THE URBAN RENEWAL PLAN FOR THE KENDALL-WHITTIER NEIGHBORHOOD TULSA, OKLAHOMA

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1 THE URBAN RENEWAL PLAN FOR THE KENDALL-WHITTIER NEIGHBORHOOD TULSA, OKLAHOMA Adopted by the Tulsa Development Authority on May 26, 1994 Certified by TMAPC as in accordance with the Comprehensive Plan on June 8, 1994 Adopted by the Tulsa City Council on June 23, 1994 Amended by the Tulsa City Council on December 8, 1994 Amended by the Tulsa City Council on February 16, 2006 Expires June 2, 2014 TULSA DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 111 S. GREENWOOD, SUITE 200 TULSA, OKLAHOMA JUNE, 1994

2 KENDALL-WHITTIER NEIGHBORHOOD URBAN RENEWAL PLAN TULSA DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY Table of Contents 1. Preface Boundary Description of Plan Area...1 Kendall-Whittier Urban Renewal Plan Boundary Map URP Definitions and Usage Duration Area History Kendall-Whittier Masterplan Urban Renewal Plan Plan Description Plan Objectives Summary of Blighting Conditions Types of Proposed Renewal Actions Actions within the Urban Renewal Area Land Acquisitions...15 Urban Renewal Plan Acquisition Map URP Relocation Assistance Demolitions, Clearance and Site Preparation Property Management Property Disposition Property Rehabilitation and Conservation Public Improvements and Facilities Project Funding The Land Use Plan Land Use Plan Map, URP-2, and Development Districts Established Land Use Provisions Established Land Use Plan Map, UPR Use Groups Permitted in Development District, Table Uses Permitted in Use Groups, Table Building Requirements and Design Criteria New Construction and Rehabilitation Guidelines Whittier Square Developmental Guidelines Procedure for Plan Amendments Minor Variations of the Plan...33 i

3 10. Amendments Amendment I...34 Appendix I, Relocation Plan...35 Appendix II, Finance Plan...46 Appendix III, Economic and Social Data...47 Appendix IV, Summary of 1998 Amendments...50 Appendix V, Summary of 1998 Amendments...51 ii

4 1.1 Boundary Description of Plan Area 1. Preface This document is the plan to guide urban renewal development, redevelopment, acquisitions, improvements and activities in the Kendall-Whittier Neighborhood. The boundaries of the Kendall-Whittier Neighborhood Urban Renewal Area are as follows: Beginning at the intersection of north line of east Archer Street and the east line of North Lewis Place, said point also being the southwest corner of Block 5, Ohio Place Addition; thence south along the projected east line of North Lewis Place projected across Admiral Place and Interstate 244 (I-244) to a point on the south line of I-244; thence easterly along the south line of I-244 to the point of intersection with the east line of South Atlanta Avenue; thence south along the projected east line of South Atlanta Avenue to the southeast corner of the intersection of East First Street and South Atlanta Avenue, said point being the northwest corner of Block 1, R.T. Daniel Addition; thence west along the projected south line of East First Street to a point, said point being 35' west and 12' south of the northeast corner of Lot 7A, of the Resubdivision of Block 2, R.T. Daniel Addition; thence south a distance of 12' to a point; thence west a distance of 25' to a point on the west line of said Lot 7A; thence south along the west line of Lot 7A and Lot 18A of said Resubdivision of Block 2, and continuing along the projected west line of Lots 7A and 17A of the Resubdivision of Block 3, R.T. Daniel Addition and further continuing south along the projected west line of said Lots 7A and 18A of the Resubdivision of Block 6, R.T. Daniel Addition and west line of Lot 7A, of the Resubdivision of Block 7, R.T. Daniel Addition to the southwest corner of said Lot 7A, Block 7; thence east along the projected south line of Blocks 7, 8, 9 and 10 of said R.T. Daniel Addition to a point on the east line of South Delaware Avenue; thence north along the east line of South Delaware Avenue to the intersection of the east line of South Delaware Avenue and the north line of East Third Street; thence easterly along the northerly line of East Third Street to intersection of northerly line of East Third Street and the east line of South College Avenue; thence south along the projected east line of South College Avenue to the southwest corner of Block 8, Pleasant View Addition; thence east along the projected south line of said Block 8, to a point on the east line of South Florence Avenue; thence south along the east line of South Florence Avenue to the Southwest corner of Block 18, University Park Addition; thence east along the projected south line of Block 18 and 17, University Park Addition to the southeast corner of Lot 8, said Block 17; thence northerly along the easterly line of Lots 9, 10 and 11, said Block 17, to the northeast corner of said Lot 11; thence northwesterly along the westerly line of Lot 12, said Block 17 to the northwest corner of said Lot 12; thence along the northerly line of said Lot 12, said line being the south line of East Fourth Street, projected to its intersection with the east line of South Harvard Avenue; thence south along the projected east line of South Harvard Avenue to its intersection with the projected south line of East Eleventh Street; thence west along the projected south line of East Eleventh Street to its intersection with the west line of South Delaware Avenue; thence 1

