New oral anticoagulants

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "New oral anticoagulants"

Transcription

1 Clinical recommendations for treatment with New oral anticoagulants These recommendations on new oral anti-coagulants have been developed on behalf of the Swedish Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (SSTH), specialist associations within the Swedish Society of Medicine, and nurses with special expertise in anti-coagulation.

2 Consolidation process These recommendations has been submitted for consultation to the following specialist associations in Sweden to give them the opportunity to present their views: Emergency medicine. Family Medicine. Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. Cardiology. Gastroenterology. Haematology. Internal Medicine. Surgery. Clinical Chemistry. Vascular Surgery. Neurology. Neurosurgery. Nephrology. Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Oncology. Orthopaedics. Thoracic surgery.transfusion Medicine. Urology. Ear, nose and throat. Otolarygology. A working group led by Associate Professor Peter J. Svensson has worked with the recommendations in the programme. Recommendations will include all new oral anticoagulants. The scientific basis for recommendations is composed of presented studies, clinical experience and consensus discussions. In many of the situations described, there are no clear studies on which to base the advice. Graphic design: Petter Grafisk Design 2011

3 CONTENTS New oral anticoagulants Page 1. General information 5 2. Surgery Anaesthesia Minor surgery/dental surgery Medical procedures requiring dose adjustment Cardiology Neurology/Stroke/Cerebral haemorrhage Bleeding/risk of bleeding Immobilized patients/cancer patients Switching between different anticoagulants Intoxications/Overdose/Interactions Follow-up/Compliance Renal insufficency and calculation of egfr APTT/PT (INR) Managing severe bleeding Working group References 39 3.

4 4.

5 1. General information Pradaxa (dabigatran etexilate) is a prodrug with approx. 6 % bioavailability after oral administration. It is hydrolyzed in the liver to the active substance dabigatran, which is mainly (80 85 %) renally excreted. Dabigatran etexilate Comment Other Coagulation effect Direct-acting and reversible Thrombin inhibitor Bioavailability after oral administration Gastrointestinal uptake is regulated via a transport protein. Dabigatran is a substrate for the transport protein P-gp. Drugs that inhibit this protein (verapamil, cordarone, dronedarone) or stimulate it (rifampicin) affect plasma concentrations. Uptake can vary post-operatively or after other changes in gastrointestinal motility and function. Maximal plasma concentration occurs approx. 1½ hours after administration of a given dose at normal absorption. Approx. 6 % Metabolism Dabigatran use is discouraged in patients with reduced liver function, e.g. transaminases >2 times the reference range. Dabigatran etexilate is hydrolyzed in the liver to the active substance dabigatran. Excretion Dose reduction is recommended for patients with reduced renal function (egfr ml/min/1.73 m2), and contraindicated with severe renal impairment (egfr <30 ml/min) % of the active substance is excreted unchanged through the kidneys (egfr is stated as ml/min/1.73 m2). In this document, either ml/min or the numerical value only will be stated for egfr for reasons of space). 5.

6 Half-life Renal function, egfr ml/min >50 15 hours >30 <50 18 hours <30 27 hours Estimated glomerular filtration rate (egfr) has been used throughout this document as it is considered to most accurately reflect the patient s kidney function in these clinical settings. For dose calculations, calculating absolute glomerular filtration may be necessary. See Panel 1 on how to calculate this. Guidelines for calculating how long the anticoagulant effect will be maintained after the last given dose In patients with hepatic impairment (egfr ml/min), the half-life times indicated above should be doubled, and doubled again at egfr <30 ml/min. It is estimated that 25 30% of the anti-coagulation effect remains after hours and approx. 5 % after hours, depending on renal function. Rebound effect after stopping treatment No rebound effect has been described. Other concomitant antithrombotic treatment Concomitant treatment with heparin, low molecular weight heparin, warfarin and certain antiplatelet drugs (GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors, ticlopidin, clopidogrel) is discouraged due to increased bleeding risk and difficulties in reversing the effects before surgery or in the case of bleeding. Concomitant use of aspirin in connection with orthopaedic surgery or as combination therapy for atrial fibrillation has not significantly increased the bleeding risk in studies on selected patients without additional risk factors for bleeding. If aspirin is indicated, combination treatment can be used with increased observation of the patient. Poorly investigated. 6.

7 Laboratory monitoring Laboratory control APTT is prolonged, but the doseresponse curve is flat and in part dependent on the APTT reagent used in the respective hospital laboratory. A slightly prolonged APTT indicates that dabigatran is present in plasma. APPT >70 90 seconds indicates a high concentration. APTT >90 seconds indicates probable overdose or accumulation. PT (INR) (Owren method) is only affected at high plasma concentrations of dabigatran. PT (INR) >1.5 indicates probable overdose or accumulation. Table 2 (page 35) shows the co-variation between APTT and PT (INR). Assessment should be based on both these analyses. All coagulation factor tests that are dependent on thrombin generation in plasma are affected and cannot be assessed (falsely low values). Antithrombin may be falsely high with some reagents. Note! At normal APTT, a small amount of dabigatran, <50 ug/l, may be found in plasma. Hemoclot Thrombin Inhibitor Assay Ecarin Clotting Time (ECT) Activated Clotting Time (ACT) Lack of established method for determining individual clinical effect and bleeding risk. Today ( ) only available at specialist laboratories in Sweden (more information will be added) Antidote Recombinant factor VIIa (Novo Seven ) has shown some neutralizing effect in vitro. Case reports indicate a clinical effect. Prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs), (Confidex Octaplex /Ocplex ) are available in Sweden and have demonstrated some neutralizing effect in vitro but have not been investigated in clinical studies. Fresh frozen plasma and Protamin have no proven neutralizing effect. For massive overdose or serious bleeding, haemodialysis may be one possibility. Activated charcoal may also have effect if administered within 2 hours of ingestion. No clinically proven antidote is available. Dabigatran is a small molecule with low-grade protein binding. Hemodialysis may be a possible treatment for severe overdose. 7.

8 Current indications Pradaxa (dabigatran etexilate) is available as 75 mg, 110 mg and 150 mg capsules. 1. Prevention of venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism after elective hip and knee replacement. Recommended dosing: First dose 110 mg 1 4 hours after surgery, from day 1 post-operatively 220 mg x 1, with dose reduction to 150 mg x 1 in elderly patients (>75 years) and patients with reduced renal function (egfr ml/min). 2. Prevention of TIA/stroke and peripheral arterial embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation. Prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in adult patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation and one or more of the following risk factors: Previous stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA), or systemic embolism (SEE) Reduced left ventricular function, ejection fraction <40% Symptomatic heart failure, New York Heart Association (NYHA) class 2 Age 75 years Age 65 years with one of the following risk factors: diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease or hypertension. For patients aged >80 years and above, 110 mg 1x2 is recommended. Contraindication(s) for dabigatran: Hypersensitivity to dabigatran Severe renal impairment (CrCL < 30 ml/min) ( egfr <30) Panel 1 Pregnancy Active bleeding Increased risk of bleeding; congenital, acquired or due to organ damage. Hepatic impairment or liver disease expected to impact survival Concomitant treatment with systemic ketoconazole, cyclosporine, itraconazole or tacrolimus. Patients who should not be treated with dabigatran: Reduced renal function, or obvious risk for reduced renal function (egfr <30mL/min), elevated liver enzymes (2 x reference), previous stroke without any strong indication for treatment, un controlled hypertension, thrombocytopenia (<75 x 109/L), breast-feeding, substance abuse uncontrolled eller un-controlled mechanical heart valve and current VTE. 8.

9 Clinical situations in which dabigatran etexilate is used The need to develop practical advice for dabigatran (Pradaxa ) has been considered to be great. In the clinical situations described, advice is based on presented studies, assessments and advice from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medical Agency (EMA), as well as clinical experience and consensus discussions in the Working Group. Colleagues both domestic and abroad have also been consulted. Few of these clinical situations have been evaluated in the study programmes, but they are common in routine healthcare. The recommendations are deliberately brief to make them easy to use in clinical practice. The attached reference list presents background documentation available The document and recommendations will be continuously updated as new information emerges. Accepted abbreviations are used in the document. These recommendations apply to patients treated with dabigatran (Pradaxa ) for the indication primary and secondary prevention of systemic thromboembolism in atrial fibrillation. 9.

10 10.

