Big Bend Community College. Associate Degree. Nursing Program. National League. For Nursing. Accrediting Commission. Site visit

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1 Big Bend Community College Associate Degree Nursing Program National League For Nursing Accrediting Commission Site visit February 9-11, 2010 i

2 Table of Contents Executive Summary...1 Standard 1 Mission and Governance Standard 2 Faculty Standard 3 Students Standard 4 Curriculum and Instruction Standard 5 Resources Standard 6 Outcomes Systematic Evaluation of Program Appendices Appendix A.1 Faculty committee list Appendix A.2 Probationary Faculty Committees Appendix A.3 BBCC Organizational Chart Appendix A.4 Advisory Committee Membership List Appendix A.5 Director, Health Education Programs Job Description Appendix A.6 Curriculum Vitae, K. Christian Appendix A.7 Notification of Counseling Form Appendix B.1 Faculty Job Descriptions Appendix B.2 Faculty Data Table Appendix B.3 Faculty Mentoring Program Appendix B.4 Probationary Faculty Review Guidelines Appendix B.5 Tenured Faculty Review Guidelines Appendix C.1 US Department of Education Letter Appendix D.1 Master Course Outline Examples Appendix D.2 Theory course curriculum map Appendix D.3 Skills laboratory curriculum map Appendix D.4 ATI program overview Appendix D ATI Predictor Scores Appendix D.6 Sample Written Work Rubric Appendix D.7 Sample Clinical Evaluation Tool Appendix D.8 Clinical Assignments Rubric Appendix D.9 Clinical site affiliation agreement Appendix D.10 Clinical site quality and safety goals Appendix E.1 Skills lab resources Appendix E.2 Memorandum, Dean of Information Resources Appendix E.3 Library Resources Appendix E.4 Audio-Visual Resources Appendix F.1 Admission Criteria Assessment Appendix F.2 Admission Criteria Grid Appendix F.3 Student Evaluation of Clinical Site ii

3 Charts and Tables Chart 1.1 BBCC Administrative Structure Related to ADN program Table 1.1 Policies Specific to the BBCC Nursing Program Faculty Table 2.1 Faculty Credentials Table 3.1 Policies and Procedures Specific to the BBCC Nursing Program Table 3.2 Sources for Nursing Program Information Table 3.3 Qualifications of Administrators for Student Services Table 4.1 Definition of Nursing Paradigm Concepts Table 4.2 BBCC Nursing Program Curriculum Table 4.3 Level I Core Concepts, Objectives, and Outcomes Table 4.4 Level II Core Concepts, Objectives, and Outcomes Table 4.5 Clinical Affiliations Table 5.1 Comparison of Fiscal Allocations Table 5.2 State-Allocated and Grant Funding Table 6.1 Program Completion Table 6.2 NCLEX-RN Pass Rate Table 6.3 Graduate Satisfaction Survey Summary Chart 6.1 Selected Items from Graduate Satisfaction Survey (1) Chart 6.2 Selected Items from Graduate Satisfaction Survey (2) Chart 6.3 Graduate and Employer Competency Ranking Table 6.4 Graduate Competency Survey Summary Table 6.5 Employer Survey Summary Table 6.6 Employment Rates Chart 6.4 Clinical Site Evaluations by Students Chart 6.5 Student Evaluation of CWH Clinical Site Chart 6.6 Student Perception of Samaritan Site Chart 6.7 Unit Specific Evaluations (Samaritan) Chart 6.8 Clinical Site Evaluation of Program iii

4 Additional resources for program evaluation will be found at the accreditation link below: Handbooks BBCC Student Handbook Nursing Student Handbook Nursing Faculty Handbook Big Bend Community College Faculty Handbook ATI Handbook Standard 1 BBCC Negotiated Agreement BBCC Organizational Charts Standard 3 Nursing Program Application Packet Standard 4 Curriculum Maps Level I Master Course Outlines Level II Master Course Outlines Clinical Evaluation Forms and Tools Standard 6 Admission Process Assessment iv

5 A. GENERAL INFORMATION EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Big Bend Community College (BBCC) is seeking continuing accreditation from the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) for its Associate in Applied Science Degree (AAS) in Nursing. The NLNAC is scheduled for visitation on February 9 th,10 th, and 11 th in Name and address of the college: Big Bend Community College 7662 Chanute Street Moses Lake, Washington Phone: (509) Name and title of the chief administrative officer: William Bonaudi, Ed.D., President Name of regional accrediting body: Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities Last regional accreditation: October, 2005 Name and address of nursing education unit: Big Bend Community College Nursing Program 7662 Chanute Street, Building 1700 Moses Lake, WA Name and title of the administrator of the nursing unit: Katherine Christian, MSN/Ed, RN, CNE Director, Health Education Programs Phone: Fax: State Board of Nursing: Washington State Nursing Care Quality Assurance Commission (WSNCQAC) Date of last review: WSNCQAC October, 2003 NLNAC March,

6 Date Program Began September 1963 September 1984 CHRONOLOGY OF BBCC NURSING PROGRAMS Program Type Accrediting Board Approval or Review Date Practical Nursing ADN, satellite of Columbia Basin College Washington State Board of Practical Nurse Examiners Washington State Board of Registered Nursing NLNAC & WSNCQAC March 1963 (provisional) September 1964 (approval) 1983 (review) May 2002 (last approval) March 1983 January 2002 (review) WSNCQAC March 2002 (approval) September 2002 ADN, BBCC independent of Columbia Basin College NLNAC WSNCQAC/NPAP WSNCQAC visit for full approval, October 2003 July 2002 (candidacy) November 2001 (provisional) January 2004 (approval) NLNAC visit, October 2003 March 2004 (denied) March 2005 ADN NLNAC site visit March 2005 June 2005 (approved) 2009: Total number of Associate Degree in Nursing faculty members for Fall Quarter, a) Tenured Full-time 1 Part-time b) Tenure track Full-time _2_ Part-time c) Non-tenured Full-time Part-time 3 d) Contract Full-time 1 Part-time Total student enrollment in educational unit in nursing as of Fall Quarter 2009: Level I 31 Level II 18 NLNAC accreditation standards and criteria used: Associate Degree in Nursing Programs 2008 Standards and Criteria B. INTRODUCTION For the ease of reading this document, Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) and Associate Degree in Nursing (AAS) are used interchangeably. Big Bend Community College is one of thirty-four publicly funded community and technical colleges in the state of Washington. It is governed by a local five-member Board of Trustees appointed by the governor. The college was authorized by the Washington Higher Education Coordinating State Board of Education in 1961 and held its first classes at night at the Moses Lake High School in the fall of The college opened classes in a new facility located a short distance southeast of the City of Moses 2

7 Lake in the fall quarter of In 1966, Big Bend Community College acquired a 159- acre tract of land on the former Larson Air Force Base that became the permanent college campus for all programs in The State Legislature s Community College Act of 1967 designated Big Bend Community College as District 18 of the state community college system. The 4,600 square mile district includes Adams and Grant counties, and a portion of Lincoln County (the Odessa Consolidated School District). Big Bend Community College offers both on-site and extension courses utilizing on-line instruction, and interactive learning technologies. C. HISTORY OF THE NURSING UNIT In 1963, the health care community of Moses Lake petitioned the college to implement a Practical Nursing Program to meet the nursing needs of the community. A needs assessment indicated that a Practical Nursing Program was appropriate. After obtaining permission from the Washington State Board of Community Colleges (currently known as the State Board of Community & Technical Colleges [SBCTC]) and the Washington State Board of Practical Nursing, a program was developed and implemented in the fall of The Practical Nursing Program remains in existence today, receiving its last eight-year approval from the Washington State Nursing Care Quality Assurance Commission in May of As the community grew, so did the health care community. In 1982, there was another request from the community to implement an Associate Degree Nursing Program. Because of the surplus of nurses at that time, the Nursing Commission of Washington State denied the approval of any new Associate Degree Nursing Programs in the state and suggested, as an alternative, that the Big Bend program become a satellite of an already existing program. The administration at Big Bend collaborated with the administration of Columbia Basin College, and the satellite program began in the fall of In the spring of 1999, the BBCC nursing faculty initiated the process to become an independent Associate Degree Nursing Program. Basing their decision on the outcome of a needs survey, the health care community, the BBCC Nursing Advisory Committee, and the Nursing Department of the College decided that it would be in the best interest of the service district to offer a local Associate Degree Nursing Program. In the fall of 2000, Big Bend Community College received permission from the SBCTC and the Washington State Nursing Care Quality Assurance Commission to develop its own Associate Degree in Nursing Program. In June 2003, Big Bend Community College awarded its first Associate Degree in Nursing diplomas. 3

8 D. SUMMARY OF STANDARDS AND CRITERIA Standard 1: Mission and Governance The mission of the Nursing Program at Big Bend Community College reinforces and supports the mission and goals of the college. The college espouses a philosophy of shared governance that includes faculty, administration, and students in decisionmaking processes. Nursing faculty are committed to the mission of both the college and the Nursing Program. They impart the mission to students during the orientation session fall quarter of each academic school year. Students are represented on both college and nursing department committees. The Director of Health Education Programs administers the program and may teach up to 25% of a full-time faculty load. Nursing faculty actively participate in curriculum and policy decision-making through formal and informal meetings. Nursing faculty believe the ladder concept of nursing education is the ideal method for serving both the students and the community s educational needs. Although the policies of the nursing department are congruent with those of the college, additional Nursing Program policies have been implemented to meet specific health and health care facility requirements and licensure requirements. A Nursing Advisory Committee meets regularly with the Nursing Program to facilitate communication and provide direction. The Nursing Program maintains community partnerships to promote effective education of the students. The college administration, nursing faculty, and the health care community are dedicated to the ongoing pursuit of excellence in the nursing program. Standard 2: Faculty and Staff The nursing faculty members are academically and professionally qualified to teach in the Level I ADN and Level II ADN programs. They are committed to the community, the college, the program, and the students. Their dedication to excellence in our Nursing Program is evidenced by their motivation and participation beyond the requirements of their position descriptions. The current cadre of faculty at Big Bend Community College Department of Nursing consists of four full-time faculty and three part-time faculty. Of the four full-time faculty, two possess earned Master s Degrees in Nursing, one is in the process of earning a Master s Degree with completion expected by the end of 2009, and the fourth holds a Bachelor s Degree in Nursing. This person was hired before the Master s Degree requirement was implemented and is therefore grandfathered into the position by the current Washington Administrative Codes (WACs). The current Director of Health Education Programs possesses an earned Master s Degree in Nursing with a specialization in Health Care Education, and has earned the designation as a Certified Nurse Educator through the National League for Nursing. The 25% teaching load outlined by the job description permits the director to maintain currency in nursing and teaching skills. 4

9 One of the full-time faculty positions is a joint appointment. Because this rural community has experienced great difficulty in hiring nurses with advanced nursing degrees, a joint faculty position was developed and advertised nationally. This unique job description was created to accomplish the following goals: Increase collaboration between Big Bend Community College s Nursing Program and Samaritan Healthcare. Share a master s-level-prepared RN between the two institutions. This individual would work at the college from mid-september through mid- June and at the hospital from mid-june through mid-september. The position holder would develop and deliver nursing education to hospital personnel and college nursing students. Increase the number of advanced degree nurses in the community. Two part-time faculty supervise clinical practicums; both instructors are currently enrolled in MSN programs. The third part-time faculty member supervises the skills laboratory. This instructor holds a BSN and has extensive clinical and academic experience. The nursing department is supported by an office assistant who performs clerical responsibilities, maintains student records, and assists faculty and director in scheduling and word processing needs. The faculty maintain current skills and knowledge by attending workshops, conferences, and seminars. The college and the nursing department support the faculty s pursuit of current nursing knowledge by budgeting funds for continuing education. Nursing faculty have teaching loads of 22 to 24 student contact hours per week. Classroom ratios do not exceed 32:1, the practicum ratios are 8 to 10:1, and the skills lab ratios are 6 to 8:1. Each full time nursing faculty has classroom, clinical, and skills laboratory assignments in each quarter to ensure continuity between the curricular components and consistency in the clinical setting. Faculty performance is assessed regularly according to the policies for evaluation of tenured and non-tenured faculty as identified in the Negotiated Agreement between the Board of Trustees of District No. 18 and the Big Bend Community College Faculty Association. The results of the evaluations are reviewed with the individual faculty member by the Dean of Education, Health, and Language Skills and the Nursing Program Director. In addition, evaluations and recommendations for tenured and tenure-track faculty are reviewed by the Vice President of Instruction and the College President. Evaluations for all faculty are placed in each member s personnel file held in the Human Resource office. Standard 3: Students Policies for students in the Nursing Program are congruent with the policies of the college; and where nursing student policies differ from those of the parent institution, 5

10 there is sufficient rationale to defend the changes. The Nursing Program has an admission process separate from that of the college and addresses special requirements, such as prerequisite classes, CPR-Health Care Provider Card and NAC certification, physical examination, immunizations, drug testing, and a Washington State Patrol Criminal History check. These policies are clear, accurate, and published in the BBCC Nursing Program literature. The nursing student population has an average age of 30 years and comes from diverse cultural populations because efforts have been made to recruit students from various ethnic backgrounds. Personnel from financial aid, counseling, student support services, and administration provide support to nursing students for successful program completion. The library, bookstore, and the computer, math, and English labs are all available to students. Students educational and financial records are securely filed by the appropriate individuals. The Nursing Program director and faculty consistently advise students of graduation requirements and each quarter review students progress toward that goal. The nursing department maintains files on each of the nursing students with materials specific to their nursing education. These files are kept for five years after graduation in the nursing building and then archived. Physical forms, criminal background history checks, and drug testing results are all filed separately from the student file. Standard 4: Curriculum and Instruction BBCC functions on the traditional quarter system and offers four quarters in one academic school year. The ADN Program is six quarters in length, September through June after admission to the program. The Level I ADN Program allows the student to participate in an optional fourth (summer) quarter and take the NCLEX-PN examination for licensure, or opt out of the summer courses and enter Level II ADN completion courses in the fall. The ADN program consists of 112 credits using a 1:1 ratio for theory courses, 1:2 ratio for lab skills courses and a 1:2 ratio for all practicums. Though the Level I summer course is optional, the majority of students elect to take courses NUR 140 and 141 and go on to take the NCLEX-PN exam before entering Level II. LPNs desiring to obtain an ADN and becoming licensed as an RN may enter the program in the fourth (summer) quarter of the first year. The BBCC Nursing Program curriculum reflects the philosophy of nursing education as defined by the faculty, delivering content from simple to complex and providing active learning opportunities in a variety of settings to support the multi-level program. The curriculum is constructed around four nursing paradigm concepts: the individual, the environment, health and nursing. These paradigm concepts lead to the core concepts of the nurse as communicator, provider of care, manager of care, and professional role. The concepts are incorporated into objectives for each quarter, advancing in complexity toward the defined outcomes. The curriculum is delivered in three distinct but interrelated modalities. The clinical environment provides the opportunity for the student to apply the theory and 6

11 psychomotor skills learned in the classroom and the skills laboratory, creating an active learning environment and promoting critical thinking. The curriculum incorporates standardized assessment testing to strengthen student performance and to provide a tool for ongoing assessment of curriculum. The assessment testing is coordinated with theory delivery across the curriculum. Students are required to participate in the testing and associated remediation processes. Students are not required to reach a specific benchmark on the tests in order to progress in the program. The Nursing Program also offers elective courses during the year depending upon student and faculty interest. These elective courses, such as Advanced Pharmacology, support the core curriculum or expand the curricular offerings, such as EKG Interpretation or Transcultural Diversity in Healthcare. The curriculum is regularly evaluated by faculty to assure currency, consistency in presentation among faculty members, and effective preparation for the workplace and the NCLEX-RN. The most recent review began in 2006, beginning with topic content placement in either Level I or Level II. After faculty consensus was reached on these components, the review continued to clarify the accuracy and progression of objectives, goals, and outcomes. The resulting revisions were incorporated into the master course outlines that form the basis of content delivery through the program. The faculty utilize various resources to assure that the curriculum is effective including the current NCLEX-RN test plan, feedback from Advisory Committee partners, and reports generated from the standardized testing program. Recent modifications to curriculum included repositioning cardiac theory for level II into fall quarter to better prepare students for clinical opportunities, and current discussion about repositioning endotracheal suctioning into Level I. Standard 5: Resources The fiscal resources for the BBCC Nursing Program are adequate. Allocated institutional funding is sufficient for program needs and is comparable to other programs at BBCC. The Nursing Program receives strong support from Big Bend Community College. The Nursing Program budget for was 10% higher than academic year , in spite of significant campus-wide budget impacts related to the economic downturn affecting the state. BBCC continues to advertise for qualified nursing faculty even though other faculty positions have been left purposely unfilled. The Dean of Education, Health, and Language Skills has been instrumental in acquiring grants to provide the Nursing Program with equipment, curriculum, and faculty development. Administrative services to the Nursing Program are adequate and responsive to the nursing faculty s requests. BBCC provides extensive learning resources and support for all students including those in the Nursing Program. The campus library maintains current nursing books and 7

12 resources in collaboration with the nursing faculty. The library also provides on-line access to journal databases at no charge to the students. Big Bend Technology (BBT) maintains over 1,000 computers across the campus, including a computer lab in the nursing building. BBT also provides campus , supports the on-line classrooms, and maintains the network access accounts for faculty and students. In September 2005, the Nursing Program moved to a remodeled facility, doubling the space available for classrooms, skills laboratory, and faculty offices. This move allowed the addition of high-fidelity simulation mannequins purchased through the support of the BBCC Foundation. The current space is more than sufficient for the needs of the program and will accommodate future plans for community health care education. Standard 6: Outcomes The Nursing Program evaluates and revises curriculum and policies to improve program outcomes based on data developed through a Systematic Program Evaluation Plan. Completion rates, NCLEX-RN pass rates, and graduate satisfaction scores are assessed annually. Recent data resulted in a modification of admission criteria, a review of curriculum flow and content, and modifications in evaluation processes. The most recent NCLEX-RN pass rate was 95.4%. Employer and student competency satisfaction surveys done six months after graduation are favorable, demonstrating our program produces safe and competent beginning practitioners. E. ANALYSIS AND SUMMARY OF STRENGTHS AND AREAS NEEDING IMPROVEMENT Participation in the self-study process provided the opportunity for the nursing faculty to identify areas of strength as well as areas that need improvement and to develop plans to correct the deficient areas. Areas of Strength 1. The greatest strength of the Nursing Program is the tremendous support it receives from the college and from the community. Because of the college s rural location and because it is one of the smallest community colleges in Washington State, there is an atmosphere of collegiality and teamwork. The small faculty and administration allow academic planning and decision making to occur at a much quicker pace than at larger institutions. 2. Most nursing faculty have earned Master s Degrees in Nursing or are in the process of obtaining the degree. All instructors are committed to providing an excellent nursing education to students who enter the program. 3. The college s fiscal support through the annual budget and grant writing allows the Nursing Program to purchase state-of-the-art equipment that enhances teaching and learning. 8

13 4. Increasing student diversity males, Russians, Ukrainians, Asians and Hispanics strengthens and broadens the program and student experience. 5. The partnership with Samaritan Healthcare benefits both the BBCC Nursing Program and the community in on-going nursing education. 6. The opening in December 2004 of the new library and the Grant County Advanced Technology Education Center (ATEC) is a positive reinforcement for student support of technology and learning resources. The building houses offices for four-year colleges and universities that bring extension classes to our campus facilitating students transfer to four-year universities. 7. In September of 2005, the nursing program moved into the remodeled space previously occupied by the library in Building 1700, which doubled the existing classroom and skills lab space. 8. Consistent financial support from the BBCC Foundation has provided state-ofthe-art technology for the skills laboratory as well as scholarships for many nursing students. 9. The childcare center on campus provides low cost, convenient childcare for nursing students. 10. An annual Job and Career Fair held at the college and the National Student Nurses Association Annual Conference is attended by many of the BBCC Nursing Program students giving them the opportunity to meet nurse recruiters. Generally, all graduates from the program are either employed prior to the end of the program or have selected to transfer to higher educational institutions. Areas Needing Improvement 1. Recruiting nursing faculty with Master s Degrees to Moses Lake is difficult. The college has identified some solutions to the problem: a. Have local hospitals partner with the college to create a more fiscally appealing package for a Joint Educator position. b. Have the college foundation provide scholarships for part-time or full-time faculty working toward their Master s Degree in Nursing. 2. Retaining newly hired instructors is a concern because they are new to the teaching profession and are also in the midst of graduate studies. A mentoring program was established in 2003 and all new faculty enter this formal program where they can work in an individualized mentored environment. 3. The skills laboratory is well supplied with equipment and technology but is not currently used to its potential. Development of a part-time position to manage the 9

14 technology and extend the resources to community hospitals is under discussion, but is currently limited by statewide budgetary concerns. 4. Selecting students who can be retained and complete the program continues to be a concern. Review of selection criteria and student outcomes is ongoing. Plans for Strengthening the Program Five-year plan, Data collection and evaluation - A. Continue to collect and analyze data. B. Compare bench marks. 2. Faculty development - A. Continue to recruit qualified faculty. B. Assist faculty as they pursue their Master s Degrees. C. Continue formalized mentoring program. D. Continue to provide continuing education in areas of expertise and in instructional methods. 3. Promote academic excellence - A. Review curriculum annually to prevent overlap or exclusion of materials in the theory courses. B. Utilize discovery to assure accuracy and currency on instructional materials. C. Maintain the NCLEX pass rates. D. Complete an annual review of Systemic Plan for Program Evaluation. 10

