Source: Minnesota Student Survey, Key Trends Through 2007, Minnesota Departments of Corrections, Education, Health, Human Services and Public Safety. Underage Drinking in Minnesota The Consequences of Drinking Outweigh the Experience. What s the Big Deal? Underage alcohol use is a big deal and directly related to criminal behavior and serious social

More information

UCLA STUDENT ALCOHOL POLICY

UCLA STUDENT ALCOHOL POLICY UCLA STUDENT ALCOHOL POLICY Issuing Officer: Vice Chancellor Janina Montero Responsible Dept: Student Affairs Effective Date: August 7, 2007 Supersedes: UCLA Student Alcohol Policy, dated 8/11/04 I. INTRODUCTION

More information

ATOD Conference - April 3, 2014

ATOD Conference - April 3, 2014 Presented by: v Janet Kaplan Ventura County Behavioral Health Alcohol & Drug Programs v Erica Pachmann EvalCorp Research & Consulting v Kim O Neil Project SAFER 1 Today s Agenda Overview of Ventura County

More information

Drug-Free Workplace. Policy Statement. Reason for the Policy. Policy V. 7.2.1

Drug-Free Workplace. Policy Statement. Reason for the Policy. Policy V. 7.2.1 Policy V. 7.2.1 Responsible Official: Vice President for Human Resources, Diversity, and Multicultural Affairs Effective Date: October 26, 2009 Drug-Free Workplace Policy Statement The University of Vermont

More information

2014 Biennial Review. Prepared by: Center for Health and Wellness Promotion Student Affairs University of San Diego

2014 Biennial Review. Prepared by: Center for Health and Wellness Promotion Student Affairs University of San Diego 2014 Biennial Review Prepared by: Center for Health and Wellness Promotion Student Affairs University of San Diego Table of Contents I. Statement of Alcohol and Other Drug (AOD) Program Goals and a Discussion

More information

University of Louisiana System

University of Louisiana System Policy Number: S-II.XXVI.-1 University of Louisiana System Title: ALCOHOL AND ILLEGAL CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Effective Date: Fall Session, 2000 Cancellation: None Chapter: Students Policies and Procedures

More information

SEXUAL ASSAULT POLICY

SEXUAL ASSAULT POLICY SEXUAL ASSAULT POLICY California State University, Stanislaus is strongly committed to the establishment of an educational environment in which students, faculty, and staff can work together in an atmosphere

More information

St. Cloud State University Alcohol and Other Drug Compliance Program. This program supports the mission of St. Cloud State University by:

St. Cloud State University Alcohol and Other Drug Compliance Program. This program supports the mission of St. Cloud State University by: St. Cloud State University Alcohol and Other Drug Compliance Program I. Philosophy This program supports the mission of St. Cloud State University by: Enhancing Learning and Service: St. Cloud State University

More information

Policy on Use of Sports Facilities by Officially Recognized University Student Organizations

Policy on Use of Sports Facilities by Officially Recognized University Student Organizations Policy on Use of Sports Facilities by Officially Recognized University Student Organizations For the purpose of this document, Official Recognized University Student Organizations are defined as: 1) a

More information

Social Event Management Procedures (SEMP)

Social Event Management Procedures (SEMP) Social Event Management Procedures (SEMP) Purpose Social Event Management Procedures (SEMP) reflects Dartmouth College s commitment to provide the safest possible social atmosphere for members of the College

More information

ABC Process & Parameters

ABC Process & Parameters ABC Process & Parameters I. PURPOSE The purpose of these regulations is to provide basic guidelines for the sale, serving, supply and consumption of alcoholic beverages on University property. Alcoholic

More information

Social Event Policy Office of Greek Life Murray State University

Social Event Policy Office of Greek Life Murray State University The Division of Student Affairs at aspires to see the attainment of growth and development of the Murray State student. When students choose to gather in social settings and partake in activities that

More information

DRUG AND ALCOHOL POLICY

DRUG AND ALCOHOL POLICY DRUG AND ALCOHOL POLICY Pace University seeks to promote individual wellness in as many ways as possible. Accordingly, in summary, the Policy prohibits the unlawful use, possession, sale, distribution,