5 north along the projected west line of South Delaware Avenue to its intersection with the south line of East Tenth Street; thence west on the projected south line of East Tenth Street to its intersection with the west line of South Columbia Avenue; thence north in the projected west line of South Columbia Avenue to its intersection with the south line of East Sixth Street; thence west along the projected south line of East Sixth Street to a point 100' west of the west line of South Lewis Avenue, said point being the northwest corner of Lot 2, Block 5, Hillcrest Addition; thence north along the projected west line of said Lot 2, Block 5 and Lots 27 and 2, Block 4, Hillcrest Addition to the north line of East Fifth Place; thence west along the north line of East Fifth Place to the southwest corner of Lot 6, Block 3, Hillcrest Addition; thence north along the west line of said Lot 6 to the northwest corner thereof; thence east along the north line of said Lots 6, 5, 4 and 3 to the northeast corner of said Lot 3; thence north along the west line of Lot 15, said Block 3 projected to the north line of East Fifth Street; thence west along the north line of East Fifth Street to the southwest corner of Lot 14, Block 2, Hillcrest Addition; thence north along the projected west line of Lots 14 and 3, said Block 2 to a point on the north line of East Fourth Place; thence east along the north line of East Fourth Place to the southwest corner of Lot 2, Block 1, Hillcrest Addition; thence north along the west line of said Lot 2, Block 1 to a point on the south line of Lot 2, Block 1, Hillcrest Ridge Addition; thence west along the south line of said Lot 2, Block 1, Hillcrest Ridge to the southwest corner thereof; thence north on the projected west line of said Lot 2 to a point on the north side of East Fourth Street; thence west along the north line of East Fourth Street to the southwest corner of Lot 7, Block 2, Hillcrest Ridge Addition; thence north along the west line of Lots 7 and 6, said Block 2 to the northwest corner of said Lot 6; thence west on the projected north line of said Lot 6 a distance of 150' to the southeast corner of Lot 18, said Block 2; thence west along the projected south line of said Lot 18 to a point on the west line of South Gillette Avenue; thence north along the west line of South Gillette Avenue projected to a point on the north line of East Third Street; thence west along the north line of East Third Street to a point 160' west of the east line of Lot 1, Block 4, Hillcrest Ridge Addition; thence north and parallel to the east line of said Lot 1, Block 4 and Lots 10 and 11, Block 7, Wakefield Addition to the southwest corner of Lot 3 of said Block 7; thence north along the projected west line of said Lot 3, Block 7 and Lots 10 and 3, Block 2, Wakefield Addition to a point on the south side of East First Street, said point being the northwest corner of said Lot 3, Block 2; thence west along the south line of East First Street a distance of 10'; thence north across East First Street to the southeast corner of Lot 9, Block 21, Gillette Hall Addition; thence north along the east line of Lots 9 through 16, Block 21 and Lots 8 through 14 of Block 2, Gillette Hall Addition, (across I-244), and proceeding further north along the east line of Lots 26 through 49, Block 3, Eastland Addition projected to a point on the north line of East Archer Street said point being the southeast corner of Lot 9, Block 16, Cherokee Heights Addition; thence east along the projected north line of East Archer Street to its intersection with the projected east line of North Lewis Place and the point of beginning. 2

