EXPLORING ECOSYSTEMS Lesson Plan

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "EXPLORING ECOSYSTEMS Lesson Plan"

Transcription

1 EXPLORING ECOSYSTEMS Lesson Plan TARGET AUDIENCE Fourth through Seventh grade STANDARDS VA grades 4-6: Scientific Investigation, Reasoning, and Logic; Living Systems; Resources; Force, Motion and Energy; Living Systems VA grade 7: Life Science LS.7-LS.11 MD grades 4-7: Skills and Processes; Life Science; Environmental Science DC grades 4-7: Scientific Thinking and Inquiry; Life Science; Resources; Ecology * See page 4-6 for an in-depth list of standards of learning covered in this program. OVERARCHING GOAL To investigate the relationship between the plants, animals and environmental/non-living factors existing in various ecosystems. STUDENT OBJECTIVES 1. Students will identify interactions of humans, plants, animals, and environmental/non-living factors from within an ecosystem (forest, river, or estuary) based on their needs for food, water, shelter and energy. 2. Students will compare and contrast the components of their ecosystems with the Biodiversity Wall in the Discovery Room, and will look for components of ecosystems in the Hall of Mammals. STUDENT OUTCOMES 1. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the concept of an ecosystem through group presentations and discussion of how humans, plants, animals, and environmental/non-living factors interact and are dependent on one another. MATERIALS, RESOURCES, TIME, SPACE Materials: Objects representing different plants and animals with corresponding image cards. Image cards depicting environmental/non-living factors, large poster paper and markers. Exploring Ecosystems/ Hall of Mammals Activity Sheet. Time: 45 min. in the Discovery Room. Space: Discovery Room, Hall of Mammals. Denotes helpful suggestions! 1

2 PROCEDURE Welcome: Scientist Discussion (2 minutes): Teachers and students are welcomed. The lesson begins with the instructor referencing a scientist in the museum who studies ecosystems: ECOLOGIST. Students will be told that they will practice being Ecologists in today s lesson as they study the relationship of organisms and the environment within 4 different ecosystems in the surrounding D.C area. Brainstorming (Focus on Students Previous Knowledge) (5 minutes): First: students will be asked to think about what they already know about ecosystems (this will activate prior knowledge and help the students become more comfortable providing thoughts). Students will be asked: What do you think about when you hear the word Ecosystem? The instructor will document the student s descriptions, strategically placing them into two groups, first without headlines. Students will be encouraged to expand on their thinking and make connections. (E.g. if the student says whale, the instructor will ask them to further their thinking by asking where the whale lives, what does it eat, need to survive, etc.) Second: to generate further thinking the students will be asked what each group has in common. This will assist students in recognizing the two major groups that make up an ecosystem (living and non-living elements). This activity should encourage students to reflect on the relationships that exist and how both groups work as a whole to retain balance. Students will explore the Discovery Rooms Biodiversity Wall which displays plants and animals from 4 ecosystems within 50 miles of Washington DC. The FOREST, RIVER, MARSH and ESTUARY/BAY. Today, students will be working as teams of scientists to design an ecosystem exhibit. Modeling (Reference for Small Group s Activity) (8 minutes): In order to visually demonstrate the connections between living and non-living elements, the students will participate as a group in designing a MARSH ecosystem. The students will be asked to think of connections as the instructor models effective thinking strategies and questioning. What does each element provide and/or need from another? Arrows and words will be added Helpful Suggestion: Ask students to think of their Basic Needs : Food, Shelter, and Warmth etc. How are the Basic Needs needs of plants or animals the same or different? Students will be told that there will be three sources to get information from in their small groups: 1.) From what they already know; 2.) From the characteristics of the objects they observe; and 3.) From information they read in the Biodiversity Wall Field Guide. It will be reinforced that there are many possible answers and no single right one, as long as they can justify their decisions. Centers (Exploration and Discussion in Small Groups) (15 minutes): The students will be divided into five groups. Each group will have 1 ecosystem bag which will include objects as well as laminated cards representing plants, animals and environmental/non-living factors from a single ecosystem. Each station will be managed by 2