More information

DRAFT ALCOHOL POLICY 1. Particulars to follow 2. POLICY STATEMENT

DRAFT ALCOHOL POLICY 1. Particulars to follow 2. POLICY STATEMENT DRAFT ALCOHOL POLICY 1. Particulars to follow 2. POLICY STATEMENT The University encourages an enlightened, mature and responsible approach to moderate alcohol consumption, based on the undeniable fact

More information

ALCOHOL AND DRUGS ON CAMPUS

ALCOHOL AND DRUGS ON CAMPUS ALCOHOL AND DRUGS ON CAMPUS Beloit College is a private, coeducational, residential institution of higher education committed to providing a sound liberal arts education that promotes life-long learning

More information

University Alcohol Policy

University Alcohol Policy Administrative Regulation 6:4 Responsible Office: Exectutive Vice President for Finance and Administration / Vice President for Student Affairs Date Effective: 6/19/2015 Supersedes Version: 8/14/2012 University

More information

What every student should know about. Alcohol & Other Drug Use

What every student should know about. Alcohol & Other Drug Use What every student should know about Alcohol & Other Drug Use 2015 16 Princeton University Alcohol and Drug Policies Alcohol Policy Students at Princeton University are responsible for knowing and abiding

More information

Drinking and Driving

Drinking and Driving 244 East 58 th Street, 4th Floor New York, NY 10022 212-269-7797 212-269-7510 Fax www.ncadd.org NCADD POLICY STATEMENT Drinking and Driving Preamble A significant percentage of drinking drivers are suffering

More information

A. The unlawful possession, use, distribution, manufacture, or dispensing of illicit drugs on EVMS property or at an EVMS off-campus activity.

A. The unlawful possession, use, distribution, manufacture, or dispensing of illicit drugs on EVMS property or at an EVMS off-campus activity. I. BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE In accordance with the federal Drug Free Workplace Act of 1988 and the federal Drug Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989, EVMS must adopt and implement a program designed

More information

Policy on Drug-Free Campus & Workplace

Policy on Drug-Free Campus & Workplace President Page 1 of 5 PURPOSE: CI recognizes that substance abuse has become an increasingly serious problem affecting all aspects of society, including the workplace and academia. Substance abuse can

More information

Alcohol and Drug Education and Prevention Programming at Seven Private Institutions

Alcohol and Drug Education and Prevention Programming at Seven Private Institutions STUDENT AFFAIRS LEADERSHIP COUNCIL Alcohol and Drug Education and Prevention Programming at Seven Private Institutions Custom Research Brief June 24, 2011 TABLE OF CONTENTS RESEARCH ASSOCIATE Lady Adjepong

More information

Biennial Review of the Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Program of Wesleyan University

Biennial Review of the Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Program of Wesleyan University Biennial Review of the Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Program of Wesleyan University For the period of September 1, 2000 to August 31, 2002 As required by the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Act of 1989

More information

Integrating Alcohol and Other Drug Use Treatment and Prevention Approaches with Suicide Prevention Efforts.

Integrating Alcohol and Other Drug Use Treatment and Prevention Approaches with Suicide Prevention Efforts. Integrating Alcohol and Other Drug Use Treatment and Prevention Approaches with Suicide Prevention Efforts. KIM DUDE DIRECTOR OF THE WELLNESS RESOURCE CENTER UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI DUDEK@MISSOURI.EDU Facts

More information

Campus Crime Awareness

Campus Crime Awareness 1 of 5 2/24/2009 9:22 AM Campus Crime Awareness Title II of the Student Right to Know and Campus Security Act, know as the Campus Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990, requires that colleges

More information

ALCOHOL POLICY FOR GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL STUDENT EVENTS

ALCOHOL POLICY FOR GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL STUDENT EVENTS ALCOHOL POLICY FOR GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL STUDENT EVENTS POLICY STATEMENT Yeshiva University is committed to creating and maintaining an environment that is free of alcohol abuse. The University

More information

College Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Use in New Mexico Spring 2013

College Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Use in New Mexico Spring 2013 College Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Use in New Mexico Spring The New Mexico Higher Education Prevention Consortium Prepared by The University of New Mexico: Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse,

More information

STATEMENT OF POLICY ON SOCIAL HOST RESPONSIBILITY

STATEMENT OF POLICY ON SOCIAL HOST RESPONSIBILITY STATEMENT OF POLICY ON SOCIAL HOST RESPONSIBILITY The University of the South supports practices that emphasize a host s responsibility to plan social gatherings in a way that provides a safe setting for