6 KENDALL-WHITTIER URBAN RENEWAL AREA BOUNDARIES URP-1 3

7 1.2 Definitions and Usage This Kendall-Whittier Neighborhood Urban Renewal Plan ("Plan") has been prepared by the Tulsa Development Authority (the "Authority") pursuant to the provisions of Title 11, Sections 101 through 123, Article 38, "Urban Renewal", of the Oklahoma Statutes, as amended ("State Law"). This Plan describes certain public and private undertakings (the "Project") in the urban renewal area shown on Map URP-1 (the "Urban Renewal Area" or "Area"). Except as otherwise provided therein or by any agreement, the administration of the Project and the enforcement of this Plan including, without limitation, the preparation and execution of any implementing documents shall be performed by the Authority. 1.3 Duration The duration of the Urban Renewal Plan for the Kendall-Whittier Neighborhood Urban Renewal Area will be until June 02, 2012, unless extended by appropriate action of the Tulsa City Council. 1.4 Area History During the 1920's and 1930's the Kendall-Whittier area was at the eastern edge of Tulsa adjacent to the University of Tulsa. It had its own "downtown" business center located along Lewis Avenue between Third and Archer Streets. The neighborhood was added to as late as the 1940's and 1950's when later parts of the Daniel Addition were built. Throughout the entire period, the University of Tulsa was expanding and during the 1960's small apartment complexes were built to the west of the campus for students and other new residents. Since then, Tulsa has grown far to the east and southeast and the neighborhood and its people have aged. Retail, industrial enterprises, and major highways have encroached on the neighborhood's formerly quiet residential streets. Real estate entrepreneurs placed higher density apartments where houses once stood. During the economic downturn of the 1980's, apartment occupancy and rents fell throughout the City. Older areas such as Kendall-Whittier became less competitive and fell victim to more transient residents and the poor. These new residents fed a perception of neighborhood decline which became fact because owner occupancy and reinvestment were discouraged. More modern and suburban retail centers drew business away from Whittier Square and other area commercial properties which then began to lease to more marginal retail and adult entertainment businesses. The schools in the area aged and student populations dropped. Crime primarily drugs and prostitution, became rampant and further destabilized the neighborhood to the point that the neighborhood began a very effective law enforcement advocacy program during the late 1980's. Deteriorating buildings, a lack of maintenance and a depressed rental market caused considerable visual and structural blight. Yet the neighborhood is a key midtown residential and business area with significant pockets of good housing and important institutions such as the University of Tulsa, Hillcrest Hospital, and a number of well established churches. 4

8 1.5 Kendall-Whittier Masterplan In 1989, the University, churches, and businesses of the neighborhood banded together to do what had never been done before in Tulsa. They contributed 50 percent of the cost to produce a neighborhood plan and challenged the City to match it. The City did match the funds and a neighborhood plan was produced to guide neighborhood growth. The Kendall-Whittier Neighborhood Masterplan is unique in that the initiative for development of the plan came from the neighborhood residents and business operators, as opposed to the Tulsa Metropolitan Area Planning Commission (TMAPC), the Authority or the City. In late 1989, at the request of TMAPC, the Urban Development Department met with the Kendall- Whittier Neighborhood Association and the Kendall-Whittier Business Development Association to discuss how to go about creating an urban renewal project. The organizations were advised to contact the Mayor's Office and the Authority and that the first step would be the development of a plan. In December, the neighborhood associations requested assistance in the preparation of a redevelopment plan. The Mayor asked the Authority to assist the neighborhood in the development of this plan. Funds to match those raised from within the neighborhood were appropriated to the Authority to cover the cost of an area study and the development of a plan. In the spring of 1990, studies were undertaken by the Urban Development Department. A series of planning workshops and meetings were held to identify neighborhood strengths, weaknesses, problems and solutions to the problems. Attendance at the workshops and meetings by area residents, business operators, representatives of area institutions, as well as public entities was excellent. Participation, and a positive attitude on the part of the participants, was extraordinary. Originally, the focus area was to be the immediate area around Whittier Square. It became obvious, however, in the early planning workshops that the development of a "donut hole" plan was not the best approach for the neighborhood. Therefore, a more comprehensive plan of a broader area was developed. The final Neighborhood Masterplan boundaries are: Utica Avenue to Harvard Avenue, Eleventh Street to Archer Street. Two of the major problems identified were: (1) the decline of the commercial districts, particularly Whittier Square with its proliferation of adult entertainment establishments, and (2) transitional and overall decline of conditions in the area immediately west of the University of Tulsa from Delaware to Lewis, between Fourth Place and Eleventh Street. This area was typified by an extremely high crime rate, particularly drug dealing and prostitution, and an abundance of vacant and derelict apartments and houses. The Masterplan addresses these and other problem areas through a series of suggested actions designed to improve the atmosphere for commercial development/redevelopment and the provision for improved public facilities to support and help stabilize housing conditions and bring about revitalization of the area. The Kendall-Whittier Masterplan was completed in late 1990, revised in April of 1991 and officially adopted by the City and County in May of 1991 as a "Special District Plan" and has been incorporated as such in the Comprehensive Plan. The University of Tulsa's Masterplan, with subsequent amendments, was incorporated as a "Special District Plan" in the Comprehensive Plan in September,

