EME Instructional Design and Applications

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1 University of North Florida Educating Professionals Who Impact the Lives of Children and Adults EME 6601 Instructional Design and Applications UNF professional education programs prepare candidates who are: Multiculturally proficient. They understand, respect, and value differences in individuals and model best practices for designing and delivering instructional programs to fit the needs of diverse learners. Professionally aware. They hold to high ethical standards, professional dispositions, and a code of professional conduct worthy of the education profession. They value fairness and believe that all students can and should learn. Analytically adept. They engage in reflective thinking about classroom practice and contexts; assess and analyze a variety of data from those contexts; use reflective practice to make appropriate adjustments to curriculum and instruction; and make data informed instructional decisions to benefit the learning of all students. Competently prepared. They possess and demonstrate the content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge and skills, and pedagogical and professional knowledge and skills necessary to help all students learn. Technologically capable. They use technology effectively to facilitate design of instruction, engage students in the learning process, and communicate with colleagues, parents, and other key stakeholders.

2 Syllabus Course Number: EME 6601 Course Title: Instructional Design and Applications Number of Credit Hours: 3 Required or Elective: Required for Adult Learning track Term: Spring 2009 Day and Time: Variable Location: Online Course web site: Professor: Dr. T. Cavanaugh Office: 9/1107 Office Hours: Virtual Office: by appointment Telephone: Office: Cell: Address: Instructor web site: Required text: Morrison, Ross & Kemp. (2007). Designing Effective Instruction, 5 th ed. Wiley. Heath, C. & Heath, D. (2007) Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Other Die. Random House Online texts: Wiggins & McTigh (1999). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. We will use the sample chapters online at Bransford, J. D., Brown, A. L. & Cocking, R. R. (1999). How people learn: Brain, mind, experience, and school. National Academy Press. We will use the text online at Conceptual Framework for the Professional Education Unit at UNF: UNF s professional education programs are founded on professional knowledge bases and the world of practice to assure that graduates possess the knowledge, skills, and dispositions appropriate for achieving excellence in their roles as educators. The programs conceptual framework is encapsulated in the phrase, educating professionals who impact the lives of children and adults and the acronym M-PACT. Our programs prepare candidates to be multiculturally proficient, professionally aware, analytically adept, competently prepared, and technologically capable. Course Description This course focuses on the application of instructional design principles to the development of instruction. Topics include contemporary issues and trends in instructional design, foundations in learning research, requirements for instruction, task and needs analysis, learning situations 2 of 20

3 and instructional models, learner characteristics, hardware and software innovations, assessing instructional outcomes, and factors affecting utilization. Topics include: Theoretical bases and critical issues in design for learning Experience working with collaborative design teams. Developing instruction for a range of content areas and grade levels Applying design and learning standards Developing standards-based instruction The following concepts are a framework for the course. Educators know the subjects they teach and how to develop experiences for learning those subjects. There are many ways to teach well, but learning is mainly an active process. There are principles based on theory, research, and experience to guide design of instruction. In consonance with the conceptual framework, this course will be focused on the acquisition of knowledge and skills for designing effective standards-based instruction. Distance Learning A component of this course will be delivered though distance learning. Distance learning, if you are new to it, is an exciting and very different learning situation from the classroom. It is important for you to realize that is takes a good amount of self-discipline to keep up. If you keep up I m sure that you will do well The course internal is for communication between class members and will use the e- mail address that you supply in your personal setting. If wish to contact the instructor or send in assignments you should them to my main mail address: Be sure to include EME 6601 in the subject of your message. You do not have to use the that was initially listed, you may change the listing to one of your choice and then continue to use your own . The discussion board/forum is an important component of the class. It is required that you participate with the discussion/forum topics and provide not only your own information but also comment/reply to others. All of your assignments and your main section to work out of is the Course Material section. Make sure that you check weekly to see if any new material has been added. Course Goals In this course, learners will develop and demonstrate dispositions of instructional designers as they analyze and apply systematic strategies for the identification of instructional needs, the design of instructional models, and the selection and design of these models to meet educational and training goals in both K-12 education, and adult education. Learners will use technology as a learning tool and as a tool for reflection on learning. This course has been designed to meet the needs of those individuals involved in designing instruction, incorporating elements of learning theory, evaluation theory and system theory which support the design of instruction. This course will provide teachers, media specialists, and adult educators with those skills needed to design instruction they are responsible for conducting and enable them to consult with others who are responsible for instruction. The purpose of this class is for learners to learn how to design effective instruction. 3 of 20