11 2. Surgery Clinical situation Recommendation 1 Acute surgery (within 1 2 hours) 1 Contact the coagulation consultant on call. 2 Check PT (INR), APTT, creatinine, thrombocytes and Hb 3 When did the patient last take dabigatran? 4 Experienced surgeon if possible, specialist case 5 Early contact with blood bank Great risk for bleeding complications. Try to optimize hemostasis, reverse the effect of dabigatran with PCC and monitor according to the directions below (Table 2 and Panel 2). If possible, reverse other concomitant anticoagulation treatment or treatment with antiplatelet drugs. 2 Semi-acute surgery (within 2 12 hours) 1 Contact the coagulation consultant on call. 2 Check PT (INR), APTT, creatinine, thrombocytes and Hb 3 When did the patient last take dabigatran? Assess renal function, APTT. If possible, postpone the operation for one half-life, i.e hours depending on egfr or until APTT is normalized (Table 2). If possible, reverse other concomitant anticoagulation treatment or treatment with antiplatelet drugs. 3 Elective surgery 1. For major surgery, discontinue dabigatran treatment according to the following (see page 33, Table 1). egfr >80 discontinue 2 days egfr discontinue 2 days egfr discontinue 4 days egfr <30 discontinue at least 5 days Preferably initiate prevention of venous thrombosis according to normal procedures within 6 hours postoperatively. Treatment with dabigatran can be resumed post-operatively on the third day if there is no increased risk of bleeding. 150 mg x 2 or 110 mg x

12 2. For minor surgery, discontinue dabigatran treatment according to the following (see page 33, Table 1). egfr >80 egfr egfr egfr <30 discontinue 1 day discontinue 1 day discontinue 2 days discontinue at least 5 days Dabigatran can be restarted the day after surgery if there is no increased risk of bleeding. LMWH is not recommended. Do not remove this patient group from the surgery schedule. 4 Thoracic surgery See paragraph 3. 5 Vascular surgery See paragraph 3. 6 Bridging situations (temporary discontinuation) due to temporary high risk of bleeding CHADS 4: consider LMWH (low molecular weight heparin) if discontinuation is long (>7 10 days) e.g. post-operatively. 12.

13 3. Anaesthesia Clinical situation Recommendation 7 Regional anaesthesia in patients on dabigatran Discontinue Pradaxa at least 48 hours before regional anaesthesia depending on renal function see page Spinal/epidural anaesthesia during ongoing treatment with dabigatran for atrial fibrillation See paragraph 7, Regional anaesthesia. 13.

14 14.

15 4. Minor surgery/dental surgery Clinical situation Recommendation 9 Scopy with/without biopsy 1. Without biopsy no action. 2. With biopsy treat like minor surgery, see page Punctures/biopsies/IM/IA Central venous catheter(cvc), Port-a-Cath installation Treat like minor surgery, see page Tartar removal, tooth extraction 1. Maintain dabigatran Soak a gauze pad in tranexamic acid (1 gram tablet dissolved in 10 ml water) and apply over the surgical site. The patient should bite on this for 1 hour. Avoid rinsing with tranexamic acid solution as it may wash away the thrombus. 2. Avoid hot drinks during the first day. 12 Major dental procedures Treat like minor surgery, see page

16 16.

17 5. Medical procedures requiring dose adjustment Clinical situation Recommendation 13 Lumbar puncture Treat like minor surgery, see page Crista biopsy Treat like minor surgery, see page Acupuncture Treat like minor surgery, see page Pleural tap Treat like minor surgery, see page Tattooing Treat like minor surgery, see page Pacemaker device, event recorder Treat like minor surgery, see page EMG Treat like minor surgery, see page Cataract surgery No action. 21 Prostate biopsy Treat like minor surgery, see page Liver biopsy Treat like minor surgery, see page Transesophageal ECG/ ultrasound No action. 24 Cardiac catheterization Treat like minor surgery, see page Skin excision Treat like minor surgery, see page Angiography Treat like minor surgery, see page Botox injections Treat like minor surgery, see page Sty or eyelid surgery Treat like minor surgery, see page Partial skin grafting Treat like minor surgery, see page ECT (electroconvulsive therapy) Treat like minor surgery, see page

18 18.

19 6. Cardiology Clinical situation Recommendation 31 PCI and triple therapy 1. Discontinue as for elective minor surgery (if possible), see page After stent: In case of continued indication for anticoagulation, warfarin is the most studied. If dabigatran is used: Give triple therapy with aspirin, clopidogrel and dabigatran 110 mg x 2 for 1 month, followed by dabigatran and aspirin. 3. Avoid DES in patients with indication for dabigatran. After 1 month, consider the higher dabigatran dose of 150 mg x 2 if the patient s risk for thrombosis is high. 32 Acute coronary syndrome 1. NST-ACS: Discontinue dabigatran. Give aspirin and clopidogrel immediately. After 12 hours (if GFR <30, wait 24 hours), give subcutaneous anticoagulation (fondaparinux or LMWH). 2. NST-ACS directly to angio/pci: Discontinue dabigatran. Give aspirin and clopidogrel immediately. Give low-dose, weight-adjusted heparin (70 U/kg) or bivalirudin. 3. STEMI with primary PCI: Discontinue dabigatran. Give aspirin and clopidogrel immediately. Give lowdose, weight-adjusted heparin (70 U/kg) or bivalirudin, possibly with the addition of a Gp IIb/IIIa inhibitor. 4. STEMI with thrombolysis (consider PCI if possible): Discontinue dabigatran. Give aspirin and clopidogrel. Analyze APTT, PT (INR), creatinine, egfr. Tablet intake <3 hours, possibly refrain, evaluate risk-benefit with thrombolysis. Refrain from other anticoagulants. Note! There are no studies supporting thrombolysis during ongoing dabigatran treatment. 33 Electric cardioversion Can be carried out after 3 weeks of continuous dabigatran 150 mg x 2 or 110 mg x 2. Continue anticoagulant therapy for at least 4 weeks after electric cardioversion. 19.

20 20.

21 7. Neurology/Stroke/Cerebral haemorrhage Clinical situation Recommendation 34 Embolic ischaemic stroke Acute APTT and PT (INR) tests to determine if treatment is ongoing and grade anticoagulation effect. 35 Thrombolysis in acute ischaemic stroke Scientific data are lacking. 1. Medical history 2. Check PT (INR), APTT, creatinine 3. When did the patient last take dabigatran? Consider thrombolysis if dabigatran values are normal and the benefit outweighs the risk. Note! There are no studies supporting thrombolysis during ongoing dabigatran treatment. Thrombolysis is discouraged if APTT is prolonged or tablet intake was within 3 4 hours (Table 2). Note! Consider catheter intervention if available. 36 Cerebral haemorrhage 1. Check PT (INR), APTT, creatinine. 2. Discontinue dabigatran and reverse and monitor the anti-coagulant effect see page Contact the coagulation consultant on call. 4. NovoSeven: If not available, consider PCC (Panel 2) (see page 7, Antidote). 21.

22 22.

23 8. Bleeding/risk of bleeding Clinical situation Recommendation 37 Acute gastrointestinal bleeding 1. Discontinue dabigatran until the source of bleeding is identified and remedied. 2. Next: Decide whether to continue with dabigatran or an alternative treatment. 3. If resumed, consider dabigatran 110 mg x Minor bleeding from sites at which mechanical haemostasis is easy, e.g. minor nose bleed (stops within minutes when pressure is applied), wound, or single occasion of blood in the urine (should, however, be investigated) 39 Investigation of anaemia caused by bleeding, blood in the stool, vaginal bleeding, bleeding from urinary tract or hemoptysis 1. Discontinue dabigatran for 1 2 doses. 2. Creatinine, APTT, PT (INR), egfr see page Restart if the bleeding stops. 1. Discontinue dabigatran until the cause of bleeding is determined and, if necessary, remedied. The latter is a priority. 2. Alternatively, change to the lowest dose or to an anticoagulant for which there is more experience. 40 Anaemia not caused by bleeding or of unknown cause 1. Discontinue dabigatran until the cause of the anaemia is determined. 2. Alternatively, change to the lowest dose or to an anticoagulant for which there is more experience. Anaemia is a general risk factor for bleeding complications during anticoagulation treatment. Re-evaluate the indication for continued dabigatran treatment and use the lowest dose. 41 Heavy menstrual bleeding 1. Ask the patient to buy tranexamic acid at the pharmacy. 2. Make sure that contraceptives are optimal. 42 Severe trauma to the head or major muscle group with the risk of compartment syndrome, thoracic or abdominal 1. Tell the patient to seek emergency care. 2. Discontinue dabigatran for 1 2 doses. In patients with reduced renal function (egfr ml/min), discontinue dabigatran for 2 3 doses. 3. Keep the patient for prolonged observation, 24 hours; consider CT scan. 4. Check PT (INR), APTT, creatinine. 23.