3 one chaperone/and or volunteer. Students will be encouraged to work as a team, talk out loud and that there is often more than one right answer. Student will create a spider-type web design showing the relationship between elements in their ecosystem using arrows and text. Students should use the group model as a reference. Students will be encouraged to make connections beyond the food chain, such as habitat and exchange of energy. Once completed, students will be asked to further their thinking by choosing a significant element from their ecosystem. Either one that they feel is important or interesting. They will discuss this element during the reconvene and sharing. Helpful suggestion: If there is time left in the end, make sure to revisit each componenet of the ecosystem, is there anything else? Always as the student s for their ideas first, however the chaperone and/or volunteer may need to provide supportive prompting and model effective thinking for the students. Make sure to include connections such as photosyntehesis, human influence and needs. Reconvene (Reflective Thinking Group Activity) (12 minutes): Students will reconvene and display their ecosystem exhibits. This will provide an opportunity to view each group s display, make comparisons and promote conversation. The instructor will visit each group and ask: What element did you chose from your ecosystem and why? The instructor will then remove that element from the poster and ask: What would happen if this element was taken away? What components of the ecosystem would be affected? Students will be asked to give themselves a round of applause for being such excellent Ecologists today. Ecosystems are complex and always changing never static! Students will be encouraged to look around and discover all the ways we are connected they will be encouraged to take their learning from today out into the world. Closure (Post Lesson Thinking) (3 minutes): Students will be encouraged to visit the Hall of Mammals (or possibly other exhibits) to examine ecosystems represented from different continents of the world. Their challenge is to look for plants, animals and environmental/non-living factors from a global ecosystem depicted in the Hall. Compare and contrast the local ecosystems studied within the Discovery Room with these global ecosystems. Exploring Ecosystems/ Hall of Mammals Activity Sheet will be distributed for students to complete while in the Museum (upon request). The students and teachers will be thanked for coming, and also the chaperones for their assistance. Students will be encouraged to visit again! 3

4 Helpful Suggestion: Alternate Activity for a special education group or ADHD group: Students can focus on the characteristics of one animal but still see the connections of the whole ecosystem. Each child or group of 2 3 children is assigned an animal or object with a card of information about that animal or object. Or, they can also get a field guide page (or adapted page) with information about their animal. After they have read the material, have the children go around and introduce their animal. Ask the students to think about who their animal or object is connected to as they go around doing their presentations. Give one group a ball of yarn and ask them to hold the end of the string. As a group they need to decide one animal/object they are connected to and why. For example I have the sun, I am connected to a fern because plants use the sun to make food. The next student group will pass the yarn to another group and state the connection. They can connect more than once but all groups should get the yarn at least once. Example for the importance of relationships within ecosystems: Tell the students you know that bald eagles are endangered meaning there are not very many of them left. What would happen if they became extinct meaning there were no more bald eagles? To demonstrate this have the bald eagle group let go of their string and the web will fall apart. 4

5 STANDARDS VA Grades : a) Distinctions are made among observations, conclusions, inferences, and predictions 4.5: Students investigate and understand how plants and animals in an ecosystem interact with one another and the non-living environment. Key concepts include: b) organization of communities; c) flow of energy through food webs; d) habitats; e) life cycles; f) influence of human activity on ecosystems. 4.8: Students will learn about some of Virginia s natural resources. Key concepts are: a) water resources; b) animals and plants; d) forests. 5.1: e) Data are collected, recorded and reported using a diagram. 6.2: b) Students will understand the role of the sun in the formation of energy sources. 6.7: Students will investigate and understand the natural processes and human interactions that affect watershed systems: Focus will be on: c) river systems and processes; d) estuaries. Grade 7: o LS.7: Students will investigate and understand that organisms within an ecosystem are dependent on one another and on non-living components of the environment. Key concepts are: b) interactions resulting in flow of energy and matter throughout system c) complex relationships within terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. d) energy flow in food webs. o LS.8: Students will investigate and understand that interactions exist among members of a population. o LS.9: Students will study interactions among populations in a biological community. Key concepts are: a) relationships among producers, consumers and decomposers; b) relationships between predators and prey; c) competition and cooperation; d) symbiotic relationships. o LS.10: a) Students will understand the difference between ecosystems and biomes. b) Students will learn the characteristics of land and freshwater ecosystems. o LS.11: Students will investigate and understand that ecosystems are dynamic and change over time. MD Grades 4-7 Standard 1.A.1. Gather data from different forms of scientific investigations including print sources and personal observations. a) Support investigative findings with data found in books. e) Follow directions and keep accurate records of one s work for 5