15 Standard 1. Mission and Administrative Capacity The nursing education unit s mission reflects the governing organization s core values and is congruent with its strategic goals and objectives. The governing organization and program have administrative capacity resulting in effective delivery of the nursing program and achievement of identified outcomes. The Mission of Big Bend Community College To serve the educational needs of a diverse population throughout its service district. As a comprehensive two-year community college, the institution works with its partners to provide a variety of educational opportunities, including courses and training for university and college transfer occupational and technical programs basic skills and developmental education community and continuing education pre-employment and customized training for local business and industry support services for students to help promote student access, success and retention. The Mission of the Big Bend Community College Nursing Program To educate qualified students to integrate the knowledge, skills, values, and attitudes essential for entry level nursing practice, and to successfully obtain licensure. The program s primary role is to foster and facilitate the development of nurses who are prepared to provide care in a variety of healthcare settings to a diverse community. Through quality education, the nursing program challenges students to develop sound clinical judgment and apply critical thinking in an environment that facilitates educational mobility, fosters personal growth, and instills a desire for lifelong learning. The mission of the Big Bend Community College Nursing Program is congruent with the mission of the college. BBCC seeks to serve the educational needs of a diverse population throughout its service district. Eighty-eight percent of the current 11

16 nursing students are residents of the college service district, and represent nine communities across the district. Ten percent of current nursing students are Hispanic; an additional 8% are Asian, Ukrainian, or Nigerian. Males comprise 10% of currently enrolled nursing students. The majority of the nursing program graduates initially seek employment as nurses in their home communities, demonstrated by records maintained by the nursing program. BBCC actively promotes distance learning to serve the large geographic service area. Many of the Nursing Program pre- and co-requisites are available through distance modalities, including English, Math, Psychology, and Nutrition. Although core nursing classes are not currently offered through distance technology, BBCC supports an Angel platform classroom for the nursing students which is utilized for hybrid delivery of specific units and for program communications. BBCC works with its partners to provide a variety of educational opportunities, including courses and training for university and college transfer, occupational and technical programs. The BBCC nursing program uses a ladder concept to provide choice in length and complexity of the educational program offered; the ladder also permits students to exit and return at specific points, such as Practical Nurse licensure. The nursing program maintains a curriculum that permits an articulated transfer to baccalaureate institutions for those students who want to pursue additional education. There are some variations between the mission of Big Bend Community College and the nursing program. BBCC is committed to basic skills and developmental education; however, the nursing program requires students to complete specific college level courses for admission and completion of the program, in compliance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) (3)(a). BBCC is a comprehensive 12

17 two-year community college; although the core nursing courses are completed in two years, the pre-requisite courses may take more than one additional year. The Governor of the State of Washington appoints a five-member Board of Trustees to govern Big Bend Community College. The President of Big Bend Community College serves the college and the Board of Trustees as the chief executive officer. The Board of Trustees and the President of Big Bend Community College practice shared governance. The governance of the college is clearly defined by the statutes or Revised Codes of Washington, the Washington Administrative Codes (WAC), and the college policies. The Vice-President of Instruction and Student Services is responsible for instructional programs, and reports directly to the President of BBCC. Four deans report to the Vice-President, including the Dean of Education, Health, and Language Skills who is responsible for oversight of the Nursing Program and works directly with the Director of Health Education Programs to administer the program. Chart 1.1 depicts the organizational structure of BBCC related to the Department of Nursing. Administrators, staff, faculty, and students serve on committees as they work in concert to fulfill the college s mission. Nursing faculty interface regularly with other departments within the institution on both a formal and an informal basis. Formal methods of interaction and collaboration include involvement in the Nursing Advisory Committee, Instructional Council, Personnel Screening, Probationary and Tenure committees, College Academic Master Planning Committee, Enrollment Management Committee, Assessment Committee, and many other informal groups that contribute to the functioning of the college. Informal methods of interaction include college wide in- 13

18 service programs, nursing and college faculty meetings and social events sponsored by the college to support students and faculty, promoting collegiality and a sense of community. Faculty participation on college committees is reflected in Appendix A.1 and A.2. The Department of Nursing is an integral part of Big Bend Community College (Appendix A.3). It is part of the Health and Physical Education Division; a member of the nursing faculty rotates as division chair and represents both health education and physical education on the Instructional Council. The Instructional Council meets monthly during the academic year and as needed throughout the year to coordinate and implement changes to the instruction and student support service areas of the college. The council is comprised of eight division chairs, six voting administrators, and two exofficio administrators. The division chair is responsible to represent the division and division members on the Instructional Council and other campus committees such as the Academic Master Planning Committee, Facilities Planning Committee, and Budget Review Task Force. This nursing faculty member is responsible for dissemination of information to division members. The Director of Health Education Programs is a member of the President s Cabinet, which serves as a broadly based advisory committee to the president. The Cabinet is a standing committee per policy AP2310, which can be found at It meets monthly or as needed to share concerns and to report on developments across the campus community. 14

19 Student participation in college governance is explained in the Big Bend Community College Student Handbook (available on the BBCC website and the accreditation link). The Associated Student Body (ASB) of Big Bend Community College is the representative governing body for students at BBCC and is recognized by the Board of Trustees. The ASB constitution and the college s administrative policies provide clear channels for student participation in the formulation and application of institutional policies regarding academic and student affairs. Nursing students are free to participate in all the activities of the student body. The ASB Executive Council is composed of officers elected by the student body in general elections. The ASB Executive Council is recognized as the students voice in the governance of the college. Students are also encouraged to provide input related to college activities and academics through formal participation on college committees including faculty probationary and tenured faculty evaluation committees (Appendix A.2) and scheduled meetings with college administrators. The ASB president represents the student body on the agenda of each of the Board of Trustees meetings and at other college meetings and functions. The nursing faculty meet at least monthly during the academic year to discuss issues relating to student learning and program implementation. Other informal meetings occur regularly to evaluate and plan for program needs. Policies for the Nursing Program are determined through the process of shared governance. The small size of the faculty facilitates communication and precludes the use of committees for departmental decision-making; rather, individual faculty members act as lead to bring necessary information to the rest of the faculty in regular faculty meetings. For example, M. Asay initiated the process of redesigning the clinical 15

20 evaluation tools and D. Alvarado researched and introduced the electronic grade book. All faculty participated in the redesign process and the decision to adopt the grade book after open discussion. All faculty participate in curricular evaluation and revision through faculty meetings and special work days. Minutes of the nursing faculty meetings and special work days are maintained in the office of the Director of Health Education Programs and are available to NLNAC team members upon request. Within the nursing program, students elect class officers each year. The elected president presides over class meetings, represents the class at monthly nursing faculty meetings, and brings class issues and concerns to the faculty for discussion and resolution. Recent examples include a request to modify the dress code for the skills laboratory and a clarification about acceptable footwear in the clinical setting. This monthly meeting also facilitates direct communication about upcoming activities, policy updates, and other matters. 16

21 Big Bend Community College Administrative Structure Related to the ADN Program Chart

22 Interdepartmental cooperation facilitates the development and implementation of some policies and procedures. In 2006, the Nursing Program introduced an alternative plan to select nursing students for the program. After initial research (Appendix F.1), the plan was presented to the Associate Vice President of Student Services, C. Lacher, and Vice President of Instruction and Student Services Dr. M. Lang. Their perspective and input helped develop the application grid that was approved and implemented for 2007 applicants. Minor modifications were made to the grid with their input and used for the 2008 application period. During summer 2009, cooperation between the advisors, the Professional/Technical advisor and Tech Prep coordinator, M. Shannon, and Nursing Program faculty led to a modification of the pre-nursing advising tool that was implemented successfully Fall Quarter The Nursing Advisory Committee is composed of community healthcare employees and employers, a labor representative, BBCC nursing faculty, and a current BBCC Level II ADN student (See Appendix A.4). The advisory committee membership is approved by Big Bend Community College s Board of Trustees. The committee meets at least three times a year to discuss issues and healthcare concerns of the community as they relate to nursing and the program. Regular interaction between the Nursing Program and the Advisory Committee provides an opportunity to share information and expertise and guides program outcomes, practices, policies and procedures. In winter 2009, discussion at the Advisory Committee led to the development of an evaluation tool for the use of ancillary site staff. This form was implemented in Spring of 2009 with positive feedback. Minutes of Advisory Committee meetings are maintained within the 18

23 department as well as in the office of the Dean of Professional/ Technical Education and will be available for review at the time of the site visit. The Nursing Program fosters partnerships primarily with clinical partners; this communication is crucial for the effective education of nursing students. In 2007, Central Washington Hospital in Wenatchee, Washington, 70 miles from Moses Lake, invited the BBCC Nursing Program to participate in ongoing joint meetings between the hospital and the nursing program at Wenatchee Valley College. These meetings bring together the administrators of both nursing programs, interested faculty, and the nursing unit managers of the hospital in order to share experiences and resolve concerns. This partnership has strengthened both nursing programs by providing a forum for sharing ideas. A clinical skills card to improve communication between staff and student was one of these ideas. This forum also helps clarify expectations for staff who had expressed frustration about interacting with two different education programs. The partnership with Samaritan Healthcare in Moses Lake is significant. Since 2000, BBCC has shared a joint faculty position with Samaritan Healthcare. This position provides a full-time equivalent faculty member during the nine months of the academic year for the nursing department. During the remaining three months, this person participates in the development of hospital education programs. The Memorandum of Agreement for this position will be available for review at the time of the visit. Community leaders and healthcare organizations invite student and faculty participation in health and career fairs, which provide community education and promote the nursing profession. Nursing faculty and students participate in GEARUP (Gaining 19

24 Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs) activities on the Big Bend campus each year, a program designed to promote college and career awareness among middle school students. The most recent partnership brings together Samaritan Healthcare, Othello Community Hospital, and Inland Northwest Health Services based in Spokane, Washington, to provide a training link for the electronic medical records system used by the two hospitals. This link will permit the students to receive initial training in the system while on campus; it will also allow practice sessions to increase their ability to use it. The director position for the BBCC Nursing Program previous to 2006 was a faculty position with release time for administration. In 2006, after a review of the workload and other issues, the administrative position of Director of Health Education Programs was developed. Although this position also oversees Allied Health programs such as the Medical Assistant Program and the Nursing Assistant Program, the primary responsibility is administration of the Nursing Program. The current director holds a MSN with a specialization in Health Care Education, and is a Certified Nurse Educator (CNE). The director represents the program to interested communities and is responsible for the overall direction and supervision of the nursing program, including scheduling for faculty and students. The director facilitates evaluation of faculty, clinical sites, and program outcomes. The director may teach up to 25% of a full time load, which would be approximately 60 hours per quarter. The job description and the CV for the current director are found in Appendices A.5 and A.6. 20

25 Each biennium, the Washington State Board of Community and Technical Colleges (SBCTC) submits a budget to the Office of Financial Management (OFM), which takes the request to the state legislators for approval. The approved biennial budget is returned to OFM and forwarded to SBCTC. A one-year allocation from the biennial budget is then forwarded to the community and technical colleges. In conjunction with this process, BBCC reviews revenue streams in the new budget and tracks historical data. Budgetary planning begins at the presidential and vicepresidential levels based on previous budgets and enrollments. Allocations for goods, services, travel, and equipment are designated for the Services, Professional/Technical, and Academic areas of the college, based on identified needs in the Academic Master Plan. The division chairs meet together in the spring to collaborate on the distribution of that allocation among the departments according to department needs, for the benefit of the students and the college. Adjustments are made to proposals where necessary, and a final budget is taken to the Board of Trustees for formal action. The director and the nursing faculty are actively involved in the preparation of the Nursing Program s budget. The director obtains input from all faculty and facilitates the process of prioritizing the Nursing Program s budgetary needs to meet program outcomes. It is through the active participation of the division chair, as the representative to the Instructional Council, that the Nursing Program director and faculty are able to influence the distribution of allocated state funding. Once funds become available after July 1st of each year, the director completes purchase requests for the equipment, supplies, and teaching materials identified by the 21

26 nursing faculty as vital to meeting the program s goals. These allocated funds support equipment purchases such as replacement beds in the skills laboratory, VitalSim mannequins, and updated DVDs and other software. A replacement plan was initiated in 2003 and is reviewed annually. Because the college is a state-funded institution, all employees and students are subject to the Washington Administrative Codes (WACs) and the statutes or Revised Codes of Washington (RCWs) that directly relate to state institutions of higher education. The hiring process includes attempts to recruit and hire qualified, culturally diverse employees while adhering to federal and state law, the college s Equal Opportunity Statement as well as the Americans With Disabilities Act. Nursing faculty are expected to adhere to all the policies. As part of the hiring process, institutional policies and procedures are reviewed with new faculty. The policies specific to the governing of faculty are clearly defined in the Negotiated Agreement between the Big Bend Community College Faculty Association, the faculty bargaining unit, and the Big Bend Community College District No. 18 Board of Trustees. The Negotiated Agreement is available on the accreditation link. Changes to the Negotiated Agreement are currently under discussion. The Negotiated Agreement addresses issues including but not limited to faculty appointment, workload, salary and advancement on the salary schedule, evaluation of tenured and tenure-track faculty, and grievance procedures. Article VII of the Negotiated Agreement allows qualified nursing instructors to be hired at a higher salary level than other faculty because the market demands a raised pay scale. There are instances when nursing faculty are required to adhere to policies in addition to those 22

27 which faculty of the institution are subject. These specific policies outlined in Table 1.1 are based upon issues of health and safety in the healthcare environment. Table 1.1 Faculty Requirements Policies Specific to the BBCC Nursing Program Faculty Clear Washington State Patrol criminal background check Comprehensive Background check Current AHA CPR Healthcare Provider card Identified immunizations and a negative TB evaluation Maintain an unencumbered RN license in the state of Washington Participation in clinical site orientation Eight hours of AIDS education Work weekends, evenings, nights Rationale Clinical site requirement Clinical site requirement Clinical site requirement Clinical site requirement Required by Washington State Nursing Commission Patient safety and site requirement Washington State law Clinical site requirement A Notification of Counseling form (Appendix A.7) is the tool utilized by BBCC nursing faculty to document concerns with student performance or behavior in relation to professional performance standards and the Nursing Code of Ethics. These forms record both the faculty concern and the student s response in the action plan, and provide evidence of either positive changes or negative behavior patterns. The BBCC Student handbook (page 39) defines the Academic Grievance process for students who believe that they have been unfairly treated. The Nursing Student handbook also identifies this process (page 21). There have been two appeals in the past two years; in both cases, the Academic Council upheld the program s action. Records of Academic Grievances and their resolution are kept on file with the Vice President of Instruction and Student Services. 23

28 One unsigned complaint from a student was delivered to the director s door in March Since it was unsigned, no action was taken. One phone complaint was received from a community member during spring quarter 2009; investigation showed that the complaint was based on erroneous information and correct information was provided to the community member. Records of complaints are maintained in the office of the Director of Health Education Programs. 24

29 Standard 2. Faculty and staff Qualified faculty and staff provide leadership and support necessary for students to attain the goals and outcomes of the nursing education unit. Currently the BBCC Nursing Program is staffed by three fulltime (tenured or tenure track) instructors. As seen on Table 2.1, one full time instructor has completed an MSN and one is scheduled to complete the MSN in December The remaining instructor holds a BSN; she has over 25 years continuous experience in nursing education here at Big Bend Community College and meets the standard for faculty set by the Washington State Nursing Care Quality Assurance Commission in A joint appointment agreement with Samaritan Healthcare provides an additional full-time equivalent instructor. The joint appointment agreement with Samaritan Healthcare is a creative response to the challenges of recruiting academically qualified faculty. Initiated in 2000, this agreement provides a full time equivalent MSN-prepared instructor during the academic year. During the summer months, the Joint Nurse Educator supports the educational programs of the hospital organization. The Joint Nurse Educator is an employee of the hospital who benefits both from the marketplace pay scale and from the flexibility of the position. Two part-time instructors support the program in the clinical setting. Each has extensive clinical experience and are currently employed in the facility where they teach. Both instructors are currently enrolled in MSN programs. One part-time instructor supports the program in the skills laboratory. This individual has a BSN and extensive clinical experience as well as experience in nursing education here at BBCC since

30 All part-time instructors are oriented to the BBCC Nursing Program and work in conjunction with MSN prepared instructors to ensure that instruction and evaluation are consistent and that outcomes are achieved. (Job descriptions Appendix B.1). The director position is an administrative appointment; however, the job description includes up to 25% of a full-time load for instruction (Appendix A.7) and the current director participates in classroom, skills laboratory and clinical practicum instruction at different times of the academic year. The BBCC nursing program is supported by an office assistant who works thirty hours per week to assist with clerical work, manage student paperwork such as immunization records, and fulfill other support functions assigned by the program director. When needed, the office assistant to the Dean of Education, Health, and Language Skills provides additional support for the program. All faculty members hold unencumbered current Registered Nursing licenses in Washington State. All faculty meet the requirements for vocational certification as mandated by the State Board for Community and Technical Colleges. All full time faculty members maintain a three or five year professional development plan which is developed with and approved by the Dean of Health, Education and Language Skills. 26

31 Director, Health Education Programs Instructor Instructor Instructor Date of Appointment Current Rank Major Major Program Years Years Table 2.1 Faculty Credentials Name FT/ PT Focus Area Degree Institution EDUCATION Degree Institution Teaching Experience Clinical Nursing Clinical Position Danielle Alvarado RN, MSN 2004 FT Medical- Surgical Fundamentals BSN-Linfield College NUR MSN, Central Missouri State Univ NUR ADN 5 ACU/Tele Operating Room Marsha Asay, RN, BSN Jennifer Brooks, RN, BSN Katherine Christian, RN, MSN/Ed, CNE FT FT Medical- Surgical Maternal/Child Health Pediatrics Fundamentals Renal Hematology Immunology GI BSN Brigham Young University BSN University of S. Australia FT Pharmacology BA University of Southern California BSN University of the State of New York (Excelsior) NUR NUR Dev. Psych NUR MSN (in progress) Flinders University (expected completion 12/09) MSN/Ed., Univ. of Phoenix 2005 ADN PN 24 1 M/S M/S Director CCU Director/Owner Private Duty Nursing Service NUR ADN 3 Post Acute Rehab Renal Dialysis MS Community Health NUR BSN ADN 2 5 MS Critical Care Office Ped/FP Home Health

32 Clinical Instructor Clinical Instructor Skills lab Instructor Instructor Date of Appointment Current Rank Major Major Program Years Years Name FT/ PT Focus Area Degree Institution EDUCATION Degree Institution Teaching Experience Clinical Nursing Clinical Position Mercedes Gonzalez -Aller, RN MSN ARNP 2009 FT Medical Surgical BSN Univ. of New Mexico NUR MSN Whitworth College (ICN) NUR ADN 2 ARNP Home Health Critical Care MS Donna Warner, RN, BSN 1982 PT Nursing Skills Laboratory ADN Spokane Community College BSN Eastern Washington University NUR ADN 6 M/S ICU/CCU Cardiac Rehab Diabetic Educator Home Health & Hospice Alex Stehr, RN, BSN 2008 PT Clinical ADN Columbia Basin College BSN Washington State Univ. NUR NUR Currently enrolled MSN Regis University ADN 1 MS/OB 12 Miki Mier- Toftness, RN 2006 PT Clinical ADN Wenatchee Valley College (BSN equivalent) Gonzaga University NUR Currently enrolled RN to MSN Gonzaga University NUR ADN 7 ICU/CCU 15 28

33 The nursing program utilizes a team approach to deliver the curriculum. Each full time faculty member has classroom, clinical, and skills laboratory assignments in each quarter. This approach ensures continuity between the curricular components and consistency in the clinical setting. According to the current Negotiated Agreement, full time nursing faculty are expected to have contact hours plus 5 office hours per week over the quarter. The schedules are constructed to assure adequate coverage for the overall program. The number of faculty ensures that the faculty to student ratio in the skills laboratory and clinical setting does not normally exceed 1:8, increasing the opportunity for effective teaching and evaluation. Classroom ratios do not exceed 32:1. Faculty schedules will be available on site for review. The faculty of the BBCC nursing program come from a variety of backgrounds with unique professional interests and are assigned to teach in their specialty and interest areas. To ensure that the entire curriculum is covered, each instructor also must be able to teach a variety of areas beyond their specialties. Instructors use a variety of resources in preparing their units to assure the delivery of the most current, evidence-based content. Faculty members increase their knowledge base and remain current through continuing education courses, journal reading, and work experience in the clinical setting (Appendix B.2). The Industry-based Professional Development grant provides support for faculty to work shifts in the clinical setting to maintain current practice competencies. Big Bend Community College encourages continuing professional development by paying registration fees and travel and per diem reimbursement for meetings or 29

34 conferences; faculty may earn a stipend for each block of fifteen professional development units, according to the faculty Negotiated Agreement. New faculty members receive both orientation and mentoring to their position. Big Bend Community College provides a three-day orientation to college organization and procedures. A formal mentoring plan is initiated between the new faculty member, the director or lead faculty, and a peer (Appendix B.3). This plan provides ongoing support and guidance for the new faculty member, including orientation to nursing program policies and procedures, and assistance in developing classroom and clinical instruction skills. Informal mentoring also occurs as faculty members team-teach in the classroom and the skills laboratory. Clinical instructors (both full-time and part-time) are oriented to new facilities either by the facility personnel or by an experienced BBCC instructor. The program orients instructors to several clinical sites in order to assure coverage in case of emergency. At Big Bend Community College faculty are evaluated using instruments and procedures consistent with the standards of the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities and the Washington Administrative Code. The purpose of the evaluation, as stated in the Negotiated Agreement between Big Bend Community College Faculty Association and Community College District No. 18 Board of Trustees for , is to improve the quality of the academic employees and of the instructional program available to students of Community College District No. 18. Probationary faculty are evaluated quarterly for a period of nine quarters, when tenure is either recommended or denied. A committee of three tenured faculty, one 30

35 administrator, and one student meet regularly during each quarter and review data collected from multiple sources that assess the instructor s abilities in relation to the seven Probationary Review Committee Evaluation Standards outlined in the Negotiated Agreement for (Appendix B.4). The committee annually makes recommendations to the vice president. The vice president reviews the material and makes a recommendation to the president, who then reports to the Board of Trustees. The Board of Trustees makes the final decision regarding tenure Tenured faculty are evaluated every five years. The evaluation process utilizes peer, division chair, administrator, student, and self-evaluations to review the quality of faculty performance. In addition, the faculty member assists in the evaluation process by producing an extensive portfolio reflecting the previous five years accomplishments. The portfolio includes documentation verifying the instructor s role pertaining to instruction, professional development, and service as outlined in the Tenured Faculty Evaluation Tool (Appendix B.5). Samples of portfolios are available during the site visit. Probationary and tenured evaluation results are kept on file in the Human Resources office. The guidelines for evaluation of part-time faculty are outlined in the BBCC Academic Employee Handbook (pg ). Part-time faculty are evaluated by students each quarter for the first three years of employment and then once every three years. Evaluation results are kept in the faculty member s personnel file in the Human Resources office. Nursing faculty, as part of the professional/technical group, adhere to the Big Bend Community College Professional Growth Plan consistent with the SBCTC 31