More information

Policy Statement on Drugs and Alcohol

Policy Statement on Drugs and Alcohol Policy Statement on Drugs and Alcohol The Drug and Alcohol Policies established at MWCC are intended to address student or employee misuse of alcohol and other drugs on campus, thereby creating a safer

More information

Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act Compliance

Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act Compliance Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act Compliance Campus Safety & Security Report Introduction The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security and Campus Crime

More information

Alcohol Awareness Month October 2013. Chad Asplund, MD, FACSM Medical Director, Student Health Georgia Regents University

Alcohol Awareness Month October 2013. Chad Asplund, MD, FACSM Medical Director, Student Health Georgia Regents University Alcohol Awareness Month October 2013 Chad Asplund, MD, FACSM Medical Director, Student Health Georgia Regents University Alcohol Statistics According to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency

More information

Greater Altoona Career & Technology Center ADULT EDUCATION DRUG & ALCOHOL POLICY

Greater Altoona Career & Technology Center ADULT EDUCATION DRUG & ALCOHOL POLICY The Greater Altoona Career & Technology Center recognizes that the abuse of controlled substances is a serious problem with legal, physical and social implications for the whole school community. As an

More information

Community Development and Substance Abuse Programs

Community Development and Substance Abuse Programs Summary Statement MIT has developed a comprehensive prevention program consistent with the Institute s priorities regarding alcohol and other drugs, which includes reducing the rates of dangerous drinking

More information

College Safety Offices. www.ecc.edu 716-851-1ECC

College Safety Offices. www.ecc.edu 716-851-1ECC College Safety Offices North Campus Spring Student Center Room 5 Phone 85-4 South Campus Building 5 Room 5 Phone 85-6 City Campus Main Building Room Phone 85- For emergencies call 76-7-4545 or 9 www.ecc.edu

More information

TEXAS SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY S STATEMENT ON DRUG FREE SCHOOLS AND CAMPUS STUDENT ANNUAL NOTIFICATION

TEXAS SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY S STATEMENT ON DRUG FREE SCHOOLS AND CAMPUS STUDENT ANNUAL NOTIFICATION TEXAS SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY S STATEMENT ON DRUG FREE SCHOOLS AND CAMPUS STUDENT ANNUAL NOTIFICATION Texas Southern University adheres to and complies with the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments

More information

Past, Present and Future

Past, Present and Future Newsletter May 2008 BNCCC Volume 1, Issue 1 Bloomington Normal Community Campus Committee, (309) 827-6026 Mission Statement To reduce high risk drinking and its consequences among Bloomington- Normal students.

More information

5530.01 - DRUG TESTING DRUG TESTING PROGRAMS

5530.01 - DRUG TESTING DRUG TESTING PROGRAMS 5530.01 - DRUG TESTING Drug and alcohol abuse in any school is a threat to the safety and health of students, faculty, staff, and the community as a whole. It jeopardizes the efficiency and the quality

More information

University of Missouri Saint Louis Alcohol and Other Drugs Biennial Review

University of Missouri Saint Louis Alcohol and Other Drugs Biennial Review University of Missouri Saint Louis Alcohol and Other Drugs Biennial Review Introduction The Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Regulations (EDGAR Part 86) require that, as a condition of receiving funds or

More information

ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUGS POLICY

ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUGS POLICY ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUGS POLICY Introduction The University of Rochester Alcohol and Other Drug Policy has been adopted to help students comply with federal, state and local laws regulating the possession,

More information

Alcohol. Policies. on campus and in the workplace

Alcohol. Policies. on campus and in the workplace Alcohol and Drug Policies on campus and in the workplace September 2014 The University of Kansas Alcohol and Drug Policies The consumption of alcoholic liquor on the campus of the University of Kansas

More information

Michigan Driving Record Alcohol, Drugs and Consequences

Michigan Driving Record Alcohol, Drugs and Consequences 7 Your Michigan Driving Record Alcohol, Drugs and Consequences Michigan maintains a driving record for every driver. The driving record contains information the Secretary of State is required to maintain,

More information

Source/Reference: Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989

Source/Reference: Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989 Page 1 of 7 Revision Responsibility: Responsible Executive Officer: Executive Director of Human Resources Vice President for Business Affairs Source/Reference: Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 Drug-Free

