THINK! Road Safety Campaign Evaluation. Post evaluation of the Eyes THINK! Drug Drive campaign

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "THINK! Road Safety Campaign Evaluation. Post evaluation of the Eyes THINK! Drug Drive campaign"

Transcription

1 THINK! Road Safety Campaign Evaluation Post evaluation of the Eyes THINK! Drug Drive campaign Report October 2009 Prepared for: Department for Transport Prepared by Helen Angle, Sarah Bone, Emily Goddard and Emma Johns, TNS-BMRB Telephone: Part of BMRB Limited (British Market Research Bureau) BMRB/HA/SB/

2 BMRB is ISO9001:2000 and ISO accredited. Printed on 100% recycled paper BMRB is also a member of the London Remade environment scheme and is working with the Woodland Trust to offset the paper used in the course of our business.

3 Table of Contents 1 Introduction Research objectives and method Drug Drive Arrangement of this report Management summary and recommendations Introduction Campaign awareness Campaign Communication Attitudes towards recreational drugs and driving Likelihood of being stopped by the police and of detection Consequences of Drug Driving Conclusions and recommendations Campaign awareness Awareness of sources of information / publicity about drug driving Proven recall What was said examples Prompted recognition of the Eyes drug driving campaign Campaign communication Communication of the Eyes TV ad Believed main message of Eyes TV ad Believed main message of Eyes Poster/Press ad Attitudes towards taking recreational drugs and driving Road safety priorities Dangerous driving behaviours within social circles Impact of recreational drugs on driving Likelihood of being stopped by the police and of detection... 38

4 6.1 Perceived likelihood of getting stopped by the police How the police can tell if a driver has taken recreational drugs How the police can tell if a driver has taken recreational drugs- examples Consequences of Drug Driving Likelihood of getting convicted for driving after taking recreational drugs Awareness of penalties for driving after taking recreational drugs Consequences of being caught driving after taking recreational drugs APPENDIX A: Sample Profile Driving status APPENDIX B Sampling Method APPENDIX C: Weighting Procedures APPENDIX D: Questionnaire Copyright: survey findings and deliverables are normally intended for use within the Client's organisation or its consultants and other associate organisations such as advertising agencies. Should the Client intend wider circulation of the survey findings and deliverables, the Client should inform BMRB prior to such disclosure and agree the form and content with BMRB. The client should acknowledge BMRB as the source of the information with wording acceptable to BMRB.

5 Index of Charts Chart 3a: Whether seen or heard anything about taking recreational drugs and driving in any of these ways Chart 3b: What remember about publicity/advertising about taking recreational drugs and driving Chart 3c: Prompted recognition of adverts Table 4a: Which of the following do you personally feel about the Eyes TV ad (prompted) all adults Table 4b: Which of the following do you personally feel about the Eyes TV ad (prompted) - subgroups Chart 4c: Main message of Eyes TV ad (spontaneous) Chart 4d: Main message of Eyes Poster/press ad (spontaneous) Chart 5a: The issue considered the single most important issue to be addressed by the government to improve road safety Chart 5b: How seriously government is taking issues Chart 5c: Whether know anyone who does any of the following these days Chart 5d: Severity of impact on driving Chart 5e: Severity of impact on driving Chart 6a: Likelihood of someone who drives after taking recreational drugs getting stopped by the police Chart 6b: How easy it is for police to spot a driver who has taken recreational drugs Chart 6c: If stopped, how easy it is for the police to tell if someone has taken recreational drugs Chart 6d: If stopped, how the police would be able to tell if a driver has taken recreational drugs (spontaneous) Chart 7a: Likelihood of conviction Chart 7b: Awareness of current penalty if convicted for driving after taking recreational drugs (spontaneous) Chart 7c: Likelihood of each consequence happening Chart 7d: Likelihood of each consequence happening... 49

6 Chart 7e: Worry about each consequence happening Chart A1: Driving status... 51

7 1 Introduction The THINK! Road Safety publicity campaign was launched in 2000, as part of the Government s road safety strategy, Tomorrow s roads: safer for everyone. The strategy set out targets to reduce road casualties in Great Britain by 50% for children and 40% overall between 2000 and A mix of engineering, enforcement and education measures are used to help meet these targets, of which the THINK! Road safety publicity campaign forms part. The THINK! campaign aims to encourage all road users to recognise that it s the small things they do that can lead to crashes on the road and that there are simple steps they can take to reduce their risk to themselves and others. THINK s power is that it fosters an attitude of shared responsibility. THINK! campaign priorities are identified by the Department for Transport s publicity team in collaboration with policy officials in Road User Safety Division. They are chosen because they account for the highest number of road casualties and it is felt that they will benefit most from coordinated national publicity. 1.1 Research objectives and method In July 2006 BMRB Social Research took over the evaluation of the THINK! campaigns. This report covers the results of the post stage evaluation for the recent Think! Drug Driving road safety ad campaign Eyes. The Eyes campaign aimed to inform drivers that they can get caught and penalised for driving after taking recreational drugs. The message let the audience know that the consequences are the same as for drink driving. The campaign launched in August Fieldwork ran from the 24 th to the 30 th September Interviews were conducted using BMRB s Omnibus survey. This is a survey that is run each week by BMRB, with different clients placing questions onto a common questionnaire, and sharing the costs of fieldwork and analysis. All results are confidential to the individual client. Interviews were conducted in-home, using Computer Assisted Personal Interviewing (CAPI) by fully trained members of BMRB s own fieldforce, working under supervision. The sample was drawn by means of Random Location sampling (see appendices for further details). In total 1,991 interviews were conducted with those aged 15+ in Great Britain. Data were weighted to be representative of the population. Only weighted data are shown in this report. In the summer of 2009 it was decided that the definition of driver should refer to those who drive a car or van only. In previous reports this definition had referred to those who drove car, van or motorbike. In this report, any reference to drivers (prior to July 2009 figures) refer to car, van TNS-BMRB Report THINK! Post Drug Drive Eyes - October

8 and motorcycle drivers. July and September 2009 figures for drivers as quoted in this report, and moving forward, will include car and van drivers only. We will however continue to include motorcycle drivers within the survey sample itself. Due to a programming error at the pre stage, two questions on the Drug Drive pre evaluation survey were not asked of all eligible respondents at the first point of contact. However, being filtered question, not all respondents should have been asked these questions. A re-contact survey was, therefore, conducted (amongst all who should have been asked and who indicated they would be willing to be re-contacted if necessary) in order to complete these questions. For these two questions, a total of 1,137 interviews were conducted. 1.2 Drug Drive The new drug drive campaign, Eyes launched in August 2009 using a variety of communication activities to try to persuade drivers to avoid taking recreational drugs and driving, including TV, festivals, radio, online and in-pub and gaming advertising. The campaign focussed, in particular, on young people aged years old. The key aims of the campaign were as follows: To start conversation around this issue by cutting through the myths, confusion and contradiction; Generate wider public discussion and debate to further impact on the social acceptability of drug driving; Raise awareness of drug driving as an issue amongst the target audience and their friendship groups challenging existing beliefs with fact and heightening understanding of the risks; the penalties of enforcement and their consequences. This report evaluates the pre and post stage data collected in July and September 2009 around campaign launch in August The objectives of the post stage research were as follows: To evaluate awareness and communication of the Eye Drug Drive campaign; To measure attitudes towards drug driving, the impact of drugs on driving and whether you are likely to get caught; TNS-BMRB Report THINK! Post Drug Drive Eyes - October

9 Also, to look at the perceived consequences of drug driving, including which consequences are seen as most likely, and which drivers are most concerned about. The new campaign included the following elements: TV advertising: Eyes 30 second ad (17 th August 13 th September 2009) Press advertising: Cannabis, Cocaine and Ecstasy press ads (August/September 2009) Online advertising: Cannabis, Cocaine, and Ecstasy banners, social networking sites and a dedicated Youtube page (17 th August 13 th September 2009) Poster advertising (indoor poster, on buses, in bars/clubs, at London tube stations): Cannabis, Cocaine and Ecstasy posters (August/September 2009) Radio DJ reads (Kiss Radio, nationally), presence at UK festivals (V Festival, Creamfields) in August 2009, and in game testing (24 th August 20 th September) 1.3 Arrangement of this report Following this introduction is a management summary of the findings. The main body of the report provides a detailed commentary, illustrated by summary tables and charts. Appendices contain details of the sampling method, weighting, the sample profile and the questionnaires. Data have been supplied in separate volumes. In charts and tables - denotes 0 and # denotes a proportion of less than half of one per cent, but more than 0. TNS-BMRB Report THINK! Post Drug Drive Eyes - October