36 guidelines, and which meet the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) for Professional/Technical Certification. Objectives are the mutual achievement of the employee s professional growth and the educational objectives of Big Bend Community College and the Nursing Program. There is an initial three-year certification granted during which faculty develop a plan to meet state-identified critical skills outcomes. Following the initial certification, a five-year Standard Certification is granted during which faculty continue their professional development with outcomes for state-identified Core Skills. Examples of acceptable activities include completing selected college or university credits, seminars or workshops, engaging in scholarly activities and/or attending professional conferences, and work-experience/clinical practice. The Faculty Data Forms (Appendix B.2) indicate active involvement by nursing faculty in professional development activities. These activities include an emphasis on teaching strategies and nursing-content-related areas. All full-time nursing faculty are currently in compliance with the College Professional Development Plan mandates. Part-time faculty are encouraged and supported, but not mandated, to participate in professional development. The Director of Health Education Programs conducts an evaluation of the office assistant annually. The Dean of Education, Health, and Language Skills evaluates the Director of Health Education Programs annually. Records of those evaluations are available in the Human Resource files. 32

37 Standard 3. Students Student policies, development, and services support the goals and outcomes of the nursing education unit. The Big Bend Community College Student Handbook and the Big Bend Community College Course Catalog outline the general policies and procedures to which all faculty, staff and students are expected to adhere. These materials are published annually but are updated in electronic form as changes become necessary. They are free to students and widely available. The Nursing Program operates within the framework of the BBCC admission guidelines. College admission procedures are identified in the BBCC catalog and all students entering the Nursing Program must have first applied to and been accepted by the college. The current Nursing Program application can be accessed on the program website at In addition to those general policies and procedures, enrolled nursing students are expected to observe the Nursing Program specific policies and procedures outlined in the Nursing Student Handbook. The purpose of these policies and procedures is to promote the safety of both the student and the patients with whom they come in contact in the course of their education and to promote the successful completion of program outcomes. These policies and procedures are summarized in Table 3.1. The Nursing Student Handbook is updated annually. Students are responsible for purchasing the current handbook each year. The policies and procedures are reviewed with students during initial advising sessions and are discussed in depth 33

38 during a three-day orientation for new students. The handbook is reviewed during the first week of classes with Level II students. After the policies and procedures are discussed with the new students and the returning students, each student signs a Letter of Agreement acknowledging the policies and procedures and their agreement to abide by them. This Letter of Agreement is maintained in the student s file. Table 3.1 Policies and Procedures Specific to the BBCC Nursing Program Student Requirements Admission---prerequisite classes and a separate application process Clear Washington State Patrol and comprehensive criminal background check Physical examination Current CPR Healthcare Provider card Identified immunizations and a negative TB evaluation Nursing Program Uniform/Lab jacket name pin Malpractice insurance Negative drug test Transportation to clinical sites Signature on confidentiality forms and HIPAA certification Participation in clinical site orientation Eight hours of AIDS education Higher standard grading policy--- minimum passing grade 80% = 2.0 Rationale To prepare for acceptance into the Nursing Program; to meet State program requirements Clinical site requirement Student and Patient safety Clinical site requirement Clinical site requirement Program and Clinical site requirement Clinical site requirement Clinical site requirement School transportation not available Clinical site requirement Patient safety and clinical site requirement Washington State law Recommended by CNEWS Articulation Forum 2002 Increase NCLEX success probability When it is necessary to revise a policy or procedure between routine cycles, the revision is distributed in writing to students prior to the effective date. Students sign a 34

39 copy of the revised policy or procedure acknowledging receipt; the receipt is maintained in the student s file. Public information regarding the nursing program is available in the BBCC Course Catalog, the BBCC Quarterly Class Schedule (http://www.bigbend.edu/ ), in promotional brochures, and at the Nursing program website All sources are reviewed and updated annually and as needed to address changes. The BBCC Course Catalog is printed annually; however, changes are posted to the online catalog on the Big Bend website in order to maintain accurate, consistent and timely information. Table 3.2 identifies the sources of public information available. Table 3.2 Sources for Nursing Program Information Information Nursing program Admission Requirements Satisfactory Academic Progression Standards BBCC Course Catalog BBCC Student Handbook Nursing Program Application Packet Nursing Student Handbook Web Site Pages no Page 5 No **Yes Yes Pages No Page 13 *Yes Graduation Requirements Yes Page 37 No Page 2-3 *Yes Academic Calendar Page 4 Page 5 No No *Yes Course Descriptions Pages No No No *Yes Grading Policies Pages No No Page 40 No Grievance Procedures No Pages 342 No Page 21 No * BBCC Website ** Nursing Website 35

40 Support programs Big Bend Community College provides a wide range of support services for students. These are discussed on pages in the BBCC Course Catalog, and on pages 7-9 of the BBCC Student Handbook. Table 3.3 summarizes the qualifications for administrators for these services. Counseling and advising services by masters prepared faculty and staff are available for all students at BBCC. Short-term personal counseling is available to BBCC students in the Counseling Office. Students can meet with counselors to talk about their feelings of confusion, stress, anxiety, family or relationship problems, sexuality issues, depression or grief, alcohol or other drug abuse, or other concerns. The counseling is confidential and is offered at no charge to the student. For some issues, referrals are made to community resources. The Disabled Student Services Office provides support to students with disabilities to maximize their independence and educational experiences. Currently one level I nursing student is enrolled to receive services through this program. Student Support Services (SSS-TRIO) is a federally funded program designed to help students succeed in college. Eligible students include those with demonstrated financial need or physical or learning disabilities. The BBCC SSS-TRIO Program currently provides services to 186 students. SSS students benefit from academic support, progress monitoring, success workshops, advising, and transfer/career counseling. Eligibility is determined by federal guidelines. For the academic year , there are five nursing students receiving assistance through this program. 36

41 Table 3.3 Qualifications of Administrators for Student Services Student Services Name Service Provided Student Support Services-TRIO Counseling Office Academic Advising for Pre-nursing Students Jerry Workman Director of Student Support Services M.Ed., Seattle Pacific University B.A., Western Washington University Special Ed Endorsement, Portland State University Vocational Directors Certification, Eastern Washington University Max Heinzmann Head Counselor B.A.; M.Ed., Western Washington University Katherine Christian Director, Health Education Programs BA., Developmental Psychology University of Southern California BSN, University of the State of New York [Excelsior] MSN/Ed, University of Phoenix Federally funded program assisting 186 students with retention, transfer, and graduation support. Provides tutors for students needing and requesting academic support. Three master s level counselors are available for program advising, career, and/or personal counseling. Students seeking a nursing degree meet quarterly with Mrs. Christian. Financial Aid Office Veteran s Services Student employment English Lab Andre C. Guzman Interim Financial Aid Director B.A., Eastern Washington University M.P.A., Indiana University, Bloomington Kate Shuttleworth Coordinator B.A., San Francisco State University Provides a full range of collegiate financial aid services and programs. Provides tutoring in reading and writing; academic support for students needing help with reading and writing; assistance in using computer software for writing, reading, grammar and vocabulary; English as a Foreign Language lab courses; advising students with pre-college level courses in reading and writing; assistance to students in developmental English courses with lab assignments; placement exams for all students who have not completed English Composition

42 Table 3.3 Qualifications of Administrators for Student Services Student Services Name Service Provided Math/Science Resource Lab Disabled Student Services Office William Bonaudi Interim Dean M.S., Wayne State University Ed.D., University of Southern California LoraLyn Allen Interim Disability Services Coordinator/Advisor B.A,, Washington State University Offers tutoring in all levels of math, science, and business courses, as well as lab sections of the pre-algebra class; reference materials, videotapes and players, computers with tutorial, mathematical and word processing software are available for student use. Provides a full range of educational support services and advocacy for students with documented disabilities. Opportunity Grant Elizabeth Mendoza Opportunity Grant Director B.A., Eastern Washington University M. Ed., Heritage University Provides tuition assistance to eligible students (up to 45 credits) as well as $1000 a year towards books/supplies; tutor assistance as well as other support services (i.e. workshops, laptop checkout, etc.). Admissions Testing/ Individual Assessment Library Candis Lacher Associate Vice President of Enrollment Services B.A., Washington State University M.S., Capella University Tim Fuhrman Dean of Information Technology A.A.S., Big Bend Community College; B.A., Central Washington University; M.A., University of Arizona Provides admissions and graduation assistance. Testing service available to students in the areas of basic skills, interest/aptitude, personality, and GED. Supports the educational mission of the college by providing access to information resources as well as instruction and assistance in the research process. The Opportunity Grant program serves individuals with less than a two-year degree who may have financial or other barriers limiting access to higher education. The program enrolls students into specific career pathways that reflect demand occupations. Through this program, four nursing students are currently receiving advising, planning and financial support. 38

43 The Worker Retraining Program advises and financially assists students in professional and technical programs. The Worker Retraining Program enrolls students who are currently receiving Washington State unemployment benefits or have recently exhausted their benefits. For the academic year, four nursing students receive advising, planning and financial support through this program. The English Lab provides a variety of services to faculty and students that include tutoring in reading and writing and assistance in using computer software for writing, reading, grammar, and vocabulary. Students enrolled at BBCC may use the English Lab at no cost. The Math/Science Resource Center Lab offers individualized tutoring in all levels of college math. Students enrolled in any Math Pre-college (MPC) or Math (MATH&) prefix courses may use the Math Lab. In addition to tutoring services, reference materials available to students include videotapes and players, computers with tutorials, and mathematical and word processing software. In addition to these services, BBCC provides all enrolled students access to tutor.com, which offers 24/7 online tutoring in math, English, biology, and chemistry. Academic advising is a part of full-time faculty responsibilities at BBCC. The Nursing Program Director is the primary advisor to all students who declare nursing as their area of interest. Nursing faculty are responsible for advising nursing students after they have been admitted to the program. Because of the dramatic increase in prenursing students, group advising is done quarterly by the counseling, financial aid, and career planning offices. 39

44 The BBCC Learning Center Childcare is located on campus. Financial assistance is available to students who take their child/children to this facility. It is a state-licensed daycare provider. Students are considered for childcare assistance on the basis of their financial need as determined by the Financial Aid Office. The availability of this service is on a first-come, first-served basis for qualified applicants. The BBCC Learning Center Childcare makes every effort to adjust hours of available childcare to meet the needs of nursing students using its services. Career and Continuing Education Planning A Job and Career Fair is held annually at Big Bend Community College for the community and all students. The Job and Career Fair includes workshops on career planning, interviewing techniques, and resume and cover-letter writing; it also provides an opportunity for students to meet prospective employers. In addition to visiting with potential employers and attending workshops, groups of nursing students participate in the fair, distributing literature on the Nursing Program and taking blood pressures for fair participants as a way of promoting the nursing program and the nursing profession. Printed informational materials for scholarships, employment, and continuing education opportunities are distributed to the nursing students in their mailboxes and posted on a bulletin board in the hallway of the nursing department. The campus Career Placement Office provides assistance with locating job openings and coaching on resume development and interview techniques. An advisor for Washington State University s RN to BSN program meets annually with nursing students to provide group advisement for interested students. Local 40

45 employers and other academic institutions schedule informational recruitment sessions throughout the academic year. Financial assistance The Financial Aid Office provides information related to available resources such as the Opportunity Grant and Worker Retraining Program, the Big Bend Community College Foundation scholarships, federal/state grant and loan programs, and other funding sources. Counseling related to repayment of student loans is addressed verbally and in written format as required by law. Information on other available scholarships is available at this office. The BBCC Foundation sponsors an annual event, Star Night, where scholarship winners are recognized and introduced to the donors. This year twenty-six nursing students received scholarships from the Foundation, the most of any single program. Information regarding these scholarships is made available each February for the next academic school year. Local hospital and healthcare organizations also offer scholarship opportunities, and the Leah Layne Foundation awards ten $1000 scholarships annually to be used by Level I students for the purchase of nursing books. Educational and Financial Records Educational records are maintained in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) and other federal/state guidelines (Appendix C.1). Educational records of coursework taken at the college are maintained in the Admission/Registration Office. Students may review their records at any time, in person, or via computer access. The Financial Aid Office has policies and procedures 41

46 for maintaining records related to student eligibility for financial aid. This office keeps records of student grants, loans, and scholarships in a confidential manner. The policies and procedures for maintenance of these records can be found in the Financial Aid Office. Ninety percent of the nursing students beginning classes in fall 2009 received some form of financial assistance. The Nursing Program has a written policy for the maintenance of student records outlined on pages of the Nursing Program Faculty Handbook. Following the guidelines from the Washington State Nursing Care Quality Assurance Commission, health and criminal background information are separated from academic records and are maintained in a confidential file in the Nursing Program Director s office. A separate student academic file is kept in a locked file cabinet in the director s office. These files are available to the student for review at any given time. The Nursing Program keeps nursing student records for five years after last attendance. Technology As the complexity of technology increases on campus, the need for training and support increases as well. The Big Bend Technology (BBT) department is responsible for orienting students and faculty. BBCC uses a secure portal for campus information. Students and faculty receive initial log-in information at the time of registration and instructions and tutorials are available on BBCC s home page. Nursing students receive an orientation to the nursing computer laboratory during their first program orientation prior to the beginning of classes. During the first week of each quarter, BBT personnel are available from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. in the library to assist students in the use of the computers and with online 42

47 courses. BBT personnel can also be reached by telephone 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Monday through Friday for assistance. During summer 2009, BBCC, as well as the other campuses in the SBCTC system, transitioned to a new platform for online course delivery, titled Angel. BBT provided personal assistance to students and faculty accessing this new platform; tutorial programs for using online resources and Angel are also available on the Big Bend portal for both students and faculty. BBT created an online classroom for the Nursing Program, which serves as a document repository, a communication site, and a place for hybrid delivery. At the beginning of the quarter, students are required to access the classroom and send a message to the instructor indicating their success in navigating the technology. Students utilize high-fidelity mannequins in the skills laboratory under the direct supervision of instructors. Prior to entering the acute care settings, students receive orientation to the electronic medical record system used in the facilities. Students also receive orientation and limited access to computerized medication control systems used within the facilities. 43

48 Standard 4. Curriculum The curriculum prepares students to achieve the outcomes of the nursing education unit, including safe practice in contemporary health care environments. The Big Bend Nursing program is built on a ladder concept, which offers multiple step-out-and-return pathways, consistent with the college mission to provide a variety of educational opportunities. The first step of the ladder is the Nursing Assistant Program. This one quarter, stand-alone course has no prerequisites and provides classroom and clinical education to meet the requirements for the National Nurses Aide Assessment Program testing. In turn, this test makes the student eligible for Nursing Assistant-Certified (NA-C) licensure in Washington State. This first step serves multiple purposes. 1) It provides an entry-level skill for the health care field. 2) It provides an opportunity for the student to experience the nursing field. 3) It offers an on-campus pathway to meet one of the entrance requirements for the Nursing Program. However, students may obtain their NA-C licensure through other means; the Nursing Assistant course is not a core class. The second step on the ladder is the Practical Nurse (PN) option. Students who successfully complete the first year of the Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) program and the optional 4 th quarter (summer) are eligible to take the NCLEX-PN. Students may step off the ladder at this point or may continue without interruption toward their ADN. The summer quarter also serves as a re-entry step for LPN s who desire to progress to an RN. The third step on the ladder is the Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN), which is an Associate Degree in Applied Science. Students who successfully complete the 44

49 Level I and Level II curriculum, or who complete Level II after entering as an LPN, are eligible to take the NCLEX-RN. Philosophy of Nursing Education The faculty believe that education is a process through which a person assimilates knowledge, develops skills, establishes values and realizes potentials. Learning is individualistic and proceeds in a simple-to-complex manner. It is influenced by the active participation, level of development, and motivation of the learner. Successful learning is demonstrated by consistent application of theoretical knowledge and skills in a variety of clinical settings. The faculty demonstrate respect for the unique qualities and learning needs of students and strive to provide a supportive and challenging learning environment to stimulate inquiry, synthesis of knowledge, and critical thinking. Learning is supported by using a variety of instructional strategies and problem solving techniques. Philosophy of Nursing The Nursing Program curriculum is built upon four nursing paradigm concepts: Individual, Health, Environment, and Nursing as defined in table 4.1: 45

50 Table 4.1 DEFINITION OF NURSING PARADIGM CONCEPTS Individual The individual is viewed as an integrated whole person with the following dimensions: biological, spiritual, physiological, patho-physiological, psychological, cultural, emotional, and social. The individual is defined as a person, family, or community, who continually responds to the environment and has the potential for self-care in dealing with the preservation or restoration of health or a dignified death. Health Health is not merely the absence of disease. The human values of health and wholeness can be maintained or restored through self-care. Each individual has the inherent right for dignity and autonomy in meeting self-care needs. The individual seeking health care must be involved and informed and participate in decisionmaking, if capable, to maximize benefits in the health care delivery system. Individuals are responsible for their own health care maintenance and utilization of community resources. The goal of health care services is to provide an atmosphere of respect without prejudice, recognizing the cultural identity unique to each individual. Environment Good health is possible through healthy environments. The environment includes those factors that create harmony and balance in a person s life. The environment is conceptualized by those factors that affect a person s sense of well-being, be they spiritual, emotional, physical, social, political, or economic issues. Stressors are present in all internal and external environments and directly affect the individual s response to maintaining homeostasis. Nursing Nursing is defined as a service to humanity that utilizes a systematic approach (the nursing process) to promote universal self-care of an individual throughout the life span. It is a profession of caring, evidenced by a consistent caring presence while delivering nursing skills in a safe and effective manner, treating all patients with dignity and respect. Nursing education presents concepts from the humanities, life and social sciences, and biological and physical sciences. It promotes competencybased learning at all levels of nursing practice. The goal of nursing education is the provision of a theoretical knowledge base, competent skill base, and professional value insights that enable a beginning practitioner to deliver safe care and to demonstrate accountability for care delivered or delegated to others. 46

51 The structure of the BBCC Nursing program curriculum is guided by the ladder concept and the nursing education philosophy stated above. In order to assure that students have a sufficient knowledge base to meet the requirements for the PN option, the first year curriculum covers the common conditions of all body systems as well as obstetric and pediatric care. Advanced and/or complex conditions comprise the curricular content in the second year. This is consistent with the nursing education philosophy of moving from simple to complex concepts and building on previous knowledge. The structure of the curriculum demands constant evaluation by the faculty to assure that it meets workplace standards, adequately prepares students for the NCLEX- RN, and that all faculty share a common understanding of content, goals, and progression. In December, 2006, the nursing faculty initiated a complete review of the curriculum, beginning with determining appropriate placement of theory content in either Level I or Level II (Appendix D.1). During a faculty retreat, all content areas were reviewed and discussed, until consensus was reached on content flow and appropriate placement. Drafts of the revised course outlines were reviewed by faculty members over the next five months with corrections and revisions incorporated into the final format. These revised Master Course Outlines were submitted to the college, approved by the Instructional Council, and bound copies provided to the faculty in May, The next phase of evaluation began in December, 2007 and continued through June, During this period, the faculty focused on the clarity, accuracy, and progression of course goals, course objectives, and program outcomes for all core 47

52 courses. Faculty brought their recommendations for revision to faculty meetings and workdays, and the final format was completed and approved in July of The faculty used various resources in their review of content, objectives, and outcomes. These included the current NCLEX test plan, which outlines expected competencies for graduate nurses, and the competency statements by the National League of Nurses and the Consortium of Nurse Educators of Washington State (CNEWS). In addition to these resources, the program used standardized assessment testing provided by Assessment Technologies, Inc. (ATI). Reports following testing provided a snapshot of student proficiency in specific areas, guiding faculty in their evaluation of both content and delivery. For example, the PN predictor examination given in July, 2009 identified a significant weakness in the area of endo-tracheal suctioning. Currently, endo-tracheal suctioning is part of Level II content. Faculty are reviewing both the ATI resource and the course content to determine if it is appropriate to reposition this content and skill development into Level I. Another example of faculty input to curriculum is the request made by M. Miers- Toftness in June 2009 to move Level II cardiac content into the first quarter (NUR 210), in order to better prepare students for exposure to critical care clinical environments. This change was incorporated into the revised Master Course Outlines and implemented in fall, The non-nursing support courses identified in Table 4.2 meet the Washington State requirements listed in WAC (3)(a). Human Anatomy and Physiology 241 & 242 (2 quarters) and English Composition 101 must be completed prior to 48