More information

Programming with Alcohol Policy for Student Groups Wittenberg University

Programming with Alcohol Policy for Student Groups Wittenberg University Philosophy Programming with Alcohol Policy for Student Groups Wittenberg University Wittenberg University s Student Code of Conduct and Ethics affords student groups the privilege of hosting events with

More information

University of Illinois at Chicago Student Sexual Misconduct and Sexual Violence Interim Policy

University of Illinois at Chicago Student Sexual Misconduct and Sexual Violence Interim Policy University of Illinois at Chicago Student Sexual Misconduct and Sexual Violence Interim Policy Introduction The University of Illinois at Chicago is committed to creating a safe and secure community for

More information

Creating an Alcohol Service Policy

Creating an Alcohol Service Policy Creating an Alcohol Service Policy The Insurance Board does not take a position on whether it is appropriate for alcoholic beverages to be served at church functions or guest/tenant functions on church

More information

BEING IN SHAPE TO RIDE

BEING IN SHAPE TO RIDE Riding a motorcycle is a demanding and complex task. Skilled riders pay attention to the riding environment and to operating the motorcycle, identifying potential hazards, making good judgments and executing

More information

TAFE SA Student Alcohol and Other Drug Policy Under the umbrella of Drugs and Alcohol Policy (DFEEST OHS&IM 026)

TAFE SA Student Alcohol and Other Drug Policy Under the umbrella of Drugs and Alcohol Policy (DFEEST OHS&IM 026) TAFE SA Student Alcohol and Other Drug Policy Under the umbrella of Drugs and Alcohol Policy (DFEEST OHS&IM 026) 1. Purpose of the policy The purpose of the Student Alcohol and Other Drug Policy is to

More information

Alcohol and Drug Abuse and Prevention Statement

Alcohol and Drug Abuse and Prevention Statement Alcohol and Drug Abuse and Prevention Statement (Updated July 2015) Introduction / Standards of Conduct While Lee College recognizes that a substance abuse disorder is an illness requiring intervention

More information

Policies and Procedures

Policies and Procedures Page 1 of 7 Policies and Procedures Policy Governing Use of Alcohol and Other Drugs 1 Introduction: The College of Environmental Science and Forestry is committed to providing a safe and healthy environment

More information

Vanderbilt University Interfraternity Council & Panhellenic Council Alcohol Policy

Vanderbilt University Interfraternity Council & Panhellenic Council Alcohol Policy Vanderbilt University Interfraternity Council & Panhellenic Council Alcohol Policy In planning and implementing social events, all members of the Interfraternity Council and Panhellenic Council within

More information

Alcohol Policy. Policy/Procedure. Philosophy

Alcohol Policy. Policy/Procedure. Philosophy Alcohol Policy Policy/Procedure Philosophy As members of an academic community, students can expect an atmosphere that supports personal growth and learning. However, because we are also members of a residential

More information

Mobilization August 20 - September 6, 2010 FACT: FACT:

Mobilization August 20 - September 6, 2010 FACT: FACT: High-visibility enforcement is vital to the Drunk Driving. Over the Limit. Under Arrest. mobilization. Studies show that the majority of Americans consider impaired driving one of our nation s most important

More information

SECURITY POLICIES AND CRIME STATISTICS REPORT POLICY STATEMENT ON SECURITY AND CAMPUS ACCESS. Harry S Truman College

SECURITY POLICIES AND CRIME STATISTICS REPORT POLICY STATEMENT ON SECURITY AND CAMPUS ACCESS. Harry S Truman College SECURITY POLICIES AND CRIME STATISTICS REPORT POLICY STATEMENT ON SECURITY AND CAMPUS ACCESS Harry S Truman College I. MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT DR. REAGAN F. ROMALI Harry S Truman College enrolls more

More information

OFFICIAL NOTICE TO FACULTY AND STAFF REGARDING SUBSTANCE ABUSE IN UNIVERSITY CAMPUS COMMUNITIES AND WORKSITES

OFFICIAL NOTICE TO FACULTY AND STAFF REGARDING SUBSTANCE ABUSE IN UNIVERSITY CAMPUS COMMUNITIES AND WORKSITES OFFICIAL NOTICE TO FACULTY AND STAFF REGARDING SUBSTANCE ABUSE IN UNIVERSITY CAMPUS COMMUNITIES AND WORKSITES This Official Notice is issued pursuant to the requirements of Subpart B, Section 86.100 of