10 2 Management summary and recommendations 2.1 Introduction This report focuses on research carried out in September This was the post stage evaluation for the new Drug Drive campaign Eyes, after its launch in mid-august The drug drive campaign was aired during August 2009 using TV, online, radio DJs, posters, in game and festival advertising. Pre-stage research to provide a benchmark on attitudinal and behavioural measures took place in July Fieldwork ran from the 24 th to 30 th September Interviews were conducted using BMRB s Omnibus survey. In total 1,991 interviews were conducted with those aged 15+ in Great Britain. 2.2 Campaign awareness Seven in ten (71%) respondents had seen or heard advertising or publicity about driving after taking recreational drugs in one of the sources used in the Eyes campaign (TV advertising, poster/press, online, advertising in pubs/clubs and at festivals). Among the target group aged 17-34, awareness of campaign media reached 76%. Those under the age of 35 (76%), as well as men (75%) were significantly more likely to be aware of any drug drive campaign advertising and publicity overall. A TV ad was the most commonly cited source, seen by over half (58%) of all respondents and six in ten (65%) year olds. Around half (46%) of respondents who had seen advertising in at least one of the sources used recalled something that could be directly attributable to the Eyes campaign. Descriptions included mentions of big/huge eyes (22%), references to eyes in general (11%) and the statement Police can tell from your eyes if you have taken drugs (7%). Levels of recall were significantly higher amongst those aged (56%). TNS-BMRB Report THINK! Post Drug Drive Eyes - October

11 When prompted, eight in ten (78%) adults recognised at least one of the ads used in the campaign, increasing to 83% amongst the target group of year olds. The Eyes TV ad was recognised by three quarters of all adults (74%) and young people aged (77%). Eight in ten (80%) of those aged recognised the TV ad, a significantly higher proportion when compared to all adults. Thirteen percent of all respondents said that they had seen at least one of the Eyes poster ads and seventeen percent recognised the online ads. Amongst the target year old group, prompted recognition of the online ads was significantly higher (30%). 2.3 Campaign Communication The Eyes TV ad achieved good impact on its launch, with a high number of respondents agreeing that the ad stuck in their mind (40%). Strong emotional reactions were elicited by the ad with a quarter liking the ad (25%). Four in ten (38%) said the ad made them realise drug driving had the same penalty as drink driving and that drink driving is a serious issue (38%). A third (36%) said it would make people think twice about drug driving. Two in ten (19%) of respondents said that the ad told them something new. Eleven per cent said it would prompt them to talk to friends about the issue of driving after taking recreational drugs. Thirty-nine percent of those who do not know anyone who has driven after taking recreational drugs agree that the TV ad made them think that drug driving is a serious issue compared with 30% of those who do know someone. The proportion of respondents who identify themselves as the target audience is very low, with 3% saying the ad is aimed at people like me. Those who know someone who has driven after taking recreational drugs were no more likely to think that the ad was aimed at someone like them. Four in ten (39%) spontaneously reported the main message of the Eyes TV ad to be simply, don t take drugs and drive, while 12% say the TNS-BMRB Report THINK! Post Drug Drive Eyes - October

12 message is you will get caught. Fewer recognise the main message as that the police can detect a drug driver or that the penalty is the same as for drink drive. The main message of the poster/ press ads was thought to be it shows in your eyes/ your eyes give you away when you have taken drugs (24%). 2.4 Attitudes towards recreational drugs and driving Drink driving was considered to be the most important issue to be addressed by the government, followed by the use of mobile phones and speeding. Drug driving, was considered by one in ten to be the most important issue to be addressed both pre and post campaign. Drink driving was the issue considered to be taken the most seriously by the government, with 85% of respondents agreeing it was taken seriously. Over two-thirds felt Drug Driving was being taken seriously by the government, an increase of seventeen percentage points post campaign (47% pre stage July 09 / 64% post stage September 09). Fewer respondents post campaign admitted to knowing anyone who has driven after taking recreational drugs (10%, compared with 14% precampaign). Nine out of ten adults believed heroin and LSD would have a severe impact on a person s ability to drive. Around 8 in 10, felt Ketamine and Cocaine would have a severe impact on driving ability. Fewer believed drugs such as Ecstasy, 4 pints, and 2 pints would have a severe impact upon driving ability post campaign. However, at the poststage respondents were more likely to say Cannabis would have a severe impact on driving than at the pre-stage. Those who knew someone who has driven after taking recreational drugs were significantly less likely to think Cocaine would have a severe impact on driving, a similar pattern could be seen with Cannabis. Conversely, these respondents were more likely to feel drugs such as Ecstasy, Ketamine and LSD would have a severe impact on driving ability, perhaps due to a greater knowledge of these drugs influencing opinions. TNS-BMRB Report THINK! Post Drug Drive Eyes - October

13 2.5 Likelihood of being stopped by the police and of detection Four in ten (40%) adults thought that a person would be likely to be stopped by the police if they were to drive after taking recreational drugs, with one in ten (10%) thinking this very likely. There was no significant change in this measure from the pre-stage (July 09). Four in ten (42%) respondents thought that it would be easy for the police to spot a driver who had taken recreational drugs, with one in ten (9%) believing that it would be very easy. The proportion of respondents who thought it would be easy for the police to spot a drug driver increased significantly from the pre-stage, from 38% to 42%. Three quarters (76%) thought it would be easy for the police to tell if a driver had taken recreational drugs if the driver were to be stopped. Three in ten (28%) thought that it would be very easy. This was a significant increase from 22% at the pre-stage. When asked how the police would be able to tell if a driver they have stopped had taken recreational drugs, the most common response was eyes/their eyes (45%). This was a marked increase from 20% of respondents giving this answer at the pre-stage. Those who knew someone who had driven after taking recreational drugs were no longer any more likely to say that police could tell by someone s eyes. 2.6 Consequences of Drug Driving Seven in ten respondents believed that, if stopped by the police, a driver who has taken recreational drugs is likely to get convicted (69%). Significantly more respondents aged felt this likely (78%). Whilst the actual penalty if convicted for driving after taking drugs is a minimum one year driving ban, or a fine up to 5000 or up to six months in prison, the penalty was thought by most to be a non-specific fine (23%), a minimum of 12 months disqualification (20%), and the same penalty as drink driving (unspecified) (18%). Adults were most likely to believe that the primary consequence of getting caught driving after taking recreational drugs was increased insurance costs (90%). Overall, there has been little change since the pre-stage in respondents perceptions of the personal consequences associated with a drug driving conviction. TNS-BMRB Report THINK! Post Drug Drive Eyes - October

14 Being given up to 6 months imprisonment and the threat of a criminal record were the greatest worry overall with four in ten of those who know someone who has driven after taking recreational drugs indicating each of these as a key consequence to them personally. 2.7 Conclusions and recommendations Post-campaign, drug driving continues to be the fourth most important issue to be addressed for road safety, after drink driving, use of mobile phones and speeding. However, drug driving is now the issue thought to be taken the most seriously by Government, after drink driving. Contributing to this shift were the high levels of awareness of advertising and publicity about taking recreational drugs and driving amongst all adults, and in particular, amongst the target audience of young people aged Almost half of all adults who recalled seeing or hearing something about this issue, spontaneously attributed what they had seen to the Eyes TV advert. Upon prompting, recognition of the TV ad (aired for the first time in summer 2009) reached 77%, on par with the 75% achieved for prompted recall at the latest evaluation (July 2009) of the Moment of doubt TV advert used for the Drink Driving Personal Consequences campaign a TV ad which has been aired several times in the past. The proportion of respondents identifying themselves as the target audience of the ad was very low, with only 3% of all adults agreeing the ad is aimed at people like me. Those who know someone who has driven after taking recreational drugs were no more likely to think the ad is aimed at someone like them. This could be a result of the campaign itself having drawn attention to this risk behaviour as being socially unacceptable and therefore, people do not want to admit that they have been identified / targeted by the ad. This coincides with the significant decrease from the pre-stage in those admitting to knowing someone who has driven after taking recreational drugs. Encouragingly however, 7% of those aged did agree the ad was aimed at someone like them indicating young people are more likely to understand they are the target audience of the ad. Based on the results of this evaluation, it is evident that the campaign messages are strengthened when multiple types of media are seen in conjunction. For example, the main message of the TV advert was understood to be don t take drugs and drive (39%), while only 7% of respondents understood this to be the message of the press/poster ads. From the posters, respondents were more likely to understand the main message to be it shows in your eyes / your eyes give you away (24%), which focuses more on the drugs element rather than drug driving specifically. In order to ensure a holistic understanding of the campaign TNS-BMRB Report THINK! Post Drug Drive Eyes - October

15 messages, and not just of individual executions, the media mix should remain balanced. While four in ten respondents think it to be likely a person would be stopped by the police if they were driving after taking recreational drugs, there has been no significant change in this measure from the pre-stage. Past experience within friendship groups may have a strong influence of perceptions of the likelihood of this happening. As identified at the pre-stage, experience amongst friendship groups will likely play a factor in credibility of this message and it may be the case that those most targeted by this message are least likely to believe it. Despite this, there has been a significant increase in the proportion who thought it would be easy for the police to spot a drug driver a message reinforced by the campaign. The proportion of respondents mentioning eyes as a way the police can detect a drug drive has more than doubled since the pre-stage. In addition, the target audience of young people were significantly more likely to believe that if stopped by the police, a drug driver is likely to get convicted. Overall, the Eyes campaign, and specifically the TV advert, has been successful in raising the profile of drug driving as a serious issue. The campaign has not only introduced the issue as new news to its target audience, but it is agreed by over one in ten young people, that the TV ad itself would prompt them to talk to their friends about the issue of driving after taking recreational drugs. With continued support, this campaign could act as a catapult for reinforcing this issue as one of importance amongst young people and adults alike. TNS-BMRB Report THINK! Post Drug Drive Eyes - October