9 2. Urban Renewal Plan 2.1 Plan Description To facilitate the implementation of the Masterplan and utilize the broad powers of the Authority to effect the various land transactions among the multiple entities, it was suggested that all or a portion of the neighborhood be designated as an urban renewal area. This designation would allow the Authority to undertake certain activities not otherwise possible. The urban renewal designation would create: Ability to accept and implement federal grant programs easily. Automatic eligibility for most federal, state and city assistance programs such as low interest housing rehabilitation loans, neighborhood improvement funds, public facilities grants, etc. Ability for the Authority to buy, sell and/or exchange publicly owned lands between public and private entities, (applies to school/park land, library, etc.) Ability for the Authority to buy and sell land for private redevelopment, (such as the removal of substandard buildings at or near Whittier Square for parking, the redevelopment of the Whittier School site, the expansion of the University, etc.). Ability to borrow funds for project implementation through the Authority, as well as make loans for public or private development; and, Added impetus and recognition of the Kendall-Whittier area needs resulting from formal designation as an urban renewal area. In December, 1993, after two public meetings, the Authority determined that the Kendall- Whittier area is blighted, approved the designation of a portion of the Kendall-Whittier Masterplan neighborhood as an urban renewal area, and instructed the Urban Development Department staff to develop an urban renewal plan for the area for approval by the Authority, TMAPC and the Tulsa City Council. A major element of both the Kendall-Whittier Neighborhood Masterplan and the Kendall- Whittier Urban Renewal Plan is the creation of a large public/institutional use area (approximately 50 acres) between Lewis and Delaware, from Fourth Place to Sixth Street. Specific uses envisioned for the area are: a park, long desired for the area by the Park Department; a site for a new elementary school, suggested several years earlier by the Tulsa Public School District; and future expansion by the University of Tulsa. This large public/institutional use site could also accommodate other possible uses such as s new fire station, expansion of area churches, etc. Creation of the public/institutional site has a two fold purpose: (1) to provide sites for much needed public facilities that would have a very positive impact on the area; and (2) to provide for the removal of a substantial portion of the substandard structures and undesirable uses from the area. The new school is viewed by most as the single most important clement to achieving the Masterplan goals. Other Plan elements include revitalizing and restoring Whittier Square through encouraging public entities, such as the Post Office, to locate, expand, or remain in the Area, infrastructure improvements, landscape screening, and continuation of the "Route 66" theme in the area; improving affordable housing opportunities and encouraging home ownership in residential 6

10 areas; encouraging the redevelopment of commercial facilities that will support and improve the general area; developing a new Town Square area with a new library and green space at Whittier Square; constructing a cul-de-sac on First Street east of the "Square" and streetscaping, screening, street improvements, and site improvements throughout the general area. The complexity of the implementation of the Plan requires all entities--the Authority, Tulsa Public Schools, the University of Tulsa, and the City--to work in close coordination and cooperation to ensure maximum benefits from the Plan. An agreement between Tulsa Public Schools and the Authority is currently being prepared. It is contemplated that Tulsa Public Schools will sell the "old" Kendall School to the Authority as soon as possible after the approval of the Plan with the understanding that Tulsa Public Schools will continue to occupy the school site until the completion of the construction of the new school or such earlier date as Tulsa Public Schools deems appropriate. It is also contemplated that the University of Tulsa will acquire the "old" Kendall School and "little" Reed Park from the Authority as soon as possible after it is acquired by the Authority. The Authority will acquire a site for a new school in the Area, the location to be mutually agreed to by Tulsa Public Schools and the Authority. The Tulsa Public School Board has adopted a resolution of intent to build the new school and has agreed to include the construction costs of the new school in a bond issue scheduled for the Fall. Construction costs are estimated to be between five and seven million dollars. With the approval of the Plan, the City Council agrees to donate "little" Reed Park to the Authority. In exchange, the Authority will deed the new park site and improvements to the City once the improvements are completed. The City Council also agrees to close streets as necessary and appropriate for the implementation of the Plan. Due to the complexity of the agreements, they will not be finalized until after the Plan is approved by the City Council, but will become a part of the Plan at the time of their completion. This Plan represents a long-range vision for the Kendall-Whittier Neighborhood. Acquisitions will be made as funding is available. Nonconforming uses to the Land Use Plan will be allowed to remain pursuant to Section 6 of this Plan. Any street shown to be closed on the Land Use Map will not be closed until the appropriate adjacent property is acquired. 2.2 Plan Objectives 1. Develop a new school as a result of merging three aging facilities (Lincoln, Whittier and Kendall Schools). This project should be given top priority because it, in conjunction with the new park, will do more for the regeneration of the neighborhood than all other project combined. 2. Develop an adequate new neighborhood park. 3. Facilitate, in an orderly and timely fashion, the growth of the University of Tulsa campus. 4. Improve off-street parking, both quantity and quality, to enhance residential, commercial and industrial uses. 7