4 Students in this class will work as "design teams", building collaborative work environments, addressing the goals and requirements of this class. This course is project-oriented: development efforts culminate in a proposal for an instructional product and a report on prototype development and testing efforts. However, the goal of the course is not to develop products per se, but to provide opportunities to practice disciplined and collaborative processes for inquiring about learning problems and opportunities, and for inquiring about the value of alternative strategies for addressing these problems and opportunities. The course takes an engineering approach to instructional development. Topics include needs assessment, analysis of subject-matter content, development of goals and objectives, classification and sequencing of objectives, design of instructional strategies, selection and integration of media-based delivery systems, design of print- and/or multimediabased instruction, and formative evaluation of product prototypes. Diversity Considerations The course includes methods for designing instruction to meet the needs of all students. Please notify the instructor within the first week if a reasonable accommodation to a disability is needed for this course. A letter from the Student Disability Office must accompany this request. Technology Considerations This course is a web-enhanced course, meaning that there will be some material provided and some tasks assigned that will require access to the Blackboard course site via the Internet. Students must have access to a computer that will enable them to access the Internet. In addition, students will be expected to use appropriate technology in the preparation of their assignments and to be able to send and receive communications to and from the professor and fellow students. Instruction is enhanced using online resources and electronically delivered reading, presentations, and assignments. Learners create assignments using a wide range of technology, including word processor, spreadsheet, database, presentation software, web page editors, scanners, digital cameras, and other means, and to submit assignments electronically. Learners also participate in reflective discussion via online synchronous and asynchronous communication tools. Course Objective Matrix Course Objective 1.0 Apply theories of learning, teaching, and instructional design 2.0 Apply instructional design principles to the design of instructional materials 3.0 Describe and practice strategies for evaluation of instructional design and materials, including summative and formative evaluations 4.0 Use technology to produce instructional material for student learning 5.0 Identify strategies to assess student learning. 6.0 Apply design concepts to a needs analysis, identifying contexts, learning tasks, and aspects of the learner. Knowledge Skill Disposition Impact 4 of 20

5 This course meets the following ISTE standards: Educational Computing and Technology Leadership TL.II.A. Design developmentally appropriate learning opportunities that apply technologyenhanced instructional strategies to support the diverse needs of learners. Candidates: 1. Research and disseminate project-based instructional units modeling appropriate uses of technology to support learning. 2. Identify and evaluate methods and strategies for teaching computer/technology concepts and skills within the context of classroom learning and coordinate dissemination of best practices at the district/state/regional level. 3. Stay abreast of current technology resources and strategies to support the diverse needs of learners including adaptive and assistive technologies and disseminate information to teachers. TL-II.B. Apply current research on teaching and learning with technology when planning learning environments and experiences. Candidates: 1. Locate and evaluate current research on teaching and learning with technology when planning learning environments and experiences. TL-II.F. Identify and apply instructional design principles associated with the development of technology resources. Candidates: 1. Identify and evaluate instructional design principles associated with the development of technology resources. TL-V.B. Continually evaluate and reflect on professional practice to make informed decisions regarding the use of technology in support of student learning. Candidates: 1. Based on evaluations make recommendations for changes in professional practices regarding the use of technology in support of student learning. Course Assignments, Expectations and Grading Procedures GRADING PROCEDURES The final grade in EDA 6217 will be determined based upon all of the following: Attendance and participation including demonstrated familiarity with assigned readings and handouts for each class. The grade of A will be awarded only to students who complete all assignments. Participation in and completion of assignments posted on the Blackboard course site. Acceptable and timely completion of assignments and application tasks/products or completion of your learning contract agreement. Unless otherwise stated, assignments presented in a session are due by the morning of the next session start date. Application tasks/products are scored according to criteria stated in the standards references boxes. Perfection is not expected on all of these projects/assignments, but serious attempts and corrective efforts are expected. You are NOT expected to master all of the applications presented. You ARE expected to be able to navigate within each application and make the attempt. 5 of 20

6 Course grades are based on activities, projects, and assignments. Assignments may be turned in though , shared documents, or they may be placed in Blackboard. Professional Conduct is necessary to earn an excellent or good grade. All written work must be typed or word-processed, except for forms. Assignment Value Weight Instructional design literature 25 9% report Design Project Report % Design Project Report % Design Project Report % Rough draft of instructional 25 9% materials Design Project Presentation and 34 12% Unit Plan Session Activities 30 estimated 10 TOTAL 280 All assignments have a 10% penalty per week for lateness, with no work accepted two weeks after the due date. Overall Percentage A Excellent performance B Good performance C Fair performance D Poor performance Assignment details and rubrics: 1. Professional conduct Read assignments and engage in a positive way in all class discussions and activities. Timeliness is required. Know and follow university policy regarding academic honesty. In your online work, follow standards of netiquette: be accountable for what you send, acknowledge online sources you reference. 6 of 20