53 Table 4.2 BBCC NURSING PROGRAM CURRICULUM LEVEL I - ADN PROGRAM WITH PN OPTION FALL QUARTER WINTER QUARTER SPRING QUARTER NUR 101 Survival skills for the Nursing Student 1 credit NUR 110 Fundamentals 5 credits NUR 111 Fundamentals Practicum 3 credits NUR 135 Nursing Skills Laboratory 1 credit NUR 114Pharmacology 2 credits 12 credits BIOL& 260 Microbiology 5 credits 5 credits NUR 120 Beginning Nursing Concepts I NUR 121 Beginning Nursing Practicum I NUR 136 Nursing Skills Laboratory NUTR& 101 Nutrition 6 credits 4 credits 1 credit 11 credits 5 credits 5 credits NUR 130 Beginning Nursing Concepts II NUR 131 Beginning Nursing Practicum II NUR 137 Nursing Skills Laboratory PSYC& 100 Intro to Psych 6 credits 4 credits 1 credit 11 credits 5 credits 5 credits SUMMER QUARTER (PN OPTION) NUR 140 PN Completion/ Transition 4 credits NUR 141 PN Completion/ Transition Practicum 8 credits 12 credits* TOTAL 17 credits TOTAL 16 credits TOTAL 16 credits TOTAL 12 credits* NUR 210 Advanced Nursing Concepts I NUR 211 Advanced Nursing Practicum I NUR 235 Nursing Skills Laboratory PSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology LEVEL II ADN COMPLETION FALL QUARTER WINTER QUARTER SPRING QUARTER 5 credits 5 credits 1 credit 11 credits 5 credits 5 credits NUR 220 Advanced Nursing Concepts II NUR 221 Advanced Nursing Practicum II NUR 236 Nursing Skills Laboratory CMST& 220 Fundamentals of Speech 5 credits 5 credits 1 credit 11 credits 5 credits 5 credits NUR 230 Advanced Nursing Concepts III 5 credits NUR 231 Advanced Nursing Practicum III 6 credits 11 credits Math > credits 5 credits TOTAL 16 credits TOTAL 17 credits TOTAL 16 credits NURSING CREDITS Credits Level I 34 credits Credits Level II 33 credits Total nursing credits 67 credits SUPPORT CLASSES FOR ADN COMPLETION ENGL& 101, English Composition 5 credits BI0L& 241, A&P 5 credits BIOL& 215, Microbiology 5 credits NUTR& credits MATH > credits PSYC& 100, Intro to Psychology 5 credits PSYC& 200, Lifespan Psychology 5 credits CMST& 220, Public Speaking 5 credits 45 credits NOTES Prerequisite classes for entrance to Level I ADN Program *Italicized Optional Credits Total for ADN 112 credits 49

54 application to the program. The remaining support courses in microbiology, nutrition, general psychology and developmental psychology, public speaking, and college level mathematics may be completed prior to or concurrent with the core nursing courses. For most applicants, the prerequisites require at least one year; however, the length of time can be influenced by the student s academic strength and personal motivation. Most applicants to the BBCC nursing program have completed some or all of the corequisite courses while completing the pre-requisite classes. Core Curriculum The curriculum is delivered in three distinct yet interrelated modalities: 1) The didactic component provides the theoretical knowledge base for safe clinical practice. 2) The skills laboratory permits the development of psychomotor skills and the integration of theoretical knowledge, and 3) the clinical component provides the opportunity for the student to utilize knowledge, skills, and critical thinking in the delivery of nursing care to patients in a variety of healthcare settings. Tables 4.3 and 4.4 outline the course objectives and program outcomes. Appendices D.2 and D.3 outline the content areas for the didactic and skills laboratory components throughout the curriculum. Level I Fall Quarter The classroom curriculum begins during orientation with the one credit NUR 101, Survival Skills for the Nursing Student. The course was introduced in Fall 2008 as an elective course. The goal of the course was to address attrition by preparing students to make the transition to the learning levels required for nursing education. The 50

55 curriculum includes study skills, learning styles, stress management, an introduction to critical thinking, and test-taking skills. After observing that over 70% of the unsuccessful first quarter students in Fall 2008 had declined to take or failed to complete NUR 101, the faculty made the decision to make NUR 101 a mandatory course beginning Fall Half the content was included in the orientation schedule and the remaining content delivered throughout the fall quarter. The evaluation of this decision is ongoing; however, the percentage of students passing the first theory test in Fundamentals increased from 80% to 84% between Fall 2008 and Fall NUR 110 Fundamentals of Nursing provides the fundamental concepts for nursing care. The curriculum includes an introduction to nursing theory, the nursing process, and physical assessment. Psychosocial aspects include communication skills, cultural and spiritual assessment, and the nursing response to stress and to death/dying. The application of nursing care to the aging population is a specific focus of this course. NUR 114 Pharmacology is required during the fall quarter Level I. This twocredit course presents the theoretical content necessary for the safe administration of medication in the clinical setting. The course introduces major pharmacologic classifications by body system. Assignments focus on application of knowledge to patient care, including medication reference cards for use in the clinical setting, and a teaching plan for a theoretical patient with a variety of medications. 51

56 Professional Role Manager of Care Provider of Care Communicator Table 4.3 LEVEL I Core Concepts, Objectives and Outcomes CORE Fall Winter Spring Summer Outcome Identify components of interpersonal communication, including barriers. Demonstrate therapeutic interpersonal communication strategies in the healthcare setting Demonstrate therapeutic communication with the adult patient in the health care setting. Demonstrate beginning proficiency in nursing documentation using electronic or paper systems. Incorporate age specific communication techniques in patient care Demonstrate advancing proficiency in nursing documentation Evaluate effectiveness of one s own communication skills Demonstrate clear, effective communications with patients and members of the healthcare team in a variety of structured settings. Evaluate the outcome of therapeutic communication Communicate effectively to deliver relevant, accurate and complete information to patients, families, and the healthcare team. Discuss aspects of health behaviors, physiological and psychological stress responses, and stress adaptation. Demonstrate a basic head to toe assessment with minimal assistance Identify principles and concepts of learning and teaching. Apply beginning skills in patient teaching. Define cultural, ethnic, and spiritual characteristics of an adult and/or elderly adult Discuss components of the nursepatient therapeutic relationship Identify a cultural or spiritual factor that may impact health care delivery Demonstrate the use of the nursing process in providing direct care to an adult and/or elderly adult patient. Explore critical thinking principles related to nursing care delivery. Identify basic principles of delegation. Implement use of established nursing protocols while providing care to patients with commonly occurring health conditions. Relate multidisciplinary concepts to plan appropriate nursing care for clients with selected common conditions. Identify a patient learning need Integrate principles of cultural awareness in the plan of care for patients with commonly occurring health conditions. Develop a plan of care utilizing the patient s medical diagnosis, medications, and laboratory results. Demonstrate beginning delegation skills to unlicensed personnel in a controlled setting. Deliver age-specific care to 2-3 patients in an organized and safe manner. Demonstrate patient teaching in a variety of settings. Discuss cultural issues that influence family dynamics throughout the lifespan. Integrate cultural considerations in planning care for families. Prioritize nursing diagnoses and patient goals in developing a plan of care for individuals across the lifespan. Demonstrate critical thinking skills in providing care for patients and families. Adapt the plan of care using agespecific criteria. Delegate tasks appropriately Implement nursing care for groups of patients by prioritized nursing diagnoses and interventions for persons with common health deviations. Conduct patient teaching within defined role. Demonstrate cultural sensitivity when caring for patients experiencing selected health deviations. Prioritize, organize, and complete assignments for groups of three or more stable patients in a timely manner. Delegate effectively within the LPN role. Deliver safe and effective physical, psychosocial, cultural, and spiritual care to the whole person in a structured setting, Implement and modify standardized teaching plans for patients across the lifespan. Demonstrate clinical decision-making from a theoretical knowledge base utilizing the nursing process to develop patient care plans that ensure safe, effective care in a stable setting Identify moral, ethical, and legal responsibilities of a nursing student Demonstrate behavior consistent with standards of performance appropriate to the Level I ADN Student Nurse role Delineate the roles of the nurse in the healthcare setting. Demonstrate behavior consistent with standards of performance appropriate to the Level I ADN Student Nurse role Discuss the transitional steps between student and professional nursing. Discuss bioethical dilemmas, including beginning/end of life and quality of life issues. Identify leadership roles within health care settings. Demonstrate behavior consistent with standards of performance appropriate to the Level I ADN Student Nurse role Outline the role of the beginning practical nurse as defined by the Washington State Nursing Care Quality Assurance Commission. Discuss legal considerations for the LPN role. Demonstrate behavior consistent with standards of performance appropriate to the Level I ADN Student Nurse role/ beginning PN role Assume responsibility for continual learning and professional growth in the nursing role 52

57 Professional Role Manager of Care Provider of Care Communicator Table 4.4 LEVEL II Core Concepts, Objectives and Outcomes CORE Fall Winter Spring Outcome Apply appropriate channels of communication within an agency to assist with interactive communication Identify appropriate nursing care interventions for patients with selected complex conditions. Implement culturally sensitive care to patients across the lifespan. Collect physical, psychosocial, cultural and spiritual assessment data on patients across the lifespan. Utilize data to identify patient and family-specific learning needs. Apply nursing skills in a safe and effective manner, while caring for patients in a less stable condition. Explore principles of delegation in the Registered Nurse role. Utilize critical thinking in making clinical judgments for patients with complex conditions, while delivering safe and effective care. Discuss the role of nursing in relation to community needs and world events. Demonstrate behavior consistent with standards of performance appropriate to the Level II ADN Student Nurse role Consistently analyze and communicate information in the clinical setting in a relevant, accurate, concise, and clear manner Participate appropriately in communications with healthcare providers Apply principles of cultural competency to the nursing care of individuals across the lifespan. Apply nursing skills in a safe and effective manner, while caring for patients in a less stable condition. Evaluate the progress of the client and significant support person(s) toward achievement of identified learning needs. Utilize critical thinking skills to evaluate and modify the plan of care for patients with higher acuity. Apply delegation principles to manage the care of a group of patients with higher acuity. Analyze scenarios related to leadership, delegation and supervision. Investigate legal and ethical issues in healthcare. Demonstrate behavior consistent with standards of performance appropriate to the Level II ADN Student Nurse role Collaborate with staff to initiate communication with healthcare providers. Consistently communicate information in the clinical setting in a relevant, concise, accurate, and clear manner. Develop and implement patient specific teaching plans. Deliver culturally competent care in the healthcare setting. Organize, prioritize and administer care to a group of patients with complex conditions. Explore the role of the charge nurse in staffing and delegation decisionmaking. Prioritize advanced care delivery using critical thinking skills to a group of less stable patients. Demonstrate behavior consistent with standards of performance appropriate to the Level II ADN Student Nurse role Research and present an evidence based education presentation to a defined nursing unit. Communicate effectively to deliver relevant, accurate and complete information to patients, families, and the healthcare team. Deliver safe and effective physical, psychosocial, cultural, and spiritual care to the whole person in a variety of settings. Plan, initiate, and evaluate patient teaching including assessment of current knowledge, use of appropriate materials and techniques. Demonstrate clinical decision-making from a theoretical knowledge base utilizing the nursing process to develop patient care plans that ensure safe, effective care in a variety of settings. Assume responsibility and accountability in the practice of registered nursing as defined by the professional standards and codes of nursing. Participate as a member of the healthcare team for educational and institutional growth. 53

58 NUR 135 Nursing Skills Laboratory focuses on the fundamental skills of patient care including physical assessment and medication administration (excluding IV routes). The skills laboratory schedule is front loaded to prepare the students to implement skills in the clinical setting earlier in the quarter. Skills check off and remediation policies documented in the Nursing Student Handbook (page 21) support competent skill performance and patient safety. NUR 111 Fundamentals of Nursing Practicum completes the core curriculum for this quarter. During rotations in local long-term care facilities, students have the opportunity to apply the theory and the skills learned in the concurrent courses. During the quarter, students provide care for one patient, delivering all nursing care during their shift and developing skills using the nursing process. Winter Quarter NUR 120 Beginning Nursing Concepts I provides the theoretical concepts for the acute care setting. Students are introduced to maternal/infant assessment and care, and to the peri-operative environment. This quarter begins the introduction of common medical-surgical topics that continues throughout the Level I year. NUR 136 Nursing Skills Laboratory advances the skill level for the Level I student. The curriculum covers sterile procedures, maternal and infant assessment, and maintenance and management of IV fluids and piggyback medications. Other procedures appropriate to the care of surgical patients are introduced. NUR 121 Beginning Nursing Practicum I provides the opportunity for students to apply theory and knowledge to the care of the adult acute care patient in the medical surgical and peri-operative settings. The student begins with one patient and delivers 54

59 total care including medication administration, documentation, and care-planning. As their organizational skills increase, students may advance to caring for two patients. The clinical experience also includes uncomplicated postpartum care with assessment of the newborn. Spring Quarter NUR130 Beginning Nursing Concepts II continues to provide theoretical grounding in a variety of common medical-surgical topics. This quarter introduces the care of the pediatric patient with a focus on growth and development. NUR 137 Nursing Skills Laboratory includes pediatric-specific skills such as physical and developmental assessment and adaptations for medication administration. The curriculum also includes more procedures for the medical surgical patient and more advanced assessment skills. NUR 131 Beginning Nursing Practicum II provides the student more experience in the acute care setting. Students provide care to a minimum of two patients, expanding their organizational and care planning skills. Patient assignments may now include pediatric patients in the acute care setting. Students rotate through two community settings for pediatric experience: a pediatric physician office and a developmental preschool associated with the local public school. The assignments for these rotations focus on developmental stages, age-appropriate communication skills, and nursing care adaptations. 55

60 Summer Quarter (optional) The summer quarter courses are optional for the ADN program but mandatory for those students desiring to become eligible for their NCLEX-PN. These courses are also mandatory for LPN s who desire to return to school to earn their ADN. NUR 140 PN Completion/Transition completes the common medical surgical conditions and includes a professional component focused on the legal aspects of the Practical Nurse role. NUR 141 PN Completion/Transition Practicum provides 176 hours of clinical experience in the medical surgical, obstetric, and inpatient psychiatric settings. Students provide care for three to four patients, including the opportunity to develop delegation skills appropriate to the PN role. LEVEL II Fall NUR 210 Advanced Nursing Concepts I focuses on advanced nursing theory as it relates to selected complicated health deviations in patients throughout the lifespan. NUR 235 Nursing Skills Laboratory introduces advanced nursing skills including initiation of intravenous therapy and management of central lines. Skills lab sessions focus on critical thinking scenarios related to patient safety and clinical decision making. NUR 211 Advanced Nursing Concepts Practicum II provides the student the opportunity to apply theory and skills to the care of patients with complex disease conditions. 56

61 Winter NUR 220 Advanced Nursing Concepts II continues to focus on advanced nursing theory related to selected complicated health deviations in patients throughout the lifespan. NUR 236 Nursing Skills Laboratory provides practice in advanced psychomotor skills and critical thinking for emergency management and cardiac arrest procedures. Skills for this quarter include chest tube management, tracheostomy care, and epidural management. NUR 221 Advanced Nursing Concepts Practicum II provides the student with the opportunity to demonstrate progression in their skill performance, critical thinking, and independent decision making within the student role. Spring NUR 230 Advanced Nursing Concepts III completes the nursing theory related to selected complicated health deviations. The curriculum includes a unit focused on recognition, priority setting, and appropriate response to acute changes in patient condition. Transition to the RN role, including legal and professional issues concludes the quarter. NUR 231 Advanced Nursing Practicum III offers the student the opportunity to develop increased independence in nursing practice while working in tandem with an experienced staff nurse. The mentorship structure helps students attain their personal learning goals in organization and professional communication. 57

62 Ethics, culture, human relations, and leadership components are integrated throughout the curriculum in both the classroom and the clinical setting. Throughout the curriculum, faculty are responsible for providing current, evidence-based material. Textbooks are updated every three years to maintain currency; however, there are circumstances when evidence-based practice outpaces that schedule. For example, this year faculty incorporated the current recommendations regarding eliciting Homan s sign into the Level I curriculum, and the current IHI guidelines for central line dressings into Level II. Additional curriculum components Assessment testing The nursing program introduced standardized assessment testing to the BBCC nursing curriculum in 2005 to expand and support the preparation of students. The faculty evaluated several programs and selected the product offered by Assessment Technology, Inc. (ATI). When ATI assessment testing was first introduced in fall 2005, students perceived it to be outside the curriculum and voiced vigorous resistance to the additional workload. During that time students scores were reported as a national percentile; students received RN level proctored and non-proctored tests, even during the Level I (PN) year, which resulted in significant student frustration. Based on student and instructor feedback, a number of modifications have been made to better serve the students education. In 2006, the program began to utilize PN level testing for Level I students and RN level testing for level II students. In 2007, ATI initiated proficiency scoring rather than national percentile ranking for proctored examinations. Each proctored examination 58

63 provides the student with a proficiency score and a report of specific weak content areas. The nursing program receives a report of individual student performance as well as a group report. The nursing program established a benchmark of Level II proficiency, defined as Fairly certain to meet NCLEX standards in this content area, Students falling below that benchmark must demonstrate remediation by responding to the specific content areas identified in their individualized report. Selected portions of the ATI handbook are included in Appendix D.4 and the complete handbook will be available on site. Initially, the proctored exams were administered after the content was delivered in the classroom; remediation was accomplished by taking non-proctored exams outside of class time utilizing available study resources. In 2007, the faculty and ATI support personnel mapped the curriculum in order to coordinate specific unit tests with content delivery. Non-proctored tests now are made available prior to the classroom examination, which complement the students classroom preparation. Students are required to complete the non-proctored examination to benchmark level prior to taking the proctored test, which is scheduled following the classroom examination. The proficiency benchmarks and remediation policies remain the same. However, because the content and preparation are effectively coordinated, more students meet the benchmark initially, reducing student frustration and improving classroom preparation and success. ATI provides NCLEX predictor examinations for both the PN and the RN examinations. The intent of these examinations is to give the student an idea of their readiness for the NCLEX and to identify weak content areas upon which to focus their 59

64 preparation. In 2007, a retrospective review of predictor scores in relation to first-pass student success on the NCLEX-RN (Appendix D.5) led the program to establish a benchmark of 96% probability of passing. Students who do not meet the benchmark are required to do remediation and take a second predictor examination. While students are required to complete the remediation process, they are not required to meet the benchmark in order to complete the program. Elective courses The core classes of the nursing program total 11 credits for most quarters. Because a full-time load for financial aid purposes is 12 credits, and because most nursing students have already completed the support courses, the nursing program offers 1-credit elective courses. These courses are designed to support the core curriculum. For example, Advanced Pharmacology (NUR 215) uses a case study approach to supplement the content covered in NUR 210. Other elective courses have included NUR 189 Writing for Nursing Education, which focuses on professional writing using APA format, NUR 150 Transcultural Diversity in Healthcare, and NUR 232 EKG Interpretation. Approximately 50% of eligible students choose to participate in these elective courses. Evaluation Processes The Nursing program uses a variety of evaluation methodologies. The primary evaluation tool in the didactic courses is multiple-choice testing. These tests are given following the end of each theory unit, with a comprehensive final. The faculty instituted the comprehensive final in as a tool to encourage students to review and retain content over time. Alternate format questions have been gradually incorporated 60

65 into the multiple-choice question format to better prepare the students for the NCLEX examination; the select all that apply questions have been particularly effective in evaluating student mastery of material. The Nursing program uses the ParTest/ParScore program to develop tests and to analyze the results of those tests. The statistics provided by the ParScore component assists the faculty in identifying effective questions and improving their testwriting skills. This process has improved the overall quality of the multiple-choice tests, and increased consistency between instructors. Written work, such as papers and care plans, are evaluated by rubrics (Appendix D.6). These rubrics promote consistent evaluation, which improves the students performance and satisfaction as they move between faculty members. During the initial orientation session, students are introduced to the concept of a portfolio as a tool to measure their professional development. The portfolio is developed throughout the program, and is submitted for evaluation at the completion of the PN and/or the ADN curriculum. In the skills laboratory, students practice skills during scheduled class sessions under instructor supervision and with instructor guidance. After the students have the opportunity to gain competency, skills check-off sessions permit the instructor to evaluate skill fluency. During these sessions, students are expected to complete the skill with minimal prompting. Scheduled skills check off sessions are also used to promote competency for previously learned skills. A camera in the simulation room permits remote observation of skill performance such as physical assessment. 61

66 The clinical evaluation tools have undergone a transformation over the last three years. Faculty dissatisfaction with a simple pass/fail assessment, and the difficulty in seeing student progression, or lack of it, when documented on a weekly form, resulted in the use of a rubric to better describe student performance. The clinical evaluation tool is now a quarterly record, permitting the instructor and student to clearly track the student s progression on a single sheet. The tools reflect the program core concepts as well as course specific objectives (Appendix D.7). All clinical evaluation tools will be available for the team to review during the site visit. Clinical assignments are also graded by rubric (Appendix D.8), which has improved the consistency of evaluation of material between instructors. In addition to faculty assessment of students, the BBCC Nursing Program strives to develop self-assessment skills. A self-evaluation tool is submitted following each clinical experience. Nursing programs in rural environments face a constant challenge to provide appropriate clinical experiences. BBCC s nursing program has developed very positive relationships with a variety of healthcare settings in order to provide satisfactory clinical opportunities (Table 4.5). A sample affiliation agreement is included in Appendix D.8. These contracts clearly delineate facility and college responsibilities in order to provide for patient and student safety. They are reviewed and renewed every two years; the current contracts are effective until Eastern State Hospital requires all affiliation contracts to align with the calendar year, and the contract should be renewed in December. 62

67 Table 4.5 Facility Name ADAMS COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT Contact Person Phone Street Address City ST. Zip Date Sent To Fac. Date Signed & Reviewed Date Sent Back to Fac. Current Contract Date Good Thru Kate Brueske W Main Ritzville WA /1/2009 4/10/ /16/09 07/30/11 BBCC CHILD CARE CENTER Angela Weber Bolling Street Moses Lake WA /01/09 04/01/09 04/16/09 07/30/11 CENTRAL WASHINGTON HOSPITAL COLUMBIA BASIN HEALTH ASSOCIATION Marilyn Brincat South Miller Street Wenatchee WA /01/09 04/28/09 04/28/09 07/30/11 Greg Brandenburg East Main Othello WA /01/09 04/10/09 04/16/09 07/30/11 COLUMBIA BASIN HOSPITAL Ginnie Folan Nat Washington Way Ephrata WA /01/09 04/14/09 04/16/09 07/30/11 COLUMBIA CREST CARE & REHABILITATION COVENTRY HOUSE ASSISTED LIVING COMM. Tawny Caldwell E Nelson Road Moses Lake WA /01/09 09/15/09 10/07/09 07/30/11 Sarah Montemayor North 2nd Othello WA /01/09 04/10/09 04/16/09 07/30/11 COULEE COMMUNITY HOSPITAL & NURSING HOME Tom Jensen Fortuyn Rd Grand Coulee WA /01/09 04/29/09 05/06/09 07/30/11 EAST ADAMS RURAL HOSPITAL Sarina Stolp /10/2009 Ritzville WA /01/09 04/21/09 04/22/09 07/30/11 EASTERN STATE HOSPITAL Stephanie Ender PO Box 800 Maple St Medical Lake WA /31/09 FRESENIUS MEDICAL CARE DBA M.L. DIALYSIS GRANT COUNTY HEALTH DISTRICT Mary Lou Krautscheid S Pilgrim Street Moses Lake WA /15/ C Street Ephrata WA /01/09 05/29/09 06/03/09 07/30/11 KADLEC Heather Newell Swift Blvd. Richland WA /11/09 04/01/09 06/01/09 02/28/14 LAKERIDGE SOLANNA SPECIAL CARE Angie Spangler E Plum Moses Lake WA /01/09 04/22/09 04/28/09 07/30/11 63