More information

Party. With A Plan. SJSU Alcohol & Drug Abuse Prevention Committee

Party. With A Plan. SJSU Alcohol & Drug Abuse Prevention Committee Party With A Plan SJSU Alcohol & Drug Abuse Prevention Committee Responsible Hosting: When throwing a party try these TIPS Never serve alcohol to people under 21. Be honest. When inviting guests who are

More information

Alcohol and Other Drugs

Alcohol and Other Drugs Alcohol and Other Drugs Policy and Procedure No. 126 Definitions Drugs - refer to alcohol and illegal drugs and tobacco. Reasonable is defined as moderate, not excessive or not exceeding the limit. Social

More information

UNIVERSITY ALCOHOL AND DRUG POLICIES

UNIVERSITY ALCOHOL AND DRUG POLICIES UNIVERSITY ALCOHOL AND DRUG POLICIES 404-185 Rev 8/14 High-risk drinking and illicit drug use increases the risk of negative health consequences and undermines the University s goals of academic success

More information

ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, AND OTHER DRUG USE POLICY (ATOD) June 2013

ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, AND OTHER DRUG USE POLICY (ATOD) June 2013 ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, AND OTHER DRUG USE POLICY (ATOD) June 2013 To help prevent the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees and to provide and maintain

More information

STUDENTS VIEWS OF EFFECTIVE ALCOHOL SANCTIONS ON COLLEGE CAMPUSES A National Study

STUDENTS VIEWS OF EFFECTIVE ALCOHOL SANCTIONS ON COLLEGE CAMPUSES A National Study STUDENTS VIEWS OF EFFECTIVE ALCOHOL SANCTIONS ON COLLEGE CAMPUSES A National Study Donald D. Gehring Professor Emeritus Bowling Green State Univ. RESEARCH TEAM John Wesley Lowery Associate Professor Indiana

More information

ALCOHOL A DEADLY MIX AND FACTS ABOUT BOATING. STATE OF CALIFORNIA - THE RESOURCES AGENCY Department of Boating and Waterways. Gray Davis Governor

ALCOHOL A DEADLY MIX AND FACTS ABOUT BOATING. STATE OF CALIFORNIA - THE RESOURCES AGENCY Department of Boating and Waterways. Gray Davis Governor S ABOUT BOATING AND ALCOHOL A DEADLY MIX STATEOFCALIFORNIA AYS WDEPARTMENT OF BOATING AND WATER STATE OF CALIFORNIA - THE RESOURCES AGENCY Department of Boating and Waterways Gray Davis Governor Mary D.

More information

College Drinking in Maryland: A Status Report

College Drinking in Maryland: A Status Report A24 College Drinking in Maryland: September 2013 A Report from www.marylandcollaborative.org About the Maryland Collaborative to Reduce College Drinking and Related Problems The Maryland Collaborative

More information

Biennial Review of the Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Program of Wesleyan University

Biennial Review of the Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Program of Wesleyan University Biennial Review of the Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Program of Wesleyan University For the period of September 1, 1998 to August 31, 2000 As required by the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Act Compiled

More information

Student Health Service FAQs for the Parent and Family Liaison

Student Health Service FAQs for the Parent and Family Liaison 1 Student Health Service FAQs for the Parent and Family Liaison Do I need to send my son or daughter with our prescription insurance card to the University Pharmacy (located at the Student Health Service)

More information

No Eastern International student shall coerce, even subtly, another Eastern International student to use drugs or alcohol.