7 2. Instructional design literature report Course Objective(s): 1, 5, 6 Florida Educator Accomplished Practices: 3, 7, 8, 9, 12 ISTE TL Competencies: TL-II.A.3, II.B.1, II.F.1 FELE Competencies: Technology, Instructional Leadership Using relevant print and/or electronic sources, you will locate 2 articles which describe strategies for instructional design. The syllabus bibliography, Blackboard and your textbook chapter reference lists are starting points for locating articles. The 2-page report (~1000 words - single-spaced) should include (1) a short summary of each article and (2) the process you used to locate and select the articles, (3) followed by your discussion of the ideas in the article. (e.g., Does the strategy seem feasible? How might you modify it for your own use?) Submit the report electronically on Blackboard. Assignment rubric: (25 points) Value Professional appearance and structure Clear description of design strategy Quality of discussion Appropriate reference Location and selection Meets/exceeds all criteria: 5 Word processed, properly formatted Strategy described in writer s words Relation of strategy to writer Full citation, properly formatted, with web link Detailed description of the article search process, and reasons why the articles were chosen Meets some criteria: 3 Less than 2 pages, improper formatting Incomplete or erroneous description Superficial or inappropriate discussion Incomplete citation Incomplete information Meets few/no criteria: 0 Requirement absent Requirement absent Requirement absent Requirement absent Requirement absent 7 of 20

8 Design Project Course Objective(s): 1, 2, 6 Florida Educator Accomplished Practices: 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 ISTE TL Competencies: TL-II.A.2, II.B.1, II.F.1, V.B.1 FELE Competencies: Technology, Managing the Learning Environment You will work as an individual or in a group of 2-4 members to design a unit or module of instruction using the instructional design process (groups must complete a team contract before starting). This unit could be an adult education unit for a specific task, or it could focus on a specific grade level or subject content area. For the purposes of this course, the instructional unit should be designed for approximately ten (10) hours or two weeks of instruction. You will pilot test and evaluate the completed unit of instruction to determine if each of the components function together to achieve your instructional unit goal. Your final unit of instruction will be shared on the last day of class. The following must be accomplished as the instructional unit is being developed. These criteria will be used to evaluate the completeness of the unit of instruction: a. Establish educational goals when designing instructional units so that they reflect the needs of the curriculum, the students, or the society. b. Analyze the learners that will be instructed in your unit. Your analyses should be based on the following categories: social background, experiential background, developmental level, motivation, knowledge level, and learning style. It should provide sufficient information to design the instructional activities and choose the resources for the unit. c. Specify instructional objectives which will enable your learners to achieve the instructional goal that you have identified in your instructional unit. The objectives must contain the necessary elements and represent various levels of learning. d. Construct performance measures that evaluate student learning outcomes, including that learning which occurs prior to, during, and following the instruction. e. Describe teaching/learning activities for each of the instructional objectives in your unit. Principles of learning theory should be applied to each teaching/learning activity so that none of the learning principles are violated. f. Select the instructional resources that will be used in each of the teaching/learning activities. The instructional resources should show evidence of being selected on the basis of implementing a given objective for a specified group of learners. 8 of 20

9 3. Design Project Report 1 Course Objective(s): 1, 5, 6 Florida Educator Accomplished Practices: 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 ISTE/TSSA Competencies: TL-II.A.2, II.B.1, II.F.1, V.B.1 FELE Competencies: Technology, Managing the Learning Environment The design team s first report should include the following information, created while planning the instructional unit. Project title Project description Detailed description of your needs assessment (Chapter 2), including development of plan and its use, and goal analysis (Chapter 2) Summary of your needs assessment outcome (Chapter 2) Goal statement as a result of your assessment (Chapter 2) List of entry competencies (Chapter 3) Learner interview (Chapter 3) Description of learners (Chapter 3) Performance context and implications for instruction (Chapter 3) Provide a title for your project that is simple and direct. Describe in clear terms the purpose of your project, why it is needed, who will be served (provide a learner analysis), and what will be accomplished. Provide a detailed description, with examples, of your needs assessment plan. Include a brief analysis of the learning environment. Include information which details how plan will be enacted and analyzed. Provide a summary of the data you collected with your needs assessment instrument. What did your team learn about your learners and the learning environment? Provide a goal statement which will address the desired outcomes of your project (this is not a listing of performance objectives). Outline the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that learners need to bring to the instructional process. Summary of discussion with a member of the learner group about the goals of instruction. Describe student attitudes, motivation, background, abilities, learning styles, and group characteristics. Describe the physical, social, and resource elements of the learning site. Assignment rubric: Report 1 Contents Points Score 1. Goal statement 6 2. Goal analysis 6/Needs assessment Identification of entry behaviors 5 4. Description of learner interview 5 5. General description of learners 5 6. Description of performance context, implications for 5 instruction TOTAL 36 9 of 20