24 24.

25 9. Immobilized patients/cancer patients Clinical situation Recommendation 43 Immobilized patients in hospital ward 1. Maintain dabigatran. Discontinue dabigatran in case of bleeding risk. 2. Monitor renal function. 44 Cancer patients (i.e. if the patient gets cancer) 1. Maintain dabigatran. 2. Monitor renal function. 3. Assess chemotherapy in relation to the anticoagulation treatment, possibly reducing dabigatran dose. 25.

26 26.

27 10. Switching between different anticoagulants Clinical situation 45 When to switch from one anticoagulant to another? Recommendation After an ischaemic stroke during warfarin treatment in therapeutic INR, consider switching to dabigatran if renal function is normal. After an ischaemic stroke during dabigatran treatment, consider adjusting the dose or switching to another anticoagulant. Dabigatran may be an alternative after an intracerebral bleeding during warfarin treatment and when continued anti-coagulant treatment is strongly indicated. Dabigatran may be an alternative when continued anticoagulant treatment is strongly indicated and PT (INR) fluctuates strongly (in spite of controls at an anti-coagulation clinic and good compliance). For patients with a high risk of bleeding, consider dabigatran 110 mg x Switching to and from warfarin 1. When switching from dabigatran to warfarin egfr >50 ml/min: Initiate warfarin therapy in the usual way for 2 3 days before stopping dabigatran treatment. egfr ml/min: Initiate warfarin therapy for 1 day before stopping dabigatran treatment. egfr ml/min: Initiate warfarin therapy for 1 day after stopping dabigatran treatment. egfr <15 ml/min: dabigatran is contraindicated due to risk of bleeding. Contact coagulation expertise. 2. When switching from warfarin to dabigatran Discontinue warfarin treatment and initiate dabigatran when PT (INR) is below Switching to and from heparin/lmwh 1. When switching from dabigatran to heparin/lmwh egfr >30: wait for 12 hours before initiating heparin/ LMWH therapy. egfr <30: wait for 24 hours before initiating heparin/ LMWH therapy. 2. When switching from heparin/lmwh to dabigatran Give the first dabigatran dose 0 2 hours before the next planned dose of LMWH or 0 2 hours after heparin infusion is completed. 27.

28 28.

29 11. Intoxications/Overdose/Interactions Clinical situation Recommendation 48 Accidental overdose (double or triple dose by mistake) 1. Discontinue dabigatran for one or two doses. 2. For patients with reduced liver function (egfr ml/min), stop dabigatran for two or three doses. 49 Intoxication 1. Hospital case. 2. Level of care; intensive care or emergency department. 3. Blood typing. 4. Check PT (INR), APTT, creatinine, egfr and blood count. 5. Contact the coagulation consultant on call. 6. Activated charcoal if drug intake <2 hours For significantly prolonged values for APTT and PT (INR) with symptoms of bleeding, start by reversing with PCC (Panel 2) and follow the clinical course for the first 4 10 days, depending on renal function. For significantly prolonged values for APTT and PT (INR) without symptoms of bleeding, start with active surveillance and follow the clinical course the first 4 10 days, depending on renal function. Make regular measurements of APTT and PT (INR). Hemodialysis may be one possibility. Optimize blood pressure and other hemostasis parameters. Activated charcoal within 2 hours after drug intake may be one possibility. 50 Interactions with other drugs, including painkillers 1. Avoid combination with long-term NSAID treatment (short treatment courses are not a problem). Check renal function if this combination is used. 2. Avoid combination with rifampicin. Check renal function if this combination is used. 3. Avoid combination with other antithrombotic drugs like LMWH, heparin, thrombolytic drugs, warfarin. 4. Dose reduction may be needed with the following combinations: verapamil, clarithromycin. Check renal function if these combinations are used. 5. Verapamil: adjust dose to 110 mg x 2. For amiodarone, do not adjust dose for the atrial fibrillation indication. Dronedarone: too little data; concomitant use is not recommended at present. 4. Avoid natural remedies containing St. John s wort. 29.

30 51 Interactions with food and alcohol l. No known interactions with food or alcohol have as yet been reported. 2. Patients are encouraged to live life as usual, with a balanced diet and moderate alcohol intake. 30.

31 12. Follow-up/Compliance Clinical situation Recommendation 52 Compliance 1. Capsules should be taken twice daily, at approximately the same time in the morning and evening. 2. Capsules should not be chewed, crushed or opened, and should be stored in the original package (not in dosette boxes/pill organizers) as the capsule is moisture-sensitive. 53 Missed dabigatran capsule If a dose is missed 1. The missed dose may still be taken up to 6 hours prior to the next scheduled dose. 2. Skip the missed dose if there is less than six hours to the next scheduled dose. 54 Patient information 1. A patient information leaflet can be ordered from Boehringer-Ingelheim. 2. Give verbal information to all patients starting on dabigatran. 3. This should include the purpose of treatment, risks/ benefits, bleeding/clotting, what to do in the case of bleeding, side effects (GI symptoms), painkillers, diet, alcohol, surgery, minor surgery, follow-up, kidney function, fertile women, pregnancy and what to do if a dose is missed. For GI symptoms related to dabigatran, intake with food and a large glas of water is recommended. Conveying this information is estimated to take approx minutes. 55 Information card 1. Provide a card with information about dabigatran and hand it to the patient. 2. Tell patients to always carry the card with them. 31.

32 56 Follow-up 1. Follow-up in quality registers. 2. Reconsider the indication for dabigatran once yearly and consider changing dose. 3. Follow egfr every 3, 6 or 12 months depending on the baseline value. 4. Register complications yearly. Note! Do not forget to report any adverse events to the Medical Products Agency. 57 Effects of new anticoagulants on common coagulation assays A Swedish expert group on coagulation, Equalis, has investigated the effects of dabigatran on common coagulation assays in vitro. All coagulation analyses based on thrombine binding are probably affected, rendering thrombosis investigations in dabigatran-treated patients inappropriate. Effects of dabigatran see page 35. The expected trough is 50 μg/l, peak μg/l. APTT was prolonged for all reagents used in Sweden already at 100 μg/l. The effects of dabigatran on PT (INR) are small, with almost all results within the reference range at 100 μg/l. For a dabigatran-treated patient with APTT >90 seconds and Owren PT (INR) >1.5 or Quick-PT INR >2, consider overdosing and/or accumulation of dabigatran. 58 Tests to be taken before starting dabigatran (Pradaxa ) Haemoglobin, thrombocytes, APTT, PT (INR), s-creatinine or cystatin C and estimation of egfr see page 33 and liver function tests. 32.

33 13. Renal insufficency and calculation egfr Panel 1. Calculating egfr To correctly assess a patient s renal function and establish correct dosing of a renally excreted drug or contrast agent, the patient s glomerular filtration rate (GFR) must be established. This can be done by invasive procedures, such as measuring plasma clearance of inulin, iohexol or 51Cr-EDTA. Such procedures are, however, expensive, time-consuming and not entirely without risk to the patient. Therefore, GFR prediction equations have been designed based on cystatin C and/or creatinine levels in plasma or serum. If the egfr i lowered, calculation of the absolute glomerular filtration may be necessary to establish the correct dosing of the drug. Refer to Table 1. Dabigatran in connection with surgery and other invasive procedures egfr < >80 Op day ml/h Stopping > 5 days 4 days 2 days 2 days 0 Restarting dabigatran dabigatran 3rd day Major 150 mg x 2 surgery 110 mg x 2 LMWH 6 hours after o Stopping >5 days 2 days 1 days 1 days 0 Restarting day dabigatran dabigatran after op with Minor previous dose surgery LMWH Not needed LMWH may be an alternative for patients considered to suffer a major post-operative risk for venous thrombosis until dabigatran can be restarted, i.e. on the third day according to Table 1. Use the LMWH prophylactic dose. 33.

34 34.

35 14. APTT/PT(INR) Table 2. Dabigatran and acquired effects on APTT and PT (INR) at different concentrations of dabigatran Dabigatran (μg/l) Normal level APTT s 45 (40-54) 63 (55-71) INR In Sweden, APTT may be considered to have a normal value of 42 seconds. PT (INR) has a normal value of Therapeutic levels of dabigatran; trough 50 µg/l and peak µg/l (therapeutic dose). Table 2 illustrates how APTT and PT (INR) (Owren method) change at different concentrations of dabigatran. Only consider these values in acute situations to indicate the drug concentration. At normal APTT levels, low concentrations of dabigatran may be present in plasma (< 50ug/L). (In vitro data, ref. 1.) 35.

36 36.

