Closing Arguments. Stephen Lindsay, Fairview, NC

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Closing Arguments. Stephen Lindsay, Fairview, NC"

Transcription

1 Closing Arguments Stephen Lindsay, Fairview, NC

2 Federal CJA Trial Skills Academy April 25 - April 30, 2010 San Diego, CA Organizing Your Closing Argument Jonathan Rapping* Executive Director Southern Public Defender Training Center * Used with permission of the author

3 A. Understand the Purpose of the Closing: It is Not Simply a Longer Opening Statement B. Start with a convincing statement that your client did not do it C. Lay out for the jury what is at issue in the case (and maybe even what is not) D. Lay out your case theory E. Argue the law a. Presumption of Innocence b. Burden of Proof c. Standard of Proof / Beyond a Reasonable Doubt d. Other Case Specific Instructions F. Argue the Facts a. Facts in Evidence i. arguing facts that directly undermine evidence presented by the state ii. arguing facts that affirmatively promote your case theory b. Absence of Facts c. Attacking the Integrity of the Investigation G. Conclusion

4 There are many considerations that go into making an effective closing argument. Keeping an eye on the theme, using the art of storytelling, staying mindful of body language, making use of exhibits, and using rhetorical techniques such as triples are just a few. However, the most important aspect of a good closing argument is the lawyer s ability to organize her arguments and place them into a structure that allows for an effective presentation of those arguments. The closing argument must provide the jury with a roadmap along the path of arguments you have to support your case theory. That roadmap must clearly lead the jury to the conclusion you seek. You may have many compelling points to support your case theory or, equally important, to cause the jury to doubt the state s prosecution theory. However, if they are delivered in a disorganized fashion, they will be lost on your audience. You must walk your jury through the journey on which you wish to take them during your closing argument. Unfortunately, in addition to being the most important aspect of the closing argument, organizing your thoughts into an effective presentation can also be the most difficult part of the process. Every trial lawyer has had the experience of knowing the points she wishes to make to the jury in her closing but not knowing how to best reduce them to a coherent, organized, and convincing argument. In this article I lay out a template for producing a coherent closing argument 1. This organizational structure is by no means the only way to deliver an effective closing argument. It is, however, an effective outline any criminal defense lawyer can use to organize the many thoughts we necessarily have running through our heads as we prepare for closing arguments. A. Understand the Purpose of the Closing: It is Not Simply a Longer Opening Statement One thing you must understand before you begin organizing your closing argument is what it is you are trying to accomplish. It is 1 There are examples of arguments throughout this article. As a disclaimer up front, I do not take credit as the person who made up these arguments. Most are variations of arguments I have heard different lawyers make at different times. They are mostly a compilation of many things I have heard many times in many variations from many lawyers. Therefore, I can not give credit to anyone in particular. However, there is no shame in taking good arguments you hear and making them your own. Therefore, use these, or any others you may hear, to the extent they may benefit your client.

5 not simply a longer opening statement. The goals are very different. The opening statement is a story about an incident. With your opening statement it is critical that you have the jury believing in your client s innocence as they begin the process of receiving evidence and filtering it through the lens you provide. It is not good enough to have the jury believing your client may have committed the charged offense, but that the state won t be able to prove it. You need the jury to be willing to presume your client innocent as the case begins. However, this is much more of a burden than you need to, or should, take on in your closing argument. With your closing argument you want the jury to believe that your client did not do the things of which he is accused, but to also understand that they need not believe in your client s innocence in order to find him not guilty. You need not take on the burden of proving your client s innocence and must find a way to make the jury understand that. Therefore, closing argument can be much more difficult than opening statement. It is not just a story about an incident, it is a story about the trial and how we want the jury to apply the law and interpret the facts. You must find a way to both argue your theory of the case while making the jury understand the high burden placed on the government. You must jointly convince the jury that you believe in your client s innocence while helping them to realize that even if they do not, they still must acquit your client. You need to consider how you can argue that the evidence supports your case theory and that, therefore, the jury should have a reasonable doubt. Otherwise you risk shifting a burden on yourself that you need not take on. Therefore, an effective closing argument begins by assuring the jury that the state has it all wrong and that your client did not do what he is accused of. It then transitions to a discussion of the law and the heavy burden our constitution places on the state. It then effectively argues the facts as reasons to doubt, rather than reasons your client is innocent. When done properly, the jury hears you as arguing that your client did not do the things with which he is accused while understanding that they need not go nearly that far in order to render a verdict of not guilty. If you fail to understand this distinction, you risk taking on a burden that might unnecessarily lead to your client s conviction. it B. Start with a convincing statement that your client did not do

6 The first words out of your mouth are the most important. The moment you stand up to begin your closing argument, all eyes are on you. Every person watching is waiting to hear what you have to say. The first words out of your mouth will convey to the jury what it is that you feel about the case. Do not treat this valuable moment as warm up. Remember the concepts of primacy and recency. You must start strong. Do not begin by saying, May it please the court, Ladies and gentlemen, thank you for your attention, or any other introduction that does not convey the most important point in your client s case, i.e. that he is innocent. When you stand up you must be ready to show the jury that this is the moment you have been waiting for since you first met your client... an opportunity to tell them that the state has wrongly accused an innocent man. You ve been thirsting for this moment. You sat through the state s summation, eagerly waiting for this moment. You are anxious to begin to fight for the life of a person you believe is innocent. All of these sentiments must come across in your first breath. Your first words should be something along the lines of: 1) Jimmy Brown did not rape Lisa Davis!, or 2) Mary Simon is innocent! She did not possess cocaine on June 1 st!, or 3) The state has the wrong man, Larry Thomas did not rob anyone! Say these words with feeling. Say them with conviction. Say them as though your client s life depends on the jury believing them. C. Lay out for the jury what is at issue in the case (and maybe even what is not) Once you have made a strong statement of innocence, tell the jurors what is at issue in the case. You want to define for them what they should focus on once they begin deliberations. You should also consider telling them what they need not focus on. Once you tell them what is at issue, make sure to tell them how that issue must be resolved. The arguments you make later in your closing will demonstrate to the jury why they must reach the conclusion you advocate. In this segment of the closing you want to define the issues and tell the jury how to resolve those issues. The following are some examples: No one is arguing that Jimmy Brown and Lisa Davis never had sex. That is not at issue in this case. The only question you must

7 consider is whether Mr. Brown and Ms. Smith had sex consensually. From the evidence in this case you know the answer to that question is, yes. There is no question that the police found drugs in the console of a car registered to Ms. Simon. But Ms. Simon did not put those drugs in her car. She didn t know they were there. She never possessed the drugs in question. The issue in this case is whether Mr. Thomas used the threat of force to take money from Mark Allen. The answer is clearly no. D. Lay out your case theory Now that the jury has been made aware of the important issue(s) in the case and told how they should resolve those issues, tell the jury your case theory in a few paragraphs. This will help the jury to understand how the important pieces of evidence fit into the case and how they support the case theory you have developed throughout the case. The length of your story will vary on the complexity of the case. In general, be concise. Don t forget that people have short attention spans. Do not spend more time than you need to set out the important points. An example might be: Mark Allen has a terrible problem. He is a chronic gambler. It is a problem that he tried to keep a secret. It is a problem he tried to run from. It is a problem that caught up with him on May 15 th. On that date Mark Allen found himself owing Larry Thomas one thousand dollars from a wager on a basketball game. Mark Allen used his paycheck to pay Mr. Thomas the money he owed. Unfortunately, this was Mr. Allen s rent money. Mr. Allen and his wife live paycheck to paycheck. They need every cent they earn. When his wife found out that he could not pay the rent, Mr. Allen could not bring himself to tell her the truth. So he made up a lie. He said Larry Thomas robbed him. But you know you can t believe Larry Thomas. E. Argue the law