6 comparison. Standard 1.B.1.a) Develop explanations using knowledge possessed and evidence gathered from print resources, observations and investigations. b) Offer reasons for their findings and consider reasons of others. Standard 1.C.1 Recognize that clear communication is an essential part of science. a) Make use of a diagram to summarize data. b) Submit work for the critique of others which involves discussing findings. Grade 4 Standard 3.F.1 Explain ways that individuals and groups of organisms interact with each other and their environment. a) Identify and describe the interactions of organisms present in a habitat: competition, beneficial interactions, roles within food chain and webs. b) Explain that changes in habitat are sometimes beneficial to it and sometimes harmful. Grade 6 Standard 3.F.1.a) Explain that populations increase and decrease relative to the availability of resources and conditions of environment. b) Identify and describe factors that could limit populations within environment. c) Explain competition for resources. Grade 7 Standard 3.E.1 Explain that the transfer and transformation of matter and energy links organisms to one another and their physical setting. Grade 7 Standard 6.A.1 Recognize and explain the impact of a changing human population on the use of natural resources. DC Grades 4-7 Grade 4: 4.1.2: Explain that clear communication is an essential part of scientific inquiry 4.1.5: Support statements with ideas and data found in print media : Organisms interact with one another in various ways : Recognize that some source of energy is needed for all organisms to stay alive and grow : Investigate an ecosystem of the Chesapeake Bay watershed and wetlands and describe how they support a wide variety of plant and animal life that interact with living and non-living things. Grade 5: 5.1: Scientific progress is made by asking relevant questions and conducting careful investigations : Explain how organisms can cause changes in their environment to ensure survival, and these changes may affect the ecosystem : Explain how changes in an organism s habitat are sometimes beneficial and and sometimes harmful and changes to the environment have caused death, migration and extinction. Grade 6: 6.1: Scientific progress is made by asking relevant questions and conducting careful investigations : Locate information in reference books. 6

7 6.6.1: Describe why water is essential for life and also for human activities : Explain the important role of the water cycle within a watershed. Grade 7: 7.1: Scientific progress is made by asking relevant questions and conducting careful investigations : Use a diagram to serve as a visual display of evidence for claims and/or conclusions : Recognize that in all environments, organisms with similar needs and living strategies compete with one another for resources : Describe how two types of organisms may interact in a competitive or cooperative relationship : Create a food web to explain how energy and matter are transferred : Describe how a population of organisms is held in check by one or more environmental constraints. 7

8 EXPLORING ECOSYSTEMS Background Information for the Teacher Information about Ecosystems An ecosystem is a naturally occurring assemblage of organisms plants, animals, and other living organisms living together within their environment, functioning as a loose unit. Ecosystems are one of the basic units of ecology, which is the study of the relationships between organisms and their environment. Ecology also includes the study of individual organisms, populations of individual species, or communities of many species in relation to their environment. Scientists who study ecosystems are called ecologists. Ecosystem level ecologists study the interactions within and between communities in relation to environmental factors. Ecosystem ecologists may study the energy flow and nutrient cycling within a system. They may also study food chains, or how organisms that decompose dead plants and animals provide a base for the entire system. An ecosystem is a dynamic and complex whole, interacting as a unit. Energy and matter flows between the components of an ecosystem. The organisms in an ecosystem are usually well balanced with each other and with their environment. This balance is achieved through various interactions such as predation, competition, parasitism, mutualism, and commensalism. The needs of the organisms, including food, water, and shelter, are met by other organisms and by nonliving factors in their ecosystems. Ecosystems are very complex, and their balance can be affected by even small changes in living or nonliving factors. Changes may be natural or caused by humans. Climate changes, introduction of new environmental factors or new species, or the removal or extinction of a species or factor in the environment, can have widespread results. Humans also interact with their ecosystems in both positive and negative ways. Humans obtain many of their needs from components of their ecosystems, and may rely on specific ecosystems for agriculture, commerce, tourism, and other uses. The size of an ecosystem can vary. It may be a whole forest or a small pond. Ecosystems are often separated by geographical barriers, like deserts, mountains, or oceans, or are isolated such as lakes or rivers. These borders are never rigid, though, so ecosystems tend to blend into each other. As a result, the whole earth can be seen as a single ecosystem, or an individual lake can be divided into several ecosystems, depending on the scale used. Biomes are related to ecosystems but are not the same thing. Biomes are major regional or global communities that are characterized by the dominant forms of plant life and the climate. Examples of biomes include temperate forests, grasslands, and deserts. Ecosystems may include one or more biomes depending on the size of the ecosystem in question. 8