37 15. Handling major bleeding Panel 2. Major or life-threatening bleeding associated with dabigatran A. Trauma or need for acute surgery within 1 2 hours or other major bleeding, e.g. GI bleeding. 1. Check APTT, PT (INR) and creatinine and assess the patient s renal function (egfr) other tests according to local routines - If APTT and PT (INR) are normal, the concentration of dabigatran is low and there is no need for any specific measure with factor concentrates - If the dabigatran dose was taken within 3 4 hours, APTT and PT (INR) may be normal in spite of the effect of the drug. Prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) may therefore be relevant in this situation. - If APTT is prolonged and PT (INR) is elevated, the concentration of dabigatran can be estimated according to page If you cannot wait for APTT and PT (INR) and reversing is necessary, go directly to paragraph 2 below. 2. Prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) Octaplex /Ocplex or Confidex (see page 7, Antidote) - <15 hours after the last dabigatran dose, give 1000 IU Octaplex /Ocplex or Confidex hours after the last dabigatran dose, give 500 IU Octaplex /Ocplex or Confidex - Retest minutes after injection. Additional Octaplex /Ocplex or Confidex may be appropriate depending on clinical response and laboratory analysis. B. Cerebral hemorrhage (Note! Especially important with minor bleeding and a conscious patient) 1. Check APTT, PT (INR) and creatinine and assess the patient s renal function (egfr) other tests according to local routines - If APTT and PT (INR) are normal, the concentration of dabigatran is low and there is no need for any specific measure with factor concentrates. - If the dabigatran dose was taken within 3 4 hours, APTT and PT (INR) may be normal in spite of the effect of the drug. Recombinant factor VIIa may therefore be relevant in this situation. - If APTT is prolonged and PT (INR) is elevated, the concentration of dabigatran can be estimated according to page If you cannot wait for APTT and PT (INR) (i.e. great likelihood of CNS hemorrhage) and reversing is necessary, go directly to paragraph 2 if dabigatran intake <15 hours. 2. Recombinant factor VIIa (rviia) NovoSeven (see page 7, Antidote) - <15 hours after the last dabigatran dose, give NovoSeven 100 μg/kg (round up to an appropriate packaging) hours after the last dabigatran dose, give NovoSeven 50 μg/kg (round up to an appropriate packaging) - Retest minutes after injection. Additional NovoSeven may be appropriate depending on clinical response and laboratory analysis. - NovoSeven is available in 1 mg, 2 mg, 5 mg and 8 mg vials. - Example: a patient weighing 80 kg should have 8 mg NovoSeven if <15 hours after the last dabigatran dose. 37.

Dabigatran: Amber Drug Guidance for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular AF

Dabigatran: Amber Drug Guidance for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular AF Leeds Dabigatran: Amber Drug Guidance for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular AF Amber Drug Level 3 (amber drug with monitoring requirements) We have started your

More information

Session 3 Topics. Argatroban. Argatroban. Drug Use and Adverse Effects. Laboratory Monitoring of Anticoagulant Therapy

Session 3 Topics. Argatroban. Argatroban. Drug Use and Adverse Effects. Laboratory Monitoring of Anticoagulant Therapy ~~Marshfield Labs Presents~~ Laboratory Monitoring of Anticoagulant Therapy Session 3 of 4 Michael J. Sanfelippo, M.S. Technical Director, Coagulation Services Session 3 Topics Direct Thrombin Inhibitors:

More information

Recommendations on Use of Dabigatran in Atrial Fibrillation

Recommendations on Use of Dabigatran in Atrial Fibrillation Recommendations on Use of Dabigatran in Atrial Fibrillation Developed by participants from the Section of Hematology/Oncology and Section of Cardiology, and Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Manitoba

More information

Dabigatran (Pradaxa) Guidelines

Dabigatran (Pradaxa) Guidelines Dabigatran (Pradaxa) Guidelines Dabigatran is a new anticoagulant for reducing the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. Dabigatran is a direct thrombin inhibitor, similar to warfarin, without

More information

Comparison between New Oral Anticoagulants and Warfarin

Comparison between New Oral Anticoagulants and Warfarin Comparison between New Oral Anticoagulants and Warfarin Warfarin was the mainstay of oral anticoagulant therapy until the recent discovery of more precise targets for therapy. In recent years, several

More information

Prescriber Guide. 20mg. 15mg. Simply Protecting More Patients. Simply Protecting More Patients

Prescriber Guide. 20mg. 15mg. Simply Protecting More Patients. Simply Protecting More Patients Prescriber Guide 20mg Simply Protecting More Patients 15mg Simply Protecting More Patients 1 Dear Doctor, This prescriber guide was produced by Bayer Israel in cooperation with the Ministry of Health as

More information

COMPARISON OF NEW ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS AND FREQUENTLY- ASKED QUESTIONS FROM PATIENTS. TARGET AUDIENCE: All Canadian health care professionals.

COMPARISON OF NEW ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS AND FREQUENTLY- ASKED QUESTIONS FROM PATIENTS. TARGET AUDIENCE: All Canadian health care professionals. COMPARISON OF NEW ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS AND FREQUENTLY- ASKED QUESTIONS FROM PATIENTS AND PHYSICIANS TARGET AUDIENCE: All Canadian health care professionals. OBJECTIVES: To provide a comparison of the new

More information

STARTING, SWITCHING OR STOPPING NEW ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS: A Practical Approach

STARTING, SWITCHING OR STOPPING NEW ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS: A Practical Approach STARTING, SWITCHING OR STOPPING NEW ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS: A Practical Approach Jeffrey I Weitz, MD, FRCP(C), FACP Professor of Medicine and Biochemistry McMaster University Canada Research Chair in Thrombosis

More information

USE AND INTERPRETATION OF LABORATORY COAGULATION TESTS IN PATIENTS WHO ARE RECEIVING A NEW ORAL ANTICOAGULANT (DABIGATRAN, RIVAROXABAN, APIXABAN)

USE AND INTERPRETATION OF LABORATORY COAGULATION TESTS IN PATIENTS WHO ARE RECEIVING A NEW ORAL ANTICOAGULANT (DABIGATRAN, RIVAROXABAN, APIXABAN) USE AND INTERPRETATION OF LABORATORY COAGULATION TESTS IN PATIENTS WHO ARE RECEIVING A NEW ORAL ANTICOAGULANT (DABIGATRAN, RIVAROXABAN, APIXABAN) TARGET AUDIENCE: All Canadian health care professionals:

More information

NHS FORTH VALLEY Rivaroxaban for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation

NHS FORTH VALLEY Rivaroxaban for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation NHS FORTH VALLEY Rivaroxaban for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation Date of First Issue 06/06/2012 Approved 06/06/2012 Current Issue Date 29/10/2014 Review Date 29/10/2016 Version 1.4 EQIA Yes 01/06/2012

More information

Cardiac Diseases and Therapies ATRIAL FIBRILLATION DABIGATRAN CLINICIAN SUMMARY

Cardiac Diseases and Therapies ATRIAL FIBRILLATION DABIGATRAN CLINICIAN SUMMARY Mechanism of Action: Direct Thrombin Inhibitor BACKGROUND Dabigatran is a direct thrombin inhibitor (DTI) that is administered orally. It inhibits both free and clot-bound thrombin. It is currently indicated

More information

Dabigatran (Pradaxa) for stroke prevention in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (da-big-a-tran)

Dabigatran (Pradaxa) for stroke prevention in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (da-big-a-tran) Dabigatran (Pradaxa) 1 Dabigatran (Pradaxa) for stroke prevention in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (da-big-a-tran) Similar rate of major bleeding to warfarin KEY POINTS Dabigatran is an

More information

DVT/PE Management with Rivaroxaban (Xarelto)

DVT/PE Management with Rivaroxaban (Xarelto) DVT/PE Management with Rivaroxaban (Xarelto) Rivaroxaban is FDA approved for the acute treatment of DVT and PE and reduction in risk of recurrence of DVT and PE. FDA approved indications: Non valvular

More information

Three new/novel oral anticoagulants (NOAC) have been licensed in Ireland since 2008:

Three new/novel oral anticoagulants (NOAC) have been licensed in Ireland since 2008: Key Points to consider when prescribing NOACs Introduction Three new/novel oral anticoagulants (NOAC) have been licensed in Ireland since 2008: Dabigatran Etexilate (Pradaxa ) 75mg, 110mg, 150mg. Rivaroxaban

More information

Rivaroxaban (Xarelto ) by

Rivaroxaban (Xarelto ) by Essentia Health Med Moment Short Video Tune-Up A brief overview of a new medication, or important new medication information Rivaroxaban (Xarelto ) by Richard Mullvain RPH BCPS (AQC) Current - August 2011

More information

New Oral Anticoagulants. How safe are they outside the trials?