16 3 Campaign awareness 3.1 Awareness of sources of information / publicity about drug driving Respondents were prompted with a list of media sources, and asked whether they recalled seeing or hearing anything about taking recreational drugs and driving in any of these sources recently. Media sources used in the latest campaign (TV, newspaper/magazine and poster advertising) are outlined in red. All other campaign sources receiving less than 3% mention are not shown. Chart 3a: Whether seen or heard anything about taking recreational drugs and driving in any of these ways TV advert National newspaper TV news Local newspaper Poster hoarding Radio advert Other TV programmes Magazine Road signs Poster on bus Radio programme TV plays/ soaps Cinema 9% 7% 7% 6% 5% 5% 5% 4% 4% 3% 19% 17% Sep-09 58% ANY DRUG DRIVE CAMPAIGN SOURCE MENTIONED 71% Base: All adults Sept 09 (1991) All mentions of 3% or above Seven in ten (71%) adults recalled seeing or hearing something about taking recreational drugs and driving in at least one of the campaign sources. Among the target group aged 17-34, awareness reached 76%. Six in ten (58%) adults recalled seeing or hearing something on a TV advert, with a significantly higher proportion of the target audience of year olds recalling a TV advert (65%). The next most commonly mentioned source of campaign activity overall was national newspaper, mentioned by one in five respondents (19%). Other key campaign sources were cited by fewer respondents overall, including radio DJ s talking about it (2%), through the internet/a website (e.g. YouTube) TNS-BMRB Report THINK! Post Drug Drive Eyes - October

17 (2%), in pubs/clubs (2%) and on social networking sites (e.g. Bebo / Facebook) (1%). The year old target group were no more likely than all adults to be aware of advertising and publicity about taking recreational drugs and driving in any campaign sources (76%). However, those under the age of 35 were significantly more likely than those over 35 years of age to recall seeing or hearing something in at least one of the sources used in the drug drive campaign (76%, compared with 69% of those aged 35+). Men were more likely than women to recall seeing or hearing any drug drive campaign advertising and publicity overall (75%, compared with 67% of women). Those with children in the household were significantly more likely to recall the TV advert (64%, compared to 54% of those in households where there are no children present), as were young male drivers aged years (77%, compared to 59% of car/van drivers aged 30+). Those who know someone who has driven after taking recreational drugs were more likely to recall the TV advert (74%, compared to 56% of those who do not know anyone who has done this). The same is true for those who know someone who has driven when over the legal alcohol limit with 66% of these respondents recalling the Eyes TV advert (compared to 56% of those who do not know anyone who has done this). There is likely to be overlap within friendship groups of those who know someone who has done one or both of these things. Amongst all adults within the sample, 67% of those who know someone who has driven after taking recreational drugs, also know someone who has driven over the legal alcohol limit. 3.2 Proven recall In order to gain an unprompted measure of campaign recall, those recalling any drug drive advertising in the media sources used at the latest campaign were asked to describe in their own words what they had seen or heard. A wide variety of responses were given, as shown in Chart 3b. TNS-BMRB Report THINK! Post Drug Drive Eyes - October

18 Chart 3b: What remember about publicity/advertising about taking recreational drugs and driving Huge/big eyes Eyes (all other references) Police can tell from your eyes if you have taken drugs Ad recall (all other references) Their eyes show they have taken drugs/their eyes give them away Young people in a car Drink driving (all references) Do not take drugs while driving Accident (no detail) Drug driving is the same/as common as drink driving Young people (no detail) Slows down your responses/affects your reactions when you take drugs 11% 7% 6% 6% 5% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 22% Sep-09 ANY MENTION OF EYES CAMPAIGN REFERENCE 46% All mentions of 4% or above Base: All adults Sept 09 (1991) Around half (46%) of respondents recalling anything relating to drug driving in campaign sources mentioned something that could be directly attributable to the Eyes campaign. Amongst those aged years, a significantly higher proportion correctly recalled the ads (56%). A quarter (22%) of adults recalling drug drive campaign activity mentioned huge/big eyes and 11% recalled something to do with eyes in general. There was little difference in what was remembered by adults and what was remembered by year olds who had seen drug drive advertising or publicity in at least one of the campaign sources. However of those who had seen or heard something in at least one of the campaign sources, those under the age of 35 years were significantly more likely to correctly describe an ad from the Eyes campaign (56%) compared to those over the age of 35 years (41%). Amongst those who know someone who has driven after taking recreational drugs, proven recall of the Eyes campaign was higher (60%, compared with 44% of those who do not know anyone who does this). TNS-BMRB Report THINK! Post Drug Drive Eyes - October

19 3.2.1 What was said examples Some examples of verbatim descriptions of the campaign are provided below. The TV ad with the big eyes. Advert featuring car occupants with big eyes. Get large eyes when on drugs. young adults are driving with big eyes - patrol car driving past. Pupils dilate - helps police to arrest drivers. There is one about people with very big eyes police can see your eyes and tell if you have taken drugs. The TV ad with the lad in the car with the huge eyes. The newspaper ad said something about drug driving. The ad on telly is the one about eyes - shows 4 children in a car who have taken drugs and their eyes are wide and the police have stopped them and I saw the same in a magazine. Kids with massive eyes. It s about anti-drug driving it says it is pretty obvious that police can tell if you have taken drugs and are driving. Remember the kids driving a car with their eyes really big and police can tell they are on drugs. I remember a load of kids in the car with their eyes huge and the comment that the police would be able to tell they had been taking drugs from their eyes. The big eye one they say you get the same penalty as someone who drinks and drives. The advert on the telly with the big eyes, saying that the eyes give it away. Advert with the car and man with wide eyes - same picture on poster at bus stop. The TV advert - there were young people driving after taking drugs. I can just remember people with really big eyes, because the police pulled them over as they could spot someone by their eyes. TNS-BMRB Report THINK! Post Drug Drive Eyes - October

20 I remember the advert with the kids with all the big eyes I thought the advert was compelling to watch. I remember the bulging eyes, it was interesting to watch. There are youths driving along and they get pulled over by the police - and the driver has large eyes and the pupils are very dilated - police being trained to distinguish between drug and drink driving. Kids with big wide eyes - saying that the police are trained to look for the signs of drug driving. The police are cracking down on it. They can do roadside tests to check coordination and they can tell with the eyes which are dilated. It carries the same penalties as drink driving. Police are now trained to recognise whether you've taken drugs and the penalties are the same as for drink driving. TNS-BMRB Report THINK! Post Drug Drive Eyes - October

21 3.3 Prompted recognition of the Eyes drug driving campaign In addition to measuring proven recall, the TV advert Eyes as well as poster ads and online ads were played or shown to respondents on a laptop during the interview, in order to accurately measure prompted recognition (Chart 3c). Respondents were asked if they had seen that advertisement or one similar on TV, on posters or on the internet, and given the opportunity to select which media they had seen the ad in. Chart 3c: Prompted recognition of adverts TV Posters Online Have seen ad % Have not seen ad 25 Base: All adults Sept 09 (1991) Upon prompting, 78% of all adults recognised at least one of the ads used in the Eyes drug drive campaign. Amongst those aged years specifically, eight in ten (83%) respondents recognised at least one of the campaign media, a significantly higher proportion than in the general population. Recognition was significantly higher amongst those in social grades C2DE (81%, compared to 76% who are ABC1). Three quarters of all adults (74%) and young people aged (77%) recognised the TV advert. A significantly higher proportion of those aged recognised this ad (80%) compared to all adults. Those with white ethnic backgrounds were more likely to recognise the ad (76%), as were those who live TNS-BMRB Report THINK! Post Drug Drive Eyes - October

22 in a household with children (80%) and those who know someone who drives after taking recreational drugs (84%). Prompted recognition of the poster ads and online ads was lower overall. Amongst all adults, over one in ten (13%) recognised the poster/press ads when prompted. The online ads had higher prompted recall than the poster ads amongst all adults (17%) and particularly so amongst those aged (30%). This younger target audience were more likely to recognise the online ads than those over the age of 35 years (10%). TNS-BMRB Report THINK! Post Drug Drive Eyes - October

23 4 Campaign communication This section looks at the main messages, and the thoughts and feelings surrounding the seat belts campaign, both spontaneous and prompted. 4.1 Communication of the Eyes TV ad Directly after being shown the Eyes TV ad on screen, all respondents were then shown a series of communication statements, and asked which they felt applied to the ad (Table 4a). Table 4a: Which of the following do you personally feel about the Eyes TV ad (prompted) all adults September 09 (1,991) It sticks in my mind 40 It made me realise that driving after taking recreational drugs has the same penalties as drink driving It made me think drug driving is a serious issue 38 It would make people think twice about driving after taking recreational drugs It would make drug drivers worry about the effect that drugs have on their eyes It made me realise that drugs have an impact on a person s ability to drive I like this ad 25 It made me realise that Cannabis can effect your ability to drive as much as drugs like Ecstasy and Cocaine It told me something new 19 It made me think about the impact that taking drugs and driving could have on my lifestyle It would prompt me to talk to my friends about the issue of driving after taking recreational drugs I found it irritating 4 I found it confusing 3 It s aimed at people like me 3 I m tired of seeing it 3 % Four in ten respondents (40%) stated that the Eyes TV ad stuck in their mind which is a core measure of cut through. Another measure of the advert s cut through is whether an emotional reaction is evoked by the ad. Again the ad TNS-BMRB Report THINK! Post Drug Drive Eyes - October