8 The jury will be instructed on many legal principles. You do not want to attempt to address all of them. The law tends to be boring. Besides, cases are won on the facts. The story you tell and the emotional themes you inject into your case are the keys to success. However, there is some law you will want to deal with. You must identify the principles that are most important to your case. Once you ve done that you must discuss those principles within the context of your case or some other anecdote that will bring the law to life. Talking about the law, without using storytelling techniques, is a sure way to lose your audience. Then why talk about the law at all, you may ask. There are important principles built into our system of justice that provide people charged with crimes great protection. You want to make certain that the jurors understands those principles and think about them in a context, which you provide them, that will best assure they reach the conclusion you desire. Examples are the presumption of innocence, the burden of proof, and the standard of proof. There are other instructions that can help a jury understand how certain facts in the case support the outcome we desire. Argued properly, they provide a filter through which the jury can view the evidence to reach the result we advocate. Examples of these include a self defense instruction, an instruction on witness credibility, or an instruction on how to evaluate identification evidence. You should consider your transition into a discussion of the law and how you plan to help the jury understand the importance of this discussion. This is the perfect opportunity to begin to help the jury understand the ideas set forth in Part A, i.e. that while the evidence points to your client s innocence, the jury does not need to go that far to return a verdict of not guilty. You may say something like this: The evidence in this case has proven that things happened as I just explained. The evidence has proven that Mr. Thomas did not rob Mark Allen. But you do not need to go nearly that far in order to find Mr. Thomas not guilty. The evidence need not prove Mr. Thomas innocence in order for you to find him not guilty. It need not convince you of what happened on May 15 th before you acquit Mr. Thomas. That is because in this country we are all protected by some very important legal principles. Principles that form the heart and soul of our great system. Let s talk about some of those principles.

9 You may also consider empowering the jury by reminding them of the importance of its function in our legal system as a way to get them to tune into the legal discussion. An example of this type of transition is: The American criminal justice system is admired all over the world. It is admired for the protections it afford every one of its citizens. It protects each and every one of us should we find ourselves in Mr. Thomas situation, an innocent man wrongly accused of a crime he did not commit. At the heart of this great system is you, the jury. No one is more important to this system than the twelve of you. You are the people charged with ensuring that these protections are provided to Mr. Thomas. In one respect your job is extremely difficult. But in another it is really very easy. It is difficult because you are given a responsibility that most people will never know. You hold the life of a man in your hands. You will decide the fate of a human being, Mr. Thomas. That is a grave responsibility that makes your job a difficult one. However, in another respect your job is quite easy. It is easy because you are not asked to figure out what happened in this case. You are not asked to determine whether Mr. Thomas is innocent. You are only asked to determine whether the prosecution has convinced you beyond a reasonable doubt that Mr. Thomas did the things he is accused of. If you have uncertainty, if you feel like you aren t sure, if there are unanswered questions that keep you from feeling confident about what happened, your job is easy. You must find Mr. Thomas not guilty. You can then begin your discussion of the law. Note that this transition accomplishes several objectives. It pumps the jury up about the importance of our system and the role they play. This helps convince them of the seriousness of the legal principles you will discuss. It also reminds them of the import of their role and the fact that they hold another person s life in their hands. This implicitly reminds them of the dire consequences of a wrong decision. It then goes on to talk about the standard of proof you will discuss below and the fact that they need not figure out what happened. It seeks to assure

10 them that it is okay if they can t solve the crime. They can still do justice. The three legal principles that I choose to address in every case are the presumption of innocence, the burden of proof, and the standard of proof (beyond a reasonable doubt). If you choose to go right from your case theory to a discussion of these principles a transition might be something as simple as:... Before we go on to look at the evidence in this case more closely, I d like to take a moment to discuss some important legal principles. The judge will talk to you about the law before you begin deliberations. However, there are three principles that are so central to our system that they deserve discussion. These principles protect us all as American citizens. They protect each and every one of us should we ever find ourselves in Mr. Thomas situation, an innocent man wrongly accused of a crime he did not commit. i. The Presumption of Innocence Then we would go on to discuss the first of those fundamental principles, the presumption of innocence. Following is an example of one such discussion using a metaphor to bring life to this legal principle: The first of these principles in the presumption of innocence. The presumption of innocence is like a cloak that we all wear as American citizens. It protects every member of our community should we ever be falsely accused of a crime. This cloak of innocence can not be removed unless and until the state meets a very high burden. A burden the state has not met in this case. But that important cloak of protection that makes up the foundation of our great justice system only works when every member of our community believes in this principle. Before being sworn in as jurors, each of you agreed to honor this principle. By doing so you agreed to view Mr. Thomas as an innocent man at the outset of this case. You agreed to continue to hold this view as you listened to the evidence in this case. You agreed to not remove this cloak from Mr. Thomas unless you

11 decided that the government has met its very high burden. Mr. Thomas continues to wear this cloak as he sits before you today. As you listen to these final arguments, you must continue to presume he is innocent. You must do this as you hold the state to the standard required by the laws of this great country. We will talk about that standard in a moment.

12 ii. The Burden of Proof We would then discuss the burden of proof: The second important principle is the burden of proof. In our criminal justice system the burden lies with the state. We do not require any person to prove his innocence. Our system recognizes that an innocent person may not have much to offer about an incident they had nothing to do with. Our system insists that before the state can take away a citizen s liberty, it must bear the entire burden of proving accusations against that person. This means that if any of you have any questions about what happened the evening of May 15 th, you can not look to Mr. Thomas for the answers. It was the responsibility of the state to answer these questions for you. And the state s failure to do so can be the basis of a not guilty verdict. So if you wanted to hear from [some witness who was discussed but did not testify], you may not look to Mr. Thomas. Look to the state. If you feel that [cite a question in the case that was not sufficiently answered] was not answered to your satisfaction, that was the responsibility of the state. You may not hold that against Mr. Thomas. If your client did not testify you may address it as follows: As Judge Martin will instruct you, you may not hold it against Mr. Thomas because he did not testify in this trial. Mr. Thomas has the right to make the state prove its case against him. We do not ask an innocent person to explain why another would make up a lie about them. We don t require an innocent man to take the stand to merely say I am innocent. Mr. Thomas has made that statement loud and clear by his decision to fight these charges against him. Your scrutiny must be on the fabricated evidence the state has used against a valuable member of our community. And where the defense has presented evidence you may choose to say something like: Our Constitution allows Mr. Thomas to sit back and make the state prove its case against him. He is not required to present a

13 single shred of evidence. But yet he did. You heard from [go on to catalogue the witnesses the defense presented]. Mr. Thomas provided you [go on to catalogue the evidence the defense presented]. Or: Our Constitution allows Mr. Thomas to sit back and make the state prove its case against him. He is not required to present any evidence. He could sit back and hold the government to the burden it is required to meet under the law. But he chose to take the stand because he wanted you to hear what really happened. iii. The Standard of Proof / Beyond a Reasonable Doubt You should then discuss the standard of proof, proof beyond a reasonable doubt. This is a difficult concept to grasp. What it means is not that well defined. Quite simply it is any doubt a juror may have that he or she can give a reason for. Lawyers discuss this concept in many ways. However you decide to discuss this principle, you must do so in a way that makes it understandable to the non lawyers. I have heard lawyers talk about how the standard in a criminal case is the highest standard in any legal system world wide. They tell the jury that this standard is higher than the standard used to take away a person s property, to strip them of fundamental rights in a civil context, and even than that used to remove your children from you. Others try to help the jury to understand the concept of proof beyond a reasonable doubt as relative to other degrees of certainty. They might say something like, in a criminal case you may think the accused probably committed the offense... that is not enough. You may believe the accused likely committed the offense... that is not enough. You may feel fairly certain that the accused committed the offense... that is not enough. In each of those scenarios you must find that person not guilty. You may only return a verdict of guilty if you have no reasonable doubt. Colleagues of mine have used a reasonable doubt chart, that lists various degrees of certainty from unsure to fairly confident, with many degrees in between. Above fairly certain is beyond a reasonable doubt. There is a bright line

14 separating fairly certain and beyond a reasonable doubt to highlight all the various degrees of certainty that require an acquittal. Another effective method is to think of a story that involves an important decision in life. Make one of the government witnesses who has credibility problems the character in the story who holds your life, or the life of a loved one, in their hands. This can demonstrate why a juror should have a reasonable doubt. For example: Imagine your spouse has a serious heart condition. You go to a doctor to get a diagnosis. You walk into the doctor s office and who is the doctor? None other than Mark Allen. Dr. Allen has gambling slips falling from his pockets. You see a message on his desk from his wife expressing concern that they can t pay this month s rent. Dr. Allen checks out your spouse and immediately tells you that your spouse will need the most expensive procedure. This is a procedure that is life threatening if not successful. To top it off, Dr. Allen says your spouse needs to have this surgery immediately and you need to write him a check this moment before he begins the operation. Do you have second thoughts? Do you seek a second opinion? Of course you do. Mr. Thomas life depends on how much you trust the word of Mark Allen. Just as Mark Allen s words would not be good enough when it comes to the life of your spouse, they should be equally troubling when you have to decide the fate of Mr. Thomas. However you decide to make the concept of proof beyond a reasonable doubt understandable and meaningful to your jury, you must do this. You must do something to counter human nature that wants to try to determine what happened. They want to take alternate theories and choose which makes the most sense. It is not in our nature to think that not figuring out what happened is a perfectly acceptable outcome in a criminal trial. Having a doubt is normal and requires the rendering of a not guilty verdict. You may also want to impart on the jury the finality of their decision. The fact that the verdict is irreversible should cause jurors to take deliberations very seriously. It can help hammer home the importance of their function, thereby further empowering them as protectors of the liberty of our citizenry.