68 Table 4.5 Contact Person Phone Street Address City ST. Zip Date Sent To Fac. Date Signed & Reviewed Date Sent Back to Fac. Current Contract Date LINCOLN HOSPITAL DISTRICT #3 Marilyn Snider Nicholls St. Davenport WA /24/09 03/24/09 03/25/09 07/30/11 Good Thru Mattawa Community Medical Clinic Dana Fox PO Box 1581 Mattawa WA /01/09 10/20/09 10/22/09 07/30/11 MCKAY HEALTHCARE Ralph Allen nd Ave SW Soap Lake WA /01/09 04/07/09 04/09/09 07/30/11 MOSES LAKE CLINIC Charee Wagner E Hill Moses Lake WA /01/09 04/07/09 04/09/09 07/30/11 MOSES LAKE COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER Shirley Merkle ext Coolidge, Ste 101 Moses Lake WA /01/09 04/14/09 04/16/09 07/30/11 MOSES LAKE SCHOOL DISTRICT Michelle Price W. Ivy Moses Lake WA /01/09 04/09/09 04/16/09 07/30/11 ODESSA MEMORIAL HEALTHCARE CENTER OTHELLO COMMUNITY HOSPITAL PARKVIEW PEDIATRICS & FAMILY MEDICINE Mark Barglof E Amende Drive Odessa WA /01/09 04/27/09 04/29/09 07/30/11 Jody Ulrich N. 14th Ave Othello WA /01/09 04/22/09 04/28/09 07/30/11 Dr. Bross S. Division St. Moses Lake WA /01/09 04/10/09 04/16/09 07/30/11 QUINCY VALLEY HOSPITAL Mehdi Merred th Ave SW Quincy WA /01/09 04/09/09 04/16/09 07/30/11 ROCKWOOD CLINIC Megan Lyman E. 5th Ave. Spokane WA /01/09 04/14/09 04/16/09 07/30/11 SACRED HEART MEDICAL CENTER Dr. Dorothy Ruzicki W 101 8th St, PO Box 2555 Spokane WA /1/ /26/09 10/28/09 07/30/11 SAMARITAN HEALTHCARE Kathryn Trumbull E Wheeler Road Moses Lake WA /01/09 05/20/09 05/27/09 07/30/11 64

69 Long-Term Care The long-term care facilities that are located in Moses Lake and Ephrata provide a low acuity setting for Level I students during fall quarter while they develop assessment and communication skills. The size of each facility is adequate to support a full clinical group of 8-10 students. The administration and staff of the facilities actively communicate with instructors to identify appropriate patient/resident assignments to meet program goals. Acute Care BBCC uses three sites for acute care experience, each with unique strengths. Each provides a full range of health care services, including obstetrics, medical, surgical, and emergency care. Each site provides the opportunity to meet clinical course objectives across the curriculum. Students are assigned to at least two of these acute care sites throughout their education program and most rotate to all three. These rotations provide students with the opportunity to benefit from the specific strengths of each site. All the acute care sites maintain strong educational programs for their staff, including in-service education and skills fairs to assure that care meets the highest standard. The quality and safety goals for each facility are discussed with students during orientation to the facilities (Appendix D.9). Samaritan Healthcare in Moses Lake is a full service, fifty bed facility. Here, students are able to provide care to patients with a variety of medical and general surgical conditions. The obstetric unit includes a Level I nursery and delivers approximately 1200 infants per year. Other areas utilized include the Peri-operative 65

70 Unit, the Respiratory Therapy Department, the Level 4 Emergency Department, and the Special Care Unit. Othello Community Hospital in Othello, Washington, approximately 25 miles south of the Big Bend campus, is a critical access hospital. The number of patient beds is limited; however, students gain valuable experience there in general medical and surgical conditions and obstetrics in a rural hospital setting. In addition, the students also utilize the Peri-operative Department and the Emergency Department. The facility offers specialized outpatient services such as wound care and tracheostomy changes and welcomes student participation in those learning experiences. This setting also provides cross-cultural experiences for the students because many of the patients do not speak English. Central Washington Hospital in Wenatchee, Washington, is located approximately 70 miles northwest of the campus. This Joint Commission-accredited facility is significantly larger at 170 available beds. It is a specialty referral center for the Central Washington area. During rotations here, students are exposed to cardiac surgery, oncology, and a broad variety of medical and surgical patients. The Nursing Program also uses a number of other acute care sites during the final quarter clinical practicum. These sites may be too small to support a full clinical group or may be too distant for routine rotations; however, they are ideal for the mentorship structure while providing good experiences in the rural setting that characterizes the program s service area. 66

71 Community settings While the acute care setting provides the ideal environment for developing the nursing skills of the nursing student, the program also uses community settings for specific learning opportunities. In the rural environment, children needing hospitalization are often transported to larger population centers and local inpatient pediatric experiences are limited. The program utilizes pediatric physician offices, a developmental preschool associated with the public school district, and routine public school health and wellness screenings to provide students with experience with children. The program also utilizes a dialysis center to support classroom learning about renal disease and laboratory values. 67

72 Standard 5: Resources Fiscal, physical, and learning resources promote the achievement of the goals and outcomes of the nursing education unit. As a state agency, Big Bend Community College (BBCC) is subject to the laws of Washington State. The laws passed by the state legislature are interpreted by the Office of Financial Management (OFM) and set forth in the Financial and Administrative Policies and Procedures Book issued online by OFM (http://www.ofm.wa.gov/ policies.htm, click on SAAM). The BBCC Board of Trustees establishes policies based upon these laws, rules and requirements as applied to the campus. The State Board for Community and Technical Colleges (SBCTC) receives the statewide appropriations approved by the legislature and allocates funds on a biennium-basis to its community and technical colleges. The SBCTC s policy manual implements statutes, policies and regulations governing Washington Community and Technical Colleges. BBCC s President is responsible for the interpretation of Board Policy (BP) into administrative procedures for action and for administration of the college in general. The Board Policies and Administrative Processes are available on the Big Bend website at In 1998 BBCC completed a Physical Plant Master Plan for future projects. It was updated in spring 2003 and is currently under review. The planning effort identified areas of concern and made recommendations to maintain quality, update facilities, and attract prospective students and programs. The BBCC Academic Master Plan identifies resource allocations and priorities for major college capital projects. 68

73 For , BBCC s State Operating Budget allocated 54% to instruction, academic administration and library. BBCC s Nursing Program is a top priority in the budget planning as the Nursing Program budget has steadily increased over the past few years. In institutional funding for the Nursing Program was 13% higher than in And although the budget throughout the campus was significantly reduced due to the economic downturn affecting the state, the nursing budget remained 10% higher than Even though faculty positions in several departments have purposely gone unfilled, the Nursing Department has been able to maintain existing positions and has continued to advertise. Of thirty-three departments on campus, only three (Aviation, English/Humanities, and Math) receive more financial support than the Nursing Department. The current level of funding is adequate to maintain state and local mandates for clinical student-to-faculty ratios in the Nursing Program. Table 5.1 compares the Nursing program s institutional fiscal allocations to other comparable college programs. Analysis demonstrates sufficient institutional funding for the Nursing Program to achieve its goals and objectives. Nursing student lab fees assist with goods and service purchases. In addition, the cost of the ATI testing program is divided over the five quarters. Currently campus skills lab fees are $71.00 per quarter for each student. This does not cover maintenance and materials for the audio-visual/computer lab with internet access with the ability to download articles. 69

74 TABLE 5.1 COMPARISON OF FISCAL ALLOCATIONS FROM INSTITUTIONAL FUNDS BETWEEN COMPARABLE BBCC PROGRAMS Year Nursing Aviation English/Humanities Math Budget FTEs Budget FTEs Budget FTEs Budget FTEs $241, $349, $397, $288, $281, $345, $434, $277, $306, $375, $426, $266, $319, $408, $449, $ $334, $425, $454, $409, $343, $443, $471, $416, $334, $449, $326, $348, $419, $478, $354, $393, $441, $476, $344, $402, $448, $445, $390, $460, $366, $430, $386, $459, BBCC s administration has been very supportive of the Nursing Program s faculty and instructional development. The supervising dean has written grants that have allowed the Nursing Program to purchase equipment, hire staff, and finance professional and curriculum development. Specifically, during the previous four years, grant funding has allowed the BBCC Nursing program to update curriculum, increase media resources, fund full- and part-time faculty participation in state-of-the-art training opportunities and staff professional development opportunities, purchase new equipment, and/or replace existing equipment. In 2005, the BBCC Foundation launched the Access to Good Health Campaign, which raised funds to expand and remodel nursing education facilities, purchase two high-fidelity simulation mannequins, and establish scholarships for both students and faculty. BBCC has several mechanisms to support professional growth and renewal for faculty. Each year the college budgets money for faculty travel. For the

75 year, travel funds totaled about $600 per faculty member, which is enough for one regional two-day meeting. The BBCC Foundation provides an additional $3,000 each year in campus-wide professional development funds. The Instructional Council distributes up to $500 per request of Foundation funds to faculty members who have additional requests not covered by their regular budget. Although distributed from January to December, this fund is usually exhausted by June. BBCC also grants Exceptional Faculty Awards from an endowment controlled by the Board of Trustees and invested by the BBCC Foundation. These funds are awarded annually. Each award is limited to a maximum of $2,000, and applicants may receive awards only every two years. (Revised Code of Washington RCW 28B and Article XXXI of the Negotiated Agreement). Exceptional Faculty Award recipients give post-completion reports to the Board of Trustees, promoting an exchange of ideas. Nursing faculty member J. Brooks received an Exceptional Faculty Award in August, Professional/technical faculty also have access to Carl D. Perkins Vocational Grants and Workforce Training funds. Through the Perkins grants, approximately $22,000 is available annually to the college for professional development of professional/technical faculty, with an additional $6,000 specifically designated for summer curriculum development. The nursing faculty have directly benefited from these grant awards, allowing them to attend national-level nursing conferences. Perkins Leadership monies allowed four nursing faculty members to update clinical skills through the use of the Industry-based Professional Development grant between

76 The Workforce Training grant has approximately $5,000 annually for professional development. Workforce Training funds are earmarked for use in developing and implementing programs that meet the needs of the local labor market. Current Workforce Training funds target the Industrial Electrical Technology Program, Commercial Driver s License Program, and the Nursing Program. The Nursing faculty have used Workforce Training funds to bring in nationally recognized speakers on curriculum development and to travel to other educational institutions for observational learning. Table 5.2 reflects how institutional and grant monies directly affect the Nursing Program. TABLE 5.2 Year Year Year Expenditures BBCC NURSING PROGRAM STATE-ALLOCATED AND GRANT FUNDING Fiscal Allocations High Demand Grant Carl Perkins Grant Salary and wages $223,369 $8, Benefits $62, Equipment, travel, goods, and services $19,933 $71,815 $79,924 Total support $306,001 $82,634 Expenditures Fiscal Allocations Workforce Development Grant $2,710 $2,710 Carl Perkins Grant Salary and wages $239,277 $5, Benefits $67, Equipment, travel, goods, and services $12,225 $24,200 $29,700 Total support $319,493 $29,974 Expenditures Fiscal Allocations (actual) CREW Grant Workforce Development Grant Worker Retraining Grant $274 $274 Carl Perkins Grant (actual) Salary and wages $252,981 $40,800 $15,500 $10, Benefits $69,079 $10,200 $4,800 $ Equipment, travel, goods, and services $12,446 $34,920 $85,920 $8,500 $28,800 Total support $334,506 $128,864 $675 $11,546 $2,598 $2,598 Grand Total $388,635 Grand Total $349,467 Grand Total $463,370 72

77 TABLE 5.2 Year Year Year Expenditures BBCC NURSING PROGRAM STATE-ALLOCATED AND GRANT FUNDING Fiscal Allocations CREW Grant Workforce Development Grant Worker Retraining Grant Carl Perkins Grant Salary and wages $258,090 $36,046 $11,119 $48, Benefits $68,057 $10,553 $2,859 $12, Equipment, travel, goods, and services $17,466 $25,999 $72,598 $4,525 $18,503 Total support $343,613 $202,050 Expenditures Fiscal Allocations High Demand Enrollment Workforce Development Salary and wages $240,787 $52,787 $13,502 Benefits $76,566 $16,570 $3,214 Equipment, travel, goods, and services $44,992 $106,288 $4,661 $4,661 Carl Perkins Grant $17,531 $10,243 $1,319 $2,426 Total support $334,884 $79,600 $18,035 $2,426 Expenditures Fiscal Allocations Workforce Development Worker Retraining Carl Perkins Grant Grand Total $545,663 Grand Total $434,945 Grand Total Year Year Year Salary and wages $292,136 $26,600 $5,175 Benefits $92,411 $2,800 $1,553 Equipment, travel, goods, and services $35,071 $26,563 $11,823 $745 Total support $419,618 $55,963 $18,551 $745 Expenditures Fiscal Allocations Workforce Development Worker Retraining Carl Perkins Grant Salary and wages $315,709 $6,868 $64,317 $4,164 Benefits $92,034 $2,289 $21,439 $1,388 Equipment, travel, goods, and services $33,585 $29,683 2,329 $6,773 Total support $441,328 $38,840 $88,085 $12,325 Expenditures Fiscal Allocations Worker Retraining Carl Perkins Grant Salary and wages $322,716 $63,433 $2,378 Benefits $15,917 $793 Equipment, travel, goods, and services $2,309 $1,940 Total support $448,665 $81,659 $5,111 Expenditures Fiscal Allocations Workforce Development Worker Retraining Carl Perkins Grant Salary and wages 280,846 $67,269 $2,376 Benefits 79,609 $14,837 $350 Equipment, travel, goods, and services 5,547 $2,340 $2,546 $2,514 Total support 366,002 $2,340 $84,652 $5,240 $494,877 Grand Total $580,578 Grand Total $535,435 Grand Total $458,234 73

78 The BBCC Foundation maintains a scholarship specifically earmarked to assist nursing faculty to progress to their MSN. This $2,000 annual award was distributed in 2007 and 2008 to support J. Brooks in her degree completion. Despite recent financial challenges and the legislated mandate of I-601 that limits the increase in fees, BBCC has adequate financial resources to support all its current offerings. Responsible financial management will allow the college to expand as needs arise. The college employs three Institutional Research and Planning staff members. The Dean of Research and Planning is particularly helpful in the area of analyzing and compiling data, such as graphing the Nursing Program NCLEX pass rates for the regional accreditation process. The Accounting Department assists the Nursing Program in budget tracking and analysis, issuing payroll and travel checks, completing purchasing processes, and collecting lab fees. The Human Resources Office provides full- and part-time faculty recruitment, position advertisement, application tracking, contract generation, leave tracking, and application and interpretation of the faculty Negotiated Agreement. The Maintenance and Operations Department provides facility development and remodeling, as well as building and grounds care and upkeep. The Word Services Department provides copying, printing and laminating services for BBCC faculty and administration, including classroom materials and promotional brochures. The Word Services staff recently provided expert assistance to update clinical evaluation forms and clinical skills pocket checklists. Most requests are completed within 24 hours; more complex requests may take longer. 74

79 In 2005, in response to the recommendation of the NLNAC site visitors, BBCC developed and approved a 30 hour per week office assistant position. The office assistant responds to phone inquiries related to the program, redirecting them appropriately, and manages the clerical responsibilities of the nursing program. These responsibilities include maintaining student files such as immunization records, assisting the faculty with word processing and document creation, and maintaining supplies. The office assistant also participates in evaluation survey processing and maintains regular communication with the Advisory Committee. This position frees the faculty for their primary responsibilities of teaching, evaluation, and student advising and supports the administrative functions of the program.. Program Specific Resources In 2005, BBCC remodeled space in the old library building for the nursing program, providing approximately 10,000 square feet of classroom, skills laboratory, faculty offices, and storage space. This approximately doubled the prior space available. Within this space are: Classrooms Three classrooms each provide seating for a minimum of 30 students and are equipped with a networked computer and projector for classroom presentations. The computers are maintained by Big Bend Technology and are replaced approximately every 3-5 years. A television, VCR and DVD player are available in the building on a rolling cart, and additional TV s and VCR players are available in the computer lab. 75

80 Skills Laboratory The skills laboratory consists of four curtained bays, a mock nursing station, a mock medication room, and a large counter space that doubles as storage for mannequins. The skills laboratory comfortably serves 8-15 students at a time, depending on the skills being practiced. The skills lab is accessible to students Monday through Friday 8-4 for independent practice or instructor supervision when other classes are not using the room. A representative list of current skills laboratory resources is found in Appendix E.1. Simulation Room Two high-fidelity simulation mannequins (one adult, one infant) occupy a separate room within the skills laboratory. A one-way glass window separates the simulation room from the instructor guiding the simulation. A camera positioned in the simulation room permits other students or instructors to observe the simulation from remote locations. Storage Areas Adjacent to the skills laboratory is a storage room with open shelving to store supplies and equipment. This room also holds a washing machine and dryer for maintaining the linens for the skills laboratory. In addition to the main storage room, there are two locked closets that hold models and other equipment. Computer Laboratory In 2005, BBCC purchased 16 new computers for the nursing program computer laboratory. These computers are available for student use during regular business 76

81 hours. The computers are networked to the college system, and a virtual image is maintained for the nursing-specific programs. This laboratory is sufficient for most program requirements. When it is necessary for a larger group of students to use the computers simultaneously, e.g., assessment testing, computer rooms in the BBCC library are reserved. BBCC replaces all campus computers on a rotating basis, recognizing that technology equipment has a limited lifespan. The computers in the nursing laboratory are next on the list for scheduled replacement when the budget permits. A Centralized Faculty Office Seven private office spaces and the office-assistant work area surround a large conference area. Faculty mailboxes, a networked printer/copier, and office supplies are maintained in this central area. The centralized design facilitates faculty communication and collegial relationships, while providing a convenient place for faculty and advisory committee meetings. The area also contains a sink, microwave and refrigerator for faculty use. Student Areas A student lounge provides lockers, sink, microwave, and refrigerator for student use. The common areas include tables, chairs, and couches for students to use for study, relaxation, and socializing. These open areas are also used for break-out sessions and special activities. Current books and professional journals are available in this common area. 77

82 Technology College-wide Resources BBCC is proud of the extent to which it supports student learning with information resources, services, facilities, and equipment for its students and staff. High-speed internet access and wireless access throughout the campus provides access to new technology and information resources for distance learners. The college has expanded distance learning opportunities to include a variety of modalities including Mediasite, which provides both real-time and archived video presentations. Many of the prerequisite and co-requisite courses are available through distance delivery, which facilitates program completion. The college has over 1,000 computers, 17 on-campus computer labs, and a Big Bend Technology (BBT) staff. The BBT staff maintains the campus website, , and network access accounts. All data is stored on network file servers for access anywhere on the campus. The BBT staff research and recommend hardware and software acquisitions as they relate to instruction. Responding to work orders for maintenance of hardware and software, the BBT staff make possible the use of technology in daily work and education. The faculty can attend software classes through faculty tuition waivers for regularly offered courses or for courses given specifically for staff to enhance instruction delivery. Library The new BBCC Library opened its doors for the first time January 3, Constructed with 7.5 million dollars of state funding, it was the first new building on campus built exclusively with state funds. The new facility offers 27,000 square feet of 78

83 space designed specifically for library services. Features of the new library include significantly expanded space for book collections, ten study rooms of various sizes, more than double the number of tables and study carrels, 80 fully networked terminals with internet access and the Microsoft Office Suite, a multipurpose multimedia capable classroom that can seat 32-48, and a 36 seat computer lab (Appendix E.3). The BBCC library is currently open 68 hours a week (7:30 AM 9:00 PM Monday Thursday, 8:00 AM 4:00 PM Friday, 12:00 PM 6:00 PM Saturday) during fall, winter, and spring quarters, and 40 hours a week during interim periods and summer quarter. It offers extended hours during finals. Professional library staff are available during the library hours to assist students and faculty with locating the resources they need. The library permits limited free printing for students. The current level of library staffing is adequate to meet the college s needs. Library personnel include one administrator; the Dean of Information Resources, who also serves as a librarian, provides library instruction, and is responsible for electronic resources; one full-time librarian who provides library instruction and oversees reference and collection development; two library and archives paraprofessionals who cover systems support and cataloging; one program assistant in charge of audio-visual services, ordering, and bookkeeping; and two part-time employees who staff weekend hours. A library and archives paraprofessional position, responsible for periodicals and interlibrary loan, was added when the new facility opened to accommodate an increase in the use of the library and its services. Prior to commencement of classes, nursing students are given a formal library orientation focusing on resources specific to their program. The nursing faculty work 79

84 closely with the library staff to plan and prioritize requests for purchases and review materials to maintain current and accurate holdings. Resources not currently available in the library s collection can easily be obtained through the web-based interlibrary loan system. The library also maintains a collection of mobile multimedia equipment that can be used by faculty and students, including fourteen laptops and eight LCD projectors. A memorandum from the Dean of Information Resources (Appendix E.2) details services and nursing resources available through the library. Learning Resources All nursing faculty participate in the selection of learning resources. When new texts or audiovisual materials become available, they are reviewed by one or more nursing faculty members. Their evaluation is then presented to the rest of the nursing faculty during regular meetings. The booklist for the upcoming academic year is reviewed and made final during spring faculty meetings. The books in the faculty conference area are reviewed annually for relevance; books older than four years are removed if more current and appropriate volumes are available. Audiovisual materials such as VHS tapes and DVD s are reviewed annually; outdated materials are replaced as more current materials become available. Selected audio-visual tapes, CD/ROMs and DVDs, purchased with allocated departmental funds, are stored in the nursing computer lab. Recently purchased CD/ROMs include Fluid and Electrolytes; Documentation, HIPAA, and Arrhythmias. (Audio-visual resources Appendix E.4.). Nursing-specific software in the computer lab includes NCLEX-PN exam and NCLEX-RN exam questions, Test-taking Strategies, Fundamental Concepts and Skills, 80