24 provoked some fairly strong responses in relation to this, with a quarter stating that they liked the ad (25%). Linked with the emotional reaction elicited by the ad is its engagement value. One in ten respondents agreed that the Eyes ad would prompt them to talk to their friends about the issue of driving after taking recreational drugs (11%). The ad also provided a fair level of new news to people, with two in ten agreeing that the ad told them something new (19%). Respondents agreed that the ads communicated specific information about drug driving to them, with four in ten (38%) stating that the ads made them realise that driving after taking recreational drugs has the same penalties as drink driving and two in ten that it made them realise that Cannabis can effect someone s ability to drive as much as drugs like Ecstasy and Cocaine (21%). Four in ten said that the ad made them think that drug driving is a serious issue (38%). A third felt that the ad would make people think twice about driving after taking recreational drugs (36%) and that the ad would make drug drivers worry about the effect that drugs would have on their eyes (32%). Only a few respondents said that they found the ad irritating (4%) or confusing (3%), or stated that they were tired of seeing it (3%). However, just three per cent of respondents believed that they were the target audience for the TV ad by agreeing that it was aimed at people like me indicating that very few identify themselves as being amongst the target group for the ad. Even those who knew someone who had driven after taking recreational drugs were unlikely to identify as the target audience, with less than 1% agreeing that the ad was aimed at people like them. Table 4b shows agreement with the same communication statements amongst different subgroups. The shading indicates significant differences between the adjacent subgroups. TNS-BMRB Report THINK! Post Drug Drive Eyes - October

25 Table 4b: Which of the following do you personally feel about the Eyes TV ad (prompted) - subgroups Total Those who know someone who drives after taking recreational drugs Those who don t know anyone who drives after taking recreational drugs Ages Ages 35+ Men Women (1,991) (200) (1791) (559) (1408) (911) (1,080) % % % % % % % It sticks in my mind It made me realise that driving after taking recreational drugs has the same penalties as drink driving It made me think drug driving is a serious issue It would make people think twice about driving after taking recreational drugs It would make drug drivers worry about the effect that drugs have on their eyes It made me realise that drugs have an impact on a person s ability to drive I like this ad It made me realise that Cannabis can effect your ability to drive as much as drugs like Ecstasy and Cocaine It told me something new It made me think about the impact that taking drugs and driving could have on my lifestyle It would prompt me to talk to my friends about the issue of driving after taking recreational drugs I found it irritating I found it confusing It s aimed at people like me 3 * I m tired of seeing it TNS-BMRB Report THINK! Post Drug Drive Eyes - October

26 As Table 4b demonstrates, there were few differences to be seen amongst subgroups, particularly among those who do/do not know anyone who has driven after taking recreational drugs. Those respondents who said that they knew someone who has driven after taking recreational drugs were significantly less likely than those who did not know someone who does this to agree that the ad made them think that drug driving is a serious issue (30% compared with 39%). There were no other significant differences between these two groups. Those in the age group were more likely than those aged 35 or over to say that the ad would make people think twice about driving after taking recreational drugs (40% of year olds compared with 35% of 35+), as were men (39%, compared to 33% of women). The younger age group were also more likely to say that the ad would make drug drivers worry about the effect that drugs have on their eyes (36%, compared with 31%) although they were less likely to say that it made them realise that drugs have an impact on a person s ability to drive. Those aged were more likely to feel that they were the target group: 7% felt the ad was aimed at people like them, whilst only 1% of those aged 35 or over felt this. However, as there was no difference between those who did and did not know someone who has driven after taking recreational drugs on this measure, this suggests they may be identifying with the people in the ad due to their age rather than their actions. Women were more likely to say that the ad told them something new (22% vs. 16% of men). Men were more inclined to think that the ad was aimed at someone like them (5% compared with 1% of women). Although men were also more likely to say that they were tired of seeing the Eyes ad (4% compared with 2% of women), this percentage is still a low proportion. TNS-BMRB Report THINK! Post Drug Drive Eyes - October

27 4.2 Believed main message of Eyes TV ad Respondents were asked to describe, in their own words, what they felt was the main message of the Eyes TV ad. The responses given by 3% or more of respondents are shown in Chart 4c. Chart 4c: Main message of Eyes TV ad (spontaneous) Don't take drugs and drive You will get caught Don't take drugs Changes in/effect on your eyes (when taking drugs) Police can tell if you've taken drugs It's easy to spot when drugs have been taken Drug driving holds the same penalty as drink driving Police can spot you from your eyes For young people/ teenagers Don't do it (no detail) 12% 8% 8% 7% 5% 4% 4% 3% 3% 39% Don't Know Other 3% 2% All responses of more than 3% Base: All adults Sept 09 (1991) Four in ten indicated the main message of the ad as don t take drugs and drive (39%). Some made reference to the risk of police catching a drug driver, with 12% saying you will get caught. Fewer indicated the main message to be don t take drugs (8%) or that drugs cause changes in/effects on your eyes (8%). Fewer still understood the message to be that the police can tell if a driver has taken drugs or that drug driving holds the same penalty as drink driving. Whether or not the respondent knew anyone who has driven after taking recreational drugs did not affect their response regarding the main message of the ad, although those aged 35 and over were more likely to give the message don t take drugs and drive (40%, compared with 35% of year olds). TNS-BMRB Report THINK! Post Drug Drive Eyes - October

28 4.3 Believed main message of Eyes Poster/Press ad Respondents were asked to describe, in their own words, what they felt was the main message of the Eyes poster/press ad. The responses given by 3% or more of respondents are shown in Chart 4d. Chart 4d: Main message of Eyes Poster/press ad (spontaneous) It shows in your eyes/ your eyes give you away (when you have taken drugs) Drugs affect your eyes Don't take drugs and drive Eyes (no detail) Don't take drugs Effect on your eyes (no detail) You know when someone has taken drugs Dilated pupils Police can spot drug drivers Tells you/ shows you the effects of taking drugs You will be caught (by police) Eyes becoming dilated/ big/ bigger 7% 5% 4% 4% 4% 4% 3% 3% 3% 3% 10% 24% Don't Know Other 2% 16% All responses of more than 3% Base: All adults Sept 09 (1991) The main message responses given for the poster and press ads mainly related to eyes (either specifically regarding pupils or general mentions of eyes), not to take drugs (and drive) and mentions of police/people being able to tell when a person has taken drugs. A quarter gave the main message of the poster ads as it shows in your eyes/ your eyes give you away when you have taken drugs (24%). One in ten said that drugs affect your eyes and 7% thought that the main message was not to take drugs and drive. Sixteen percent were unable to identify a main message for the poster/press ads, answering don t know at this question. Responses for the main message of the poster ads were less likely to include messages about not drinking and driving and references to getting caught than the TV ad, concentrating more on the fact that drug use shows in your eyes. Because of these differing focuses it is essential that complimentary messages are reinforced across all media sources used as the campaign progresses to ensure that key messages such as your eyes will give you away and the penalty for drug driving is the same as for drink driving provide a cohesive, connected message across media. TNS-BMRB Report THINK! Post Drug Drive Eyes - October

29 By social grade, ABC1s were more likely to say that it shows in your eyes or that your eyes give you away when you have taken drugs (26%) than C2DEs (21%). Whether or not the respondent knew anyone who had driven after taking recreational drugs had no effect on their perception of the main message of the poster/press ad. TNS-BMRB Report THINK! Post Drug Drive Eyes - October

30 5 Attitudes towards taking recreational drugs and driving This chapter looks at road safety priorities and the public s perception of how seriously the government are taking a variety of road safety issues. The chapter then looks at whether respondents know anyone who undertakes dangerous driving behaviours. Finally it will cover the level of impact respondents think certain drugs will have on driving ability. 5.1 Road safety priorities To put drug driving into context, at the start of the interview respondents were asked to choose the single most important road safety issue to be addressed by the government (prompted with a list). Chart 5a: The issue considered the single most important issue to be addressed by the government to improve road safety Drink Driving Use of mobile phones Speeding Drug Driving Drivers not fully concentrating Child road awareness Not wearing seatbelts Road rage Tail gating Driving while tired Not using child restraints Motorcycle accidents Other Don't Know 2% 3% 2% 3% 2% 3% 2% 3% 2% 2% 1% 2% 2% 1% 1% 1% 6% 7% 5% 6% 10% 10% 14% 15% 17% * 21% 23% Sep-09 Jul-09 33% * Base: All adults July 09 (2048), Sept 09 (1991) * Indicates a significant difference at the 99% level Drink driving was considered to be the most important issue to be addressed by the government (33%, up from 23% in July 09) followed by the use of mobile phones (17%) and speeding (14%). The proportion of adults selecting drink driving has increased significantly since the pre-stage. It is possible that the difference pre to post-stage is a result of order effect as at the pre-stage, this question was asked after a series of questions regarding drink driving (Drink Drive post survey). TNS-BMRB Report THINK! Post Drug Drive Eyes - October