15 I have heard lawyers effectively convey to jurors the importance of thoughtful and careful consideration of the evidence as they examine potential reasons to doubt by arguing something like: Once you begin deliberation we urge you to carefully and thoughtfully consider all of the evidence in this case. Take your time, your decision is final and irreversible. If you rush to judgment and wrongly return a verdict of guilty you can not later take it back after you think of this case when you return to your daily routine. If you wake up in the middle of the night and think, oh my, I have made a terrible mistake, I just can t stop thinking about how the description Mark Allen first gave the police of the robbery is vastly different from the story he told in court, you can t call Judge Martin and change your vote. It is final. If you find yourself continually thinking about how neither Mark Allen nor Mr. Thomas had any injuries consistent with the struggle Mr. Allen claims took place, you can t call the prosecutor and tell her you want to reconsider. If you think to yourself a week from now how much pressure Mark Allen must have felt when confronted by his wife about the missing money, and you realize that is a powerful motive to make up a story, you can t call me and say, I feel terrible, I want to take back the verdict. It is irreversible. So please consider all of the reasons to doubt in this case. Remember that you each only have to have one reason to doubt. They need not be the same reason. I urge you to leave no stone unturned as you begin your search for reasons to doubt. iv. Other Case Specific Instructions In addition to these bedrock principles, you may have other legal principles that you wish to highlight for the jury in light of your case theory or certain facts in your case. It can be a very powerful technique for a lawyer to take the language from an instruction the judge will deliver and to weave it into her argument using the facts in her case. Such arguments will shape the way the jury thinks about the case as they ponder the judge s instructions and will give influence they way they view various evidence in the case. Which additional instructions you choose to argue should depend on which help you to tell the story of your case theory and the state s failure to meet its burden.

16 For example, in a self defense case a lawyer might argue something like, The law, as Judge Johnson will instruct you, does not require that any of us stand by and allow another person to physically harm us. The law allows each and every one of us to use whatever force is necessary to defend ourselves when we have a reasonable belief that we are under attack. When Michael Swain desperately swung a beer bottle at Andrew Dixon, known to his friends as Spike, Mr. Swain did what he believed was necessary to protect himself. Put yourselves in Michael Swain s shoes the night of July 8 th. You are five foot seven inches, a hundred and forty pounds. You are very familiar with Andrew Dixon s reputation as a violent and destructive man. Mr. Dixon has accused you of flirting with his girlfriend. As Andrew Dixon s six foot, two hundred pound frame comes rushing towards you, you see pure hatred in his eyes. Your heart begins to pound. Terror overcomes you. In the two seconds you have to make a decision. You grab the closest object you can find. You pray. You swing. The law does not require that we stand by as another person does physical harm to us. Mr. Swain s actions were reasonable. They were justified. They were done in self defense. Another example of using an instruction to help the jury to understand how to view evidence in the case might be a case where the credibility of a witness is at issue. If you have an instruction on the factors the jury might consider when weighing credibility you might argue something like: This entire case comes down to whether you believe the words that come out of the Hillary Porter s mouth. The question is, do you have a doubt about her credibility? Well in weighing a witness credibility, Judge Henderson will instruct you that there are many factors you may consider. You may consider any biases the witness may have. Immediately an alarm should sound. You will think about Hillary Porter s animosity towards Mr. Porter because of the divorce they are currently going through. Judge Henderson will also tell you that you may consider any financial incentive the witness may have. You will think about the financial interest Hillary Porter has in the pending divorce case and how your decision in this matter will impact what she hopes

17 to receive. And Judge Henderson will tell you that you should evaluate the witness demeanor on the stand. You will recall how cooperative Hillary Porter was with Mr. Young [the prosecutor] as he asked her questions, but how she became uncooperative and unwilling to answer simple questions I asked her on crossexamination. When you think about the factors that can help you decide Hillary Porter s credibility that Judge Henderson will provide you during his instructions to you, you will realize that they all point to one conclusion. She is not trustworthy. F. Argue the Facts While you will certainly address the facts to some extent earlier in your argument, you should save a thorough analysis of the facts until after you have discussed whatever legal principles you deem important in your case. The success of your discussion of the legal principles you deem important will impact how the jury considers the facts you will discuss. As you discuss the facts in your case it can be helpful to refer to legal principles you previously discussed as you tell the jury why certain facts are important and how the jury should consider those facts. The factual discussion can reinforce arguments you have made about the law and how it should be used in your case. Having said that, a good closing argument is one that contains factual arguments throughout. As demonstrated above, factual arguments can, and should, be made throughout your discussion of the law. But it is essential that you include a section in which you comb through the facts, in an organized and thoughtful fashion, highlighting the facts that support your case theory and explaining how the jury should view those facts, i.e. as reasons to have doubt about the prosecution case. This section of your closing will be the meatiest and how you organize your argument about the facts is of critical importance. The organization of this section will also depend on the case. In some cases it may make sense to organize the discussion by witnesses or other important pieces of evidence. In others it may be more powerful to organize this presentation by issue. However you chose to organize this discussion, it must be in a logical and understandable manner. You should organize the facts into groupings that you wish to argue: i.e.

18 problems with the physical evidence, reasons to doubt the complainant, lack of corroborating evidence, etc. It is important that you consider how you will argue the facts that are in evidence, but equally important is how you choose to deal with the absence of important facts and how that void should impact the jury s decision. In addition to these two categories of factual argument that you will likely lay out in every case, there may be times that you make a third type of argument: one that attacks the quality of the investigation. All of these categories give the jury a reason to doubt. We will briefly discuss these categories of factual argument. Before we begin that discussion we should talk about how you might transition from the legal discussion to the factual discussion. The transition into and out of the legal discussion can be the most difficult. We addressed the transition into that discussion. Let s consider how we may transition into a discussion of the facts. Consider implicitly discussing the facts as reasons to doubt. This highlights the state s burden and ensures you do not take on a burden you don t have. We have just argued to the jury that they only need one reason to doubt to return a verdict of not guilty. We now want to give them many reasons to doubt to highlight how easy their decision should be in this case. You may consider labeling the facts you discuss as reason to doubt #1, reason to doubt #2, etc., thereby highlighting the many reasons to doubt present in the case. In an appropriate case where you have enough reasons to go around, this might be preceded by the following transition: You only need one reason to doubt. However, in this case there is enough doubt that you can each have your own reason. You would then go on to lay out twelve reasons to doubt. A simple transition from a legal discussion of reasonable doubt to the facts of the case might be as simple as, you only need one reason to doubt, and you fulfill your duty as a jury by returning a verdict of not guilty. Just one. That should be easy in this case. This case is filled with reasonable doubt. Let s talk about all of the reasons to doubt in this case. You then launch into a discussion of the facts as reasons to doubt.