11 5. Develop a new town square area with a new library at Whittier Square. 6. Remove substandard housing stock and encourage renovation, residential maintenance and redevelopment. 7. Improve affordable housing opportunities and encourage home ownership in residential areas. 8. Revitalize the retail center at Whittier Square and encourage the rehabilitation and expansion of other viable commercial properties. 9. Remove substandard commercial buildings and encourage the redevelopment of commercial facilities that will support and improve the general area. 10. Develop streetscape improvements at Whittier Square and other areas within the Plan boundaries. 11. Improve streets, intersections and pedestrian ways to provide better vehicular and pedestrian traffic circulation and safety. 12. Implement drainage plans and solve neighborhood flooding problems. 13. Encourage the continuation and growth of employment in the area and encourage business opportunities. 14. Continue and enhance the efforts to deter crime in the area. 15. Remove blight, improve the neighborhood's landscaping, and concentrate on making the outside areas accessible to the large population of the aging and handicapped. 16. Install screening of landscape or physical barriers between sensitive properties and the M. L. King Jr. (I-244) Expressway or other high-traffic corridors. Also install screening between incompatible land uses. 17. Improve area fire protection through development of a new or improved station or other means. 18. Encourage public entities to locate, expand, or to commit to remain in the Area including: A. The U. S. Post Office B. The City-County Library C. State and Local Social Service Agencies D. Tulsa Police and Fire Departments E. Physically and Developmentally Challenged and Social Service Facilities 8

12 3. Summary of Blighting Conditions The data and information contained herein was taken, in part, from the Kendall-Whittier Neighborhood Masterplan dated April 4, 1991, field surveys of physical conditions conducted by the Urban Development Department in the spring and summer of 1990, Elm Creek and Coal Creek Master Drainage Plans of the City of Tulsa, other studies of the City of Tulsa Public Works Department, Bureau of Census reports, comments of planning team participants, City of Tulsa Water and Sewer Atlas, Tulsa Police Department Annual Reports, The City of Tulsa Comprehensive Plan and zoning maps of INCOG. Blighting conditions present in the Kendall-Whittier Urban Renewal Plan area, as defined by Title 11, O.S et seq are as follows: Structural Conditions The incidence of home ownership is closely correlated to the pockets of well maintained structures in the neighborhood. Home ownership relates inversely with structures which need repair or should be removed. Home ownership is the most concentrated in the Daniel Addition with slightly more scattered ownerships in the 1920's residential areas north of the Tulsa University Campus and west of Lewis near Fifth, Sixth and Seventh Streets. Home ownership is rare in the northwest and extreme western residential areas as well as in the mixed apartment neighborhood west of Tulsa University. Many structures in those areas should be removed as they are in the midst of other structures which are in need of repair. The structural conditions survey clearly shows a broad based deterioration which can be attributed to age, conversion of use, and neglect. An Urban Renewal designation for these areas is appropriate as well as other mechanisms and funding sources available to assist in arresting deterioration and blight, and promoting revitalization of these areas and the neighborhood as a whole. The following survey is of principal structures only and does not include use, setback, overcrowding and other conditions. Number Percent Total Structures % Structures with Deficiencies % Non-repairable (dilapidated) % Vacant 211 8% Traffic Circulation Improvements Wide street rights-of-way were not anticipated when the area was planned and platted. Portions of Route 66, which used 11th Street through the neighborhood, has a right-of-way width of only 6- feet while sections of Lewis Avenue are only 50 feet wide. Other area arterial streets have 9