85 Nurse Pro Calc (including abbreviations and equivalent drugs and solutions); Mathematics for Pharmacology; Psychiatric Drugs, Terms, and Nursing; Tubes Management, and Mosby s Fluids and Electrolytes. The APA/PERRLA Program assists students to develop papers in APA format. As with any technology, the rates of adoption of new resources vary according to personal comfort of the users. Examples of recent additions to the nursing program are ParTest/ParScore: This program facilitates test building, grading, and analysis. All faculty currently are able to create tests and analyze results independently. Web-Based Case Studies: Prior to initiating the use of this program, the faculty participated in a web-based training session in April The use of this program has increased as faculty gained confidence in their skills. Web-Based Grade Book: This program was initially used by a single faculty member. After that faculty member reported on its benefits and challenges, it was adopted for use across the program to improve student privacy and faculty efficacy. Hybrid instructional delivery: Beginning in 2007, faculty experimented with the use of hybrid course delivery. Students and faculty, using the electronic portal classroom and the Angel classroom software, engaged in discussion and projects focused on ethics and leadership concepts. Both faculty and students perceived the electronic classroom as an effective tool, promoting more extensive discussions than would have occurred in a face-to-face classroom. 81

86 Standard 6: Outcomes Outcome 1: 75% of beginning nursing students will complete the program within three years of beginning nursing course work. Table 6.1 Program Completion within Three Years Graduation year % 81% 75% 67% The BBCC nursing program is committed to developing competent caring nurses and maintaining academic rigor adequate to prepare graduates to successfully complete the NCLEX-RN. Attrition is highest during the first and second quarters. Up to 30% of students who do not complete the program within two years withdraw for nonacademic reasons, e.g., family stress, health issues, relocation. Academic or clinical failure account for the remaining students. However, students may return to the program within a year; 70% of returning students have been successful within the three year time frame. The Nursing Program also accepts qualified transfer students and LPN s who want to progress to their RN; these students are included in the completion statistics. Although attrition may be a result of personal decisions as well as academic struggles, retention is a concern of the program, and several responses have been initiated. Re-design of admissions process During spring and summer of 2007, faculty expressed increasing concern about the academic strength of the current and incoming students. At that time, application rank was based strictly on a weighted GPA scale, and many students had retaken 82

87 courses in order to improve their GPA to gain an advantage. Faculty theorized that the existing admissions process was not selecting the most successful nursing students. Faculty designed a prototype tool for ranking applicants based on multiple factors, including support course completion and health care work experience. This tool was then applied retrospectively to current and previous students to determine validity. It was determined that GPA alone was the least sensitive indicator of nursing program and NCLEX success among these students (Appendix F.1), while the combination of factors as measured on the matrix were correlated with success. In October 2007, these results were presented to BBCC administration. With their input, a grid was designed and implemented for the incoming class for Fall After reviewing the attrition in relation to the scores on the grid, minor modifications were made for the class of 2009 (Appendix F.2) The program continues to review the tool for reliability in predicting student success in the nursing program. Initiation of NUR 101 One of the significant factors identified by faculty in student attrition was difficulty in adjusting to the study skills and testing expectations for nursing courses. The faculty theorized that directly addressing these skills could be beneficial to student retention and developed NUR 101: Survival Skills for the Nursing Student. This course was introduced in Fall 2008 as an elective course. After noting that 70% of the unsuccessful students that quarter had failed to complete or declined to participate in NUR 101, and receiving feedback from successful students that the course had been 83

88 very helpful, the department decided to make the course a requirement beginning Fall Assessment of the effectiveness of this course is ongoing. Outcome 2: 85% of Nursing graduates will pass the NCLEX on the first attempt. Table 6.2 First Time NCLEX-RN Pass Rate Graduation year % 71.4% 83.3% 62.5% 100% 95.4% It is significant that 2007 had the highest completion rate, but the lowest NCLEX- RN pass rate. The academic year began with a new director and two new faculty members, all of whom were inexperienced in the academic setting. In April 2007, the director resigned. The pass rate for the class of 2007 was the impetus for a review of overall program structure. During a retreat in September 2007, the faculty identified factors related to students, curriculum, and faculty and initiated steps to improve the quality of the program. Students In the classroom, faculty noted that Level II students failed to retain learned material from the previous year. In the skills laboratory and the clinical setting, many students were unable to recall or safely demonstrate skills taught the previous quarter or the previous year. In fall quarter 2007, the faculty implemented comprehensive final examinations in the didactic component to encourage review and retention of course content. In spring quarter 2008, faculty implemented skills check-offs in the skills laboratory to promote accountability for consistent practice and retention of previously 84

89 learned skills. Faculty have noted that retention of both knowledge and skills have improved. Curriculum The faculty recommended increased use of a case study approach to increase critical thinking and application skills. A case study book was used fall quarter 2007, but it was extremely labor intensive for both students and faculty. An electronic case study program was selected in spring 2008 for incorporation into the curriculum. The faculty participated in a web-based training session on the BBCC campus, and the students began using the program regularly in fall The nursing program collaborated with Assessment Technologies, Incorporated (ATI) to map the assessment tests to our curriculum. Changing the testing process to support the core curriculum also provided the students with more experience with computerized testing. The reports received from the assessment tests identified areas of content weakness and became a tool to evaluate curriculum delivery. A review of the 2007 ATI predictor scores compared to student performance led the department to set a benchmark of 96% probability of passing the NCLEX-RN (appendix D.5). Remediation policies were re-evaluated for 2008, and performance on ATI was given more grade weight. Following the predictor exam in spring 2008, all students were required to meet with an instructor and develop a personal plan for NCLEX-RN preparation. The goal of this meeting was to promote personal accountability for preparation. It also provided an opportunity for faculty to identify 85

90 factors which could interfere with preparation, e.g., financial constraints, and work with students to find resolution of those barriers. Faculty also recognized the need for improved evaluation processes as an area for development, particularly in the area of classroom test development and consistency of degree of difficulty. The ParTest/ParScore system permits the instructor to analyze test structure, degree of difficulty, and question validity. A tutorial guide was redistributed to the faculty to promote competency in using the programs. Prior to test administration, instructors often review their test structure with peers to evaluate their test construction. Each instructor reviews the existing test bank for their content area to eliminate poor or ineffective questions. Instructors now routinely use the statistics to effectively evaluate their tests. Faculty The nursing program has undergone considerable faculty and staff turnover since In response to this turnover, and in an effort to retain qualified faculty, informal peer mentoring was emphasized during fall quarter 2007 to promote collegiality and to encourage new faculty as they developed into their faculty role, particularly in the areas of content delivery and evaluation methods. Although not all faculty actively participated in the peer mentoring activities initially, the overall atmosphere has significantly improved as faculty work together as a team. The 2008 pass rate indicates that the combination of these changes were effective. The program continues to monitor the curriculum and evaluation processes to 86

91 maintain quality. In 2009, one student did not pass the NCLEX-RN on the first attempt: this student acknowledges not preparing for her exam, feeling overconfident based on her predictor test score. The nursing program faculty will continue to encourage personal responsibility for test preparation; however, this factor is one that is ultimately beyond the program s control. Outcome 3: 85% of Graduates will rate the program above 3.0 (on a 4 point scale) six months after graduation. At the end of their educational program, students evaluate their satisfaction with the program as they experienced it. This evaluation includes the support services of the college as well as the nursing specific environment. The same survey is distributed again to the graduates six months after graduation and summarized in Table 6.3. From 2005 through 2007, the Nursing program underwent many changes. These changes clearly affected satisfaction among our 2006 graduates, as seen in Table 6.3. In September 2005 the program relocated to new quarters at the same time classes were beginning. While this was an excellent move for the program, it contributed to stress for students and faculty alike. 87

92 Graduate satisfaction with program Table Overall satisfaction with BBCC nursing program The BBCC nursing program adequately prepared me for entry level work as an RN I would recommend the BBCC nursing program to others The nursing skills taught in the campus lab were adequate for me as an entrylevel practitioner in the nursing profession I felt the instruction adequately prepared me for leadership and critical thinking skills I found the staff at clinical sites to be helpful and interested in working with the nursing students The clinical facility available to the BBCC nursing program was adequate to prepare me as an entry-level RN The overall classroom climate was positive The quality of instruction was strong The reading assignments were appropriate and correlated well with my theory assignments I was treated fairly and with respect while in the program My instructors were willing to give me extra help when needed Resources from the library, internet, audiovisuals, textbooks, and tutoring were adequate. The supporting courses for nursing broadened my knowledge for my role as a RN. The policies and procedures for the nursing program were clearly outlined in the student handbook The financial aid personnel were helpful to me The counseling and registration personnel were helpful to me The instructors were open and receptive to the suggestions and concerns of the students. The nursing instructors role-modeled professional nursing behavior. Learning by progression (NAC, LPN, and ADN) was helpful and is adequate preparation for a BSN Overall The academic year also saw significant challenges as the faculty struggled as a team; a faculty member departed mid-year and much energy was expended to heal divisions among the remaining faculty. At the end of the year, the director retired. Charts 6.1 and 6.2 demonstrate the turnaround over the past two years in student satisfaction. 88

93 Chart 6.1 Selected Items from Graduate Satisfaction Survey (1) Chart 6.2 Selected Items from Graduate Satisfaction Survey (2) 89

94 Outcome 4: Graduates will rate their competency as beginning practitioners at 3.0 or greater (on a 4 point scale), six months after graduation. Outcome 5: Employers will rate the graduates competency as beginning practitioners at 3.0 or greater (on a 4 point scale), six months after graduation. These two outcomes are closely related. As seen in chart 6.3 and tables 6.4 and 6.5, employer and student rankings are consistently 3.0 or greater. Chart

95 Table 6.4 Graduate Competency Survey Summary Based on my education at BBCC Nursing program I am prepared to: Perform technical skills of the nursing role Determine the current health status of clients Develop plans of nursing care based on nursing diagnosis Provide nursing interventions required to meet needs of individuals with common health problems. Intervene during crisis situations to deliver basic emergency care Act upon judgments related to effectiveness of nursing care. Function within the scope of the nursing practice act Exhibit the ethical standards of the nursing profession Implement independent nursing decisions based on professional judgment. Communicate verbally and in written documentation appropriately. Assume a leadership role, when appropriate, to provide healthcare Overall In 2007, in response to low student scores in 2006 regarding perceived competency in responding to emergency situations, the faculty recommended adding a Level II unit on the topic. Student response was positive, and they demonstrated a significant improvement in the perception of their competency. The decrease in confidence in documentation competency may be related to electronic charting. Students have had very little opportunity to practice this skill outside of the clinical rotation. The nursing program director has been in discussion with Inland Northwest Health Services based in Spokane, Washington, since October 2008 to set up a link to their electronic medical record training module for Samaritan Healthcare and Othello Community Hospital. Although there has been some delay related to maintaining the security of both systems, the director hopes that the connection will be completed before the end of calendar year

96 Table 6.5 Employer Survey Summary The Big Bend Community College trained nursing employee: Is technically prepared to function at the basic entry level Is prepared well overall * 3.31 Functions within the scope of the job description and meets the quality of work expected Provides quality patient care using the nursing process * 3.31 Practices with safety, minimizing chances for an accident * 3.23 Demonstrates a strong work ethic regarding initiative, diligence, and attendance * 3.54 Exhibits ethical and confidential behavior Demonstrates the ability to communicate and work well with clients and families Demonstrates a professional attitude in regards to dress, continuing education, and confidentiality * 3.42 Demonstrates ability to organize and complete assigned tasks in a timely manner Overall (*note: survey distributed in 2007 was structured differently) Outcome 6: 90% of graduates will be hired in health care within the first 6 months. TABLE 6.6 Employed in Healthcare within 6 months % 100% 95% At the time of graduation, students are asked to inform the program of their employment plans. In a small community, this has been adequate to track employment. All students who desire employment obtain employment as an RN within six months of graduation. The employment rate in 2007 reflects the delay resulting from difficulty passing the NCLEX-RN. At the time of this writing, the single unsuccessful

97 graduate has not yet retaken the NCLEX-RN, but is still within the six month window. That graduate is working as an LPN. Evaluations of Clinical Sites At least once a year, students are asked to evaluate their clinical site. This evaluation includes both a quantitative tool and comments. The scores and the associated comments are forwarded to the clinical sites for their comment and response. These evaluations help both the program and the clinical sites improve the educational experience of the students. An example of the clinical site evaluations can be found in Appendix F.3, and all clinical survey data will be available on site. Chart 6.4 Clinical site evaluations by students Chart 6.4 demonstrates clinical site evaluations over six quarters with the students response to the statement overall I would rate the clinical site as, and the average of their responses to the entire evaluation form. 93

98 Chart 6.5 Student evaluation of CWH clinical site As evidenced in Chart 6.5, in spring 2007, student evaluations at Central Washington Hospital were below standard. After reviewing the comments and identifying specific concerns, the Nursing Program director assigned a different clinical instructor for this rotation. This resulted in significant improvement in the perceived value of the site. The director responded to clinical site evaluation data in another example. Samaritan Hospital is the primary clinical site and is used every quarter by one or both levels of the program. As seen in chart 6.6, students generally perceive Chart 6.6 Student perception of Samaritan site 94

99 the site as satisfactory (3) or better. However, feedback from instructors and student comments during winter and spring quarter 2008 indicated that there were concerns on a specific unit, and the overall scores for the facility had declined by almost 10% by spring In response, during summer quarter 2008, the students were asked to respond to the survey for specific units within the hospital, and the results were tallied by unit. This evaluation identified significant unit differentials (Chart 6.7) that had previously been masked by the general site evaluation. The evaluations and comments were shared with Samaritan Hospital s education department and appropriate nurse managers. The manager and staff of Unit 3 worked together to create a tool to improve their interactions with students; this tool was implemented in Fall Chart 6.7 Unit specific evaluations Samaritan Faculty, staff, and students all reported a significant improvement in the educational experience on that unit. At the end of fall quarter 2008, the students were invited to submit separate evaluation forms for the various units if they desired; none felt 95

100 it necessary. As seen in chart 6.6, the overall scores and the total scores had returned to or surpassed their previous level. Program evaluations by clinical sites At least once a year, clinical sites are invited to comment on their experience with the students and faculty. This survey is distributed to staff and middle management nurses and includes student competence, interaction with staff, and perceptions of faculty. These surveys include both a quantitative measure and room for comments. Data for this component is only available for 2007 and 2008, due to the transition of directors prior to Chart 6.8 Clinical site evaluations of program These surveys are voluntary and may be completed by only 3-5 individuals at a site. However, these are comments that can most effectively inform the program of 96

101 needed changes. For example, the 2008 OTH survey comments indicated a concern with the inexperience of the clinical instructor. In response, the program and OTH are currently in discussion about using an experienced staff nurse as an adjunct instructor. In addition to these surveys, direct communication between the sites and the program director provide immediate feedback, permitting the program to respond to specific concerns in a timely manner. For example, when site staff expressed concerns (through the joint meetings with Central Washington Hospital and Wenatchee Valley College) about not knowing what the students objectives and skill levels were, the nursing program responded by designing pocket cards outlining what skills required supervision and what skills the student should be able to perform independently. The course objectives are made available to the site nursing unit managers prior to the beginning of each rotation. 97

102 Systematic Evaluation of Program 98

103 Mission and Administrative Capacity The nursing education unit s mission reflects the governing organization s core values and is congruent with its strategic goals and objectives. The governing organization and program and program have administrative capacity resulting in effective delivery of the nursing program and achievement of identified outcomes. Plan Component Goals Frequency of Assessment The mission/philosophy and The philosophy and Annual outcomes of the nursing outcomes are program are congruent with congruent those of the Big Bend Community College Implementation Assessment Method Date Results of Data Collection & Analysis Review of program and college philosophies and outcomes Dec 08 Current mission, philosophy and outcomes statements distributed to faculty for review and discussion Actions Faculty reviewed, revised and approved program mission statements April 09 Big Bend Community College and nursing department ensure representation of students, faculty, and administrators in ongoing governance activities Communities of interest have input into program processes and decision making Students, faculty and administrators are involved in ongoing governance Communities of interest have input into program processes and decision making Annual Annual Review of faculty meeting minutes Review of advisory committee meeting minutes 4/10/06 Faculty concern about readmissions process 5/21/07 Level I students want to set up a mentor program for incoming students 10/8/07 clarification of croc shoes for clinical 2/15/08 Student request for scrub attire in skills lab 2/24/09 Need gradebook that can be networked 10/25/07 Admission criteria proposal discussed 11/19/07 Admission criteria proposal to go to Dr. Bonaudi 5/1/08 Advisory board desire more frequent meetings 9/11/08 Discussion about improving student experience 12/18/08 Request for tool for ancillary sites to evaluate students; concerns about relationship with one unit at SHC. 3/19/09 Form designed and in place for Spring quarter; reported improved relationship with specific unit. NOADN survey offered some ideas for readmissions guidelines Advised and encouraged Barbeque during orientation 9/07 very successful; repeated 9/08, 9/09 croc footwear acceptable if no holes and a heel strap. Faculty approved scrubs Dani trialing Snapgrades: students can access own grades reducing privacy issues Advisory board recommended interview process: expressed willingness to participate; will consider logistics Approved December 07 Quarterly meeting schedule approved Lead nurses; need for tool to permit feedback from ancillary sites Revise and institute Ancillary site evaluation form 6/0 9 Good feedback from clinical sites: will continue to utilize 99

104 Component Faculty and Staff Qualified faculty and staff provide leadership and support necessary to attain the goals and outcomes of the nursing education unit. Plan Expected Achievement Frequency of Assessment Assessment Method Date Implementation Results of Data Collection and Analysis Actions Faculty are appropriately credentialed with a minimum of a master s degree with a major in nursing and maintain expertise in their areas of responsibility. Faculty (full-and part-time) are oriented and mentored in their areas of responsibilities. All full-time and part-time faculty will have a minimum of a Master s degree in Nursing Faculty will participate in regular professional development Faculty are oriented and mentored Annual Review of faculty records Faculty records 9/09 Brooks on track for completion of MSN by 12/09 Stehr enrolled in MSN 8/09 Toftness-Mier continuing MSN track Warner (skills lab) has BSN Annual 9/08 Informal mentoring for Brooks Continue support for faculty education 9/09 Formal mentoring process initiated for Gonzalez-Aller 100

105 Component Student policies of the nursing education unit are congruent with those of the governing organization, publicly accessible, nondiscriminatory, and consistently applied; differences are justified by the goals and outcomes of the nursing education unit. Integrity and consistency exist for all information intended to inform the public, including the program s accreditation status and NLNAC contact information. Students Student s policies, development, and services support the goals and outcomes of the nursing education unit. Plan Expected Achievement Policies are congruent and consistently applied All public information about program is consistent Frequency of Assessment Annual Annual Assessment Method Review of student and college handbook Review of brochures, catalog etc. Date 9/15/08 4/30/09 7/07 7/08 8/09 Implementation Results of Data Collection Actions and Analysis Tardy, cell phone (clinical Policies approved and incorporated setting), and building dress into handbooks code policies reviewed and updated Handbook policies reviewed, clarified. Current information and updated testimonials each summer Communicated to students at orientation and 1 st day of class Brochure updated Changes in policies, procedures, and program information are clearly and consistently communicated to students in a timely manner. Changes in policies are clearly and consistently communicated to students Annual 9/08 9/09 Student agreement filed in student folder Handbook updated each summer; policy changes distributed Orientation to technology is provided and technological support is available to students, including those receiving instruction using alternative methods of delivery All students receive orientation to technology at beginning of program and as needed Annual Orientation agenda and schedules 9/06 9/07 9/08 Included in orientation each fall for incoming students 9/09 Transition to new IT platform required additional orientation Level I and II students required to successfully sign in and utilize new platform 101

106 Curriculum The curriculum prepares students to achieve the outcomes of the nursing education unit, including safe practice in contemporary health care environments. Component The curriculum incorporates established professional standards, guidelines, and competencies, and has clearly articulated student learning and program outcomes. The curriculum is developed by the faculty and regularly reviewed for rigor and currency. The student learning outcomes are used to organize the curriculum, guide the delivery of instruction, direct learning activities, and evaluate student progress. The curriculum includes cultural, ethnic, and socially diverse concepts and may also include experiences from regional, national, or global perspectives. Evaluation methodologies are varied, reflect established professional and practice competencies, and measure the achievement of student learning and program outcomes. Plan Expected Achievement Curriculum plan, delivery and evaluation will be current and evidenced based Frequency of Assessment Annual Assessment Method Master Course Outlines, faculty minutes Implementation Date Results of Data Collection Actions and Analysis 1/24/06 Plan to begin assessment of Article assigned students to improve retention and NCLEX pass rates 4/10/06 Sample evaluation form Will review and consider presented from Aviation dept (course long flow instead of daily record) 9/13/06 Curriculum hours redistributed (NUR 110 and NUR 111) to increase clinical hours in Level I fall 12/8/06 Confusion and disagreement Faculty retreat to review Core about what topics should be curriculum for general consensus of covered at each level topics. Changes will be incorporated into MCO s for faculty review before going to Instructional Council ATIprogram not well understood by faculty or students 4/23/07 Software programs available: are they useful and effective? MCO s content revisions from December complete Book list review 5/21/07 Improved student acceptance of ATI; continue to modify and improve use of the program to improve outcomes Final quarter mentorship not sufficient hours from student or mentor perspective Education session by D. Alvarado Trial EGDT Faculty to review and correct prior to Instructional Council Book list updated and confirmed for Continue to assess ATI effectiveness: switch to Proficiency scale instead of scores Skill lab hours removed from final quarter to be added to NUR