31 In addition, the figure for use of mobile phones as the most important issue to be addressed fell from the pre-stage (21%) to the post-stage (17%) - this could be linked to the increased proportion of adults choosing drink drive at the latest stage. Although order effects may have influenced the proportion of adults answering drink drive pre to post, the rank order of these issues was as expected and in line with the results from the Annual Survey 2008 (the last time this question was asked). The focus of this report, drug driving, was considered by one in ten to be the most important issue to be addressed both pre and post campaign (10%) the fourth in the list. Drug driving therefore remained as a priority over other issues such as drivers not concentrating fully (6%), child road awareness (5%) and a wide range of other potential dangers. There were no particular sub-groups who were more likely to feel drug driving was the most important issue to be addressed. Younger respondents, however, were broadly more likely to feel drink driving needed to be addressed (37% of year olds, compared with 31% of those 35 and older) and older respondents felt the use of mobile phones should be addressed (20% of those aged 35+, compared with 11% of year olds). Respondents were then asked how seriously the government were taking various dangerous driving issues. The results are presented in Chart 5b. Chart 5b: How seriously government is taking issues Very seriously Fairly seriously Not very seriously Not at all seriously July Sept * July Sept Drink Drug Road drive drive rage Using a mobile whilst driving July Sept * July Sept 7 * Driving when too tired July Sept % Base: All adults July 09 (2048), Sept 09 (1991) * Indicates a significant difference at the 99% level TNS-BMRB Report THINK! Post Drug Drive Eyes - October

32 Drink driving was the issue considered to be taken the most seriously by the government, with 84% of respondents agreeing it was taken seriously. At the post-stage, fewer respondents felt drink drive is being taken very seriously by the government (48%, compared with 54% at the pre-stage). However, high figures for drink drive at the pre-stage could be the result of the drink drive ad Personal Consequences being aired in June 2009 just prior to the pre drug drive research. Young people were more likely to think the government were taking drink driving very seriously (55% of year olds, compared with 45% of those aged 35+) and were also more likely to state drink driving to be the single most important issue to be addressed by government. Over two-thirds felt Drug Driving was being taken seriously by the government, an increase of seventeen percentage points post campaign (47% pre stage July 09, 64% post stage September 09). Men were more likely to feel the government were taking Drug Driving seriously (70% compared with 59% of women), as were young people (77% of year olds, compared with 58% of those over 35). Six in ten respondents agreed using a mobile phone whilst driving was being taken seriously (57%), showing no change from the pre stage (July 09). Young people were more likely to feel the government was taking mobile phone use whilst driving seriously (70%, compared with 51% of older respondents). Young people, however, did not see it as such a priority, when compared with those over 35 years old, when asked what the most important road safety issue was for the government to focus on. Four in ten felt driving when too tired (40%) was being taken seriously, with significantly fewer respondents feeling it was being taken very seriously at the post-stage (7%, compared with 11% at the pre-stage). Young people were more likely to feel this issue was being taken seriously by the government (47% of young people aged 17-34, compared with 37% of those over 35). TNS-BMRB Report THINK! Post Drug Drive Eyes - October

THINK! Road Safety Campaign Evaluation. Post evaluation of the Personal Consequences Drink Drive campaign

THINK! Road Safety Campaign Evaluation. Post evaluation of the Personal Consequences Drink Drive campaign THINK! Road Safety Campaign Evaluation Post evaluation of the Personal Consequences Drink Drive campaign Report February 2009 Prepared for: Department for Transport Prepared by Helen Angle, Sarah Kirwan,

More information

2014 May Elections Campaign Tracking Research

2014 May Elections Campaign Tracking Research 2014 May Elections Campaign Tracking Research Report for: Controlled document - Issue 4 TNS 2014 08.08.2014 JN 123256 Controlled document - Issue 5 Contents Executive Summary... 1 1. Background and objectives...

More information

So that's how they drive! Tracking driver behaviour and attitudes in Scotland Chris Eynon, TNS-BMRB. Road Safety Scotland Seminar, October 2011

So that's how they drive! Tracking driver behaviour and attitudes in Scotland Chris Eynon, TNS-BMRB. Road Safety Scotland Seminar, October 2011 So that's how they drive! Tracking driver behaviour and attitudes in Scotland Chris Eynon, TNS-BMRB Road Safety Scotland Seminar, October 2011 Aim of the research To monitor driver behaviour and attitudes

More information

COI Research Management Summary on behalf of the Department of Health

COI Research Management Summary on behalf of the Department of Health COI Research Management Summary on behalf of the Department of Health Title: Worth Talking About Campaign Evaluation 2010 / 2011 Quantitative research conducted by TNS-BMRB COI Reference number: 114770

More information

New Queensland motorcycle safety campaign Be aware. Take care. Survive.

New Queensland motorcycle safety campaign Be aware. Take care. Survive. New Queensland motorcycle safety campaign Be aware. Take care. Survive. The Department of Transport and Main Roads is committed to addressing the safety of motorcyclists. Motorcycle riders and pillions

More information

Speeding Enforcement (Post-It Notes) Campaign Evaluation Summary Report Office of Road Safety. July 2013

Speeding Enforcement (Post-It Notes) Campaign Evaluation Summary Report Office of Road Safety. July 2013 Speeding Enforcement (Post-It Notes) Campaign Evaluation Summary Report Office of Road Safety July 2013 Contents Page # 3 Objectives and Methodology 5 Summary of Findings 7 Campaign Awareness 11 Campaign

More information

SAFER JOURNEYS. DISCUSSION DOCUMENT Have your say on our next road safety strategy AUGUST 2009

SAFER JOURNEYS. DISCUSSION DOCUMENT Have your say on our next road safety strategy AUGUST 2009 22 SAFER JOURNEYS DISCUSSION DOCUMENT Have your say on our next road safety strategy AUGUST 29 11 Reducing the impact of alcohol/drug impaired driving What is the problem? Alcohol/drug impaired driving

More information

THINK! Cycling evaluation. January 2014. THINK! Cycling evaluation

THINK! Cycling evaluation. January 2014. THINK! Cycling evaluation January 201 Contents 1 Campaign aims and background 2 Overview of key findings Campaign awareness and take out Cause and responsibility for cycling accidents Driver knowledge and behaviour Cyclist knowledge

More information

The Road to an Effective Campaign Think! Don t Drink and Drive Case Study. Richard Bookey Leo Burnett 27 th January 2009

The Road to an Effective Campaign Think! Don t Drink and Drive Case Study. Richard Bookey Leo Burnett 27 th January 2009 The Road to an Effective Campaign Think! Don t Drink and Drive Case Study Richard Bookey Leo Burnett 27 th January 2009 Aim: by 2010 to reduce road deaths & serious injuries by: 40% overall 50% for children

More information

Story & The Scottish Government Take it right outside Campaign Tracking Research Key findings Post-campaign. September 2014

Story & The Scottish Government Take it right outside Campaign Tracking Research Key findings Post-campaign. September 2014 Story & The Scottish Government Take it right outside Campaign Tracking Research Key findings Post-campaign September 2014 Presentation Content Background Objectives Method Sample Profile Main findings

More information

THE DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF ROAD SAFETY PUBLICITY CAMPAIGNS

THE DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF ROAD SAFETY PUBLICITY CAMPAIGNS THE DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF ROAD SAFETY PUBLICITY CAMPAIGNS INTRODUCTION This note discusses some basic principals of the data-led design of publicity campaigns, the main issues that need to be considered

More information

Killed 2013 upper estimate Killed 2013 lower estimate Killed 2013 central estimate 700

Killed 2013 upper estimate Killed 2013 lower estimate Killed 2013 central estimate 700 Statistical Release 12 February 2015 Estimates for reported road traffic accidents involving illegal alcohol levels: 2013 (second provisional) Self-reported drink and drug driving for 2013/14 Main findings

More information

How to Develop a Sporting Habit for Life

How to Develop a Sporting Habit for Life How to Develop a Sporting Habit for Life Final report December 2012 Context Sport England s 2012-17 strategy aims to help people and communities across the country transform our sporting culture, so that

More information

Know Your Limits campaign

Know Your Limits campaign Know Your Limits campaign Alcohol harm: government context Cross- government alcohol strategy: Safe. Sensible. Social Reducing alcohol-related harm, disorder & ASB Reducing alcohol-related health harms

More information

Drug Drive August 2009 Post Campaign Report

Drug Drive August 2009 Post Campaign Report Drug Drive August 2009 Post Campaign Report Background Introduction Long running campaigns have established a general consensus that drink-driving is socially unacceptable and dangerous, and the general

More information

PCC Elections Campaign Tracking Research. Report for: TNS BMRB. Controlled document - Issue 4 JN 113244 TNS 2013 15/2/2013

PCC Elections Campaign Tracking Research. Report for: TNS BMRB. Controlled document - Issue 4 JN 113244 TNS 2013 15/2/2013 PCC Elections Campaign Tracking Research Report for: Controlled document - Issue 4 TNS BMRB TNS 2013 15/2/2013 JN 113244 Contents Executive Summary... 1 1. Background and objectives... 12 2. Methodology...