10 4. Design Project Report 2 Course Objective(s): 1, 5, 6 Florida Educator Accomplished Practices: 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 ISTE/TSSA Competencies: TL-II.A.2, II.B.1, II.F.1, V.B.1 FELE Competencies: Technology, Managing the Learning Environment The design team s second report should include the following information, created while developing the instructional unit. Project title Revisions since Report 1 Goals statement Task analysis tied to the goals (Chapter 4) Instructional objectives (Chapter 5) Instructional sequence (Chapter 6) Strategies for objectives (Chapter 7) Details on objectives (Chapter 8-9) Practice for objectives (Chapter 8) Pre-instructional activities (Chapter 8) Groupings and media (Chapter 8-9) Sample assessments (Chapter 10-11) Comment on revisions to the project s needs assessment, goals, sub-skills, learners, or context made since Report 1. Attached your revised goal statement, based on what you learned during the learner assessment. Identify the appropriate skills needed for each step of the instructional process. Identify the skill or behavior the learner will be able to demonstrate at the end of each instructional task, the conditions under which the learner will perform, and the level the student will meet for each objective. Show a timeline or flow chart with the events of instruction for the unit, such as with a Gant chart or other tool. List strategies that will be employed for teaching the objectives in the lessons. Summarize the lessons and materials that will be used to teach each objective. Describe how students will practice skills associated with each objective, and the form that feedback to students will take. Outline ways that learners will be motivated and prepared for learning, and methods the instructor will use to learn about the students prior knowledge and/or misconceptions. Discuss the student groupings and the instructional media that will be used with the strategies. Attach example pre- and post-assessments correlated with the objectives and goals. Assignment rubric: Report 2 Contents Points Score 1. Comments on revisions made since Report Attached revised instructional analysis and goal 0 statement 3. Instructional objectives Sample assessment for each objective 8 5. Describe instructional sequence 2 6. Describe pre-instructional activities 2 7. Information/example for each objective Practice/feedback for each objective Strategy for teaching each terminal objective 2 10 of 20

11 10. Describe student groupings and media selections Attached pre- and post assessments used with 4 instruction TOTAL Rough draft of instructional materials Course Objective(s): 1, 5, 6 Florida Educator Accomplished Practices: 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 ISTE/TSSA Competencies: TL-II.A.2, II.B.1, II.F.1, V.B.1 FELE Competencies: Technology, Managing the Learning Environment Your team will prepare a package of instructional materials for the lessons in your unit. The materials are those resources that the teacher and the students will use for learning the objectives. Include materials that the instructor will use to present information or instructions to students, and materials students will use to guide their learning, practice, and be assessed. The materials may be printed, and they may be other media including transparencies, audio, video, images, diagrams, presentation files, websites, and other electronic or multimedia forms. The expectation is that your lessons will use a combination of existing and original materials use published materials and materials you create in a variety of formats. Assignment rubric: Value Professional appearance and structure Completeness and quality Correlation with objectives Variety of materials and media, mix of existing and original materials References Meets/exceeds all criteria: 5 All materials are goodquality copies and electronically-produced originals, and they include information about their use in the lessons. Meets some criteria: 3 Some materials are good-quality copies and electronicallyproduced originals, and/or some include information about their use in the lessons. All objectives are Some objectives are supported with high quality supported and\or the materials appropriate to quality and the learning context and appropriateness needs the learners. improvement. All materials support Some materials appear objectives. to support objectives. Materials represent at least three media types, and at least half are original. Complete reference information for all materials used and developed. Meets few/no criteria: 0 Requirement absent Requirement absent Requirement absent Materials represent Requirement fewer than three media absent types, and/or less than half are original. Incomplete reference information, or sources for some materials listed. Requirement absent 11 of 20