19 In a case in which a conviction hinges on the testimony of a single witness you might try something a little more dramatic. For example, If you have a reasonable doubt about the story the prosecutor is asking you to believe, you must find Mr. Thomas not guilty. How could you not have a reasonable doubt. In this case, reasonable doubt walked right in front of you, took the witness stand, raised his right hand, and said, my name is Mark Allen. You would then begin talking about all the problems with Mark Allen s testimony. The obvious connection between your discussion of reasonable doubt and your discussion of the facts of the case is another reason to discuss the law immediately before the facts. However, you choose to do so, think of a good transition i. Facts in Evidence As we prepare our closing argument we must consider the facts that have been presented throughout the case and how we will argue those facts. We must think about which of the facts in the case will best help us advocate for the outcome we desire. In closing argument we are permitted to argue the logical inferences from facts presented. In general we must marshal facts that will help us do one of two things: 1) directly undermine evidence presented by the state, or 2) affirmatively promote our case theory. a. arguing facts that directly undermines evidence presented by the state As defense attorneys we must be masters at pointing out holes in the state s case. A skilled prosecutor will present evidence in such a way that it lays out a clear and compelling story of guilt. The prosecutor will attempt to mask problems with the evidence she presents and suggest that the evidence leads to only one conclusion. In reality, there will always be a question mark behind any piece of evidence. Some question marks are obvious. Others are less so. It is up to us to find them. Examples of arguments that point out defects in the state s case include: 1) You know you can t trust the state s key witness, Bubba Jones, because he has such a powerful motive to lie. At the time he came forward with the information he claims he has about this case, he was awaiting a trial for murder. He made a deal with the prosecutor. In

20 exchange for his testimony in this trial he hopes to earn freedom. This was his only chance to keep from dying in prison. This motive gives you a reason to doubt the prosecution case, or 2) Now, Jill Taylor tells you that she saw Mr. Luther pull the trigger. But you know that is not true. You know she talked to Mr. Robles, a defense investigator, three days after the shooting, and at that time she said she did not look out of her window until several seconds after the shots were fired. You have to have a doubt about a story that changes over time, or 3) The fingerprint evidence does not have the value the prosecution wants you to believe. You heard from Dr. Wilmer, a leading expert in fingerprint analysis, who told you that the evidence is inconclusive. You can not conclude that Mr. Simpson left the fingerprint at the scene of the crime. That is speculation on the state s part. Dr. Wilmer s testimony gives you yet another reason to doubt the state s case. Equally true is that a collection of facts can tell any number of stories depending on how they are argued. It is also up to us to offer alternate versions of events to the jury. During trial we must develop facts that highlight the problems with the state s evidence and suggest alternate theories of what might have occurred. Spelling these arguments out in a coherent fashion is the function of closing argument. An example may be, Trisha Newman made up a story about rape after her boyfriend caught her sneaking into their apartment at two o clock in the morning. But you know that Trisha Newman had consensual sex with Mr. Alexander because she did not call the police after leaving his apartment. She had a cell phone. She never used it. If Trisha Newman was really raped she would have called the police as soon as she left the apartment. She didn t. That is a reason to doubt. At the end of every discussion of a fact or set of facts, tell the jury why those facts create a reason to doubt. b. arguing facts that affirmatively promote your case theory While attacking the prosecutor s case is a central role of the defense attorney, we also must develop facts that support our case theory. Therefore, a second category of factual argument is to catalogue those facts that support our case theory. However, these are still reasons to doubt and should be argued as such. These facts will certainly include any evidence that we put on in a defense case if we choose to do so. However, they may also include facts we were able to develop during the prosecution s case. Spelling

Colorado Criminal Jury Instruction Chapter 1:04 and Chapter 3

Colorado Criminal Jury Instruction Chapter 1:04 and Chapter 3 Attachment No. 2 Proposed Plain Language Revisions to Colorado Criminal Jury Instruction Chapter 1:04 and Chapter 3 The work of the Plain Language Subcommittee is set forth below. For comparison, the redrafted

More information

TOP TEN TIPS FOR WINNING YOUR CASE IN JURY SELECTION

TOP TEN TIPS FOR WINNING YOUR CASE IN JURY SELECTION TOP TEN TIPS FOR WINNING YOUR CASE IN JURY SELECTION PRESENTED BY JEFF KEARNEY KEARNEY & WESTFALL 2501 PARKVIEW STREET, SUITE 300 FORT WORTH, TEXAS 76102 (817) 336-5600 LUBBOCK CRIMINAL DEFENSE LAWYERS

More information

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF TEXAS HOUSTON DIVISION

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF TEXAS HOUSTON DIVISION UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF TEXAS HOUSTON DIVISION UNITED STATES OF AMERICA v. CRIMINAL ACTION H-00-0000 DEFENDANT(S) JURY INSTRUCTIONS I. General A. Introduction Members of the Jury:

More information

The Federal Criminal Process

The Federal Criminal Process Federal Public Defender W.D. Michigan The Federal Criminal Process INTRODUCTION The following summary of the federal criminal process is intended to provide you with a general overview of how your case

More information

SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF CONTRA COSTA. Mock Trial Script. The Case of a Stolen Car

SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF CONTRA COSTA. Mock Trial Script. The Case of a Stolen Car SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF CONTRA COSTA Mock Trial Script The Case of a Stolen Car This mock trial is appropriate for middle and high school students. The script includes a role for a narrator,

More information

Medical Malpractice VOIR DIRE QUESTIONS

Medical Malpractice VOIR DIRE QUESTIONS Medical Malpractice VOIR DIRE QUESTIONS INTRODUCTION: Tell the jurors that this is a very big and a very important case. Do a SHORT summary of the case and the damages we are seeking. This summary should

More information

Role Preparation. Preparing for a Mock Trial

Role Preparation. Preparing for a Mock Trial Civil Law Mock Trial: Role Preparation This package contains: PAGE Preparing for a Mock Trial 1-5 Time Chart 6 Etiquette 7-8 Role Preparation for: Plaintiff and Defendant Lawyers 9-12 Judge 13 Jury 13

More information

ROLES TO ASSIGN. 1. Judge. 2. Courtroom Deputy. 3. Prosecutor 1 opening statement. 4. Prosecutor 2 direct of Dana Capro

ROLES TO ASSIGN. 1. Judge. 2. Courtroom Deputy. 3. Prosecutor 1 opening statement. 4. Prosecutor 2 direct of Dana Capro ROLES TO ASSIGN 1. Judge 2. Courtroom Deputy 3. Prosecutor 1 opening statement 4. Prosecutor 2 direct of Dana Capro 5. Prosecutor 3 direct of Jamie Medina 6. Prosecutor 4 cross of Pat Morton 7. Prosecutor

More information

Role Preparation. Preparing for a Mock Trial

Role Preparation. Preparing for a Mock Trial Criminal Law Mock Trial: Role Preparation This package contains: PAGE Preparing for a Mock Trial 1 Time Chart 2 Etiquette 3-4 Role Preparation for: Crown and Defence Lawyers 5-7 Judge and Jury 8 Court

More information

THE COURT: You have been selected and sworn to determine the facts and

THE COURT: You have been selected and sworn to determine the facts and 1 THE COURT: You have been selected and sworn to determine the facts and render a verdict in the case of the Commonwealth / 1 of Pennsylvania versus Robert Greene, who is charged with one count of robbery,

More information

PEOPLE V. HARRY POTTER

PEOPLE V. HARRY POTTER PEOPLE V. HARRY POTTER THE COURT: Members of the jury, the defendant, Harry Potter, is charged in a one-count information which reads as follows: On or about November 23, 2008, HARRY POTTER, did unlawfully

More information

STEPS IN A TRIAL. Note to Students: For a civil case, substitute the word plaintiff for the word prosecution.

STEPS IN A TRIAL. Note to Students: For a civil case, substitute the word plaintiff for the word prosecution. STEPS IN A TRIAL Note to Students: For a civil case, substitute the word plaintiff for the word prosecution. A number of events occur during a trial, and most must happen according to a particular sequence.