More information

HMRC Tax Credits Error and Fraud Additional Capacity Trial. Customer Experience Survey Report on Findings. HM Revenue and Customs Research Report 306

HMRC Tax Credits Error and Fraud Additional Capacity Trial. Customer Experience Survey Report on Findings. HM Revenue and Customs Research Report 306 HMRC Tax Credits Error and Fraud Additional Capacity Trial Customer Experience Survey Report on Findings HM Revenue and Customs Research Report 306 TNS BMRB February2014 Crown Copyright 2014 JN119315 Disclaimer

More information

The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents The North Review of Drink and Drug Driving Law February 2010

The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents The North Review of Drink and Drug Driving Law February 2010 THE NORTH REVIEW INTO DRINK AND DRUG DRIVING This is the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents submission to the North Review of Drink and Drug Driving Law. It has been produced following consultation

More information

New National Poll Reveals Public Attitudes on Substance Abuse, Treatment and the Prospects of Recovery

New National Poll Reveals Public Attitudes on Substance Abuse, Treatment and the Prospects of Recovery New National Poll Reveals Public Attitudes on Substance Abuse, Treatment and the Prospects of Recovery Finds some significant differences in perceptions among various population groups. Nearly half of

More information

Drink and Drug Driving in Victoria: Lessons from 10 years of TAC Research

Drink and Drug Driving in Victoria: Lessons from 10 years of TAC Research Drink and Drug Driving in Victoria: Lessons from 10 years of TAC Research Allison McIntyre 1, Samantha Cockfield 2 & Michael Nieuwesteeg 2 1 Consultant, 2 Transport Accident Commission, Victoria Abstract

More information

ef*f Children and Parents: Media Use and Attitudes Report

ef*f Children and Parents: Media Use and Attitudes Report ef*f Children and Parents: Media Use and Attitudes Report Research Document Publication date: October About this document This report examines children s media literacy. It provides detailed evidence on

More information

PAYMENT PROTECTION INSURANCE RESEARCH

PAYMENT PROTECTION INSURANCE RESEARCH PAYMENT PROTECTION INSURANCE RESEARCH ANALYTICAL REPORT NOVEMBER 2015 ABOUT COMRES ComRes provides specialist research and insight into reputation, public policy and communications. It is a founding member

More information

AHIS Road safety project Student Council THINK!

AHIS Road safety project Student Council THINK! AHIS Road safety project Student Council 2013 THINK! Today, we drive safer cars on safer roads; decades of advertisements and public information campaigns have made most of us safer drivers. Improvements

More information

Findings 258. Drink-driving: prevalence and attitudes in England and Wales 2002. Laura Brasnett. Key points

Findings 258. Drink-driving: prevalence and attitudes in England and Wales 2002. Laura Brasnett. Key points The Research, Development and Statistics Directorate exists to improve policy making, decision taking and practice in support of the Home Office purpose and aims, to provide the public and Parliament with

More information

The Partnership Attitude Tracking Study (PATS)

The Partnership Attitude Tracking Study (PATS) The Partnership Attitude Tracking Study (PATS) Teens 7 Report Released August 4, 8 Partnership for a Drug-Free America Partnership Attitude Tracking Study Table of Contents Page Mission..........................................3

More information

Alcohol and Drink Driving Legal Alcohol Limit

Alcohol and Drink Driving Legal Alcohol Limit The facts about... Alcohol and Drink Driving Legal Alcohol Limit Five key things you need to know In 2012, 1,200 people were seriously injured when a driver was over the legal alcohol limit. As a result,

More information

Consumer research into use of fixed and mobile internet

Consumer research into use of fixed and mobile internet Consumer research into use of fixed and mobile internet Research Document Publication date: 23 March 10 Contents Section Page 1 Introduction 1 2 Methodology 2 3 Residential consumers 3 4 Business consumers

More information

Combating Drink Driving: The Next Steps The Views of the Automobile Association. Summary

Combating Drink Driving: The Next Steps The Views of the Automobile Association. Summary Combating Drink Driving: The Next Steps The Views of the Automobile Association Summary * Drinking and driving is perceived by the great majority of AA members and drivers in general as inexcusable and

More information

SNT newsletter Rural East Dorset

SNT newsletter Rural East Dorset SNT newsletter Rural East Dorset March 2015 Safer Neighbourhoods is a commitment by Dorset Police to improving the quality of life within our communities by working together with partners to target the

More information

Global advertising specialties impressions study

Global advertising specialties impressions study Global advertising specialties impressions study Melinda Ligos, Andy Cohen and Larry Basinait piece together a cost analysis of promotional products versus other advertising media 38 / www.cgasa.com www.cgasa.com

More information

Risk Management Guidelines

Risk Management Guidelines Driving - Drugs & Alcohol The Problem Drug Driving Around 18% of people killed in road crashes have traces of illegal drugs in their blood, with cannabis being the most common. Although the risks of drug

More information

2015 Arkansas Driver s Survey 42 questions July 7, 2015

2015 Arkansas Driver s Survey 42 questions July 7, 2015 2015 Arkansas Driver s Survey 42 questions July 7, 2015 Hello, my name is from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. We are doing a short survey asking Arkansans about their driving practices. We

More information

Prior Qualifications of Adult OLASS learners 2015

Prior Qualifications of Adult OLASS learners 2015 BIS RESEARCH PAPER NUMBER 260 Prior Qualifications of Adult OLASS learners 2015 JANUARY 2016 1 The views expressed in this report are the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Department

More information

Global Food Security Programme A survey of public attitudes

Global Food Security Programme A survey of public attitudes Global Food Security Programme A survey of public attitudes Contents 1. Executive Summary... 2 2. Introduction... 4 3. Results... 6 4. Appendix Demographics... 17 5. Appendix Sampling and weighting...

More information

Early Indicator Estimates from the Wealth and Assets Survey

Early Indicator Estimates from the Wealth and Assets Survey Early Indicator Estimates from the Wealth and Assets Survey Abstract Preliminary estimates from the Wealth and Assets Survey using attitudinal data which are not dependent on the thorough checking and

More information

Review of NSW Roadside drug testing. 2 NSW Police Force

Review of NSW Roadside drug testing. 2 NSW Police Force Review of NSW Roadside drug testing Patricia Bryant 1, Mark Stevens 2 and Glyn Hansen 3 1 Roads and Traffic Authority 2 NSW Police Force 3 Division of Analytical laboratories Abstract The Road Transport

More information

CAMPAIGN TEST SUMMER CAMPAIGN NORWAY SUMMER 2013 INNOVASJON NORGE JUNE 2013

CAMPAIGN TEST SUMMER CAMPAIGN NORWAY SUMMER 2013 INNOVASJON NORGE JUNE 2013 CAMPAIGN TEST SUMMER CAMPAIGN NORWAY SUMMER 2013 INNOVASJON NORGE JUNE 2013 1 Background And Purpose In May 2013, Innovasjon Norge launched a campaign in Norway about Norway as a summer holiday destination.

More information

UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTRE PATIENT PARTICIPATION GROUP ANNUAL REPORT & ACTION PLAN 2012-13

UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTRE PATIENT PARTICIPATION GROUP ANNUAL REPORT & ACTION PLAN 2012-13 UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTRE PATIENT PARTICIPATION GROUP ANNUAL REPORT & ACTION PLAN 2012-13 Introduction & Recruitment of the Patient Participation Group Review on how and why the Patient group was established:

More information

Awareness of the CRB, and the impact of CRB checks on crime, the fear of crime and job applicants Research with the general public for the Criminal

Awareness of the CRB, and the impact of CRB checks on crime, the fear of crime and job applicants Research with the general public for the Criminal Awareness of the CRB, and the impact of CRB checks on crime, the fear of crime and job applicants Research with the general public for the Criminal Records Bureau May-June 2008 Contents Introduction 1

More information

E-Government Chair Research Project The use of social media for effective public engagement. Case Study - NZ Transport Agency: Drugged drivers

E-Government Chair Research Project The use of social media for effective public engagement. Case Study - NZ Transport Agency: Drugged drivers E-Government Chair Research Project The use of social media for effective public engagement Case Study - NZ Transport Agency: Drugged drivers Author: Summary New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) uses a

More information

CCMTA Public Opinion Survey of Drugs and Driving in Canada SUMMARY REPORT. Completed by: Brian Jonah, Senior Researcher CCMTA

CCMTA Public Opinion Survey of Drugs and Driving in Canada SUMMARY REPORT. Completed by: Brian Jonah, Senior Researcher CCMTA CCMTA Public Opinion Survey of Drugs and Driving in Canada SUMMARY REPORT Completed by: Brian Jonah, Senior Researcher CCMTA Contents 1.0 Executive Summary... 3 2.0 Background... 5 3.0 Method... 5 3.1

More information

CAMPAIGN ASSETS THINK CYCLIST STAKEHOLDER TOOLKIT

CAMPAIGN ASSETS THINK CYCLIST STAKEHOLDER TOOLKIT STAKEHOLDER TOOLKIT INTRODUCTION The Department for Transport s campaign provides road safety information for road users. Our aim is to encourage safer behaviour to reduce the number of people killed and

More information

Attitudes to Road Safety: Analysis of Driver Behaviour Module, 2010 NatCen Omnibus Survey

Attitudes to Road Safety: Analysis of Driver Behaviour Module, 2010 NatCen Omnibus Survey Road Safety Research Report No. 122 Attitudes to Road Safety: Analysis of Driver Behaviour Module, 2010 NatCen Omnibus Survey Lucy Lee and Alun Humphrey NatCen February 2011 Department for Transport Although

More information

Consumer Engagement and Detriment Survey 2014

Consumer Engagement and Detriment Survey 2014 Consumer Engagement and Detriment Survey 2014 JN121550 Contents 1. Executive summary 3 2. Introduction 7 3. Methodology 9 4. Consumer knowledge and capability 11 5. Consumer problems 24 6. Impact of problems

More information

March 2016. Renewal of Private Health Insurance Consumer Research

March 2016. Renewal of Private Health Insurance Consumer Research March 2016 2 Renewal of Private Health Insurance Consumer Research CONTENTS FOREWORD... 3 KEY FINDINGS... 4 1 INTRODUCTION... 6 2 PROFILE OF RESEARCH RESPONDENTS... 8 3 RENEWING AND SWITCHING HEALTH INSURANCE...11

More information

2012 Traffic Safety Behaviors Survey Executive Summary

2012 Traffic Safety Behaviors Survey Executive Summary 2012 Traffic Safety Behaviors Survey Executive Summary Minnesota Department of Public Safety, Office of Traffic Safety Prepared By: Corona Insights Corona Insights, 2011 CoronaInsights.com CONTENTS Introduction...