12 6. Design Project Report 3 Course Objective(s): 1, 5, 6 Florida Educator Accomplished Practices: 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 ISTE/TSSA Competencies: TL-II.A.2, II.B.1, II.F.1, V.B.1 FELE Competencies: Technology, Managing the Learning Environment The design team s third report should include the following information, created while evaluating and revising the instructional unit. Project title Revisions since Report 2 Comment on revisions to the project made since Report 2. Goals, objectives and task analysis, and Report 2 Plan for one-to-one formative evaluation (Chapter 12) Results of one-to-one formative evaluation (Chapter 12) Materials and assessments for smallgroup evaluation (Chapter 12) Characteristics of small-group learners (Chapter 12) Instruments for small-group evaluation (Chapter 12) Procedures for small-group evaluation (Chapter 12) Summary of small-group evaluation (Chapter 12) Discussion of small group data (Chapter 12) Revisions for instruction and assessment Attached your revised goals, objectives, and task analysis, based on what you learned during the project development, and attach Report 2. Describe the learners, materials, and procedures used in the one-to-one formative evaluation. Describe the results of the one-to-one formative evaluation, by discussing how the students performed. List revisions made to your unit as a result. Attach a copy of the instructional materials and assessments used in the small-group evaluation. Describe the characteristics of the small-group learners. Describe the instruments used in the small-group evaluation. Describe the procedures used in the small-group evaluation. Summarize the data from the small-group evaluation by discussing how the students performed. Reflect on the small-group evaluation outcome. Discuss what you learned. List the revisions your group plans for the next version of the unit instruction and assessment. Assignment rubric: Report 3 Contents Points Score 1. Comments made on revisions since Report Attached instructional analysis and Report Describe learners, materials, and procedures used in one-toone 5 formative evaluation 4. Describe results of one-to-one formative evaluation, and 10 revisions made as a result 5. Attached copy of instructional materials and assessments used 20 in small-group evaluation 6. Describe characteristics of small-group learners 3 7. Describe instruments used in small-group evaluation 3 8. Describe the procedures used in the small-group evaluation 5 9. Summary of data from small-group evaluation Discussion of small group data Revisions planned for next version of instruction and 12 assessment TOTAL of 20

13 7. Design Project Presentation and Unit Plan Course Objective(s): 1, 5, 6 Florida Educator Accomplished Practices: 2, 3, 11, 12 ISTE/TSSA Competencies: TL-II.A.1, II.A.2, II.A.3 FELE Competencies: Technology, Instructional Leadership Your group will share an overview of your unit for the class. You will choose the method of presentation. For example, the presentation may take the form of a discussion of the full unit timeline and then a mini-lesson from the unit; a web page with a unit outline and links to instructional materials; an electronic presentation with screen captures showing instructional materials; a combination of methods. Include a theoretical framework (Chapter 13), the context and need for the instruction, your goals and objectives, and a brief summary of the strategies and materials, along with a short synopsis of your assessment experiences, and considerations for planning implementation of instruction (Chapter 15). The presentation should be minutes in length and be professional, clear, and logically organized. Prepare an overview or sample lesson handout for each member of the class, and turn in your full unit plan to the course instructor. Assignment rubric: Presentation and Unit Plan Points Score Each group member has a significant role in the 2 presentation minutes in length 2 Synopsis of assessment experiences 3 Professional, clear and logically organized 3 Handout (3 fold brochure) contains: Unit overview or sample lesson 3 Theoretical framework relates to design 2 Context and need for instruction 3 Unit goals and objectives 3 Summary of strategies, materials, implementation 3 considerations Unit plan includes : 10 Educational goals and a statement of rationale for the goals Description of learners: social background, experiential background, developmental level, motivation, knowledge level, and learning style Instructional objectives Performance measures that evaluate student learning outcomes, including that learning which occurs prior to, during, and following the instruction Strategies and materials for each objective TOTAL of 20