13 similar widths while current standards would require a width of at least 100 feet. Some developments, notably at 11th and Lewis, have therefore squeezed the pavement width so that there is not enough room for left turn bays. Although the Tulsa Metropolitan Area Transportation Study shows 11th Street west of Harvard as approaching its 4-lane capacity, intersection limitations along 11th Street limit the street's ability to move traffic in and through the area. Protected turn lanes or a two-way center-turn lane (a center turn lane) would enhance the capacity of the street. The City of Tulsa's 1991 Average Daily Traffic (ADT) count on both 11th Street and Harvard Avenue was 18,000 vehicles a day north and west of the intersection. The Lewis Avenue count, north of 11th Street, was 14,000 vehicles a day. The City is implementing a $10 million street repair program which has targeted older arterial streets for complete stripping, resurfacing, and comprehensive curb and sidewalk repair. Much of the work is in progress and will result in substantial elimination of the deficiencies noted in the planning process for: 1. Harvard Avenue 2. 11th Street (completed) 3. Utica Avenue The repairs do not include improvement at several intersections in the area such as: 1. 11th and Utica 2. 11th and Lewis 3. 11th and Delaware 4. Admiral and Lewis Nor do these repairs replace other street improvements needed in the area, including: 1. Archer (from Zunis to Lewis) which is called for closure and vacation in the plan. 2. Seventh Street (from Utica to Wheeling), and Xanthus (from Seventh to the Railroad right-of-way) both of which may be eliminated or redeveloped based on the Elm Creek Detention Pond specific site selection. 3. A one block stretch of College Street north of Eighth Street needs to be replaced, but the realignment of Tulsa University Campus streets will likely eliminate it altogether eventually. 4. Lewis Avenue from the Broken Arrow Expressway to Archer needs surfacing, curb and gutter repairs, sidewalk repairs, and some local widening. 5. Virtually all of the remaining residential or local streets, because of their age, require overlay or minor repair. Ironically, two of the few streets in good condition (Fifth Street and Fifth Place from Atlanta to Delaware) are recommended for closure and vacation as part of the school/park site and Tulsa University Campus acquisition. About 32,040 lineal feet of streets, or 11.6 blocks, need to be repaired in the Area, while about 3,490 lineal feet, or blocks, should be replaced. 10

14 Sidewalks Improvements The neighborhood is an old one which has its good and bad points. The good is that nearly all of the development was built during an era when good, wide sidewalks were a tradition and not an annoying subdivision requirement. The bad news is that they are aged and over the years damaged by tree roots, dug up, patched, and partially replaced. The key issues will be to upgrade the sidewalks in the retail areas and street frontages of Whittier Square, 11th Street, and in the residential areas, particularly those adjacent to the proposed school/park site. Of particular importance is the area around the Tulsa Center for the Physically Limited. Substantially wide sidewalks with curb cuts and gentle slopes are badly needed between the Center and the medical facilities at Hillcrest and the shopping facilities on Lewis between Third and Fourth Streets. Other sidewalks from the Center to other area locations are also desirable. Wide sidewalks surrounding the University Campus and its heavier pedestrian traffic are also important. Well maintained sidewalks are one of the lower costs, but key elements to a stable residential neighborhood. In the Area, about 61,890 lineal feet of sidewalks need to be repaired while about 34,405 lineal feet of sidewalks need to be totally replaced. Stormwater Improvements The Kendall-Whittier Neighborhood falls in the uppermost watershed area of two drainage basins. The Elm Creek Basin begins roughly along Birmingham Avenue and flows westward to downtown Tulsa and then southwestwardly to the Arkansas River at 21st Street. The Floodplain Atlas for the City of Tulsa shows two 100 year floodplains on Elm Creek tributaries which penetrate the neighborhood from the west. A northern tributary crosses Utica at Fifth Street and then travels northeastwardly to a point 1/2 block south of Third on Xanthus. It then travels eastwardly 1 1/2 blocks to the alleyway between Yorktown and Zunis. The floodplain is approximately feet wide. The southern tributary of Upper Elm Creek crosses Utica at Seventh Street and travels east southeastwardly to Eight Street 1/2 block west of Lewis. This floodplain is approximately 300 feet wide in most places. The Elm Creek Drainage Plan calls for a detention pond on this reach near the railroad right-of-way at Eighth Street. The storm sewer feeders are largely old and travel only a few blocks before reaching the sewer and pond system called for on Elm Creek. The second basin which drains the eastern half of the neighborhood is that of Coal Creek which travels northeastward to Bird Creek. The old creek bed (now a storm sewer alignment) enters the south edge of the neighborhood at 11th and Delaware, travels northward three block to Seventh Street and northwestward between Delaware and Columbia to Third Street. The floodplain in this reach varies from 60 feet at 11th to 300 feet of width at Third Street. The creek bed then turns northeastward to I-244 between Delaware and College then continues under it in a northeastern direction to Archer near Florence Avenue. A third floodplain, which has a very minimal impact on the neighborhood, is that of as more eastern reach of the Coal Creek Basin which potentially floods the 11th and Harvard intersection during a 100 year storm event. 11