New Oral Anticoagulants. How safe are they outside the trials? New Oral Anticoagulants How safe are they outside the trials? Objectives The need for anticoagulant therapy Indications for anticoagulation Traditional anticoagulant therapies Properties of new oral anticoagulants

More information

DABIGATRAN ETEXILATE TARGET Vitamin K epoxide reductase WARFARIN RIVAROXABAN APIXABAN

DABIGATRAN ETEXILATE TARGET Vitamin K epoxide reductase WARFARIN RIVAROXABAN APIXABAN TARGET SPECIFIC ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS (TSOACs) This document is intended as a guideline only and should not replace sound clinical judgment Please refer to UNMH formulary in Lexicomp for approved use(s)

More information

East Kent Prescribing Group

East Kent Prescribing Group East Kent Prescribing Group Rivaroxaban (Xarelto ) Safety Information Approved by the East Kent Prescribing Group. Approved by: East Kent Prescribing Group (Representing Ashford CCG, Canterbury and Coastal

More information

Guideline for managing patients on Dabigatran (Pradaxa ) Statewide

Guideline for managing patients on Dabigatran (Pradaxa ) Statewide Guideline for managing patients on Dabigatran (Pradaxa ) Statewide Custodian: Medication Safety, Medicines Regulation and Quality medicationsafety@health.qld.gov.au Developed by Medication Safety, Medicines

More information

NEWER ANTICOAGULANTS: FOCUS ON STROKE PREVENTION IN ATRIAL FIBRILLATION AND DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS/PULMONARY EMBOLISM

NEWER ANTICOAGULANTS: FOCUS ON STROKE PREVENTION IN ATRIAL FIBRILLATION AND DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS/PULMONARY EMBOLISM NEWER ANTICOAGULANTS: FOCUS ON STROKE PREVENTION IN ATRIAL FIBRILLATION AND DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS/PULMONARY EMBOLISM Carol Lee, Pharm.D., Jessica C. Song, M.A., Pharm.D. INTRODUCTION For many years, warfarin

More information

NHS FORTH VALLEY Rivaroxaban for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation

NHS FORTH VALLEY Rivaroxaban for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation NHS FORTH VALLEY Rivaroxaban for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation Date of First Issue 06/06/2012 Approved 06/06/2012 Current Issue Date 06/06/2012 Review Date 06/06/2014 Version 1.1 EQIA Yes /

More information

NORTH WEST LONDON GUIDANCE ANTITHROMBOTIC MANAGEMENT OF ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

NORTH WEST LONDON GUIDANCE ANTITHROMBOTIC MANAGEMENT OF ATRIAL FIBRILLATION North West London CardioVascular & Stroke Network NORTH WEST LONDON GUIDANCE ON ANTITHROMBOTIC MANAGEMENT OF ATRIAL FIBRILLATION Key Messages 1. Efforts should be made to identify patients with Atrial

More information

Rivaroxaban: Amber Drug Guidance for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular AF

Rivaroxaban: Amber Drug Guidance for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular AF Leeds Rivaroxaban: Amber Drug Guidance for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular AF Amber Drug Level 3 (amber drug with monitoring requirements) We have started your

More information

The Role of the Newer Anticoagulants

The Role of the Newer Anticoagulants The Role of the Newer Anticoagulants WARFARIN = Coumadin DAGIBATRAN = Pradaxa RIVAROXABAN = Xarelto APIXABAN = Eliquis INDICATION DABIGATRAN (Pradaxa) RIVAROXABAN (Xarelto) APIXABAN (Eliquis) Stroke prevention

More information

Oral Anticoagulants: What s New?

Oral Anticoagulants: What s New? Oral Anticoagulants: What s New? Sallie Young, Pharm.D., BCPS (AQ-Cardiology) Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Cardiology Penn State Hershey Medical Center syoung1@hmc.psu.edu August 2012 Oral Anticoagulant

More information

Speaker Disclosure. Outline. Pharmacist Objectives. Patient Case. Outline 9/4/2014

Speaker Disclosure. Outline. Pharmacist Objectives. Patient Case. Outline 9/4/2014 Speaker Disclosure Matthew K. Pitlick, Pharm.D., BCPS St. Louis College of Pharmacy/VA St. Louis HCS mpitlick@stlcop.edu Matthew K. Pitlick, Pharm.D., BCPS declares no conflicts of interest, real or apparent,

More information

Novel Anticoagulation Agents DISCLOSURES. Objectives ATRIAL FIBRILLATION TRIALS. NOAC Comparison 6/12/2015

Novel Anticoagulation Agents DISCLOSURES. Objectives ATRIAL FIBRILLATION TRIALS. NOAC Comparison 6/12/2015 Novel Anticoagulation Agents DISCLOSURES James W. Haynes, MD Department of Family Medicine Univ of TN Health Science Center (Chattanooga) Objectives Understand mechanism of action behind the NOAC agents

More information

The author has no disclosures

The author has no disclosures Mary Bradbury, PharmD, BCPS Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Cardiac Surgery September 18, 2012 Mary.bradbury@inova.org This presentation will discuss unlabeled and investigational use of products The author

More information

Primary prevention of venous thromboembolic events in adult patients who have undergone elective total hip or knee replacement surgery.

Primary prevention of venous thromboembolic events in adult patients who have undergone elective total hip or knee replacement surgery. PRADAXA (DABIGATRAN ETEXILATE) PRESCRIBER GUIDE FOR PRIMARY PREVENTION OF VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLIC EVENTS (VTE) FOLLOWING ELECTIVE TOTAL HIP OR KNEE REPLACEMENT SURGERY This guide provides recommendations

More information

Xarelto (Rivaroxaban)

Xarelto (Rivaroxaban) Xarelto (Rivaroxaban) Hightly selective, reversible, direct oral FXa inhibitor Maxium concentratiion after 2 to 4 hrs High bioavailability(66%),increase with food ( suggest with food) 1/3 from renal excretion,

More information

5/21/2012. Perioperative Use Issues. On admission: During hospitalization:

5/21/2012. Perioperative Use Issues. On admission: During hospitalization: Dabigatran and Rivaroxaban: Challenges in the Perioperative Setting Claudia Swenson, Pharm.D., CDE, BC-ADM, FASHP Central Washington Hospital Wenatchee, WA claudia.swenson@cwhs.com Dabigatran and Rivaroxaban:

More information

Appendix C Factors to consider when choosing between anticoagulant options and FAQs

Appendix C Factors to consider when choosing between anticoagulant options and FAQs Appendix C Factors to consider when choosing between anticoagulant options and FAQs Choice of anticoagulant for non-valvular* atrial fibrillation: Clinical decision aid Patients should already be screened

More information

NWMIC Medicines FAQ. New oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and management of dental patients - Dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban.

NWMIC Medicines FAQ. New oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and management of dental patients - Dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban. NWMIC Medicines FAQ New oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and management of dental patients - Date prepared: May 2013, updated November 2013 Summary In primary care; Consider liaising with the local hospital

More information

Impact of new (direct) oral anticoagulants in patient blood management

Impact of new (direct) oral anticoagulants in patient blood management Impact of new (direct) oral anticoagulants in patient blood management Yulia Lin, MD, FRCPC, CTBS Transfusion Medicine & Hematology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre Dept of Laboratory Medicine & Pathobiology,

More information

Antiplatelet and Antithrombotic Therapy. Dr Curry Grant Stroke Prevention Clinic Quinte Health Care

Antiplatelet and Antithrombotic Therapy. Dr Curry Grant Stroke Prevention Clinic Quinte Health Care Antiplatelet and Antithrombotic Therapy Dr Curry Grant Stroke Prevention Clinic Quinte Health Care Disclosure of Potential for Conflict of Interest Dr. F.C. Grant Atrial Fibrillation FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE:

More information

Experience matters: Practical management in your hospital

Experience matters: Practical management in your hospital Experience matters: Practical management in your hospital Dr AGG Turpie McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada Disclosures AGG Turpie has acted as a consultant for Bayer HealthCare, Janssen, Sanofi-Aventis,

More information

NHS FORTH VALLEY RIVAROXABAN AS TREATMENT FOR DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS AND PULMONARY EMBOLISM IN ADULTS

NHS FORTH VALLEY RIVAROXABAN AS TREATMENT FOR DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS AND PULMONARY EMBOLISM IN ADULTS NHS FORTH VALLEY RIVAROXABAN AS TREATMENT FOR DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS AND PULMONARY EMBOLISM IN ADULTS Date of First Issue 01/12/ 2012 Approved 15/11/2012 Current Issue Date 29/10/2014 Review Date 29/10/2016