More information

Managing drug and alcohol misuse at work

Managing drug and alcohol misuse at work Survey report September 2007 Managing drug and alcohol misuse at work Contents Summary of key findings 2 Policies and procedures 4 Testing 10 Managing and supporting employees with drug and/or alcohol

More information

The rules you have to follow when you are on Licence

The rules you have to follow when you are on Licence The rules you have to follow when you are on Licence Information taken from: PI 20/2012 & PSI 40/2012 Licences and Licence Conditions Annex A Developed and illustrated by www.changepeople.co.uk 1 Anyone

More information

Views on eligibility for tax credits and Child Benefit and any stigma associated with claiming these

Views on eligibility for tax credits and Child Benefit and any stigma associated with claiming these Views on eligibility for tax credits and Child Benefit and any stigma associated with claiming these Helen Breese HM Revenue and Customs Research Report Number 150 Disclaimer The views in this report are

More information

Young Drivers The High-Risk Years

Young Drivers The High-Risk Years Chubb Personal Insurance (CPI) is the personal lines property and casualty strategic business unit of Chubb & Son, a division of Federal Insurance Company, as manager and/or agent for the insurers of the

More information

Seat belt and mobile phone use surveys: England and Scotland, 2014

Seat belt and mobile phone use surveys: England and Scotland, 2014 Statistical Release 25 February 2015 Seat belt and mobile phone use surveys: England and Scotland, 2014 Main findings In 2014, 1.6% of all drivers and 1.4% of car drivers in England and Scotland were using

More information

Customers experiences of the Youth Contract

Customers experiences of the Youth Contract Customers experiences of the Youth Contract February 2014 Research Report No 865 A report of research carried out by TNS-BMRB on behalf of the Department for Work and Pensions Crown copyright 2014. You

More information

Attitudes to Mental Illness 2014 Research Report

Attitudes to Mental Illness 2014 Research Report Attitudes to Mental Illness 2014 Research Report Prepared for Time to Change April 2015 TNS BMRB JN121168 Contents 1. Executive summary 3 2. Introduction 6 3. Attitudes to mental illness 8 4. Ways of describing

More information

The facts about road accidents and children

The facts about road accidents and children A The AA Motoring Trust The facts about road accidents and children Around 5, children under the age of 16 die or are seriously injured on Britain s roads each year Nearly two in three road accidents happen

More information

Mobile phone usage. Attitudes towards mobile phone functions including reception

Mobile phone usage. Attitudes towards mobile phone functions including reception Attitudes towards mobile phone functions including reception Research Document Publication date: 23 January 13 Contents Section Page 1 Executive summary 1 2 About the research 3 3 Consumer experience

More information

Welsh Fire and Rescue Services Road Safety Strategy 2015-2020

Welsh Fire and Rescue Services Road Safety Strategy 2015-2020 All Wales Call Challenge Welsh Fire and Rescue Services Road Safety Strategy 2015-2020 GWASANAETH TÂN AC ACHUB Canolbarth a Gorllewin Cymru Mid and West Wales FIRE AND RESCUE SERVICE 2 Contents Executive

More information

Topic: The legal system

Topic: The legal system Topic: The legal system Lesson: Legalising drugs KS or Year Group: Year 10/11 Resources: 1. Resource 1 Sky News clip 1 Police chief: All drugs should be legal 2. Resource 2 Sky News clip 2 Netherlands

More information

2012 Traffic Safety Behaviors Survey Minnesota Department of Public Safety, Office of Traffic Safety

2012 Traffic Safety Behaviors Survey Minnesota Department of Public Safety, Office of Traffic Safety This document is made available electronically by the Minnesota Legislative Reference Library as part of an ongoing digital archiving project. http://www.leg.state.mn.us/lrl/lrl.asp 2012 Traffic Safety

More information

How to Guide Users Guide to Door Drop Marketing

How to Guide Users Guide to Door Drop Marketing How to Guide Users Guide to Door Drop Marketing 2nd Edition, 2011 540 Television channels 400 Radio stations 9000 Magazines & newspapers 100 Million websites ONLY 1 LETTERBOX CONTENTS An introduction to

More information

YOUTH AND ALCOHOL SURVEY

YOUTH AND ALCOHOL SURVEY YOUTH AND ALCOHOL SURVEY OVERVIEW Based on a survey conducted by the Business Research Centre for the Alcohol Advisory Council of New Zealand ALAC Occasional Publication: No. 1 ALCOHOL ADVISORY COUNCIL

More information

Betting odds and advertising for betting agencies during sports broadcasts Community research JULY 2013

Betting odds and advertising for betting agencies during sports broadcasts Community research JULY 2013 Betting odds and advertising for betting agencies during sports broadcasts Community research JULY 2013 Canberra Purple Building Benjamin Offices Chan Street Belconnen ACT PO Box 78 Belconnen ACT 2616

More information

Study into the Sales of Add-on General Insurance Products

Study into the Sales of Add-on General Insurance Products Study into the Sales of Add-on General Insurance Quantitative Consumer Research Report Prepared For: Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) March, 2014 Authorised Contact Persons Frances Green Research Director

More information

DON T DRINK AND DRIVE WORK TOWARDS YOUNG PEOPLE

DON T DRINK AND DRIVE WORK TOWARDS YOUNG PEOPLE DON T DRINK AND DRIVE WORK TOWARDS YOUNG PEOPLE Helena Hellstén, Helsäker Konsult AB Alpstigen 22, 589 37 Linköping Sweden Tel. +46 733-262232 E-mail: helena@helsaker.se ABSTRACT Drinking and driving is

More information

school transport: survey of good practice

school transport: survey of good practice school transport: survey of good practice IMPROVING SERVICES SAFE WORKING TOGETHER SUSTAINABLE SCHOOL TRANSPORT: SURVEY OF GOOD PRACTICE 1 MVA Consultancy was commissioned to undertake a survey of good

More information

Drunk Driving in the United States: A Roadmap for Progress

Drunk Driving in the United States: A Roadmap for Progress Drunk Driving in the United States: A Roadmap for Progress J. H. Hedlund and A. T. McCartt Preusser Research Group, Trumbull, Connecticut, USA Abstract The study investigated why drunk driving in the United

More information

Results of the Second Flexible Working Employee Survey

Results of the Second Flexible Working Employee Survey Results of the Second Flexible Working Employee Survey 297 Results of the Second Flexible Working Employee Survey By Heidi Grainger and Heather Holt, Employment Market Analysis and Research, Department

More information

Patient survey report 2008. Category C Ambulance Service User Survey 2008 North East Ambulance Service NHS Trust

Patient survey report 2008. Category C Ambulance Service User Survey 2008 North East Ambulance Service NHS Trust Patient survey report 2008 Category C Ambulance Service User Survey 2008 The national Category C Ambulance Service User Survey 2008 was designed, developed and co-ordinated by the Acute Surveys Co-ordination

More information

Drinking and Driving in Great Britain: Which Way Forward?