15 Water & Sewer Conditions Water supply and fire protection are considered adequate to good to most of area. The main sanitary sewer system is considered adequate though the collection system in certain sub-areas is old and experiencing infiltration problems. Inadequate Park & Recreational Area The Area is served by only two small parks, Reed and Admiral, each being a little over two acres. The current City Criteria for a neighborhood park is ten acres. This is a serious deficiency in the Area. Grade Schools The study area was served by three of the district's oldest schools. Lincoln was closed prior to the study and Whittier subsequently. The remaining school, Kendall, is the oldest active school in the system. The University of Tulsa Expansion Even though the University has sought to expand its facility, it has been limited in its acquisition of property. This inability to purchase certain properties in a timely, orderly fashion has helped to generate blight because owners are often unwilling to spend money to upgrade properties that may be bought by the University. Increased density through conversion of homes to apartments and development of apartment units have added to the parking and circulation problems and a decrease in owner occupancy. Subdivision Platting Much of the area is platted in 50' x 140' lots which is considered inadequate by today's standards. The typical RS-3 zoning of today requires a 60' minimum frontage lot. Of greater concern is that a number of these lots have been subdivided for two or three separately owned houses. Also, many houses have been converted to multi-family single-room occupancy use. Some older homes have been removed and replaced by multi-family units built on narrow lots, creating overcrowding as well as parking and traffic circulation problems. Zoning and Land Use Most of the area was developed prior to zoning and subdivision regulations, in an era when behavior and standards were less strict concerning land use. Many commercially used properties are too small and lack adequate parking, setbacks, and sufficient street right-of-way which has contributed to the decline of the area and traffic congestion. There are also a number of instances where single family residences front or side heavy commercial or industrial uses. Finally, a large portion of the predominantly single family area was zoned multi-family which produced an undesirable mix of residential uses and a decline in owner occupancy. 12

16 The most significant deficiency in the neighborhood is the "over-zoning" of old single family residential areas to multifamily. This was a result of a planning belief in the 1950's and early 1960's that redevelopment and modernization of an aging inner city area is best encouraged by zoning which permits higher density. In Kendall-Whittier this resulted in all of the area south of Fourth Place and west of Lewis not otherwise zoned commercial or industrial to be zoned for multifamily. The Daniel Addition and the older neighborhoods east and north of it are the only remaining areas zoned as they are presently being used - single family residential. Commercial zoning (including some downtown high intensity districts) has also tended to strip out along the major streets, resulting in an excessive amount of land available for commercial usage on small and shallow lots with little or no parking and traffic congestion. Diversity of Ownership Because of small lot platting and subsequent re-subdivision, it is sometimes difficult for developers to assemble and acquire adequately sized property for new development. It is also difficult for existing owners to acquire adjacent property for expansion. As a result, little recent development or expansion has occurred recently. Economic Development The condition of commercial buildings, lack of parking, number of vacant buildings, types of commercial uses and low commercial rental rates in the area are indicative of stagnation and/or decline of viable commercial development. Many once thriving commercial and industrial properties are now obsolete and cannot compete with more modern shopping centers, except for those less desirable uses that are attracted to the area by lower rents. Some residential areas of the neighborhood are also in decline as evidence by the trend toward rental occupancy and away from owner occupancy. Crime The Kendall-Whittier neighborhood is located in Uniform Division North, Beat C201. The beat is bounded by I-244 on the north, Harvard Avenue on the east, 11th Street on the south and Peoria Avenue on the west. Beast C201 had the third highest incidence of all major crime in the City of Tulsa for 1991 and Major crimes are defined as homicide, rape, robbery, assault, burglary, auto theft, and larceny. Major crimes in the beat totaled 1,051 in 1991 and 1,008 in The beat had the distinction of having the highest rates of rape and robbery in 1991 and It also had the highest incidence of assault in There were two murders in the beat in Economic and Social Data The Area is one of the most mature in the City. Its homes are older and some of its residents are likely the original home owners. The area residents earn significantly less income than the City average, both in household and per capita income categories. There are slightly more households receiving both Social Security and public assistance income. There are significantly more vacant homes than the City average and the age of structures is much older. The statistics of area 13