9 Example of Pond/Lake Ecosystem Image courtesy of Image courtesy of 9

10 Glossary abiotic Adjective. Non-living. assemblage Noun. Group. biodiversity Noun. The variety of organisms living within a specific habitat or region, or the world as a whole. biome Noun. A major regional or global biotic community, such as a grassland or desert, characterized by the dominant forms of plant life and the prevailing climate. biotic Adjective. Living. carnivore Noun. An organism that eats animals. commensalism Noun. A relationship between two organisms in which one benefits while the other is unaffected. community Noun. A group of plants and animals living and interacting with one another in a specific region under relatively similar environmental conditions. competition Noun. The demand by two or more organisms for limited environmental resources, such as nutrients, living space, or light. component Noun. A part of a system. deciduous Adjective. Losing leaves at the end of the growing season. diversity Noun. Variety or difference; a mix. ecology Noun. The science of the relationships between organisms and their environments. ecosystem Noun. A community of living organisms, together with their environment, functioning as a unit. environment Noun. The combination of external physical conditions that affect and influence the growth, development, and survival or organisms. filter feeder Noun. An animal that lives in water and feeds by filtering microscopic material from the water. habitat Noun. The area or environment where an organism normally lives or occurs. herbaceous Adjective. Lacking wood or xylem within its structure; a non-woody plant. herbivore Noun. An organism that eats plants. interbreed Verb. To breed with another species. introduced Adjective. Brought into and established in a new place or environment. Plants and animals that are introduced in a specific area are not native to that area. invertebrate Noun. An animal without a backbone or spinal column. migrant Noun. An organism that changes location, usually by moving from one region to another between seasons. migrate Verb. To change location, usually by moving from one region to another between seasons. mutualism Noun. An association between two organisms in which both organisms benefit. niche Noun. The function, position, or space occupied by an organism within a habitat or ecological community. nocturnal Adjective. Active at night. non-vascular Adjective. Lacking vessels that carry fluids or nutrients. omnivore Noun. An organism that eats both plants and animals. organism Noun. An individual form of life, such as a plant, animal, fungus, bacterium, or protist. parasitism Noun. A relationship between two organisms in which one, the parasite, benefits at the expense of the other, the host. permanent resident Noun. A bird or other animal that lives in one area and does not migrate. photosynthesis Noun. A process used by plants to convert water, carbon dioxide and sunlight into carbohydrates and oxygen. pollinate Verb. To transfer pollen from the anther, or male part, of one flower to the stigma, or female part, of another flower. Pollination allows plants to reproduce. population Noun. All the organisms that make up a specific group or live in a specific habitat. predation Noun. The capturing of prey as a means for obtaining food. range Noun. The geographic region in which a plant or animal normally lives or grows. species Noun. A group of organisms that share common characteristics and are able to reproduce with one another. The seventh largest grouping of organisms in the scientific system of classification. specimen Noun. An individual used to represent a group, such as a scientific genus or species. subspecies Noun. A smaller group of organisms within a species that live in a specific geographic range and may have different coloration or characteristics than other organisms of that species. Different subspecies are still part of a single species because they can reproduce with one another. substrate Noun. The surface or ground. territory Noun. An area occupied by a single animal, mated pair, or group, that is often defended against intruders, especially of the same species. vascular Adjective. Having vessels that carry fluids or nutrients. vertebrate Noun. An animal with a backbone or spinal column. wetlands Noun. A wet area, such as a marsh or swamp. woody Adjective. A plant with wood or xylem within its structure. 10

11 Resources Suggested Web Sites: Chesapeake Bay Foundation Missouri Botanical Gardens Biomes of the World, Freshwater Ecosystems, and Marine Ecosystems Institute of Ecosystem Studies Defenders of Wildlife National Wildlife Federation Field guides Office of Naval Research Habitats National Geographic Society Habitats National Geographic Society and World Wildlife Federation Ecosystem video, audio, and photography World Wildlife Fund Local Links for Biodiversity, Washington DC, Museums and Nature Centers Suggested Books: Begon, M., Harper, J.L. & Townsend, C.R. (1996). Ecology: Individuals, Population, and Communities. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell Science. Ricklefs, R.E. (1990). Ecology. NY: W.H. Freeman and Company. References Begon, M., Harper, J.L. & Townsend, C.R. (1996). Ecology: Individuals, Population, and Communities. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell Science. Burton, D. (1996). Ecology of Fish and Wildlife. Albany, NY: Delmar Publishers. Krebs, C.J. (1994). Ecology: The Experimental Analysis of Distribution and Abundance. NY: Harper Collins College Publishers. Pickett, S.T.A., Kolasa, J. & Jones, C.G. (1994). Ecological Understanding. San Diego: Academic Press. Ricklefs, R.E. (1990). Ecology. NY: W.H. Freeman and Company. Valiela, I. (1995). Marine Ecological Processes. NY: Springer-Verlag. 11