107 9/10/07 Poor NCLEX performance, inconsistent testing and evaluation in theory and clinical 11/19/07 Student and faculty questions about alternative assessment testing Trial comprehensive final exams; increase test building skills; revamp clinical evaluation tools for quarterlong progression ATI to come meet with faculty Workday 12/14/07 MCO s still need completion 3/14/08 On line case study program initiated (per 9/10/07) 4/21/08 Review booklist for next year Booklist approved Curriculum revision ongoing Student/employer survey results reviewed 9/15/08 Outcomes/objectives need review 11/17/08 NCLEX reports available 12/11/08 Assignment weighting not consistent with amount of work required 2/24/09 Objectives/outcomes work nearly complete All scores above 3.0 Fall quarter classes done, winter classes assigned. Case study and ATI values adjusted, faculty to review assignments for appropriate weighting Need to complete spring/summer courses 4/2/09 Mission and philosophy need review Current copies distributed: plan work day 4/13/09 Mission/philosophy and core concept need review Revised statements to be incorporated into appropriate documents 4/30/09 Need booklist for Booklist approved 5/18/09 Review of all course documents for clarity and consistency Partially completed, will complete in June 6/4/09 Level II Cardiac unit too late (winter) for effective use of CWH site Reposition cardiac into fall quarter, move hematology/immunology to winter 6/29/09 Complete review of curriculum 9/17/09 ATI reports indicate weakness in ET suctioning Review resources to determine if we should reposition content 103

108 Outcomes The curriculum prepares students to achieve the outcomes of the nursing education unit, including safe practice in contemporary health care environments. Component Completion/Retention NCLEX RN First test pass rate Student Satisfaction Student Competency Employer satisfaction Graduate employment Plan Expected Achievement 75% of Beginning nursing students will complete the program within 3 years 85% of nursing graduates will pass the NCLEX-RN on the first attempt 85% of nursing graduates will rate the program at 3.0 or above (4 point scale) 6 months after graduation Graduates will rank their competency as beginning practitioners about 3.0 (4 point scale) 6 months after graduation Employers will rate the graduates competency about 3.0 (4 point scale) six months after graduation 90% of graduates will be hired in health care within the first 6 months Frequency of Assessment Annual (Summer) Annual (Fall) Annual (December) Annual (December) Annual (December) Annual (December) Assessment Method Student Statistics NCSBN Reports, Student reports Graduate Satisfaction Survey Graduate Competency Survey Employer Satisfaction Survey Student Report Date 12/09 12/09 12/09 Implementation Results of Data Collection and Analysis See Narrative See Narrative See Narrative Actions 104

109 Other Assessments The curriculum prepares students to achieve the outcomes of the nursing education unit, including safe practice in contemporary health care environments. Component Practice Environments Student evaluation of site Site evaluation of program Plan Expected Achievement Students will rate each clinical site 3.0 or higher (5 point scale) Practice sites will rate program as 3.0 or higher (5 point scale) Frequency of Assessment Semi Annual Annual Assessment Method Clinical evaluation tools Program evaluation tools Implementation Date Results of Data Collection Actions and Analysis 5/07 CWH 2.59 Reassigned clinical instructor SAM /07 CWH 4.14 SAM 3.61 OCH /08 CWH 4.17, 4.04 SAM 3.49 OCH /08 CWH 4.07 SAM 3.54, 3.06 Specific unit concerns identified and responded to by site 1/09 CWH 4.56 Specific student concern referred to CWH for response SAM /09 CWH4.26 SAM /10 11/07 CWH 3.84 CBH 3.9 McKay 3.38 OCH /09 OCH 3.15 CWH 3.57 SAM /10 105

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111 APPENDIX 107

112 108

113 Appendix A.1 Faculty Committee List Academic Council Marsha Asay Greg Crane Max Heinzmann Exceptional Faculty Awards Bill Autry (chair) Matthew Sullivan John Gillespie Dennis Knepp Financial Aid/Scholarship MariAnne Zavala-Lopez Dave Hammond Marsha Nelson Customer Service Task Force Mark Poth Assessment Committee Dave Hammond MariAnne Zavala-Lopez Ryann Leonard Salah Abed Steve Close (Chair) Daneen Berry-Guerin Jim Hamm Shawn McDaniel Jennifer Brooks John Gillespie Technology Advisory Committee Stephen Lane Chris Riley Joe MacDougall Rie Palkovic Bill Autry Daneen Berry-Guerin Professional Rights and Responsibilities Gail Erickson (Chair) Angela Leavitt Pat Teitzel Safety Committee Ryann Leonard Gordon Kaupp Erik Borg Student Disciplinary Council John Carpenter Gail Erickson Student Services and Activities Fee John Peterson Kathleen Duvall Library Committee Red Shuttleworth Dennis Knepp Angela Leavitt Lance Wyman Pat Patterson Negotiating Team Mike O Konek Les Michie Max Heinzmann Jim Hamm Standing Tenured Faculty Evaluation Barbara Jacobs (1 st year) Pat Teitzel (1 st year) Matthew Sullivan (2 nd year) Joe MacDougall (2 nd year) Board Representative (Faculty Association President) Mike O Konek IT Safety Committee Erik Borg Shawn McDaniel Social Committee Jim Hamm Rie Palkovic Division Chairs Kathleen Duvall John Carpenter Mike O Konek John Swedburg Marsha Asay Daneen Berry-Guerin Gail Erickson Chris Riley Financial Aid Council Greg Crane Marsha Nelson 109

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115 Appendix A.2 Probationary Faculty Committees Faculty Probationer Tenure Year Department Committee Members Salah Abed 3 rd Mathematics Kara Garrett-Admin Stephen Lane John Peterson Greg Crane Jeff Ranstrom-ASB Jennifer Brooks 3 rd Nursing Katherine Christian-Admin Barbara Jacobs Dave Hammond Lance Wyman Rhen Ashby/Forester-ASB Guillermo Garza 3 rd CDL Tim Fuhrman-Admin Mike O Konek Randy Miller Kathleen Duvall Carmen Gonzales-ASB Gordon Kaupp 3 rd Welding Clyde Rasmussen-Admin Mike O Konek Erik Borg Marsha Nelson Regina Coriell-PTK Scott Richeson 2 nd Sociology Tim Fuhrman-Admin Chris Riley Ryann Leonard Angela Leavitt Kathtrina Komlofske-PTK Sonja Farag 2 nd Mathematics Candy Lacher-Admin Kathleen Duvall Stephen Lane John Gillespie Devin Petersen-ASB Tyler Wallace 2 nd Mathematics Sandy Cheek-Admin Kathleen Duvall Barbara Whitney Joe Mac Dougall Emily West-ASB 111

116 Julia Berry 1 st Psychology Kara Garrett-Admin Chris Riley Ryann Leonard Pat Patterson CJ Hatch-ASB Mercedes Gonzalez-Aller 1 st Nursing Katherine Christian Marsha Asay MariAnne Zavala-Lopez Dennis Knepp Ginna Fontaine-ASB Richard Wynder 1 st Automotive Clyde Rasmussen Mike O Konek Shawn McDaniel Matthew Sullivan Miranda Kluge Jerry Wright 1 st Industrial Electrical Clyde Rasmussen Mike O Konek Bill Autry Steve Close 112

117 Appendix A.3 College President Dr. Bill Bonaudi Faculty & Library Executive Asst Linda Chadwick Vice President of Instructional Services Vice President of Student Services/ Instruction Dr. Mike Lang Assoc Vice President of Student Services Candy Lacher Assistant Arts & Science Dean Anthropology Art Biology/Botany Chemistry Dev Studies Drama Economics History/Political Sci Journalism Mathematics Music Philosophy Physics Medical Assistant Coordinator Mandy Mann Assistant Traci Bartleson Adult Basic Skills Child & Family Education Parent Education Physical Education Director of Health Education Katherine Christian Nursing Medical Asst First Aid Ed, Health & Language Skills Dean Kara Garrett Assistant Kathy Aldrich Assistant Heidi Weisler Information Resources Dean Tim Fuhrman Librarian Lance Wyman Library & Archives Paraprofessionals- John Anderson Carolyn Riddle Teresa Curran Assistant Michele Williamson Professional Tech Ed Dean Dr. Clyde Rasmussen Agriculture Air Rescue & Fire Fighting Automotive Technology Aviation Aviation Maintenance Technology Business/Accounting Commercial Drivers License Computer Science Drafting Industrial Elect Technology Office Information Technology Welding Technology 113

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119 Member Kathryn Trumbull Chief Nursing Officer Big Bend Community College Nursing Advisory Committee August 2009 Roster Address Samaritan Healthcare 801 E. Wheeler Road Moses Lake, WA Phone: ext Fax: Appendix A.4 Term Expires 2011 Jody Ulrich Director of Nursing Julie Larson Registered Nurse Joyce Spencer RN Area manager Pat Brannon Emily Webster Med-Surg Director Ginnie Folan Director of Nursing Daniel Guzman Director of Nursing Services Mary Mayo Training Coordinator Othello Community Hospital 315 N. 14 th Ave Othello, WA Phone: Fax: Moses Lake Clinic (Branch of Wenatchee Valley Clinic) 840 E. Hill Moses Lake, WA Phone: , ext Fax: Moses Lake Clinic (Branch of Wenatchee Valley Clinic) 840 E. Hill Moses Lake, WA Phone: , ext Direct: Fax: Central Basin Home Health & Hospice 311 W 3 rd Avenue Moses Lake, WA Phone: , ext. 310 Fax: Samaritan Healthcare 801 E. Wheeler Road Moses Lake, WA Phone: Columbia Basin Hospital 200 Nat Washington Way Ephrata, WA Phone: ext 226 Moses Lake Community Health Center 606 Coolidge, Suite 101 Moses Lake, WA Phone: , ext SkillSource 309 E. 5 th Ave Moses Lake, WA Phone: Fax:

120 Member Vicki Sullivan Director of Nurses Jeni Seitz Student Representative Peggy Grigg, Chair Dir. Of Personal Health Services / Administrator Tawny Caldwell Becky Trepanier Marilyn Brincat Student Services Specialist 16.Travis Scothern Administrator 17. Colleen Canfield Operating room director 18. Allan Jacobson Business Representative 19. Serena Fahrner Director of Nursing Address Columbia Basin Health Association 140 E. Main Othello, WA Phone: Big Bend Community College Nursing Program 7662 Chanute Street NE Moses Lake, WA Phone: Grant County Health District P.O. Box 37 Ephrata, WA Phone: , ext. 26 Cell phone: Columbia Crest Care and Rehab 1100 E. Nelson Rd. Moses Lake, WA Phone: McKay healthcare and Rehab Center nd Ave S.W. Soap Lake, WA Phone: Central Washington Hospital 1201 S. Miller Wenatchee, WA Phone: Columbia Crest Care & Rehab 1100 E. Nelson Rd. Moses Lake, WA Phone: Quincy Valley Medical Center 908 Tenth Avenue SW Quincy, Washington work fax Office & Prof. Employees International Union 3602 N. Proctor St, Ste 203 Tacoma, WA Phone: Quincy Valley Medical Center th Ave. SW Quincy, WA Term Expires 2010 Annual

121 Appendix A.5 Director of Health Education Programs JOB DESCRIPTION Reports to Dean of Education, Health & Language Skills Supervises 4 fulltime and 3-6 part-time nursing and health education programs instructors Job Summary: The Director of Health Education Programs directs the instructional team for the nursing career ladder program, including Certified Nursing Assistant, the Practical Nursing certificate, and the Associate Degree Nursing programs. The Director also oversees the Medical Assistant program and the support courses for that program. Job Duties: Coordinate, plan, and direct the health education programs including class schedules and instructional assignments Facilitate curriculum evaluation, revision and implementation to reflect current professional standards Coordinate evaluation of program components, including clinical sites, student/graduate, and employer satisfaction, and develop appropriate responses to results. Establish and maintain effective communication with clinical and community partnerships Maintain national accreditation standards of National League for Nursing Accreditation Commission Foster an organizational culture that supports collegiality, personal well-being, and professional development of students, faculty and staff Manage department budget including planning, monitoring, advocating for department and the division in campus budget process and pursuing grant opportunities Coordinate and facilitate ongoing review of student admission, advising, and support systems for the Health Education programs Respond to student academic/disciplinary problems and student grievances as outlined in the College student grievance process Establish and coordinate clinical sites and placements throughout the BBCC service district and occasionally in other areas May be expected to teach health education courses or components, typically not more than 60 contact hours per quarter Participate in and facilitate recruitment and retention efforts for full-time and adjunct faculty Supervise and evaluate Health Education staff and promote a positive professional environment Assist in the management of the facilities and equipment, including controlling inventory, notifying maintenance personnel when necessary Represent the College to develop, promote and enhance vocational educational activities including serving on college, community and statewide committees Train, orient, and supervise employees and manage the department in accordance with the BBCC Faculty Negotiated Agreement; applicable state, local and federal rules and regulations; and applicable governing agencies such as NLN and the State Board of Nursing Prepare reports, papers and applications relevant to the Health Education programs Support and promote faculty development 117

122 Ensure that all faculty are appropriately certified Promote partnerships with community groups, high schools and higher education institutions Work to support diversity goals as established by the College Involve service district communities in health education at the BBCC campus Perform related duties as required Budget control of approximately of $450,000 for department budgets, lab budgets, Professional Development grants, industry-based contracts, and other assigned budgets Knowledge, Skills, Experience: Knowledge: Washington State Nursing Care Quality Assurance Commission regulations; National League of Nursing Accrediting Commission standards; Curriculum development; evaluation processes; current nursing practice standards; college policies and procedures and chain of command; supervisory techniques. Skills : strong interpersonal management skills; organizational and time management; computer skills including word processing and basic office and productivity software; writing skills for preparation of state and national organizational reports; Experience teaching in the community and technical college system, designing and implementing curriculum, designing and implementing assessment tools and reporting systems, management of resources including time, money, instructional supplies and texts, experience organizing, planning, implementing and evaluating new and existing programs, collaboration with business, industry, and partner with social service agencies. Creative, self-directed, flexible, team oriented, ability to work with diverse populations. Freedom to Act: Generally Regulated: These employees are permitted to determine their own priorities and practices to meet acceptable standards. The job is subject to practices and procedures covered by precedents or well-defined policy and/or supervisory review. Usually mid-level managers are in these categories. 118

123 Appendix A.6 Katherine Christian, MSN/Ed., RN, CNE 2232 Belair Drive Moses Lake, WA Phone Office: Education University of Phoenix 2005 MSN/Ed: Nursing Phoenix, AZ University of the State of New York 1988 BSN: Nursing Albany, NY Rio Hondo College ASN: Nursing Whittier, CA Graduated cum laude University of Southern California BA: Developmental Psychology Los Angeles, CA Graduated cum laude Teaching experience Big Bend Community College 5/2007 to current Director, Health Education Programs Moses Lake, WA Coordinate, plan and direct health education programs, including scheduling and evaluation of faculty, students and clinical sites; manage budget and recruit faculty and students. Advise students; promote effective communication within the campus and the community. Participate in classroom and clinical instruction. Big Bend Community College 9/2003 to 5/2007 Instructor Moses Lake, WA Provide clinical and classroom instruction for Associate Degree Nursing students, with emphasis on Pharmacology and Nursing Fundamentals. Developed new curriculum for online delivery of theory courses. Biola University Instructor La Mirada, CA Developed new clinical rotation at major urban medical center to provide crosscultural experience in addition to basic nursing skills. Provided clinical supervision for leadership development rotations. Clinical experience Inpatient Acute Care Staff Nurse (per Diem) Othello Community Hospital 2007 to current Family Medicine Practice Office Nurse, Business Manager Moses Lake, WA Provided ambulatory nursing care including assessment, patient education, and procedures. Trained employees in basic procedures to be certified as Health Care Assistants. Pediatric Office

124 Staff Nurse Rockford, IL Provided pediatric assessment and family education in a federally funded setting for low-income residents. Inpatient Acute Care Staff Nurse, ICU/CCU Various locations Provided nursing care in a variety of facilities. Gained experience and exposure to geographic variations. Continuing Education WashingtonOnLine Faculty Training: Angel July 2009 Emergency Management Institute: Introduction to the Incident Command System. May 2009 Big Bend Community College, Moses Lake WA. Vocational Technical Certificate. 9/ /30/2013 Reigniting the Spirit of Caring. 6/19-20/08 Samaritan Healthcare, Moses Lake WA Laerdal simulation training workshop. 6/10/08 Big Bend Community College, Moses Lake WA. Evolve On Line Course Training. 4/17/08 Big Bend Community College, Moses Lake WA. Diversity Training. 4/14/08. Big Bend Community College, Moses Lake, WA NLNAC Self Study Forum. April 4-5, 2008 Las Vegas, NV NLNAC Self Study Forum. April 2007 Orlando FL Medical Surgical Nursing: Current Trends, Treatments & Issues. April 11, Spokane, WA. Teaching Online: Planning for Success. July 7 August 3, Spokane, WA. 16 th Annual International Nurse Educators Conference in the Rockies. July 21-23, Breckenridge, CO. Concept Mapping: Active Learning Techniques. September 9, Moses Lake, WA. Certification Certified Nurse Educator February, 2007 Professional memberships Big Bend Community College Faculty Association Washington State Nurses Association Community activities Elected member of Grant County Hospital District #1 Board of Commissioners, currently serving as secretary. Active participant in the governance activities for 50 bed acute care facility with associated hospital-owned Physician Group. References Available upon request. 120

125 Notification of Counseling Big Bend Community College Nursing Program NUR Date Student Standards of Academic Performance Your performance indicates you have failed to meet a standard of clinical nursing practice: Standards of Care Standard 1 Assessment Standard 2 Diagnosis Standard 3 Outcome Identification Standard 4 Planning Standard 5 Implementation Standard 5A Coordination of Care Standard 5B Health Teaching and Health Promotion Standard 5C Consultation Standard 5D Prescriptive Authority and Treatment Standard 6 Evaluation Standards of Professional Performance Standard 7 Quality of Care Standard 8 Practice Evaluation Standard 9 Education Standard 10 Collegiality Standard 11 Collaboration Standard 12 Ethics Standard 13 Research Standard 14 Resource Utilization Standard 15 Leadership Your performance demonstrates you have failed to adhere to the Code of Ethics for Nurses: Provision Respect for human dignity 1.2 Relationships to patients 1.3 The nature of health problems 1.4 The right to self-determination 1.5 Relationships with colleagues and others Provision Primacy of the patient s interest 2.2 Conflict of interest for nurses 2.3 Collaboration 2.4 Professional boundaries Provision Privacy 3.2 Confidentiality 3.3 Protection of participants in research 3.4 Standards and review mechanisms 3.5 Acting on questionable practice 3.6 Addressing impaired practice Provision Acceptance of accountability and responsibility 4.2 Accountability for nursing judgment and action 4.3 Responsibility for nursing judgment and action 4.4 Delegation of nursing activities Provision Moral self-respect 5.2 Professional growth and maintenance of competence 5.3 Wholeness of character 5.4 Preservation of integrity Appendix A.7 Provision Influence of the environment on moral virtues and values 6.2 Influence of the environment on ethical obligations 6.3 Responsibility for the health care environment Provision Advancing the profession through active involvement in nursing and in health care policy 7.2 Advancing the profession by developing, maintaining and implementing professional standards in clinical, administrative and educational practice 7.3 Advancing the profession through knowledge development, dissemination and application to practice Provision Health needs and concerns 8.2 Responsibilities to the public Provision Assertion of values 9.2 The profession carries out its collective responsibility through professional associations 9.3 Intraprofessional integrity 9.4 Social reform 121

126 Description of infraction: Action(s) needed to be taken by student to continue in the Nursing Program: Action Plan Return to Skills Lab for remediation (Remediation slip should also be completed). Skill/date to be completed: Meet with instructor and Program Director as scheduled below: Date signed 122

127 BIG BEND COMMUNITY COLLEGE NURSING PROGRAM Appendix B.1.1 POSITION TITLE: Nursing Instructor POSITION DESCRIPTION: Didactic instructor for a variety of nursing courses, preparing Level I and Level II students for an Associate of Applied Science Degree in Nursing RESPONSIBLE TO: Director, Health Education Programs QUALIFICATIONS: Hold a Master s Degree in Nursing from an accredited institution Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing candidate may be considered if currently enrolled in a Master s Degree Program Must have a current unencumbered professional license as a Registered Nurse in Washington State Evidence of current clinical skills in nursing, particularly in geriatrics and medical-surgical areas Meet Washington Vocational Certification Standards Prior teaching experience in a higher education setting preferred Experience in computer applications for instructional purposes SALARY: Commensurate with education and experience RESPONSIBILITIES: Provide on-campus and off-campus lecture, lab and clinical instruction in nursing theory, especially in medical/surgical. Teaching assignments are determined by college needs and/or the individual s background and experience and may include day, evening/night or occasional weekend classes Inspire excitement and enthusiasm into the teaching of Nursing Evaluate and develop or modify curriculum to reflect current standards of nursing practice Maintain or develop competence in current medical and educational technology Implement a current professional development plan Maintain current student files and monitor required materials Support students academic success by maintaining regular office hours, advising students and providing service to students with special needs Possess effective computer skills including Internet, Word, and information technology resources Participate as an active member of working committees dealing with instruction, collegewide and department assessment, student matters and/or college related concerns Work effectively with colleagues and students of various cultural and socio-economic backgrounds and be a contributing member of the campus community Maintain positive and effective communication with students, faculty, administration and staff Foster a flexible, healthy learning environment with respect for student and staff diversity Demonstrate a commitment to professional growth and development Assume other duties as assigned by director or division chair 123