17 residents are tempered by the dominant institution of the Area - the University of Tulsa. The population characteristics of the University census tract are younger in age, higher in Asian population, lower in income, and higher in some education characteristics. Some characteristics are shared by both the residents and the students, however, such as income. See Appendix III, Economic and Social Data, Selected 1990 Census Information. 14

18 4. Types of Proposed Renewal Actions 4.1 Actions within the Urban Renewal Area Actions by the Authority shall include such undertakings and activities as are in accordance with this Plan and State Law, including without limitation: A. Acquisition of certain properties located in the Urban Renewal Area as set forth in this Plan. B. Demolition and removal of buildings and improvements and the provision of relocation assistance as set forth in this Plan. C. Installation, construction and reconstruction of public improvements as set forth in this Plan. D. Disposition of property within the Urban Renewal Area for public or private redevelopment or retention for public use in accordance with this Plan. E. Voluntary action and the regulation of the use, repair, alteration, and rehabilitation of buildings or other improvements in accordance with this Plan. F. Acquisition of any other property where necessary to eliminate unhealthful, unsanitary or unsafe conditions, lessen density, eliminate obsolete or other uses detrimental to the public welfare, or otherwise remove or prevent the spread of blight or deterioration or to provide land for redevelopment or needed public facilities. 4.2 Land Acquisitions The property proposed to be acquired by the Authority within the Urban Renewal Area shall be any or all of those parcels (or interest therein) located within the plan area, as shown on the Urban Renewal Plan Acquisition Map(s), URP-3, attached hereto. All acquisitions, current and future, shall be identified and shown on the Urban Renewal Plan Acquisition Map URP-3, or as amended, before being acquired. The Urban Renewal Plan Acquisition Map, URP-3, attached hereto is a summary map. A detailed map is available at the Urban Development Department currently located at 111 South Greenwood, Suite, 200, Tulsa, Oklahoma The property identified on the Urban Renewal Plan Acquisition Map, URP-3 as scheduled acquisition will be acquired only as funding becomes available. 15

19 KENDALL-WHITTIER URBAN RENEWAL AREA ACQUISITION STATUS MAP URP-3 16

20 4.3 Relocation Assistance The Authority shall assist all persons, families and business concerns displaced by Project activities in finding other decent, safe and sanitary accommodations within their means and without undue hardship. The Authority will make relocation payment to eligible residents and business concerns in such amounts and under such terms and conditions as may be determined by the Authority and in conformance with applicable law, City policy, ordinances and state/federal laws and standards. The Relocation Plan is attached hereto as Appendix I. 4.4 Demolitions, Clearance and Site Preparation The Authority may demolish and clear those buildings, structures and other improvements from property it acquires, or by agreement with any property owner the Authority may demolish structures on land not acquired. 4.5 Property Management During such time as may property is owned by the Authority, such property shall be under the management and control of the Authority and may be rented or leased by the Authority pending disposition for redevelopment or rehabilitation or retained by the Authority for use in accordance with this Plan. Properties shall be maintained in a manner so as not to be detrimental to revitalization efforts. 4.6 Property Disposition Any property acquired by the Authority may be sold, leased or otherwise transferred for redevelopment and/or rehabilitation in accordance with the provisions of this Plan and applicable state and local laws. Any sale or lease to a private entity shall be made under reasonable negotiating procedures at fair market value, as determined by the Authority, taking into consideration the conditions imposed on the purchaser or lessee by this Plan and a redevelopment agreement or lease. Any sale or lease to a public or non-profit entity may be at less than market value where it is determined by the Authority that such sale, lease or donation contributes to implementation of the Plan and furthers the goals and objectives and public purposes embodied by the Plan as determined by the Authority. Any sale, lease or other transfer shall be subject to such covenants, conditions and restrictions as may be contemplated by the terms of any Redevelopment Agreement relating thereto or as may otherwise be necessary to carry out the purposes of this Plan including without limitation: covenants, conditions and restrictions requiring redevelopment in accordance with the provisions of this Plan, requiring the commencement and completion of redevelopment within a reasonable period of time, prohibiting discrimination upon the basis of race, color, creed, sex, age, physical disability or national origin, providing security for payment of bonds or other obligations issued or incurred by the Authority, or other requirements deemed necessary or appropriate to the objectives of this Plan. Such covenants may be required to run with the land for a period as may be reasonably required by the Authority. 17

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