12 EXPLORING ECOSYSTEMS Activity Sheet Ecosystems in the Hall of Mammals Name Complete the chart for one of the following ecosystems in the Hall of Mammals: North American temperate forest; North American frozen north; African savanna; African desert; South American rainforest; Australia. List at least 5 plants and animals you see in this ecosystem. List non-living components you see in this ecosystem (water, shelter, etc.). HINT: You may need to carefully look, listen, and read the backgrounds, painted pictures, and written descriptions in the Hall to find more information and some of the non-living components! In the Discovery Room, you saw examples of water sources, flowering plants, trees, insects and other invertebrates, fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals from several local ecosystems. What specific types of environmental factors, plants, and animals were MISSING in the Mammals Hall global ecosystems? 12

13 EXPLORING ECOSYSTEMS Post Activity to do in the Classroom Schoolyard Ecosystems Objectives: 1. Students will identify plants, animals, and environmental/non-living factors that compose a local ecosystem (schoolyard). 2. Students will sort and arrange plants, animals, and environmental/non-living factors from within an ecosystem (schoolyard) according to potential interactions. Time: Two 55-minute periods (could be longer depending on complexity of project) Materials: Activity sheets from Museum visit; reference books on ecosystems; white paper and colored pencils; large poster-size paper; markers; string; glue; a variety of natural objects found in the schoolyard; pictures of various plants, animals, and habitats. Post Activity Discussion (10 min; Day 1) Students share their findings from the Exploring Ecosystems lesson and the Hall of Mammals visit. Teacher lists the additional characteristics and vocabulary about ecosystems as students presents their findings. Post Activity Problem Solving/Application (45 minutes, Day 1; 35 minutes, Day 2) Introduce the problem students will solve. You are scientists at NMNH who have been asked to make an exhibit showing the relationships between components of a local ecosystem. Ask students to arrange the objects in a web-type design that reflects how the plants, animals, and environmental/non-living factors might interact in an ecosystem. 1. In the classroom, students compile a list of the plants, animals, and nonliving/environmental factors they will include from the local ecosystem. Reference books may be used to determine which species can be found locally. 2. Student groups assemble a variety of natural materials from the schoolyard that represent plants, animals, and non-living/environmental factors from the local ecosystem. When they cannot collect the objects (i.e. live insects), they should use white paper and colored pencils to make field drawings. 3. Back in the classroom, students supplement the natural materials and field drawings they have collected to represent components of the ecosystem with pictures cut out from magazines. Teacher circulates and asks questions to guide them. 4. Students use string and glue to attach objects, drawings, and pictures to a large poster-size sheet of paper in a web design. Students draw lines with arrows and descriptions of interactions between parts of the ecosystem web. Post Activity Presentation (20 minutes): Members from each group present their ecosystems and explain how their exhibit demonstrates the components of ecosystems and the interactions between those components. 13

14 14

EXPLORING ECOSYSTEMS Lesson Plan

EXPLORING ECOSYSTEMS Lesson Plan EXPLORING ECOSYSTEMS Lesson Plan TARGET AUDIENCE Fourth through Seventh grade STANDARDS VA grades 4-6: Scientific Investigation, Reasoning, and Logic; Living Systems; Resources; Force, Motion and Energy;

More information

tundra desert coniferous forest deciduous forest rainforest grassland aquatic biome habitat environment ecosystem species

tundra desert coniferous forest deciduous forest rainforest grassland aquatic biome habitat environment ecosystem species Science Unit 6: Vocabulary List One tundra desert coniferous forest deciduous forest rainforest grassland aquatic biome habitat environment ecosystem species The coldest of the biomes, located at the top

More information

Lesson Plan Two - Ecosystems

Lesson Plan Two - Ecosystems Lesson Plan Two - Ecosystems Summary Students discuss what living things need to survive. They identify the abiotic and biotic components of an ecosystem and describe the roles and interactions of producers

More information

LESSON 1: EXPLORE THE ECOSYSTEM

LESSON 1: EXPLORE THE ECOSYSTEM LESSON 1: EXPLORE THE ECOSYSTEM LENGTH: 60 MINUTES GRADES/AGES: GRADES 3-7 Lesson Overview: Learn more about ecosystems and how an ecosystems species are interconnected through games and diagrams. Explore

More information

NOTE TO TEACHER: It is appropriate to introduce the mitochondria (where energy is made) as a major structure common to all cells.