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129 BIG BEND COMMUNITY COLLEGE NURSING PROGRAM Appendix B.1.2 POSITION TITLE: Nursing Practicum Instructor POSITION DESCRIPTION: Instructs Level I and Level II nursing students in BBCC s Associate of Applied Science Degree in Nursing (AAS) Program. Provides clinical instruction to students caring for clients across the health care spectrum RESPONSIBLE TO: Director, Health Education Programs QUALIFICATIONS: Hold a Master s Degree in Nursing from an accredited institution Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing candidate may be considered Must have a current unencumbered professional license as a Registered Nurse in Washington State Evidence of current clinical skills in nursing, particularly in geriatrics and medical-surgical areas Meet Washington Vocational Certification Standards Prior teaching experience in a higher education setting preferred Experienced in computer applications for instructional purposes preferred SALARY: Commensurate with education and experience RESPONSIBILITIES: Possess current clinical knowledge and skills to insure the safety of clients, students, and instructors. Conduct effective instruction, focusing on application of theoretical knowledge to clinical application. Role-model professional integrity, critical thinking, caring, and ethical behaviors. Assign appropriate practicum experiences for each student. Assist students in meeting clinical objectives, making necessary modifications. Complete weekly evaluation forms in relation to student clinical experiences. Advise and counsel students regarding their progress. Maintain current student records and regular office hours. Maintain collaborative relationships with assigned agency staff members. Participate in the development and evaluation of the Nursing Program curriculum. Keep abreast of current professional trends and provide a current professional improvement plan. Maintain compliance with nursing faculty health requirements as designated by BBCC Nursing Program policies, (current BCLS card, immunizations, and HIV education). Attend and participate in monthly staff meetings. Perform in a manner which strengthens the coordination and cooperation of all organizational components of the college. 125

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131 BIG BEND COMMUNITY COLLEGE NURSING PROGRAM Appendix B.1.3 POSITION TITLE: Nursing Skills Laboratory Instructor POSITION DESCRIPTION: Instructs Level I and Level II nursing students in BBCC s Associate of Applied Science Degree in Nursing, emphasizing the application of nursing theory to nursing skills RESPONSIBLE TO: Director, Health Education Programs QUALIFICATIONS: Bachelor of Science Degree required, Master s Degree in Nursing preferred Must have a current unencumbered professional license as a Registered Nurse in Washington State Evidence of prior medical-surgical nursing experience Previous maternal/child experience desirable SALARY: Commensurate with education and experience RESPONSIBILITIES: Teach, supervise, and advise Level I and Level II students in the nursing skills lab. Participate in analyzing and recommending nursing theory as it relates to clinical nursing skills needed. Participate in curriculum development coordinating lab skills to nursing theory. Plan lab set-ups for nursing classes according to established guidelines, revising individual skills syllabi as needed. Develop and utilize approved instructional techniques to encourage selected behaviors. Assist students in the use of audio-visual materials. Mediate students who need additional practice with selected skills. Incorporate changing technologies and use a variety of teaching strategies. Work and interact effectively with colleagues, staff, students, and others of various cultures and socio-economic backgrounds. Contribute to the college s appreciation of diversity and foster a climate of multicultural understanding. Utilize technology to support instruction. Integrate current theoretical concepts and competency-based approaches with dynamic teaching skills. Participate in identifying expenses in the laboratory setting. Maintain the lab in a clean, stocked, and orderly manner. 127

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133 APPENDIX B.2 Faculty and Degree Danielle Alvarado RN MSN Joint Faculty BBCC and Samaritan Healthcare Years RN Experience Years Teaching Areas of Background Expertise 12 4 Telemetry ACU Operating Room PACU Short Stay Unit Nursing Education FACULTY DATA Primary Teaching Responsibilities Medical Surgical Fundamentals Clinical Practicum Level I and II Skills Laboratory Professional Development and Education Masters of Science Rural Family Nursing: May 2005 SMUG Training, Renton Community College October 2006 Laerdal Training seminar, Texas November 2006 Simulation Conference Portland OR March th National Conference on Nursing Skills Laboratories June 28-30, 2007 Vocational Technical Education Certificate 12/21/2007 9/1/ 2012 ATI Pacific Northwest Regional Nurse Educator Conference March 2008 Evolve OnLine Course Training 4/17/08 Patricia Maguire Nursing Lectureship (5 contact hours) 5/12/2008 ATI Item Writing Workshop, Kansas City June 2008 Reigniting the Spirit of Caring: Samaritan Healthcare 6/19-20/08 Medical Surgical Nursing 2008: Update for Practice & Certification (50 contact hours) August 15, 2008 HealthStream Administrator User Training July 2009 Katherine Christian, RN, MSN/Ed, CNE Director 31 BBCC 6 year Biola University- 2 years Critical Care Pediatrics/Family Office Nursing Pharmacology Completed MSN/Ed 2006 Certified Nurse Educator February 2007 NLNAC Self Study Forum April 2007 NLNAC Self Study Forum April 4-5, 2008 Diversity Training 4/14/08 Evolve On Line Course Training 4/17/08 Laerdal simulation training workshop 6/10/08 Reigniting the Spirit of Caring: Samaritan Healthcare 6/19-20/08 Vocational Technical Certificate 9/ /30/2013 Emergency Management Institute: Introduction to the Incident Command System May 2009 WashingtonOnLine Faculty Training: Angel July

134 APPENDIX B.2 Faculty and Degree Marsha Asay, RN, BSN Full-time Faculty Jennifer Brooks, RN, BSN Full time faculty Years RN Experience Years Teaching Areas of Background Expertise Medical-Surgical IV Therapy Cancer Diabetes/Endocrine Burns/Emergency Dept. FACULTY DATA Primary Teaching Responsibilities Teaching between Level I and Level II Programs Theory Laboratory Skill Check-off Lab Clinical Practicum 12 3 Renal Medical Surgical Theory Level I and II Clinical Practicum Level I Skills laboratory Professional Development and Education Medical Surgical Nursing May 19, 2004 Othello Community Hospital-Computer Charting May 20, 26, 2004 EB Kennedy Critical Thinking & Mapping Session 9/9/2005 Pain Management at the End of Life 4/5/2006 Nurse Manager Update Las Vegas April 2006 Vocational Technical Education Certificate 12/21/2007-9/30/2011 Diversity Training 4/14/08 Evolve On Line Course Training 4/17/08 Moses Lake Laerdal Simulation Training 6/10/08 Moses Lake Shoulder Dystocia/Fistula repair presentation 10/28/2008 Nurses in Charge, Odessa Memorial Hospital 3/10/2009 Boot Camp for Professional Technical Educators Sept 2009 Healthcare Provider 9/25/09 Currently enrolled in Masters of Clinical Education Program (anticipated completion 12/2009) Industry-based professional development shifts 12/06 3/07 Boot Camp for Educators August 2007 Diversity Training 4/17/08 National Student Nurse Conference Faculty sessions Mar 25-30,2008 Simulation Conference, Spokane WA Feb 16-17, 2008 Evolve OnLine Course Training 4/17/08 Moses Lake Laerdal simulation training 6/10/08 Moses Lake ANNA Renal Update, Seattle WA Mar 11-13,

135 APPENDIX B.2 FACULTY DATA Faculty and Degree Mercedes Gonzalez-Aller, RN, MSN, ARNP Full time faculty Years RN Experience Years Teaching 21 Part-time 2 years Areas of Background Expertise Critical Care Medical Surgical Outpatient pediatric and adult primary care Primary Teaching Responsibilities Medical surgical Level I and II Clinical Practicum Level II Skills Laboratory Professional Development and Education Differentiating Vascular Leg Disorders Feb. 5, 2008 Differentiating Muscular Leg Disorders Feb. 7, 2008 Advanced Cardiac Life Support Renewal Feb. 22, 2008 Intensive Insulin Therapy March 10, 2008 Initiating Insulin Therapy March 10, 2008 Diabetes Care: focus on Pharmacology and Guidelines March 10, 2008 Applying Current Diabetes Guidelines March 10, 2008 Structural and Functional Differences Among the Anti- Tumor Necrosis Factor Agents May 12, 2008 Reviews in Dermatology May 12, 2008 Advances in Combination Opioid Therapy May 19, 2008 Focus on Hypertriglyeridemia May 17, 2008 Getting to Goal in Hypertension Treatment May 17, 2008 The Role of Nonprescriptive Antihistamines in the Treatment of Allergic Rhinitis May 17, 2008 Strategies for Managing Nasal Congestion May 26, 2008 Current Trends in Cardiovascular Disease Sept. 6, 2008 Audio Digest 18 contact hours August 2009 UpToDate 28 contact hours August 2009 UpToDate 7 contact hours October 2009 Marguerite Mier- Toftness, RN Clinical Instructor 15 7 Medical-Surgical Critical/Intensive Care Respiratory Therapy Clinical practicum RN Preceptor Workshop 3/28/07 CIWA Protocol 6/21/07 Diabetes: Best Practice 2/5/08 Malignant Hyperthermia 8/27/08 ACLS Renewal 3/16/09 TNCC Provider 3/24/09 PALS Renewal 3/26/09 Neonatal Resuscitation Program Renewal 5/6/09 Enrolled Gonzaga University RN to MSN program 131

136 APPENDIX B.2 FACULTY DATA Faculty and Degree Alex Stehr, RN, BSN Clinical Instructor Years RN Experience Years Teaching 15 Part time 2 years Areas of Background Expertise Medical Surgical Obstetrics Primary Teaching Responsibilities Clinical practicum Professional Development and Education Currently enrolled Regis University MSN/Ed Neonatal Resuscitation Program Provider 6/17/08 ACLS Provider 7/15/08 PALS Provider 8/11/09 Donna Warner, RN, BSN Part-time Faculty 33 Part-time at college and hospital 7 years Medical-Surgical Critical Care Diabetes Educator Outpatient Cardiac Rehab (See CV in Human Resource Department) Nursing Skills Lab Organize and develop progressive lab skills for the Level I ADN students and Level II ADN students Write teaching objectives after faculty assess learning needs Med 2000: Completed 11/04 Cholesterol and Beyond 7 hours Diabetes: A Natural Epidemic 7 hours Menopause and Beyond 7 hours Bone and Joint Disease 7 hours Hormone Replacement Therapy 2 hours ACLS Provider exp 11/2010 AHA Healthcare Provider CPR exp 9/2011 Samaritan Healthcare Skills Fair April

137 Big Bend Community College Nursing Program Appendix B.3 Master Faculty Mentoring Program The purpose of BBCC s Nursing Faculty Mentoring Program is to: 1. Develop a genuinely friendly, trusting, collegial, mutually respectful, and collaborative relationship between the new faculty member and other nursing faculty. 2. Provide structure in which both parties can achieve mutually agreed upon goals. 3. Energize and mobilize the nursing faculty s commitment to the pursuit of professional growth and teaching excellence. We believe job satisfaction and faculty retention increases in an environment that fosters camaraderie and a willingness to help one another succeed. We believe that it is only within the context of a teamwork approach that our program s mission and philosophies can be attained. The mentoring checklist is structured only to serve as a guide to the mentors and new faculty member and may be added to by either party. Ongoing, effective communication and quality time spent together will be the hallmarks behind a successful mentoring program. The formal mentoring program will extend over a minimum three-month period with the recognition that a full year may be needed for the new faculty who has no prior teaching experience. Reviewed 09/10/09 133

138 134

139 Appendix B.4 Probationary Review Committees (Excerpted from the Negotiated Agreement) 1. Review committees shall be established for each of the instructional divisions, the library, and student services. 2. The probationary review committees required by RCW 28B through 28B shall be composed of members of the administrative staff, the student body representative, and the tenured faculty. Faculty appointments to the Probationary Review Committees must be made based on anticipated hiring for the next academic year. These appointments will be confirmed with the appropriate Vice President no later than the end of spring quarter. In the event that the employee is hired in a quarter other than fall, the tenured faculty will be appointed by the end of the first week of instruction of that quarter. The representatives of the tenured faculty shall represent a majority of the members on each probationary review committee. The members representing the tenured faculty on each probationary review committee shall be selected by the Faculty Association. The student representative shall be a full-time student in good standing, chosen by the student association in such manner as Associated Student Body (ASB) shall determine. The administrator shall be appointed by the President or his/her designee, and will call the first meeting during the first week but not later than the end of the second week of the probationer s employment. Attendance by the student representative is not mandatory at this first meeting if he/she has not been appointed. Each probationary review committee shall be comprised of at least five (5) persons, three of whom shall consist of tenured faculty representatives of the disciplines for whom review committees have been established; provided, however, that each faculty member so appointed shall have at least three (3) years community college experience at the time of his/her appointment. Each probationary review committee will choose its own chairperson and meet at least once during each quarter. 3. At least four of the five committee members, including the administrator, must be present at all probationary review committee meetings. However, probationary review committee recommendations shall be the responsibility of all five committee members. 4. The duration of each appointment to the probationary review committee shall be for a minimum of one year. Committee members may be reappointed throughout the probationary period. 5. If a vacancy arises upon any probationary review committee prior to the expiration of the appointed term, the vacancy shall be filled pursuant to section "2" of this rule. 135

140 6. Either faculty member or administrative member of the probationary review committee can be replaced prior to the expiration of the term upon recommendation to the faculty or to the College President respectively by a majority of the committee. The procedure in item "2" above shall be followed in filling the vacant position. No change can be made during a hearing. D. Probationary Review Committee Evaluation 1. Each probationary review committee shall be required to conduct an evaluation of each full-time probationary faculty appointee assigned to such review committee by the College President and render reports required by this rule to the President, the probationary faculty appointee and to the Board during the regular College year. 2. The probationary review committee and the probationer shall understand that the purpose of the evaluation is twofold; namely to guide the probationer so that his/her effectiveness in his/her faculty appointment shall be upgraded, and to provide a simple record of his/her annual performance of his/her probationary appointment. 3. The probationary period will normally be 8 quarters in duration excluding summer quarter and will not normally exceed 8 quarters. Three written recommendation reports are due to the Board of Trustees; one during the 2nd, 5th, and 8th quarters of employment. The committee must evaluate the probationer during each of the 8 quarters. If Spring quarter evaluations raise concerns regarding the probationer's performance, the committee must meet with the probationer to review those evaluations prior to the last contract day of spring quarter after the probationer s grades have been turned in. E. Probationary Review Committee Evaluation Standards: Each probationary review committee shall consider the following standards in the course of evaluating each fulltime probationer's effectiveness in his/her appointment: 1. The probationer's instructional skills. 2. The probationer's relationship with students. 3. The probationer's relationship with faculty. 4. The probationer's relationship with administration. 5. The probationer's knowledge of the subject matter s/he is charged with teaching. 6. The probationer's action toward professional improvement. 7. The probationer's adherence to appropriate guides and specific objectives in meeting institutional goals, as determined in consultation between the faculty member, appropriate administrator, and faculty representative from the probationary review 136

141 committee. F. Communication of Evaluation to Probationers: 1. During the course of each evaluation interview conducted by the appropriate probationary review committee, the probationary review committee shall, as a part of its duty, note by written summary the probationer's progress in regard to the evaluation standards. 2. Upon completion of said evaluation report, it shall be signed by the probationer and each probationary committee member and distributed by the chairperson of the probationary review committee to the appropriate Vice President/Dean, the Division Chairperson, and the probationer. If any probationary committee member has any disagreements with the report, s/he may so note his/her disagreement in writing to be included with the completed evaluation report. 3. If the probationer has any disagreements in regard to matters noted by the review committee in its evaluation report, s/he may so note his/her disagreement in writing to the committee chair and the appropriate Vice President within seven (7) calendar days after receipt of his/her copy. Said writing is to be attached to evaluation report copies by probationary review committee chairperson. 4. If, in the course of its evaluation report, the probationary review committee states that the probationer is performing unsatisfactorily in whole or in part, it shall develop a program with the probationer that will be devised to improve such deficiencies. 5. All files should be maintained in the College Human Resources Office. G. Tenure Recommendations/Contract Renewal/Non-Renewal of Probationary Faculty: 1. The probationary review committee's recommendation and all source documents shall be transmitted to the appropriate Vice President prior to the end of the 3rd week of instruction of the probationer s 2nd, 5th and 8th quarters of employment accompanied by a comprehensive summary of the probationary committee's findings. Copies of the recommendations shall be sent to the probationer, his/her Division Chairperson, and the appropriate Vice President/Dean and all source documents shall be sent to the Office of Human Resources. The appropriate Vice President shall add his/her recommendations to those received by the College President, and will provide copies to the probationer and all probationary committee members as well. 137

142 2. The probationary faculty appointment period shall be one of continuing evaluation of the probationer through fall, winter, and spring quarters of each negotiated calendar year by the probationary review committee. The evaluation process shall place primary importance upon the probationer's effectiveness in his/her appointment. The probationary review committee shall meet at least quarterly with each probationer, and provide, in writing a signed report, of his/her progress during the probationary period and receive the probationer's written acknowledgment thereof. All probationary committee reports will be signed by all faculty and administrators on the committee as well as the probationer. The probationary review committee shall, as per subsection (3) below, make appropriate recommendations to the Board through the President. The College President at this time may choose to add his/her recommendation or may respond to questions from the Board regarding his/her recommendation. 3. If at any time prior to the end of the 3rd week of instruction for the 2nd and 5th quarters of the probationer s employment, the review committee recommends nonrenewal of the probationer's contract, or if before the end of the 3rd week of instruction for the 8th quarter, during the probationer's third year of his/her appointment, the probationary review committee recommends that tenure not be awarded said probationer, written notice thereof shall be transmitted to the President of the College, who in turn shall forward the same to the Board and to the probationer. H. Board Decisions Regarding Tenure: 1. Upon receiving the various recommendations regarding the award or non-award of tenure or the nonrenewal of a contract of the evaluated probationers, the Board shall, before its final meeting of the 2nd, 5th and 8th quarters of a probationer s employment, examine the records of the probationer(s) so referred to them and give reasonable consideration to the recommendation of the probationary review committee as to the award or non-award of tenure or the nonrenewal of a contract to said probationer or probationers. 2. All Board decisions regarding the award or non-award of tenure to probationers considered pursuant to this section shall be accomplished by no later than the last day of the 2nd, 5th and 8th quarter of a probationer s employment. Written notice of such award or non-award shall be transmitted by the Board to the probationer no later than the last day of the 2nd, 5th and 8th quarter of a probationer s employment. 3. The final decision to award or withhold tenure, or to continue probationary status for faculty, shall rest with the Board, after it has given reasonable consideration to the 138

143 recommendation of the Probationary Review Committee and the College President. Any recommendations of the Probationary Review Committee and the President shall be advisory only and not binding upon the Board. The Faculty Association and the President agree that the ultimate authority to grant or deny tenure, or continuing probationary status, for faculty is vested with the Board. 4. In the case of the award of tenure, all probationary source documents, including all original evaluations, will be destroyed upon satisfactory completion by the newly tenured faculty member of the first tenured faculty evaluation cycle (Article XX). Within thirty (30) calendar days the faculty member being evaluated may indicate in writing on the summary evaluation document that s/he chooses to have the source documents retained in his/her personnel file. 139

144 140

145 Appendix B.5 General Guidelines for the Standing Tenured Faculty Evaluation Committee and for the Tenured Faculty Evaluation Process The Standing Tenured Faculty Evaluation Committee (STFEC) (See Negotiated Agreement, Article XX: F) The tenured faculty evaluation committee was designated a standing committee of the Big Bend Faculty Association during the academic year. The composition of this committee is six members: two academic faculty, two professional technical faculty, the Vice-President of Instruction, and a Dean. The faculty members of the committee are appointed by the faculty association president and ratified by the faculty. Two faculty members, one professional technical and one academic, will be replaced each year so that every member serves two academic years. The responsibility of the committee will be to provide continuity and oversight to the evaluation process for tenured faculty as well as develop and/or modify the evaluation process as deemed appropriate after approval of those modifications by the faculty association and review by the college president. The Evaluation Process: (See Negotiated Agreement, Article XX) 1. At the completion of the Probationary Tenure Process, each newly tenured faculty member will be given a TFE Procedure Booklet and a BBCC notebook for the compilation of a portfolio. Every tenured faculty member will be evaluated every five years after tenure is granted. 2. The process will include student, peer, and administrative evaluations and the presentation of a portfolio that covers the faculty member s activities during the previous five years. 3. The Vice President of Instruction will maintain a current list of faculty members who are to be evaluated and will notify each of them before the appropriate quarter. 4. Tenure Review Committees (TRC) for each tenured faculty member will be created at a joint meeting of the STFEC and the president of the faculty association. 5. Faculty being evaluated will receive notice of committee assignments from the faculty association president. Each faculty member being evaluated will receive a confidential list of the two faculty and one administrator who were selected to make up his /her evaluation committee. 6. When division chairs are due for evaluation, a faculty member on his/her committee will assume division chair TFEC TRC duties. 7. If the person being evaluated wishes to replace a committee member, he/she must send a written response to the STFEC chair and/or the faculty association president within two weeks following the receipt of the original committee list. A request to change a committee member must include specific reasons for the change. 8. If after two weeks no changes have been requested, the list will be released to the members of the faculty person s committee and the entire faculty. Decisions about changes in committee appointments will be made by the STFE committee on a case-by-case basis. 141

146 9. When faculty evaluation committees meet, they will be expected to use this booklet as the guideline for fulfilling the requirements of the evaluation of a tenured faculty member. Fall 2007 to Winter 2012 Five Year Tenured Faculty Evaluation Schedule Fall Donat, Gene Autry, Bill Asay, Marsha Cox, Chuck Carpenter, John Miller, Randy Gillespie, John Leavitt, Angela Harberts, Brinn Close, Steve Swedburg, John Wilks, Preston MacDougall, Joe Michie, Les Lane, Stephen Whitney, Barbara Riley, Chris O Konek, Mike Teitzel, Pat Palkovic, Rie Peterson, John Matt Sullivan W i n t e r Knepp, Dennis Jacobs, Barbara Crane, Greg Hammer, Pete Borg, Erik Matern, Steve Moore, Dan Erickson, Gail Heinzmann, Max Duvall, Kathleen Wyman, Lance Hamm, Jim Poth, Mark Nelson, Marsha Zavala-Lopez Marianne Jorgensen, Van Thimot, Linda Shuttleworth, Red Tanko, Zachariah Spooner, Ed 142

147 Appendix C.1 143

148 144

149 145

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