No Eastern International student shall coerce, even subtly, another Eastern International student to use drugs or alcohol. Eastern International College Alcohol and Drug Policy for Students and Employees This Policy applies to all students on any Eastern International College property or at any activity sponsored or authorized

More information

Alcohol Policy. Updated & Adopted: September 21, 2015. Article I POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

Alcohol Policy. Updated & Adopted: September 21, 2015. Article I POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Alcohol Policy Updated & Adopted: September 21, 2015 Article I POLICIES AND PROCEDURES The consumption of alcoholic beverages at the Mauldin Cultural Center, the Ray Hopkins Senior Center, the Mauldin

More information

University of Central Missouri Interfraternity and Panhellenic Councils Risk Management Policy Revised: Fall 2012. I. Preface

University of Central Missouri Interfraternity and Panhellenic Councils Risk Management Policy Revised: Fall 2012. I. Preface University of Central Missouri Interfraternity and Panhellenic Councils Risk Management Policy Revised: Fall 2012 I. Preface A. Mission Statement of the University of Central Missouri (UCM) Fraternity

More information

Alcohol & Other Drug Policy

Alcohol & Other Drug Policy For more information, contact the Student Leadership and Involvement Center (909) 335-5103 Alcohol & Other Drug Policy For further information, contact Student Life at 909-748-8053 University of Redlands

More information

University of Louisiana at Lafayette STUDENT ALCOHOL & DRUG POLICY

University of Louisiana at Lafayette STUDENT ALCOHOL & DRUG POLICY University of Louisiana at Lafayette STUDENT ALCOHOL & DRUG POLICY In 1990, an Alcohol/Drug Policy was approved for UL Lafayette. This policy is in compliance with the federal Drug Free Schools and Communities

More information

Board of Regents Approved May 4, 2010 MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE POLICY

Board of Regents Approved May 4, 2010 MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE POLICY Board of Regents Approved May 4, 2010 MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE POLICY Morgan State University (the "University), is dedicated to providing a campus environment free of the illegal

More information

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND POLICY ON EMPLOYEE ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG ABUSE

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND POLICY ON EMPLOYEE ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG ABUSE VI-8.00(A) UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND POLICY ON EMPLOYEE ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG ABUSE (Approved by the President September 9, 1992; technical changes November 2009; technical changes September 2014.) The University

More information

The Community Alcohol Personality Survey

The Community Alcohol Personality Survey The Community Alcohol Personality Survey Learn how to establish the size and shape of alcohol problems in your community and where to focus your efforts for the most impact. www.faceproject.org Toll Free

More information

MICHIGAN JEWISH INSTITUTE Policy and Procedure Manual

MICHIGAN JEWISH INSTITUTE Policy and Procedure Manual Effective Date: June 2003 Page No. 1 of 12 GENERAL PURPOSE: This policy is intended to provide a process and procedure that will increase awareness of campus safety and security issues and to communicate

More information

Event Management Guidelines. Month 2011. 1 Event Management Guidelines (Month, 2011)

Event Management Guidelines. Month 2011. 1 Event Management Guidelines (Month, 2011) Month 2011 1 (Month, 2011) Table of Contents Executive Summary... 2 More information... 2 Event Risk Assessment... 3 Event Checklist... 4 Event Details... 8 Event Contact List... 10 Event Task List...

More information

2015-2016 ACADEMIC YEAR CONTRACT Herkimer College - HCCC Housing Corporation Student Housing Contract

2015-2016 ACADEMIC YEAR CONTRACT Herkimer College - HCCC Housing Corporation Student Housing Contract Herkimer County Community College Housing Corporation Mission Statement The Herkimer County Community College Housing Corporation is committed to facilitating and enhancing the academic, social and personal

More information

Key Club Awake-A-Thon To Benefit the Kiwanis Family House. A How to Guide...

Key Club Awake-A-Thon To Benefit the Kiwanis Family House. A How to Guide... Key Club Awake-A-Thon To Benefit the Kiwanis Family House A How to Guide... Kiwanis Family House, 2875 50 th Street, Sacramento, Ca, 95817 www.kiwanisfamilyhouse.org Mission: To provide temporary housing

More information

California Society of Addiction Medicine (CSAM) Consumer Q&As

California Society of Addiction Medicine (CSAM) Consumer Q&As C o n s u m e r Q & A 1 California Society of Addiction Medicine (CSAM) Consumer Q&As Q: Is addiction a disease? A: Addiction is a chronic disorder, like heart disease or diabetes. A chronic disorder is

More information

2013 Annual Security Report: Boston University Brussels

2013 Annual Security Report: Boston University Brussels 2013 Annual Security Report: Boston University Brussels 1. Brief Overview of Program, Enrollment and Facilities Boston University Brussels serves 140 to 200 students each year, offering graduate certificate