Drinking and Driving in Great Britain: Which Way Forward? Drinking and Driving in Great Britain: Which Way Forward? Andrew B Clayton British Institute of Traffic Education Research, Kent House, Kent Street, Birmingham B5 6QF, UK DRINKING AND DRIVING IN GREAT

More information

WORD OF MOUSE. How radio optimises internet search

WORD OF MOUSE. How radio optimises internet search WORD OF MOUSE How radio optimises internet search Introduction The internet has become a primary tool for consumers to access brands, and this has inevitably led to a shift in the roles that other media

More information

Back to School Car Safety. Direct Buy Warranty Staff September 19, 2014

Back to School Car Safety. Direct Buy Warranty Staff September 19, 2014 Back to School Car Safety Direct Buy Warranty Staff September 19, 2014 It s back to school season, and that means kids are picking out new clothes, putting on their backpacks, and hitting the road to get

More information

Social Media & Its Importance For Brands. September 2015

Social Media & Its Importance For Brands. September 2015 Social Media & Its Importance For Brands September 2015 Contents 3. Introduction 4. Key Points 5. Conclusions 7. Frequency Of Using Social Media 8. Interacting With Consumers 10. Types Of Company Ever

More information

Illegal Drugs Policy Swansea University and Students Union

Illegal Drugs Policy Swansea University and Students Union Illegal Drugs Policy Swansea University and Students Union Illegal Drugs Policy for Swansea University and Students Union Table of Contents Page Drugs Policy Statement 2 Drugs Policy 3 1. Introduction

More information

Stigmatisation of people with mental illness

Stigmatisation of people with mental illness Stigmatisation of people with mental illness Report of the research carried out in July 1998 and July 2003 by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) on behalf of the Royal College of Psychiatrists Changing

More information

The Government propose to take a zero tolerance approach to the following 8 controlled drugs which are known to impair driving:

The Government propose to take a zero tolerance approach to the following 8 controlled drugs which are known to impair driving: Drug-Driving: Proposed New Law New law on drug driving to be introduced in the near future The new law on drug driving is designed, in part, to reduce the number of failed prosecutions under the existing

More information

CAMPAIGN ASSETS THINK CYCLIST STAKEHOLDER TOOLKIT

CAMPAIGN ASSETS THINK CYCLIST STAKEHOLDER TOOLKIT STAKEHOLDER TOOLKIT INTRODUCTION The Department for Transport s campaign provides road safety information for road users. Our aim is to encourage safer behaviour to reduce the number of people killed and

More information

Key Findings ASIC Report 419. Australian Financial Attitudes and Behaviour Tracker Wave 1: March August 2014

Key Findings ASIC Report 419. Australian Financial Attitudes and Behaviour Tracker Wave 1: March August 2014 ASIC Report 419 Wave 1: March August 2014 Australian Securities and Investments Commission December 2014 Contents INTRODUCTION 3 KEY FINDINGS 9 Financial attitudes 10 Keeping track of finances 11 Planning

More information

November 2014 March 2015

November 2014 March 2015 November 2014 March 2015 April 2015 1 Executive Summary & Acknowledgements Background Aims Objectives National context Local context - Trafford School Nurse Service Methodology Project Outline Firs Primary

More information

Analysis of Employee Contracts that do not Guarantee a Minimum Number of Hours

Analysis of Employee Contracts that do not Guarantee a Minimum Number of Hours Analysis of Employee Contracts that do not Guarantee a Minimum Number of Hours Coverage: GB Date: 30 April 2014 Geographical Area: GB Theme: Labour Market 1. Summary There is no legal definition of zero-hours

More information

Child Road Safety Audit for South Gloucestershire 2009-2011

Child Road Safety Audit for South Gloucestershire 2009-2011 Child Road Safety Audit for South Gloucestershire 9 - August 9 Contents Page Foreword Executive Summary. Introduction. Review of the Action Plan. Summary of Casualty Statistics 9. Child Casualty Trends.

More information

Victims of Crime the help and advice that s available

Victims of Crime the help and advice that s available Details about Victim Support Your local Victim Support Scheme is: Victims of Crime the help and advice that s available You can also contact the Victim Supportline on: 0845 30 30 900 Or, if you prefer,

More information

1 Research into parents and teenagers opinions and concerns on pre-watershed television programming

1 Research into parents and teenagers opinions and concerns on pre-watershed television programming 1 Research into parents and teenagers opinions and concerns on pre-watershed television programming 1 Introduction Background Following Ofcom decisions in April and May 2011 on The X Factor 1 and two music

More information

Guidance on health and character

Guidance on health and character Guidance on health and character Who is this document for?... 2 About the structure of this document... 2 Section 1: Introduction... 4 About us (the HPC)... 4 How we are run... 5 About registration...

More information

Investors in People Impact Assessment. Final report August 2004

Investors in People Impact Assessment. Final report August 2004 Final report Investors in People Impact Assessment 2004 Final report Investors in People Impact Assessment By: Charles Michaelis Michelle McGuire Final report Contents 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY... 5 1.1 BACKGROUND...5

More information

PENNSYLVANIA MALPRACTICE STUDY

PENNSYLVANIA MALPRACTICE STUDY The Project on Medical Liability in Pennsylvania Funded by The Pew Charitable Trusts PENNSYLVANIA MALPRACTICE STUDY General Public Survey Small Business Survey Conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates,

More information

Investigating Superannuation: Quantitative Investigation with Superannuation Consumers Final Quantitative Report

Investigating Superannuation: Quantitative Investigation with Superannuation Consumers Final Quantitative Report Australian Taxation Office Investigating Superannuation: Quantitative Investigation with Final Quantitative Report Colmar Brunton undertakes all research projects to the highest possible standards, and

More information

Adults media use and attitudes report

Adults media use and attitudes report Adults media use and attitudes report Research Document Publication date: March 01 Contents Section Page 1 Executive Summary... 4 Introduction... 11.1 Background... 11. Research methodology and analysis...

More information

Adults Media Use and Attitudes Report 2014

Adults Media Use and Attitudes Report 2014 Adults Media Use and Attitudes Report 2014 Research Document Publication date: April 2014 1 Contents Section Page 1 Executive summary 4 2 Introduction 10 2.1 Ofcom s duties 10 2.2 What is media literacy?

More information

Hosting Motivation and Satisfaction Study:

Hosting Motivation and Satisfaction Study: Hosting Motivation and Satisfaction Study: Feedback from 2006-07 Long-Term Exchange Students, Host Families, and Host School Conducted by surveying a random selection of participants from exchange programs

More information

Antisocial personality disorder

Antisocial personality disorder Understanding NICE guidance Information for people who use NHS services Antisocial personality disorder NICE clinical guidelines advise the NHS on caring for people with specific conditions or diseases

More information

Children and road safety: a guide for parents

Children and road safety: a guide for parents Child Safety Week Report Children and road safety: a guide for parents What are the facts? The number of children aged up to 19 years who are killed or seriously injured each year on Britain's roads has

More information

2015 Christmas Post-Campaign Tracking Research

2015 Christmas Post-Campaign Tracking Research ATTACHMENT 3 uary 2015 Christmas Post-Campaign Tracking Research Introduction Background Metro Vancouver first launched a Zero Waste Challenge Christmas campaign in 2009 to encourage residents to reduce

More information

This presentation has been put together by DDRC Healthcare. It focuses on a basic understanding of alcohol, and some of DDRC s research findings from

This presentation has been put together by DDRC Healthcare. It focuses on a basic understanding of alcohol, and some of DDRC s research findings from This presentation has been put together by DDRC Healthcare. It focuses on a basic understanding of alcohol, and some of DDRC s research findings from a study, recently conducted by them, which looked at

More information

News consumption in the UK: 2014 Report

News consumption in the UK: 2014 Report News consumption in the UK: 2014 Report Research Document Publication date: June 2014 About this document This report provides key findings from Ofcom s 2014 research into news consumption across television,

More information

Allegations in Foster Care A UK study of foster carers experiences of allegations

Allegations in Foster Care A UK study of foster carers experiences of allegations Allegations in Foster Care A UK study of foster carers experiences of allegations Vicki Swain October 2006-2 - Contents 1 Introduction 1.1 Previous research 2 Methodology 2.1 The sample 3 Findings 3.1

More information

Gambling Help campaigns Summary of Evaluations

Gambling Help campaigns Summary of Evaluations Gambling Help campaigns Summary of Evaluations Responsible Gambling Community Awareness Campaigns Phases 1-4 The Responsible Gambling Community Awareness Campaign uses an early intervention approach, the

More information

1 NHS Health Check Marketing Advice and Ideas. Public Health England NHS Health Check Marketing Advice and Ideas

1 NHS Health Check Marketing Advice and Ideas. Public Health England NHS Health Check Marketing Advice and Ideas 1 NHS Marketing Advice and Ideas Public Health England NHS Marketing Advice and Ideas In partnership with In partnership with 2 NHS Marketing Advice and Ideas Introduction This short document has been

More information

DRINK DRIVING AND THE LAW

DRINK DRIVING AND THE LAW This information is general and not a substitute for legal advice. The Legal Services Commission provides free advice for most legal problems. Contact the Legal Helpline 1300 366 424 (TTY 8463 3691) www.lsc.sa.gov.au

More information

Paper Bills and Statements A Real Necessity In A Digital World

Paper Bills and Statements A Real Necessity In A Digital World Paper Bills and Statements A Real Necessity In A Digital World Banks, Utilities and Telecoms companies are now increasingly going on-line and either withdrawing paper based bills and statements, making

More information

About drugs. Psychoactive drugs. Drugs are substances that change a person s physical or mental state.

About drugs. Psychoactive drugs. Drugs are substances that change a person s physical or mental state. 1 About drugs Drugs are substances that change a person s physical or mental state. The vast majority of drugs are used to treat medical conditions, both physical and mental. Some, however, are used outside

More information

Expanding the Conversation Leveraging Social Media for Brand Interaction. April 2013. Copyright 2013

Expanding the Conversation Leveraging Social Media for Brand Interaction. April 2013. Copyright 2013 Expanding the Conversation Leveraging Social Media for Brand Interaction April 2013 Copyright 2013 Overview Turn on the television or open up your local newspaper. Chances are you will see brands highlighting

More information