More information

JUROR S MANUAL (Prepared by the State Bar of Michigan)

JUROR S MANUAL (Prepared by the State Bar of Michigan) JUROR S MANUAL (Prepared by the State Bar of Michigan) Your Role as a Juror You ve heard the term jury of one s peers. In our country the job of determining the facts and reaching a just decision rests,

More information

Sexual Assault of a Child VOIR DIRE QUESTIONS

Sexual Assault of a Child VOIR DIRE QUESTIONS ATTORNEYS Sexual Assault of a Child VOIR DIRE QUESTIONS 1. What are your feelings or opinions about criminal defense attorneys? 2. Have you ever had a bad experience with a criminal defense attorney? If

More information

THE SUPREME COURT OF THE REPUBLIC OF PALAU HANDBOOK FOR TRIAL JURORS

THE SUPREME COURT OF THE REPUBLIC OF PALAU HANDBOOK FOR TRIAL JURORS THE SUPREME COURT OF THE REPUBLIC OF PALAU HANDBOOK FOR TRIAL JURORS I. Purpose of This Handbook The purpose of this handbook is to acquaint trial jurors with the general nature and importance of their

More information

Opening Statements Handout 1

Opening Statements Handout 1 Opening Statements Handout 1 Once the jury has been chosen, the attorneys for both sides deliver an opening statement about the case to the jury. Opening statements outline the facts that the attorneys

More information

From Opening to Summation, Making First Impressions Count

From Opening to Summation, Making First Impressions Count From Opening to Summation, Making First Impressions Count By Ben Rubinowitz and Evan Torgan There is an old adage that every trial lawyer should accept as gospel: "You don't get a second chance to make

More information

Boulder Municipal Court Boulder County Justice Center P.O. Box 8015 1777 6 th Street Boulder, CO 80306-8015 www.bouldercolorado.

Boulder Municipal Court Boulder County Justice Center P.O. Box 8015 1777 6 th Street Boulder, CO 80306-8015 www.bouldercolorado. Boulder Municipal Court Boulder County Justice Center P.O. Box 8015 1777 6 th Street Boulder, CO 80306-8015 www.bouldercolorado.gov/court JURY READINESS CONFERENCE INSTRUCTIONS You have set your case for

More information

OPENING INSTRUCTIONS

OPENING INSTRUCTIONS OPENING INSTRUCTIONS Members of the Jury: Respective Roles of Jurors and Judge You ve been chosen as jurors for this case, and you ve taken an oath to decide the facts fairly. As we begin the trial, I

More information

Glossary of Terms Acquittal Affidavit Allegation Appeal Arraignment Arrest Warrant Assistant District Attorney General Attachment Bail Bailiff Bench

Glossary of Terms Acquittal Affidavit Allegation Appeal Arraignment Arrest Warrant Assistant District Attorney General Attachment Bail Bailiff Bench Glossary of Terms The Glossary of Terms defines some of the most common legal terms in easy-tounderstand language. Terms are listed in alphabetical order. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W

More information

If a Dismissal of Your Omaha DUI Charges Is Not Forthcoming You May Decide to Take Your Case in Front of a Jury in the Hope of Being Exonerated

If a Dismissal of Your Omaha DUI Charges Is Not Forthcoming You May Decide to Take Your Case in Front of a Jury in the Hope of Being Exonerated TAKING YOUR OMAHA DUI CASE TO JURY TRIAL If a Dismissal of Your Omaha DUI Charges Is Not Forthcoming You May Decide to Take Your Case in Front of a Jury in the Hope of Being Exonerated Thomas M. Petersen

More information

The Legal System in the United States

The Legal System in the United States The Legal System in the United States At the conclusion of this chapter, students will be able to: 1. Understand how the legal system works; 2. Explain why laws are necessary; 3. Discuss how cases proceed

More information

*Reference Material For information only* The following was put together by one of our classmates! Good job! Well Done!

*Reference Material For information only* The following was put together by one of our classmates! Good job! Well Done! From: "We The People for Independent Texas" Subject: No contract - No case. *Reference Material For information only* The following was put together by one of our classmates! Good job! Well Done! Courts

More information

If You Have Been Charged With a Crime that Requires the Prosecution to Prove Possession Based on a Constructive Possession Argument It Is Crucial for

If You Have Been Charged With a Crime that Requires the Prosecution to Prove Possession Based on a Constructive Possession Argument It Is Crucial for CONSTRUCTIVE POSSESSION IN TENNESSEE CRIMINAL OFFENSES If You Have Been Charged With a Crime that Requires the Prosecution to Prove Possession Based on a Constructive Possession Argument It Is Crucial

More information

INTRODUCTORY REMARKS and INITIAL VOIR DIRE (CRIMINAL) (JUDGE O. H. EATON, JR. ) Good morning ladies and gentlemen. Welcome to the criminal

INTRODUCTORY REMARKS and INITIAL VOIR DIRE (CRIMINAL) (JUDGE O. H. EATON, JR. ) Good morning ladies and gentlemen. Welcome to the criminal INTRODUCTORY REMARKS and INITIAL VOIR DIRE (CRIMINAL) (JUDGE O. H. EATON, JR. ) Good morning ladies and gentlemen. Welcome to the criminal division of the Circuit Court. The Circuit Court considers criminal

More information

NO. COA13-614 NORTH CAROLINA COURT OF APPEALS. Filed: 3 December 2013. v. Buncombe County No. 11 CRS 59792 DANNY DALE GOSNELL

NO. COA13-614 NORTH CAROLINA COURT OF APPEALS. Filed: 3 December 2013. v. Buncombe County No. 11 CRS 59792 DANNY DALE GOSNELL NO. COA13-614 NORTH CAROLINA COURT OF APPEALS Filed: 3 December 2013 STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA v. Buncombe County No. 11 CRS 59792 DANNY DALE GOSNELL 1. Homicide first-degree murder not guilty verdict jury

More information

DESCRIPTION OF THE FEDERAL CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM FOR DEFENDANTS

DESCRIPTION OF THE FEDERAL CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM FOR DEFENDANTS DESCRIPTION OF THE FEDERAL CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM FOR DEFENDANTS DESCRIPTION OF THE FEDERAL CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM FOR DEFENDANTS This pamphlet has been provided to help you better understand the federal

More information

Stages in a Capital Case from http://deathpenaltyinfo.msu.edu/

Stages in a Capital Case from http://deathpenaltyinfo.msu.edu/ Stages in a Capital Case from http://deathpenaltyinfo.msu.edu/ Note that not every case goes through all of the steps outlined here. Some states have different procedures. I. Pre-Trial Crimes that would

More information

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE WESTERN DISTRICT OF MISSOURI WESTERN DIVISION

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE WESTERN DISTRICT OF MISSOURI WESTERN DIVISION IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE WESTERN DISTRICT OF MISSOURI WESTERN DIVISION UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ) ) Plaintiff, ) ) vs. ) Case No. 09-00296-03-CR-W-FJG ) ROBERT E. STEWART, ) ) Defendant.

More information

If You have Been Arrested Don t Do Anything Until You Read My Special Report!

If You have Been Arrested Don t Do Anything Until You Read My Special Report! If You have Been Arrested Don t Do Anything Until You Read My Special Report! If you have been arrested by the police for a criminal offense, you re probably confused or worried about what steps to take

More information

CIVIL DIVISION PLAINTIFF S PROPOSED JURY INSTRUCTIONS. The Plaintiff, JENNIFER WINDISCH, by and through undersigned counsel, and

CIVIL DIVISION PLAINTIFF S PROPOSED JURY INSTRUCTIONS. The Plaintiff, JENNIFER WINDISCH, by and through undersigned counsel, and IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 16TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR MONROE COUNTY, FLORIDA JENNIFER WINDISCH, Plaintiff, v. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 2007-CA-1174-K JOHN SUNDIN, M.D., RHODA SMITH, M.D., LAURRAURI

More information

A Citizen s Guide to the Criminal Justice System: From Arraignment to Appeal

A Citizen s Guide to the Criminal Justice System: From Arraignment to Appeal A Citizen s Guide to the Criminal Justice System: From Arraignment to Appeal Presented by the Office of the Richmond County District Attorney Acting District Attorney Daniel L. Master, Jr. 130 Stuyvesant

More information

Law & The Courts Resource Guide

Law & The Courts Resource Guide Law & The Courts Resource Guide - what to do in case of an auto accident - your rights in traffic court - your rights if arrested table of contents What To Do In Case Of An Auto Accident...1 Your Rights

More information

SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA-COUNTY OF CONTRA COSTA 1. Mock Trial Script: The Case of a Stolen Car

SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA-COUNTY OF CONTRA COSTA 1. Mock Trial Script: The Case of a Stolen Car SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA-COUNTY OF CONTRA COSTA 1 Mock Trial Script: The Case of a Stolen Car SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA-COUNTY OF CONTRA COSTA 2 Mock Trial Script BAILIFF: All rise. Department One

More information

Decades of Successful Sex Crimes Defense Contact the Innocence Legal Team Now

Decades of Successful Sex Crimes Defense Contact the Innocence Legal Team Now Criminal Court Felonies The U.S. has the highest rate of felony conviction and imprisonment of any industrialized nation. A felony crime is more serious than a misdemeanor, but the same offense can be

More information

MINNESOTA JUDICIAL TRAINING UPDATE

MINNESOTA JUDICIAL TRAINING UPDATE MINNESOTA JUDICIAL TRAINING UPDATE CRIMINAL VOIR DIRE QUESTIONS ASKED BY THE COURT THE MN SUPREME COURT TASK FORCE ON JURY SELECTION HAS RECOMMENDED THAT JUDGES BE MORE PROACTIVE IN ASKING INITIAL QUESTIONS

More information

CREATING & DEVELOPING WINNING THEMES & ARGUMENTS By: Ervin A. Gonzalez

CREATING & DEVELOPING WINNING THEMES & ARGUMENTS By: Ervin A. Gonzalez CREATING & DEVELOPING WINNING THEMES & ARGUMENTS By: Ervin A. Gonzalez I. INTRODUCTION A winning trial attorney recognizes that to reach the goal of a successful verdict, you must first develop a plan

More information

SETTLEGOODE v. PORTLAND PUBLIC SCHOOLS, et al CV-00-313-ST JURY INSTRUCTIONS FOLLOWING CLOSE OF EVIDENCE

SETTLEGOODE v. PORTLAND PUBLIC SCHOOLS, et al CV-00-313-ST JURY INSTRUCTIONS FOLLOWING CLOSE OF EVIDENCE SETTLEGOODE v. PORTLAND PUBLIC SCHOOLS, et al CV-00-313-ST JURY INSTRUCTIONS FOLLOWING CLOSE OF EVIDENCE These instructions will be in three parts: first, general rules that define and control your duties

More information

The Witness and the Justice System in Alberta

The Witness and the Justice System in Alberta The Witness and the Justice System in Alberta Introduction This booklet provides basic information about appearing as a witness in the courts of Alberta. It is designed to explain your role as a witness,

More information

Representing Yourself. Your Family Law Trial

Representing Yourself. Your Family Law Trial Representing Yourself at Your Family Law Trial - A Guide - June 2013 REPRESENTING YOURSELF AT YOUR FAMILY LAW TRIAL IN THE ONTARIO COURT OF JUSTICE This is intended to help you represent yourself in a

More information

DUI FAQ Guide. FAQs to Help Guide You Through The Florida DUI Process

DUI FAQ Guide. FAQs to Help Guide You Through The Florida DUI Process DUI FAQ Guide FAQs to Help Guide You Through The Florida DUI Process Randy Berman, Esq. Law Offices of Randy Berman (561) 537-3877 RandyBermanLaw.com A Simple guide for someone recently arrested for a

More information

The Police Have Left Word That They Want to Speak With You

The Police Have Left Word That They Want to Speak With You The Police Have Left Word That They Want to Speak With You What Does it Mean and What Should You Do? Don A. Murray, Esq. Shalley & Murray 125-10 Queens Blvd., Suite 10 Kew Gardens, NY 11415 273 Sea Cliff

More information

INTRODUCTION DO YOU NEED A LAWYER?

INTRODUCTION DO YOU NEED A LAWYER? INTRODUCTION The purpose of this handbook is to provide answers to some very basic questions that inmates or inmates families might have regarding the processes of the criminal justice system. In no way

More information

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE DISTRICT OF HAWAII. J. MICHAEL SEABRIGHT United States District Judge

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE DISTRICT OF HAWAII. J. MICHAEL SEABRIGHT United States District Judge IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE DISTRICT OF HAWAII August 8, 2011 J. MICHAEL SEABRIGHT United States District Judge GENERAL FEDERAL JURY INSTRUCTIONS IN CIVIL CASES INDEX 1 DUTY OF JUDGE 2

More information

Oratory Techniques for Effective Opening Statements and Summations

Oratory Techniques for Effective Opening Statements and Summations Oratory Techniques for Effective Opening Statements and Summations Ben Rubinowitz And Evan Torgan Without question, the ultimate goal of every trial lawyer is to win. To accomplish this goal, the lawyer

More information

New York Law Journal. Wednesday, July 31, 2002

New York Law Journal. Wednesday, July 31, 2002 New York Law Journal Wednesday, July 31, 2002 HEADLINE: BYLINE: Trial Advocacy, Cross-Examination: The Basics Ben B. Rubinowitz and Evan Torgan BODY: Cross-examination involves relatively straightforward

More information

Your Voice in Criminal Court

Your Voice in Criminal Court Your Voice in Criminal Court a guide to court orientation for adult witnesses INFORMATION + RESOURCES FOR VICTIM SERVICE WORKERS introduction Victim Service Workers have an important role to play in the

More information

COURT S INSTRUCTIONS TO THE JURY (CIVIL) SEXUAL HARASSMENT. I will now explain to you the rules of law that you must follow and apply in

COURT S INSTRUCTIONS TO THE JURY (CIVIL) SEXUAL HARASSMENT. I will now explain to you the rules of law that you must follow and apply in IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ALABAMA KEYBOARD()DIVISION KEYBOARD(), Plaintiff, v. KEYBOARD(), Defendants. ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] CV Members of the Jury: COURT S INSTRUCTIONS

More information

CRIMINAL LAW AND VICTIMS RIGHTS

CRIMINAL LAW AND VICTIMS RIGHTS Chapter Five CRIMINAL LAW AND VICTIMS RIGHTS In a criminal case, a prosecuting attorney (working for the city, state, or federal government) decides if charges should be brought against the perpetrator.

More information

How will I know if I have to give evidence in court?

How will I know if I have to give evidence in court? Being a Witness What is a witness? A witness is a person who is required to come to court to answer questions about a case. The answers a witness gives in court are called evidence. Before giving evidence,

More information

VOIR DIRE: DEFENSE PERSPECTIVE. Voir dire is the single most important part of a DWI jury trial. Breath test DWI

VOIR DIRE: DEFENSE PERSPECTIVE. Voir dire is the single most important part of a DWI jury trial. Breath test DWI VOIR DIRE: DEFENSE PERSPECTIVE Voir dire is the single most important part of a DWI jury trial. Breath test DWI prosecutions are more difficult to defend then no test cases. Blood test cases are even harder

More information

STEPS IN A MOCK TRIAL

STEPS IN A MOCK TRIAL STEPS IN A MOCK TRIAL 1. The Opening of the Court Either the Clerk of the Court of the judge will call the Court to order. When the judge enters, all the participants should remain standing until the judge

More information

The HIDDEN COST Of Proving Your Innocence

The HIDDEN COST Of Proving Your Innocence The HIDDEN COST Of Proving Your Innocence Law-abiding citizens use guns to defend themselves against criminals as many as 2.5 million times every year, or about 6,850 times per day. This means that each

More information

DUI Voir Dire Questions INTRODUCTION

DUI Voir Dire Questions INTRODUCTION DUI Voir Dire Questions INTRODUCTION 1. Can you give me an example of a law that you disagree with (i.e., the speed limit)? 2. Someone tell me what the First Amendment protects? You see Ladies and Gentlemen,

More information

JURY QUESTIONNAIRE [PLEASE PRINT]

JURY QUESTIONNAIRE [PLEASE PRINT] JURY QUESTIONNAIRE [PLEASE PRINT] BACKGROUND INFORMATION Full name: Date of birth: Any other names you have used: City/Area of residence: Place of birth: Are you a citizen of the United States? Yes No

More information

THURGOOD MARSHALL ACADEMY April 2014 LAW DAY Civil Mock Trial Lesson Make-Up Assignment