More information

Practical guide dabigatran Guidance for use in particular situations

Practical guide dabigatran Guidance for use in particular situations Practical guide dabigatran Guidance for use in particular situations Writing Committee Prof. Dr. Hein Heidbüchel, Universitaire Ziekenhuizen, Leuven. Prof. Dr. Vincent Thijs, Universitaire Ziekenhuizen,

More information

Devang M. Desai, MD, FACC, FSCAI Chief of Interventional Cardiology Director of Cardiac Catheterization Lab St. Mary s Hospital and Regional Medical

Devang M. Desai, MD, FACC, FSCAI Chief of Interventional Cardiology Director of Cardiac Catheterization Lab St. Mary s Hospital and Regional Medical Devang M. Desai, MD, FACC, FSCAI Chief of Interventional Cardiology Director of Cardiac Catheterization Lab St. Mary s Hospital and Regional Medical Center A.Fib affects 2.2 million Americans. The lifetime

More information

New oral anticoagulants and antiplatelets: Where do they fit? Meredith Hollinger, PharmD BCPS

New oral anticoagulants and antiplatelets: Where do they fit? Meredith Hollinger, PharmD BCPS New oral anticoagulants and antiplatelets: Where do they fit? Meredith Hollinger, PharmD BCPS Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Cardiology September 2012 Objectives Describe the mechanisms of action for novel

More information

More information for patients and caregivers can be accessed at http://www.xarelto-us.com/.

More information for patients and caregivers can be accessed at http://www.xarelto-us.com/. Janssen Research & Development Submits Application to U.S. FDA for XARELTO (rivaroxaban) to Reduce Secondary Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome RARITAN, DECEMBER 29, 2011 -

More information

HERTFORDSHIRE MEDICINES MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE (HMMC) RIVAROXABAN RECOMMENDED see specific recommendations for licensed indications below

HERTFORDSHIRE MEDICINES MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE (HMMC) RIVAROXABAN RECOMMENDED see specific recommendations for licensed indications below Name: generic (trade) Rivaroxaban (Xarelto ) HERTFORDSHIRE MEDICINES MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE (HMMC) RIVAROXABAN RECOMMENDED see specific recommendations for licensed indications below What it is Indications

More information

Dr Gordon Royle Haematologist, Middlemore Hospital

Dr Gordon Royle Haematologist, Middlemore Hospital The New Oral Anticoagulants (NOACs) Dr Gordon Royle Haematologist, Middlemore Hospital Disclaimers Boehringer-Ingelheim Bayer Sanofi Douglas Pharmaceuticals Preventing disasters: lessons learned A cautionary

More information

Practical guide to Pradaxa in NVAF

Practical guide to Pradaxa in NVAF Practical guide to Pradaxa in NVAF Pradaxa (dabigatran etexilate) is indicated for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) and at least one

More information

1/12/2016. What s in a name? What s in a name? NO.Anti-Coagulation. DOACs in clinical practice. Practical aspects of using

1/12/2016. What s in a name? What s in a name? NO.Anti-Coagulation. DOACs in clinical practice. Practical aspects of using What s in a name? Practical aspects of using DOACs (Direct Oral Anticoagulants) James L. Sebastian, MD, MACP Professor of Medicine (GIM) Medical College of Wisconsin February 5, 2016 DOAC NOAC NOAC ODI

More information

VOLUME No: 21 04 written by Sara Wilds & Kathryn Buchanan. Date of issue: June 2012 (updated November 2012 following NICE TA 256)

VOLUME No: 21 04 written by Sara Wilds & Kathryn Buchanan. Date of issue: June 2012 (updated November 2012 following NICE TA 256) Prescribing Points A NEWSLETTER FOR ALL HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS IN OXFORDSHIRE, WRITTEN BY THE MEDICINES MANAGEMENT TEAM, OXFORDSHIRE PCT, JUBILEE HOUSE, OXFORD BUSINESS PARK SOUTH, OXFORD, OX4 2LH.

More information

Anticoagulation Dosing at UCDMC Indication Agent Standard Dose Comments and Dose Adjustments VTE Prophylaxis All Services UFH 5,000 units SC q 8 h

Anticoagulation Dosing at UCDMC Indication Agent Standard Dose Comments and Dose Adjustments VTE Prophylaxis All Services UFH 5,000 units SC q 8 h Indication Agent Standard Dose Comments and Dose Adjustments VTE Prophylaxis All Services UFH 5,000 units SC q 8 h See EMR adult VTE prophylaxis CI order set Enoxaparin See service specific dosing Assess

More information

TA 256: Rivaroxaban for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in people with atrial fibrillation

TA 256: Rivaroxaban for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in people with atrial fibrillation Service Notification in response to DHSSPS endorsed NICE Technology Appraisals TA 256: Rivaroxaban for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in people with atrial fibrillation 1 Name of Commissioning

More information

Clinical guide to managing patients treated with Pradaxa

Clinical guide to managing patients treated with Pradaxa Clinical guide to managing patients treated with Pradaxa Updated August 2013 Treatment with Pradaxa (dabigatran etexilate) requires no routine laboratory monitoring. 1 Routine coagulation tests (aptt,

More information

The New Anticoagulants are Here! Do you know how to use them? Arrhythmia Winter School February 11 th, 2012. Jeff Healey

The New Anticoagulants are Here! Do you know how to use them? Arrhythmia Winter School February 11 th, 2012. Jeff Healey The New Anticoagulants are Here! Do you know how to use them? Arrhythmia Winter School February 11 th, 2012 Jeff Healey RELY: A New Era in AF Connolly SJ et al. N Engl J Med 2009;361:1139-1151 ROCKET-AF:

More information

Dr Gordon Royle Haematologist, Middlemore Hospital

Dr Gordon Royle Haematologist, Middlemore Hospital The New Oral Anticoagulants (NOACs) Dr Gordon Royle Haematologist, Middlemore Hospital Disclaimers Boehringer-Ingelheim Bayer Sanofi Douglas Pharmaceuticals Preventing disasters: lessons learned A cautionary

More information

New oral anticoagulants. Surveillance and follow-up Laurent Fauchier

New oral anticoagulants. Surveillance and follow-up Laurent Fauchier New oral anticoagulants. Surveillance and follow-up Laurent Fauchier Pole Coeur Thorax Vaisseaux Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Trousseau, Tours Disclosures Laurent Fauchier: Lecture fees: Travel grants:

More information

2.5mg SC daily. INR target 2-3 30 mg SC q 12 hr or 40mg daily. 10 mg PO q day (CrCl 30 ml/min). Avoid if < 30 ml/min. 2.

2.5mg SC daily. INR target 2-3 30 mg SC q 12 hr or 40mg daily. 10 mg PO q day (CrCl 30 ml/min). Avoid if < 30 ml/min. 2. Anticoagulation dosing at UCDMC (SC=subcutaneously; CI=continuous infusion) Indication Agent Dose Comments Prophylaxis Any or No bleeding risk factors see adult heparin (VTE prophylaxis) IV infusion order

More information

Practical guide dabigatran Guidance for use in particular situations Version 2.0 (January 2013)

Practical guide dabigatran Guidance for use in particular situations Version 2.0 (January 2013) Practical guide dabigatran Guidance for use in particular situations Version 2.0 (January 2013) Writing Committee Prof. Dr. Hein Heidbüchel, Universitaire Ziekenhuizen, Leuven. Prof. Dr. Vincent Thijs,

More information

The management of cerebral hemorrhagic complications during anticoagulant therapy

The management of cerebral hemorrhagic complications during anticoagulant therapy The management of cerebral hemorrhagic complications during anticoagulant therapy Maurizio Paciaroni Stroke Unit Division of Cardiovascular Medicine University of Perugia - Italy Perugia Stroke Registry

More information

Time of Offset of Action The Trial

Time of Offset of Action The Trial New Antithrombotic Agents DISCLOSURE Relevant Financial Relationship(s) Speaker Bureau - None Consultant Amgen Tom DeLoughery, MD FACP FAWM Oregon Health and Sciences University What I am Talking About

More information

Novel oral anticoagulant (NOAC) for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation Special situations

Novel oral anticoagulant (NOAC) for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation Special situations Novel oral anticoagulant (NOAC) for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation Special situations Dardo E. Ferrara MD Cardiac Electrophysiology North Cascade Cardiology PeaceHealth Medical Group Which anticoagulant

More information

Traditional anticoagulants

Traditional anticoagulants TEGH Family Practice Clinic Day April 4, 03 Use of Anticoagulants in 03: What s New (and What Isn t) Bill Geerts, MD, FRCPC Director, Thromboembolism Program, Sunnybrook HSC Professor of Medicine, University

More information

STROKE PREVENTION IN ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

STROKE PREVENTION IN ATRIAL FIBRILLATION STROKE PREVENTION IN ATRIAL FIBRILLATION OBJECTIVE: To guide clinicians in the selection of antithrombotic therapy for the secondary prevention of ischemic stroke and arterial thromboembolism in patients

More information

48 th Annual Meeting. Non-VKA Oral Anticoagulants: Prevention & Treatment of Bleeding. Terminology. Disclosure. Public Health Impact.