14 Schedule Week Date Topic Reading Assignment due 1 1/4 Introduction to instructional design 2 1/11 Needs assessment and goal analysis Learner and context analysis DEI Chp 1 MTS 1 DEI Chp 2-3 MTS 2 3 1/18 Task analysis DEI Chp 4 Literature report 4 1/25 Report writing and online meetings 5 2/1 Objectives DEI Chp 5 MTS 3 6 2/8 Instructional sequencing DEI Chp 6 MTS 4 7 2/15 Developing instructional strategies DEI Chp 7 MTS 5 8 2/22 Developing instructional materials DEI Chp 8-9 MTS 6 Report 1: Goals and analyses 9 3/1 Evaluation of learning DEI Chp MTS /8 Formative and summative evaluation of instruction 11 3/15 Spring Break DEI Chp 12 MTS 8 Report 2: Objectives and activities 12 3/22 Consulting/team session One-to-one formative evaluation 13 3/29 Team planning Small group evaluation 14 4/5 Theories and models for learning DEI Chp 13 Rough draft of materials 15 4/12 Implementing instructional design DEI Chp 14- Report 3: Evaluations /19 Summary and project presentation (presented online at a TBA day/time) Presentations DEI: Designing Effective Instruction. Morrison, Ross & Kemp. (2007). MTS: Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Other Die. Heath, C. & Heath, D. (2007) Blackboard course: 14 of 20

15 Bibliography Anglin, G.J. (1995). Instructional technology: Past, present and future (2nd ed.) Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited. Bandura, A Social learning theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall Publishers. Bransford, J. D., Brown, A. L. & Cocking, R. R. (1999). How people learn: Brain, mind, experience, and school. National Academy Press. Dick, W. (1995). Instructional design and creativity: A response to the critics. Educational Technology, 35, (4), Dick., W., Carey, L. (1996). The systematic design of instruction. Fourth edition. New York: Harper Collins College Publishers. Duffy, T. & Jonassen, D. (Eds.). (1992). Constructivism and the Technology of Instruction. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. Duffy, T.M., Lowyck, J. & Jonassen, D.H. (Eds). (1993). The design of constructivist learning environments: Implications for instructional design and the use of technology. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Ely, D.R. & Plomp, T. (1995). Classic writings on instructional technology. Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited, Inc. Fleming, M., Levie, W.H. (Eds). (1993). Instructional message design: Principles from the behavioral and cognitive sciences. (2nd ed.) Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Gagne, R. (1997). The conditions of learning and theory of instruction. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston. Gagne', R.M., Briggs, L.J., & Wagner, W.W. (1992). Principles of instructional design (4th ed.). Fort Worth, TX: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich College Publishers. Gardner, H. E. (1993). Multiple intelligences: The theory in practice. New York: Basic Books. Gladwell, M. (2000). The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference. Boston: Little, Brown and Company publishers. Hannafin, M.J. & Peck, K.L. (1988). The design, development and evaluation of instructional software. New York: MacMillan Publishing Company. Heath, C. & Heath, D. (2007). Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die. New York: Random House. Heinrich, R., Molenda, M., & Russell, J.D. (1993). Instructional media and the new technologies of instruction. (4th ed.). New York: MacMillian Publishing Company. Jonassen, D. (1996). Computers in the classroom: Mindtools for critical thinking. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Merrill. Jonassen, D., Hannum, W. and Tessmer, M. (1988). Instructional designs for microcomputer courseware. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Jonassen, D., Hannum, W. and Tessmer, M. (1989). Handbook of procedures for task analysis. New York: Praeger. Kemp, J. (1977) Instructional design. Belmont: Fearon-Pitman Publishers. Laurillard, D. (1993). Rethinking university teaching: A framework for the effective use of educational technology. New York: Routledge. Leshin, C., Pollack, J., & Reigeluth, C. (1990). Instructional design: Strategies and tactics for improving learning and performance. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Educational Technology Publications. Mager, R. (1984). Goal analysis. Belmont, CA: David S. Lake Publishers. Mager, R. (1984). Preparing instructional objectives. Belmont, CA: David S. Lake Publishers. Merrill, M.D. & Twitchell, D.G. (Eds). (1994). Instructional design theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Educational Technology Publications. Nielson, J. (1999). Designing websites with authority. New Riders Publishing. ISBN X 15 of 20