NOTE TO TEACHER: It is appropriate to introduce the mitochondria (where energy is made) as a major structure common to all cells. 5.2.1 Recall the cell as the smallest unit of life and identify its major structures (including cell membrane, cytoplasm, nucleus, and vacuole). Taxonomy level: 1.1 and 1.2-A Remember Factual Knowledge

More information

3 Types of Interactions

3 Types of Interactions CHAPTER 1 3 Types of Interactions SECTION Interactions of Living Things BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: What determines an area s carrying capacity?

More information

How do organisms interact?

How do organisms interact? Lesson 1 Energy Flow in Ecosystems Lesson 2 Relationships in Ecosystems Lesson 3 Adaptation and Survival How do organisms interact? ecosystem population community food chain food web predator prey energy

More information

plankton eat plankton world

plankton eat plankton world It s a plankton eat plankton world Table of Contents Ask A Biologist activity for classroom and home By Colleen Miks Experiment Overview Food Web Worksheet Marine Organisms Worksheet What do I eat? Worksheet

More information

1 Everything Is Connected

1 Everything Is Connected CHAPTER 1 1 Everything Is Connected SECTION Interactions of Living Things BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: What do organisms in an ecosystem depend

More information

Matter and Energy in Ecosystems

Matter and Energy in Ecosystems Matter and Energy in Ecosystems The interactions that take place among biotic and abiotic factors lead to transfers of energy and matter. Every species has a particular role, or niche, in an ecosystem.

More information

How do abiotic factors affect the distribution of organisms?

How do abiotic factors affect the distribution of organisms? How do abiotic factors affect the distribution of organisms? Why aren t Kangaroos in N. America? Factors affecting the distribution of organisms can be divided in to biotic and abiotic categories. Biotic

More information

4 th Grade Science Unit B: Life Sciences Chapter 3: Flow of Energy and Matter Lesson 1: How does energy flow?

4 th Grade Science Unit B: Life Sciences Chapter 3: Flow of Energy and Matter Lesson 1: How does energy flow? 4 th Grade Science Unit B: Life Sciences Chapter 3: Flow of Energy and Matter Lesson 1: How does energy flow? ecosystem Ecosystem is the living and nonliving things and the way they interact in an environment.

More information

Principles of Ecology

Principles of Ecology Principles of Ecology Before You Read Use the What I Know column to list the things you know about ecology. Then list the questions you have about ecology in the What I Want to Find Out column. K W L What

More information

Science Tenth Edition

Science Tenth Edition Richard T. Wright Environmental Science Tenth Edition Chapter 2 Ecosystems: What They Are Copyright 2008 Pearson Prentice Hall, Inc. Key Topics Ecosystems: A Description The Structure of Ecosystems From

More information

Ecology & Biome Vocabulary

Ecology & Biome Vocabulary Ecology & Biome Vocabulary Create a table in your lab notebook with these headings. You will use the front and back of a page. There are vocabulary words underlined, the definition column should be the

More information

Ecology- an ecosystem: a Biome: o They are either terrestrial or aquatic. rainforests, deserts, coral reefs

Ecology- an ecosystem: a Biome: o They are either terrestrial or aquatic. rainforests, deserts, coral reefs Topic 17: Ecology Ecology- The environment is an organism s surroundings o It includes:! biotic factors: Ecosystems! abiotic factors: an ecosystem: In order for an ecosystem to maintain life it must: -

More information

Ecology - Interactions in Communities

Ecology - Interactions in Communities Ecology - Interactions in Communities Symbiotic Relationships ( living together ) symbiosis - dissimilar organisms living together symbiont lives in /on a second species, host parasitism and mutualism

More information

In this lesson, students will identify a local plant community and make a variety of

In this lesson, students will identify a local plant community and make a variety of MAKING COMMUNITY MEASUREMENTS: BIOTIC FACTORS Grades 3 6 I. Introduction In this lesson, students will identify a local plant community and make a variety of measurements, preferably during two different

More information

HUNTINGTON BEACH STATE PARK

HUNTINGTON BEACH STATE PARK HUNTINGTON BEACH STATE PARK 16148 Ocean Highway Murrells Inlet, SC 29576 Phone: (843) 237-4440 Fax: (843) 237-3387 and a new Eco Lab with a plankton farm and biotope aquariums representing the different

More information

Grassland Food Webs: Teacher Notes

Grassland Food Webs: Teacher Notes Grassland Food Webs: Teacher Notes Alan Henderson ecosystem Objectives After completing this activity students will be able to: Create a food web and identify producers and consumers. Assign organisms

More information

Predator & Prey. Time: 2 hours. Carnivore- a flesh-eating animal. Consumer- a heterotrophic organism