48 th Annual Meeting. Non-VKA Oral Anticoagulants: Prevention & Treatment of Bleeding. Terminology. Disclosure. Public Health Impact. 48 th Annual Meeting Terminology Non-VKA Oral Anticoagulants: Prevention & Treatment of Bleeding Stacy A. Voils, PharmD, MS, BCPS Navigating the Oceans of Opportunity Target-specific oral anticoagulants

More information

Low Molecular Weight Heparin. All Wales Medicines Strategy Group (AWMSG) Recommendations and advice

Low Molecular Weight Heparin. All Wales Medicines Strategy Group (AWMSG) Recommendations and advice Low Molecular Weight Heparin All Wales Medicines Strategy Group (AWMSG) Recommendations and advice Starting Point Low Molecular Weight Heparin (LMWH): Inhibits factor Xa and factor IIa (thrombin) Small

More information

New Treatments for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation. John C. Andrefsky, MD, FAHA NEOMED Internal Medicine Review course May 5 th, 2013

New Treatments for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation. John C. Andrefsky, MD, FAHA NEOMED Internal Medicine Review course May 5 th, 2013 New Treatments for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation John C. Andrefsky, MD, FAHA NEOMED Internal Medicine Review course May 5 th, 2013 Classification Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) Last < 7

More information

Analyzing Clinical Trial Findings of the Efficacy and Safety Profiles of Novel Anticoagulants for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation

Analyzing Clinical Trial Findings of the Efficacy and Safety Profiles of Novel Anticoagulants for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation Analyzing Clinical Trial Findings of the Efficacy and Safety Profiles of Novel Anticoagulants for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation Drew Baldwin, MD Virginia Mason Seattle, Washington NCVH May 29,

More information

Guideline for managing patients on a factor Xa inhibitor Apixaban (Eliquis ) or Rivaroxaban (Xarelto )

Guideline for managing patients on a factor Xa inhibitor Apixaban (Eliquis ) or Rivaroxaban (Xarelto ) Guideline [Optional heading here. Change font size to suit] Document Number # QH-GDL-950:2014-2 Guideline for managing patients on a factor Xa inhibitor Apixaban (Eliquis ) or Rivaroxaban (Xarelto ) 1.

More information

Dabigatran SCG for the prevention of stroke and embolism in adult patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation

Dabigatran SCG for the prevention of stroke and embolism in adult patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation South West Essex Dabigatran Shared Care Guideline (SCG) Dabigatran SCG for the prevention of stroke and embolism in adult patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation Introduction Indication and Licensing

More information

New Oral Anticoagulants

New Oral Anticoagulants Disclosures The New Oral Anticoagulants: Are they better than Warfarin? Alan P. Agins, Ph.D. does not have any actual or potential conflicts of interest in relation to this CE activity. Alan Agins, Ph.D.

More information

Committee Approval Date: September 12, 2014 Next Review Date: September 2015

Committee Approval Date: September 12, 2014 Next Review Date: September 2015 Medication Policy Manual Policy No: dru361 Topic: Pradaxa, dabigatran Date of Origin: September 12, 2014 Committee Approval Date: September 12, 2014 Next Review Date: September 2015 Effective Date: November

More information

AHA/ASA Scientific Statement Oral Antithrombotic Agents for the Prevention of Stroke in Atrial Fibrillation

AHA/ASA Scientific Statement Oral Antithrombotic Agents for the Prevention of Stroke in Atrial Fibrillation AHA/ASA Scientific Statement Oral Antithrombotic Agents for the Prevention of Stroke in Atrial Fibrillation A Statement for Healthcare Professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke

More information

PENINSULA NETWORK GUIDANCE ON NOVEL ANTICOAGULANTS FOR STROKE AND TIA MANAGEMENT 1. Aim/Purpose of this Guideline

PENINSULA NETWORK GUIDANCE ON NOVEL ANTICOAGULANTS FOR STROKE AND TIA MANAGEMENT 1. Aim/Purpose of this Guideline PENINSULA NETWORK GUIDANCE ON NOVEL ANTICOAGULANTS FOR STROKE AND TIA MANAGEMENT 1. Aim/Purpose of this Guideline The aim of this document to guide clinicians on use of novel anticoagulants for stroke

More information

Anticoagulant therapy

Anticoagulant therapy Anticoagulation: The risks Anticoagulant therapy 1990 2002: 600 incidents reported 120 resulted in death of patient 92 deaths related to warfarin usage 28 reports related to heparin usage Incidents in

More information

Update on Antiplatelets and anticoagulants. Outlines. Antiplatelets and Anticoagulants 1/23/2013. Timir Paul, MD, PhD

Update on Antiplatelets and anticoagulants. Outlines. Antiplatelets and Anticoagulants 1/23/2013. Timir Paul, MD, PhD Update on Antiplatelets and anticoagulants Timir Paul, MD, PhD Antiplatelets Indications Doses Long term use (beyond 12 months) ASA and combination use of NSAIDS ASA resistance Plavix resistance Plavix

More information

New Anticoagulants: When and Why Should I Use Them? Disclosures

New Anticoagulants: When and Why Should I Use Them? Disclosures Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University New Anticoagulants: When and Why Should I Use Them? Christine L. Kempton, MD, MSc Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Hematology and Medical Oncology Hemophilia

More information

FDA Approved Oral Anticoagulants

FDA Approved Oral Anticoagulants FDA Approved Oral Anticoagulants Generic (Trade Name) Warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven ) 1 FDA approved indication Prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) Prophylaxis and treatment of thromboembolic

More information

Birmingham, Sandwell and Solihull Cardiac and Stroke Network. Rivaroxaban or warfarin for treatment of Atrial Fibrillation: Position statement

Birmingham, Sandwell and Solihull Cardiac and Stroke Network. Rivaroxaban or warfarin for treatment of Atrial Fibrillation: Position statement Birmingham, Sandwell and Solihull Cardiac and Stroke Network Rivaroxaban or warfarin for treatment of Atrial Fibrillation: Position statement Introduction This guidance informs prescribers and commissioners

More information

PERI-OPERATIVE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WHO ARE RECEIVING A NEW ORAL ANTICOAGULANT (DABIGATRAN, RIVAROXABAN,

PERI-OPERATIVE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WHO ARE RECEIVING A NEW ORAL ANTICOAGULANT (DABIGATRAN, RIVAROXABAN, PERI-OPERATIVE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WHO ARE RECEIVING A NEW ORAL ANTICOAGULANT (DABIGATRAN, RIVAROXABAN, APIXABAN) TARGET AUDIENCE: All Canadian health care professionals, including primary care physicians,

More information

New Oral Anticoagulants Increase Risk for Gastrointestinal Bleeding - A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

New Oral Anticoagulants Increase Risk for Gastrointestinal Bleeding - A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis New Oral Anticoagulants Increase Risk for Gastrointestinal Bleeding - A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Holster IL, Valkhoff VE, Kuipers EJ, Tjwa ET Departments of Gastroenterology and Hepatology,

More information

New anticoagulants: Monitoring or not Monitoring? Not Monitoring

New anticoagulants: Monitoring or not Monitoring? Not Monitoring The 2 nd World Congress on CONTROVERSIES IN HEMATOLOGY (COHEM) Barcelona, Spain September 6 8, 2012 New anticoagulants: Monitoring or not Monitoring? Not Monitoring Anna Falanga, MD Immunohematology and

More information

Dorset Cardiac Centre

Dorset Cardiac Centre P a g e 1 Dorset Cardiac Centre Patients with Atrial Fibrillation/Flutter undergoing DC Cardioversion or Ablation procedures- Guidelines for Novel Oral Anti-coagulants (NOACS) licensed for this use February

More information

LAMC Reversal Agent Guideline for Anticoagulants 2013. Time to resolution of hemostasis (hrs) Therapeutic Options