More information

ALCOHOL and CRIME in WYOMING

ALCOHOL and CRIME in WYOMING 2010 ALCOHOL and CRIME in WYOMING INTRODUCTION Alcohol and Crime in Wyoming - 2010 In spring of 2005, the Wyoming Association of Sheriffs and Chiefs of Police received grant funding from the Wyoming Department

More information

AFL QUEENSLAND YOUTH MANAGEMENT POLICY

AFL QUEENSLAND YOUTH MANAGEMENT POLICY AFL QUEENSLAND YOUTH MANAGEMENT POLICY GUIDELINES FOR MANAGING YOUTH AFL TEAMS Any person who will manage and supervise the AFL Queensland staff and/or community volunteers involved in an AFL youth team

More information

Federico Beauty Institute. Campus Safety and Security Handbook

Federico Beauty Institute. Campus Safety and Security Handbook Federico Beauty Institute Campus Safety and Security Handbook I. Campus Geography Federico Beauty Institute is located & controls 1515 Sports Drive, Sacramento, CA 95834. This is The School s only location.

More information

STONY HILL RURAL FIRE DEPARTMENT OPERATING GUIDELINES

STONY HILL RURAL FIRE DEPARTMENT OPERATING GUIDELINES Date: 5-4-2010 Page: 1 of 6 1. Purpose The purpose of this membership group is to give young adults in our community an opportunity to learn about duties, responsibilities, skills, and obligations of a

More information

YOU BETTER WATCH OUT, I M TELLING YOU WHY: AVOID DUI TASK FORCE IS CRACKING DOWN ON DRUNK DRIVERS Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over

YOU BETTER WATCH OUT, I M TELLING YOU WHY: AVOID DUI TASK FORCE IS CRACKING DOWN ON DRUNK DRIVERS Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE December 11, 2014 CONTACT: Sergeant Robert Tipre Riverside Police Department Phone: 951.351.6046 Email: rtipre@riversideca.gov YOU BETTER WATCH OUT, I M TELLING YOU WHY: AVOID DUI

More information

Model House Policies A Guide to Developing Responsible Business Practices for On-Sale Licensees

Model House Policies A Guide to Developing Responsible Business Practices for On-Sale Licensees STATE OF CALIFORNIA Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control Model House Policies A Guide to Developing Responsible Business Practices for On-Sale Licensees ABC-620-A (4/04) Introduction Your business

More information

Alcohol and Other Drug (AOD) Program Framework

Alcohol and Other Drug (AOD) Program Framework Alcohol and Other Drug (AOD) Program Framework groups: athletic teams, fraternities, res hall communities (mezzo) individual (micro) campus-wide (macro) Person in Environment Approach to AOD Prevention

More information

Drug and Alcohol Policy and Procedure

Drug and Alcohol Policy and Procedure Drug and Alcohol Policy and Procedure Drug and Alcohol Policy It is the policy of LTC to promote a safe, healthy and productive environment for all students and employees and to maintain a learning and

More information

1 of 7 8/15/2005 4:40 PM. home > student handbook > codes & policies

1 of 7 8/15/2005 4:40 PM. home > student handbook > codes & policies 1 of 7 8/15/2005 4:40 PM home > student handbook > codes & policies 2 of 7 8/15/2005 4:40 PM Values and Moral Standards at FSU Mission Statement General Statement Of Philosophy On Student Conduct And Discipline

More information

SACRED HEART UNIVERSITY STUDENT ORGANIZATION EVENTS INVOLVING ALCOHOL

SACRED HEART UNIVERSITY STUDENT ORGANIZATION EVENTS INVOLVING ALCOHOL SACRED HEART UNIVERSITY STUDENT ORGANIZATION EVENTS INVOLVING ALCOHOL For all social events involving alcohol (i.e., socials, semi-formals, formals), the event must be submitted through the event registration

More information

LAWS FOR JUVENILES. Officer Brian V. Hubbard School Resource Officer Edina High School 952-848-3809 brian.hubbard@edinaschools.org

LAWS FOR JUVENILES. Officer Brian V. Hubbard School Resource Officer Edina High School 952-848-3809 brian.hubbard@edinaschools.org LAWS FOR JUVENILES Officer Brian V. Hubbard School Resource Officer Edina High School 952-848-3809 brian.hubbard@edinaschools.org Officer Aaron White School Resource Officer South View & Valley View Middle

More information