Predator & Prey. Time: 2 hours. Carnivore- a flesh-eating animal. Consumer- a heterotrophic organism Concepts: Energy passes from one living thing to another. Energy from the sun and nutrients in the soil are recycled and pass through all levels of the food chain. Consumers compete for resources and against

More information

Science Standards of Learning for Virginia Public Schools Correlation with National Science Standards

Science Standards of Learning for Virginia Public Schools Correlation with National Science Standards Standards of Learning for Virginia Public Schools Correlation with National Standards Key P = Pre-activity E = Extension activity C = Core activity S = Supplemental activity Standard Strands Finding Common

More information

All About Butterflies

All About Butterflies All About Butterflies Middle School Life Science TEKS Sixth Grade: 6.12E, 6.12F Seventh Grade: 7.10A, 7.10B, 7.11A, 7.11B, 7.12A, 7.12B, 7.13A Eighth Grade: 8.11A, 8.11B, 8.11C Life Science Vocabulary

More information

Relationships in Ecosystems. Vocabulary

Relationships in Ecosystems. Vocabulary Relationships in Ecosystems Vocabulary Relationships in Ecosystems Big Ideas Diversity and Evolution of Living Organisms Explore the scientific theory of evolution by relating how the inability of a species

More information

Rain Forests. America's. Web of Life. Rain Forest Ecology. Prince William Network's OVERVIEW OBJECTIVES SUBJECTS

Rain Forests. America's. Web of Life. Rain Forest Ecology. Prince William Network's OVERVIEW OBJECTIVES SUBJECTS Rain Forest Ecology National Science Education Standards Standard C: Life Sciences Populations and ecosystems. Standard C: Life Sciences Diversity and adaptation of organisms. Standard F: Science in Personal

More information

Plants, like all other living organisms have basic needs: a source of nutrition (food),

Plants, like all other living organisms have basic needs: a source of nutrition (food), LEARNING FROM LEAVES: A LOOK AT LEAF SIZE Grades 3 6 I. Introduction Plants, like all other living organisms have basic needs: a source of nutrition (food), water, space in which to live, air, and optimal

More information

of relationships that exist are parasitic relationships and mutualistic relationships.

of relationships that exist are parasitic relationships and mutualistic relationships. Ecology Escapade: Pre-/Post-Visit Activities Teacher Guide Thank you for registering for the Ecology Escapade Workshop at the Everett Children s Adventure Garden. During this workshop, your students will

More information

Name period date assigned date due date returned

Name period date assigned date due date returned Name period date assigned date due date returned Vocabulary Match the vocabulary word to the correct definition. 1. biotic 2. abiotic 3. biodiversity 4. biome 5. sustainability 6. habitat 7. species 8.

More information

Environmental Science 101 Biodiversity. Fall Lecture Outline: Terms You Should Know: Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment:

Environmental Science 101 Biodiversity. Fall Lecture Outline: Terms You Should Know: Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment: Environmental Science 101 Biodiversity Fall 2012 1 Lecture Outline: 5. ECOLOGY A. The Structure of Ecosystems B. Definition and Examples of Ecosystems C. Biotic Structure Terms You Should Know: Biota Ecotone

More information

Plants, like all other living organisms have basic needs: a source of nutrition (food),

Plants, like all other living organisms have basic needs: a source of nutrition (food), LEARNING FROM LEAVES: ADAPTATIONS TO DIFFERING LIGHT LEVELS Grades 3 6 I. Introduction Plants, like all other living organisms have basic needs: a source of nutrition (food), water, space in which to live,

More information

Ecology 1 Star. 1. Missing from the diagram of this ecosystem are the

Ecology 1 Star. 1. Missing from the diagram of this ecosystem are the Name: ate: 1. Missing from the diagram of this ecosystem are the 5. ase your answer(s) to the following question(s) on the diagram below and on your knowledge of biology.. biotic factors and decomposers.

More information

Ecosystems and Communities practice test

Ecosystems and Communities practice test Name: answers Score: 0 / 37 (0%) [14 subjective questions not graded] Ecosystems and Communities practice test Multiple Choice Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers

More information

Organisms and Their Environment

Organisms and Their Environment Organisms and Their Environment Before You Read This section discusses organisms and their environment. All of us come into contact with a variety of organisms every day. On the lines below, list all of

More information

Lesson 1. Objectives: ocus: Subjects:

Lesson 1. Objectives: ocus: Subjects: Lesson 1 The Web of Life Objectives: 1. Understand the concept of an ecosystem. 2. Understand the interdependence of members of an ecosystem. Subjects: 1. Ecology 2. Language 3. Art MATERIALS: Copies of

More information

Westerville City Schools Science Power Standards Safety Net Skills * Grade 7

Westerville City Schools Science Power Standards Safety Net Skills * Grade 7 Westerville City Schools Science Power Standards Safety Net Skills * Grade 7 Standard 1 Earth and Space Sciences Students will be able to describe the positions of matter and energy throughout the lithosphere,

More information

Ecosystems. I.1 Soil. I.2 Air. I.3 The sun. I.4 Water. I. What is an ecosystem?