16 Ragan, Tillman J. (1999). Instructional Design. (2nd ed.) New York: Macmillan Publishing Company. Ritchey, R.C. (1995). Trends in instructional design: Emerging theory-based models. Performance Improvement Quarterly, 8, (3), Ross, S.M. & Morrison, G.R. (1997). Getting started in instructional technology research. (2nd ed). AECT Publication. ISBN Siegel, D. (1997). Creating killer websites. (2nd ed). Hayden Books. ISBN: Weinmann, L. Designing web graphics 2. New Riders Publishing. ISBN: Wiggins & McTigh (1999). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Websites Design Links Instructional Design Glossary Instructional Design Theories Site Theory into Practice Database Combining Two Contrasting Philosophies to Instructional Design, By Lois A. Ritter. Performance Standards for Teachers of English for Speakers of Other Languages Sunshine State Standards Contrasting Teaching Philosophies among American Teachers Teacher Pedagogical Differences by Computer Platform Constructivist Compatible Beliefs and Practices among U.S. Teachers POLICIES UNF registration, grading, and academic progress policies may be found in the Graduate Catalog, and are also available at: Instructor Policies: To provide you the benefits of a focused, disciplined learning experience, online courses are structured within the framework of the semester. Although there may be some required synchronous class meetings online, there will be no regularly scheduled campus class attendance requirements. While there is more flexibility than in on-campus instruction, online courses do require regular participation; for example, observing assignment due dates, regularly logging in, and responding to your instructor s and classmates' correspondence, including discussion board postings. Failure to participate in the class in a timely manner or absence from the class for an extended period of time will result in a decrease in grade. Assignments and Due Dates: Assignments are due on the dates noted. Completion of all assignments is expected during the week indicated, and must be submitted by the first class meeting of the following week. Assignments submitted after the due dates are considered late, and a 10% reduction in grade will occur for each class day the assignment is late. No late work 16 of 20

17 is accepted after 2 sessions/weeks beyond the due date, or after the course is over, without prior arrangement with the instructor Due Dates: Assignments are due on the dates noted. Completion of all assignments is expected during the week indicated, and must be submitted by 9AM of the following Monday (next session - this means the beginning of the first day of the next week). Assignments submitted after 9AM of the due dates are considered late, and a 10% reduction in grade will occur for each class day the assignment is late. No late work is accepted after 2 sessions beyond the due date, or after the course is over, without prior arrangement with the instructor Testing: Students are expected to take examinations at the scheduled day and time. Please notify me in advance if an examination is scheduled on a day on which you may have a conflict. Students who miss in-class quizzes will not be able to take them at a later date. Use of UNF designated accounts for students: the university and/or the instructor will send messages to you via your Osprey account. Please be certain that have set your university account to forward to the address at which you prefer to receive . You may forward your UNF Osprey by following directions provided at the following URL: Academic Integrity: UNF places high priority on and strives to uphold the highest standards of academic integrity while protecting the rights of students and faculty. Should any instructor find evidence of cheating, plagiarism, or other inappropriate assistance in work presented by a student, the instructor should inform the student of the action that will be taken. Any student who becomes aware of misconduct related to academic integrity should inform the instructor or other proper authority. The consequences of a breach of academic integrity may result in an F, which is nonforgivable, regardless of withdrawal status. Additional information may be found in the Graduate Catalog or at: University/College Policies and Guidelines College of Education and Human Services Policies Apply to all courses. COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES POLICIES 1. Students with Disabilities: Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Policy. The College of Education and Human Services complies with ADA requirements in making reasonable accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. Students with disabilities who seek reasonable accommodations in the classroom or other aspects of performing their coursework must first register with the UNF Disability Resource Center (DRC) located in Building 10, Room DRC staff members work with students to obtain required documentation of disability and to identify appropriate accommodations as required by applicable disability laws including the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). After receiving all necessary documentation, the DRC staff determines whether a student qualifies for services with the DRC and if so, the accommodations the student will be provided. DRC staff then prepares a letter for the student to provide faculty advising them of approved accommodations. For further information, contact 17 of 20