THURGOOD MARSHALL ACADEMY April 2014 LAW DAY Civil Mock Trial Lesson Make-Up Assignment THURGOOD MARSHALL ACADEMY April 2014 LAW DAY Civil Mock Trial Lesson Make-Up Assignment Dear Student, This is your make-up assignment for missing law day on Friday, May 2, 2014. Please read and complete

More information

Documents Relating to the Case of Dwight Dexter

Documents Relating to the Case of Dwight Dexter Documents Relating to the Case of Dwight Dexter Exhibit A, Document 1 The Investigation into the Murder of Floyd Babb Notes from Sheriff Dodd: July 20 July 30, 1982, Eaton, Michigan July 20 I approached

More information

Information for Crime Victims and Witnesses

Information for Crime Victims and Witnesses Office of the Attorney General Information for Crime Victims and Witnesses MARCH 2009 LAWRENCE WASDEN Attorney General Criminal Law Division Special Prosecutions Unit Telephone: (208) 332-3096 Fax: (208)

More information

ESL Criminal Mock Trial Scenario R. v. Lee

ESL Criminal Mock Trial Scenario R. v. Lee ESL Criminal Mock Trial Scenario R. v. Lee What Happened? On January 5th, 20**, at around 7:00 pm, two friends, Keri Lee and Tom Chang, went shopping at the local mall. They were looking for a joint birthday

More information

Voir Dire in Domestic Violence Cases

Voir Dire in Domestic Violence Cases Voir Dire in Domestic Violence Cases By Sarah M. Buel, Co-Director, University of Texas School of Law Domestic Violence Clinic Voir dire provides the opportunity to educate jurors while probing for bias,

More information

AN OVERVIEW OF THE JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM

AN OVERVIEW OF THE JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM 2006 AN OVERVIEW OF THE JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM OUTCOMES As a result of this lesson, students will be able to: Summarize juvenile court process and procedures Define legal terms used in the juvenile justice

More information

Facts for. Federal Criminal Defendants

Facts for. Federal Criminal Defendants Facts for Federal Criminal Defendants FACTS FOR FEDERAL CRIMINAL DEFENDANTS I. INTRODUCTION The following is a short summary of what will happen to you if you are charged in a federal criminal case. This

More information

Where can I get help after a sexual assault?

Where can I get help after a sexual assault? Sexual Assault What is assault? Assault is when someone uses force to hurt you. Slapping, kicking and pushing can be assault. Sometimes touching can be an assault. Threatening or trying to hurt someone

More information

10. After they have announced the verdict, ask them to explain how they decided on it.

10. After they have announced the verdict, ask them to explain how they decided on it. From Classroom to Courtroom JUDGE INSTRUCTIONS The Trial 1. After the bailiff has called the court to order, judge enters courtroom and sits at bench. The judge tells everyone, but the jury, to be seated.

More information

ARREST! What Happens Now?

ARREST! What Happens Now? Personal Injury Wrongful Death Slip & Fall Automobile Accidents Trucking Accidents Motorcycle Accidents Medical Malpractice Criminal Defense You re Under ARREST! What Happens Now? Do NOT Speak to Police

More information

Scaled Questions During Jury Selection

Scaled Questions During Jury Selection Scaled Questions During Jury Selection By: Ben Rubinowitz and Evan Torgan One of the most crucial tasks a trial attorney must undertake is selecting a pool of jurors that will view her client's case in

More information

AN INTRODUCTION COURT. Victim Services Department of Justice

AN INTRODUCTION COURT. Victim Services Department of Justice AN INTRODUCTION TO COURT Victim Services Department of Justice TABE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION......1 2. FIING A POICE REPORT...1 3. COURT PROCESS......2 4. TESTIFYING IN COURT...5 5. COMMONY ASKED QUESTIONS...6

More information

Jury Duty and Selection

Jury Duty and Selection Jury Duty and Selection Introduction That unwelcome letter arrives in the mail jury duty. Many famous trial attorneys have described jurors as a group of individuals who didn't have a good enough reason

More information

IN THE COURT OF CRIMINAL APPEALS OF TENNESSEE AT KNOXVILLE Assigned on Briefs May 24, 2011

IN THE COURT OF CRIMINAL APPEALS OF TENNESSEE AT KNOXVILLE Assigned on Briefs May 24, 2011 IN THE COURT OF CRIMINAL APPEALS OF TENNESSEE AT KNOXVILLE Assigned on Briefs May 24, 2011 STATE OF TENNESSEE v. SHAWN DALE OWNBY Direct Appeal from the Circuit Court for Sevier County No. 14548-III Rex

More information

Franklin County State's Attorney Victim Services

Franklin County State's Attorney Victim Services Franklin County State's Attorney Victim Services FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS What type of services and information can I get through Victim Services Program? A Victim Advocate will be assigned to assist

More information

- 2 - Your appeal will follow these steps:

- 2 - Your appeal will follow these steps: QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ABOUT YOUR APPEAL AND YOUR LAWYER A Guide Prepared by the Office of the Appellate Defender 1. WHO IS MY LAWYER? Your lawyer s name is on the notice that came with this guide. The

More information

ROLE PREPARATION MOCK BAIL HEARING PREPARING FOR A MOCK BAIL HEARING

ROLE PREPARATION MOCK BAIL HEARING PREPARING FOR A MOCK BAIL HEARING THIS PACKAGE CONTAINS: PAGE Preparing for a Mock Bail Hearing 1-2 Background: The Bail Process 3-7 Courtroom Etiquette 8-9 Mock Bail Hearing Schedule 10 Role Preparation Packages for: Crown & Defence Counsel

More information

SUPERIOR COURT OF ARIZONA MARICOPA COUNTY LC2014-000424-001 DT 01/22/2015 THE HON. CRANE MCCLENNEN HIGHER COURT RULING / REMAND

SUPERIOR COURT OF ARIZONA MARICOPA COUNTY LC2014-000424-001 DT 01/22/2015 THE HON. CRANE MCCLENNEN HIGHER COURT RULING / REMAND Michael K. Jeanes, Clerk of Court *** Filed *** 01/26/2015 8:00 AM THE HON. CRANE MCCLENNEN STATE OF ARIZONA CLERK OF THE COURT J. Eaton Deputy GARY L SHUPE v. MONICA RENEE JONES (001) JEAN JACQUES CABOU

More information

Trying a Wrongful Death Case: Voir Dire as a Bridge to Summation

Trying a Wrongful Death Case: Voir Dire as a Bridge to Summation Trying a Wrongful Death Case: Voir Dire as a Bridge to Summation By: Ben Rubinowitz and Evan Torgan Damages in a wrongful death case are fraught with complex issues and legal challenges. While it is easy

More information

CRIMINAL COURT IN MINNESOTA: Understanding the Process so You can Sleep at Night

CRIMINAL COURT IN MINNESOTA: Understanding the Process so You can Sleep at Night RYAN PACYGA CRIMINAL DEFENSE 333 South 7 th Street, Suite 2850 Minneapolis, MN 55402 612-339-5844 www.arrestedmn.com More information on the YouTube channel Ryan Pacyga CRIMINAL COURT IN MINNESOTA: Understanding

More information

The opening statement is a most important part of trying a lawsuit. Many lawyers do not

The opening statement is a most important part of trying a lawsuit. Many lawyers do not OPENING STATEMENTS Introduction The opening statement is a most important part of trying a lawsuit. Many lawyers do not treat the opening statement with the importance it deserves. Many opening statements

More information

Bail in Rape Cases. CONFERENCE ROOM 3 o clock. I need to take this phone call. I will return in a few minutes. AT THE SAME TIME...