LAMC Reversal Agent Guideline for Anticoagulants 2013. Time to resolution of hemostasis (hrs) Therapeutic Options LAMC Reversal Agent Guideline for Anticoagulants 2013 Medication resolution of hemostasis (hrs) Intervention Administration Instructions Heparin 3-4 Protamine 1mg IV for every 100 units of heparin Slow

More information

Dorset Medicines Advisory Group

Dorset Medicines Advisory Group Shared Care Guideline for prescribing rivaroxaban in the prevention of adverse outcomes after acute management of acute coronary syndrome in adults INDICATION In accordance with NICE TA335 rivaroxaban

More information

Management of bleeding in emergency situations for patients treated with Pradaxa (dabigatran etexilate)

Management of bleeding in emergency situations for patients treated with Pradaxa (dabigatran etexilate) Management of bleeding in emergency situations for patients treated with Pradaxa (dabigatran etexilate) Updated January 2015 2 3 Management of bleeding in emergency situations for patients treated with

More information

News Release. Media contacts: Ernie Knewitz Tel: 908.927.2953 Mobile: 917.697.2318 eknewitz@its.jnj.com

News Release. Media contacts: Ernie Knewitz Tel: 908.927.2953 Mobile: 917.697.2318 eknewitz@its.jnj.com News Release Media contacts: Ernie Knewitz Tel: 908.927.2953 Mobile: 917.697.2318 eknewitz@its.jnj.com Shaun Mickus Phone: 908.927.2416 Mobile: 973.476.7144 smickus@its.jnj.com Investor contacts: Stan

More information

3/25/14. To Clot or Not What s New In Anticoagulation? Clotting Cascade. Anticoagulant drug targets. Anita Ralstin, MS CNS CNP. Heparin.

3/25/14. To Clot or Not What s New In Anticoagulation? Clotting Cascade. Anticoagulant drug targets. Anita Ralstin, MS CNS CNP. Heparin. To Clot or Not What s New In Anticoagulation? Anita Ralstin, MS CNS CNP 1 Clotting Cascade 2 Anticoagulant drug targets Heparin XI VIII IX V X VII LMWH II Warfarin Fibrin clot 1 Who Needs Anticoagulation

More information

Clinical Guideline N/A. November 2013

Clinical Guideline N/A. November 2013 State if the document is a Trust Policy/Procedure or a Clinical Guideline Clinical Guideline Document Title: Document Number 352 Version Number 1 Name and date and version number of previous document (if

More information

Practical Management of Patients receiving Rivaroxaban 울산의대 서울아산병원 심장내과 최기준

Practical Management of Patients receiving Rivaroxaban 울산의대 서울아산병원 심장내과 최기준 Practical Management of Patients receiving Rivaroxaban 울산의대 서울아산병원 심장내과 최기준 Contents Converting to/from rivaroxaban Measuring levels of rivaroxaban Patients potentially at higher risk of bleeding Renal

More information

NnEeWw DdEeVvEeLlOoPpMmEeNnTtSs IiıNn OoRrAaLl AaNnTtIiıCcOoAaGgUuLlAaTtIiıOoNn AaNnDd RrEeVvEeRrSsAaLl

NnEeWw DdEeVvEeLlOoPpMmEeNnTtSs IiıNn OoRrAaLl AaNnTtIiıCcOoAaGgUuLlAaTtIiıOoNn AaNnDd RrEeVvEeRrSsAaLl NnEeWw DdEeVvEeLlOoPpMmEeNnTtSs IiıNn OoRrAaLl AaNnTtIiıCcOoAaGgUuLlAaTtIiıOoNn AaNnDd RrEeVvEeRrSsAaLl Mikele Wissing, RN June 2014 Introduction until recently, was the unrivaled medication for treatment

More information

New Oral Anticoagulants in the Management of Atrial Fibrillation June, 2012 By Deborah K Brokaw, Pharm.D.

New Oral Anticoagulants in the Management of Atrial Fibrillation June, 2012 By Deborah K Brokaw, Pharm.D. New Oral Anticoagulants in the Management of Atrial Fibrillation June, 2012 By Deborah K Brokaw, Pharm.D. Introduction Since the 1950 s, the only orally available anticoagulant has been the vitamin K antagonist

More information

QUICK REFERENCE. Mary Cushman 1 Wendy Lim 2 Neil A Zakai 1. University of Vermont 2. McMaster University

QUICK REFERENCE. Mary Cushman 1 Wendy Lim 2 Neil A Zakai 1. University of Vermont 2. McMaster University QUICK REFERENCE Clinical Practice Guide on Antithrombotic Drug Dosing and Management of Antithrombotic Drug- Associated Bleeding Complications in Adults February 2014* Mary Cushman 1 Wendy Lim 2 Neil A

More information

Reversing the New Anticoagulants

Reversing the New Anticoagulants Reversing the New Anticoagulants Disclosure Susan C. Lambe, MD Assistant Clinical Professor Department of Emergency Medicine University of California, San Francisco Roadmap for today 1 Roadmap for today

More information

The Brave New (Anticoagulant) World

The Brave New (Anticoagulant) World The Brave New (Anticoagulant) World Diane M. Birnbaumer, M.D., FACEP Emeritus Professor of Medicine University of California, Los Angeles Senior Clinical Educator Department of Emergency Medicine Harbor-UCLA

More information

CHADS score of 5 or 6 Recent (within 3mo) stroke or TIA Rheumatic valvular heart disease CHADs score of 3 or 4

CHADS score of 5 or 6 Recent (within 3mo) stroke or TIA Rheumatic valvular heart disease CHADs score of 3 or 4 LAMC Department of Pharmacy Services: ANTICOAGULATION: Surgical Intervention Table 1: Classification of Surgical interventions according to bleeding risk t required to discontinue anticoagulation Dental

More information

MANAGING BLEEDING IN THE

MANAGING BLEEDING IN THE MANAGING BLEEDING IN THE SETTING OF NEW ANTICOAGULANTS: HOW DO OLD METHODS MEASURE UP? Michelle Zeller MD Clinical Hematology Fellow November 5th, 2011 A FRIDAY NIGHT ON-CALL WITH DR. B. LUD Very keen

More information

Management for Deep Vein Thrombosis and New Agents

Management for Deep Vein Thrombosis and New Agents Management for Deep Vein Thrombosis and New Agents Mark Malesker, Pharm.D., FCCP, FCCP, FASHP, BCPS Professor of Pharmacy Practice and Medicine Creighton University 5 th Annual Creighton Cardiovascular

More information

Antiplatelet and Antithrombotics From clinical trials to guidelines

Antiplatelet and Antithrombotics From clinical trials to guidelines Antiplatelet and Antithrombotics From clinical trials to guidelines Ashraf Reda, MD, FESC Prof and head of Cardiology Dep. Menofiya University Preisedent of EGYBAC Chairman of WGLVR One of the big stories

More information

Kevin Saunders MD CCFP Rivergrove Medical Clinic Wellness Institute @ SOGH April 17 2013

Kevin Saunders MD CCFP Rivergrove Medical Clinic Wellness Institute @ SOGH April 17 2013 Kevin Saunders MD CCFP Rivergrove Medical Clinic Wellness Institute @ SOGH April 17 2013 Family physician with Rivergrove Medical Clinic Practice in the north end since 1985 Medical Director of the Wellness

More information

PRADAXA (DABIGATRAN ETEXILATE) PRESCRIBER GUIDE FOR STROKE PREVENTION IN ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

PRADAXA (DABIGATRAN ETEXILATE) PRESCRIBER GUIDE FOR STROKE PREVENTION IN ATRIAL FIBRILLATION PRADAXA (DABIGATRAN ETEXILATE) PRESCRIBER GUIDE FOR STROKE PREVENTION IN ATRIAL FIBRILLATION This guide provides recommendations for the use of Pradaxa (dabigatran etexilate) in order to minimise the risk

More information

XARELTO (RIVAROXABAN) PRESCRIBER GUIDE

XARELTO (RIVAROXABAN) PRESCRIBER GUIDE XARELTO (RIVAROXABAN) PRESCRIBER GUIDE Prescribing information found on pages 16-17 This guide is to be used to support the appropriate use of Xarelto in the following indications: Prevention of stroke

More information

The speakers have attested that their presentation will be free of all commercial bias toward a specific company and its products.

The speakers have attested that their presentation will be free of all commercial bias toward a specific company and its products. Update on New Anticoagulants (Apixaban, Dabigatran and Rivaroxaban) Patient Safety Daniel B. DiCola, MD and Paul Ament,, Pharm.D Excela Heath, Latrobe, PA Disclosures: Paul Ament discloses that he receives

More information