18 the DRC by phone (904) , or visit the DRC website (http://www.unf.edu/dept/disabled-services). 2. College Undergraduate Admission Policy. In order to earn credit toward an undergraduate degree in the College of Education and Human Services, students must be admitted to a COEHS undergraduate program of study. Admission to the University does NOT in and of itself constitute admission to a given program of study. Transfer students cannot take more than 14 UNF hours toward any COEHS undergraduate degree without first having been fully admitted into a program of study. Prior to being considered for full admission into an undergraduate program of study, students must (a) submit acceptable scores on all parts of the College-Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST) and (b) present official transcripts documenting a cumulative undergraduate GPA of 2.5 or better on a minimum of 60 semester hours from a regionally accredited college or university. Students are encouraged to consult the Undergraduate Catalog and/or contact the College s Office of Student Services (Schultz Hall 2305; telephone: 904/ ) for information regarding admission to a specific undergraduate program of study. 3. University Enrollment Policy. Only those students who are admitted to the University are entitled to enroll in classes, and only those students who are enrolled in a given course are permitted to attend class meetings for that course. Sitting through a class without registering does not constitute enrollment. Instructors are authorized to bar students who are not enrolled in a course from attending class sessions until evidence of enrollment is presented to the instructor. Even if unenrolled students are allowed via the instructor s oversight to remain in a class, university policy prohibits students from being added to a class roster after the reinstatement deadline. The primary responsibility for assuring that a student is enrolled in a course belongs to the student. Students are therefore encouraged to check their enrollment status several times during each semester with an advisor or via the UNF website. 4. Policies Governing Student Conduct. The University of North Florida has adopted a Student Conduct Code in order to promote responsible behavior for all students and to assure a physically, emotionally, and intellectually safe university community. This code addresses issues that may threaten the safety and order of the university environment and provides procedures and remedies for addressing these issues. Specific issues addressed include, but are not limited to, sexual misconduct; endangerment; harassment; hazing; possession/use of weapons, alcohol, and illegal drugs; damage or destruction of property; malicious mischief; computer misuse; and falsification/fraud. Students who are aware of and/or feel they are victims of any activity in violation of the Student Conduct Code should report the activity to the University Police or the appropriate campus administrator. The conduct code is available in its entirety on the University website at web address 5. Academic Integrity Policy. The University of North Florida has adopted a strict policy on academic integrity. As noted in the UNF Undergraduate Catalog (p. 35) and the UNF Student Handbook (p. 23), violations to academic integrity include, but are not limited to cheating; fabricating and falsifying information or citations; submitting the same work for credit in more than one course; plagiarizing; providing another student with access to one s own work to submit under this person s name or signature; destroying, stealing, or making inaccessible library or other academic resource material; and helping or attempting to help another person commit an act of academic dishonesty. The full policy on academic integrity is available on the University website at web address The Academic Integrity Policy affords University instructors authority to assign penalties for these offenses. For example, the instructor may assign a grade of F on the assignment in 18 of 20

19 question or for the course. In the case of flagrant violations of the Academic Integrity Policy, the instructor may recommend additional specific penalties to the university administration, including referral for academic counseling, expulsion from a program of study, denying of degree, expulsion from the University, or revocation of a degree already granted. 6. Policy. The University of North Florida s policy on student allows academic and service units of the University to use as the primary means for communicating certain types of information to students. Although individual instructors may determine that external (i.e., non-university-provided) accounts are a suitable means for communicating with students, the University policy specifies that the University-provided e- mail address serve as the official address for purposes of formal electronic communication with students. All students should become knowledgeable of their Universityprovided address and either check their account regularly or arrange for all delivered to their account to be forwarded to an external account of their choice. UNF Academic Integrity Code In order to protect the integrity of the teaching, learning, and evaluation process, the University of North Florida expects all members of the academic community to respect the principle of academic freedom, and to behave with academic integrity. Briefly stated, academic misconduct shall consist of any attempt to misrepresent one s performance on any exercise submitted for evaluation. The primary responsibility for insuring adherence to the principle of academic integrity rests with students and faculty. Any infraction which comes to the attention of any person should be brought to the attention of the faculty member to whose course it pertains. Violations of Academic Integrity Violations of the principle include, but are not limited to: Cheating: Intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, notes, study aids, or other devices in any academic exercise. This definition includes unauthorized communication of information during an academic exercise. Fabrication & Falsification: Intentional and unauthorized alteration or invention of any information or citation in an academic exercise. Falsification is a matter of inventing or counterfeiting information for use in any academic exercise. Multiple Submissions: The submission of substantial portions of the same academic work for credit (including oral reports) more than once without authorization. Plagiarism: Intentionally or knowingly presenting the work of another as one s own (i.e., without proper acknowledgment of the source). The sole exception to the requirement of acknowledging sources is when the ideas, information, etc., is common knowledge. Abuse of Academic Materials: Intentionally or knowingly destroying, stealing, or making inaccessible library or other academic resource materials. Complicity in Academic Dishonesty: Intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to help another to commit an act of academic dishonesty. Possible Faculty Actions in a Case of Suspected Academic Misconduct: academic counseling or referral to the appropriate support service (e.g., referral to Personal Counseling and Career Development); reprimand (oral or written); a grade of F or reduction of grade on the specific piece of work; a grade of F or reduction of grade in the course; referral of the charges to the dean/director of the academic unit in which the student is enrolled if the faculty member deems the offense so serious as to warrant a more stringent penalty than those listed above. 19 of 20

20 Reference: University of North Florida ( ). Student Handbook [Rights and regulations section: Academic integrity code, p 35] Retrieved from 20 of 20

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