Bail in Rape Cases. CONFERENCE ROOM 3 o clock. I need to take this phone call. I will return in a few minutes. AT THE SAME TIME... Bail in Rape Cases CONFERENCE ROOM 3 o clock I need to take this phone call. I will return in a few minutes. A FEW MINUTES LATER... AT THE SAME TIME... LATER THAT DAY... You have been arrested on suspicion

More information

JURY INSTRUCTIONS. 2.4 Willful Maintenance of Monopoly Power

JURY INSTRUCTIONS. 2.4 Willful Maintenance of Monopoly Power JURY INSTRUCTIONS PRELIMINARY INSTRUCTIONS 1. ANTITRUST CLAIMS 2. Elements of Monopoly Claim 2.1 Definition of Monopoly Power 2.2 Relevant Market 2.3 Existence of Monopoly Power 2.4 Willful Maintenance

More information

Defending Yourself in Criminal Court

Defending Yourself in Criminal Court Community Legal Information Association of Prince Edward Island, Inc. Defending Yourself in Criminal Court If you are charged with a criminal offence, certain federal offences, or a provincial offence,

More information

A Mediation Primer for the Plaintiff s Attorney

A Mediation Primer for the Plaintiff s Attorney By: Bruce Brusavich A Mediation Primer for the Plaintiff s Attorney Making your case stand out to the other side, and what to do when they ask you to dance. Make the Defense Ask to Mediate Obtaining a

More information

What Is Small Claims Court? What Types Of Cases Can Be Filed In Small Claims Court? Should I Sue? Do I Have the Defendant s Address?

What Is Small Claims Court? What Types Of Cases Can Be Filed In Small Claims Court? Should I Sue? Do I Have the Defendant s Address? SMALL CLAIMS COURT What Is Small Claims Court? Nebraska law requires that every county court in the state have a division known as Small Claims Court (Nebraska Revised Statute 25-2801). Small Claims Court

More information

What can I expect facing criminal charges?

What can I expect facing criminal charges? What can I expect facing criminal charges? Being charged with a crime can be one of the hardest things you will ever have to deal with. The American Criminal Justice system is not designed to be stress

More information

JUVENILE COMPETENCY HANDBOOK

JUVENILE COMPETENCY HANDBOOK JUVENILE COMPETENCY HANDBOOK The judge has placed you in the restoration process for mental competency. It is very important that you meet with your restoration specialist and see the doctor when you are

More information

Judge calls prosecution's witnesses liars

Judge calls prosecution's witnesses liars Monday, March 02, 2009 Judge calls prosecution's witnesses liars Defendant's money-laundering sentence downgraded by 20 years By R. Robin McDonald, Staff Reporter When a man convicted of money-laundering

More information

Decided: May 11, 2015. S15A0308. McLEAN v. THE STATE. Peter McLean was tried by a DeKalb County jury and convicted of the

Decided: May 11, 2015. S15A0308. McLEAN v. THE STATE. Peter McLean was tried by a DeKalb County jury and convicted of the In the Supreme Court of Georgia Decided: May 11, 2015 S15A0308. McLEAN v. THE STATE. BLACKWELL, Justice. Peter McLean was tried by a DeKalb County jury and convicted of the murder of LaTonya Jones, an

More information

VOIR DIRE 2/11/2015 STATE OF TEXAS VS JANE DOE 1. CONVERSATION - ONLY TIME YOU CAN ASK THE LAWYERS QUESTIONS 2. NO RIGHT OR WRONG ANSWER

VOIR DIRE 2/11/2015 STATE OF TEXAS VS JANE DOE 1. CONVERSATION - ONLY TIME YOU CAN ASK THE LAWYERS QUESTIONS 2. NO RIGHT OR WRONG ANSWER STATE OF TEXAS VS JANE DOE VOIR DIRE 1. CONVERSATION - ONLY TIME YOU CAN ASK THE LAWYERS QUESTIONS 2. NO RIGHT OR WRONG ANSWER 3. DESELECTION (TO MAKE THE JURY = SIT THERE & BE QUIET) 4. SOME QUESTIONS

More information

Common Myths About Personal Injury and Wrongful Death Cases 1. By B. Keith Williams

Common Myths About Personal Injury and Wrongful Death Cases 1. By B. Keith Williams Common Myths About Personal Injury and Wrongful Death Cases 1 By B. Keith Williams There are several myths about accident cases and the attorneys that handle them. It is important to keep these myths in

More information

MEDIATION STRATEGIES: WHAT PLAINTIFFS REALLY WANT By Jim Bleeke, SweetinBleeke Attorneys

MEDIATION STRATEGIES: WHAT PLAINTIFFS REALLY WANT By Jim Bleeke, SweetinBleeke Attorneys MEDIATION STRATEGIES: WHAT PLAINTIFFS REALLY WANT By Jim Bleeke, SweetinBleeke Attorneys As defense attorneys, we often focus most of our efforts on assembling the most crucial facts and the strongest

More information

Child Abuse, Child Neglect. What Parents Should Know If They Are Investigated

Child Abuse, Child Neglect. What Parents Should Know If They Are Investigated Child Abuse, Child Neglect What Parents Should Know If They Are Investigated Written by South Carolina Appleseed Legal Justice Center with editing and assistance from the Children s Law Center and the

More information

Victims of crime: Understanding the support you can expect

Victims of crime: Understanding the support you can expect Victims of crime: Understanding the support you can expect If you have been a victim of crime, you are entitled to certain information and support from criminal justice organisations such as the police

More information

Peace Bond Process. What is a Peace Bond? Contents

Peace Bond Process. What is a Peace Bond? Contents Peace Bond Process October 2010 Contents Peace Bond Basics 2 The Process 3 Protecting Privacy 5 Joint Peace Bonds 9 The purpose of this brochure is to help guide you through the process of acquiring a

More information

SUMMATION: A WORK IN PROGRESS

SUMMATION: A WORK IN PROGRESS SUMMATION: A WORK IN PROGRESS BENJAMIN BRAFMAN, Esq. Brafman & Associates, P.C. 767 Third Avenue, 26 th Floor New York, New York 10017 Bbrafman@braflaw.com Tel (212) 750-7800 Introduction An experienced

More information

THE COURT: You may have a seat. JAMES BINFORD, having been first duly sworn, testified as follows: DIRECT EXAMINATION

THE COURT: You may have a seat. JAMES BINFORD, having been first duly sworn, testified as follows: DIRECT EXAMINATION 0 THE COURT: You may have a seat. JAMES BINFORD, having been first duly sworn, testified as follows: DIRECT EXAMINATION BY MS. ALLEN: Q. Good morning. A. Good morning. Q. Would you please state your name

More information

Trying a Labor Law Case with a Sole Proximate Cause Defense

Trying a Labor Law Case with a Sole Proximate Cause Defense Trying a Labor Law Case with a Sole Proximate Cause Defense By Ben Rubinowitz and Evan Torgan Although Labor Law Section 240 was designed to protect workers, making owners and general contractors strictly

More information

Community Education Workshop Youth Criminal Justice Act/ Youth rights Length of Session: 2 hours

Community Education Workshop Youth Criminal Justice Act/ Youth rights Length of Session: 2 hours Workshop Objectives: At the end of the session each participant will be able to: 1. Understand their legal obligations when stopped and questioned by the Police 2. Understand their legal rights if arrested

More information

aeinti, WITNESS ~ m As a witness in a cr;;ninal case, you have a very important role to play in the administration of justice.

aeinti, WITNESS ~ m As a witness in a cr;;ninal case, you have a very important role to play in the administration of justice. aeinti, WITNESS As a witness in a cr;;ninal case, you have a very important role to play in the administration of justice. Our legal system depends upon citizens coming forth to give evidence truthfully

More information

How to Prepare for your Deposition in a Personal Injury Case

How to Prepare for your Deposition in a Personal Injury Case How to Prepare for your Deposition in a Personal Injury Case A whitepaper by Travis Mayor, Attorney If you have filed a civil lawsuit in your personal injury case against the at fault driver, person, corporation,

More information

IN THE IOWA DISTRICT COURT FOR WOODBURY COUNTY. WRITTEN PLEA OF GUILTY AND WAIVER OF RIGHTS (OWI First Offense)

IN THE IOWA DISTRICT COURT FOR WOODBURY COUNTY. WRITTEN PLEA OF GUILTY AND WAIVER OF RIGHTS (OWI First Offense) IN THE IOWA DISTRICT COURT FOR WOODBURY COUNTY THE STATE OF IOWA, Plaintiff, vs. Defendant. CRIMINAL NO. WRITTEN PLEA OF GUILTY AND WAIVER OF RIGHTS (OWI First Offense) COMES NOW the above-named Defendant

More information

The support you should get if you are a victim of crime

The support you should get if you are a victim of crime The support you should get if you are a victim of crime This is an EasyRead booklet showing you what to do. About this booklet The Ministry of Justice wrote this information. This is an EasyRead guide

More information