Ecosystems. I.1 Soil. I.2 Air. I.3 The sun. I.4 Water. I. What is an ecosystem? I. What is an ecosystem? Ecosystems An ecosystem is a community of living and non-living things that work together. Ecosystems have no particular size. An ecosystem can be as large as a desert or as small

More information

Ecology: An Explanation

Ecology: An Explanation Ecology: An Explanation Define Ecology - study of the interactions that take place among Biosphere - part of Earth that supports life, including the top portion of Earth's crust, the atmosphere, and all

More information

Rainforest Glossary. Adaptation: A body part or behavior that helps a plant or animal to survive

Rainforest Glossary. Adaptation: A body part or behavior that helps a plant or animal to survive Rainforest Glossary Adaptation: A body part or behavior that helps a plant or animal to survive Amphibious: Capable of living on both land and water for at least a portion of its life cycle Arboreal: An

More information

Activity 1.4: Nature Walk & Ecosystem Introduction

Activity 1.4: Nature Walk & Ecosystem Introduction Activity 1.4: Nature Walk & Ecosystem Introduction Grades 7 9 Description: Part 1: Nature Walk Students take a walk through nature, make observations of their surroundings, and learn or review what a food

More information

Biology Chapter 4 Section 2 Review

Biology Chapter 4 Section 2 Review Name: Class: Date: Biology Chapter 4 Section 2 Review Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. Which is a biotic factor that affects the size of

More information

Lesson 4.13: Life Science Ecosystems 1

Lesson 4.13: Life Science Ecosystems 1 Weekly Focus: Reading Comprehension Weekly Skill: Finding Evidence from Passage Lesson Summary: This week students will read two different passages with information on ecosystems. The first passage includes

More information

Ecology PS 12 PS 13:

Ecology PS 12 PS 13: Ecology PS 12: Matter cycles and energy flows through living and nonliving components in ecosystems. The transfer of matter and energy is important for maintaining the health and sustainability of ecosystems.

More information

#9978 THE BIOSPHERE DESCRIPTION ACADEMIC STANDARDS INSTRUCTIONAL GOALS SUBJECT AREA: GEOGRAPHY PHYSICAL SYSTEMS SUBJECT AREA: SCIENCE LIFE SCIENCES

#9978 THE BIOSPHERE DESCRIPTION ACADEMIC STANDARDS INSTRUCTIONAL GOALS SUBJECT AREA: GEOGRAPHY PHYSICAL SYSTEMS SUBJECT AREA: SCIENCE LIFE SCIENCES #9978 THE BIOSPHERE DESCRIPTION VISUAL LEARNING COMPANY, 2002 Grade Level: 7-10 20 mins. 2 Instructional Graphics Enclosed The biosphere is a thin zone of land, air, and water that is home to all living

More information

Creating Chains and Webs to Model Ecological Relationships

Creating Chains and Webs to Model Ecological Relationships Creating Chains and Webs to Model Ecological Relationships Overview This hands-on activity supports the HHMI short film The Guide and the 2015 Holiday Lectures on Science: Patterns and Processes in Ecology.

More information

4th GRADE MINIMUM CONTENTS UNIT 8: ECOSYSTEMS

4th GRADE MINIMUM CONTENTS UNIT 8: ECOSYSTEMS CEIP Ginés Morata 4th GRADE MINIMUM CONTENTS UNIT 8: ECOSYSTEMS WHAT IS AN ECOSYSTEM? An ecosystem is made up of all the living things and non-living things that function together in one place. All ecosystems

More information

Food Web Crasher. An introduction to food chains and food webs

Food Web Crasher. An introduction to food chains and food webs Food Web Crasher An introduction to food chains and food webs Activity Students create a physical food web and watch what happens when an aquatic nuisance species is introduced into the ecosystem. Grade

More information

trophic levels environment abiotic interactions producers consumers decomposers food chain components trophic interactions community food webs biotic

trophic levels environment abiotic interactions producers consumers decomposers food chain components trophic interactions community food webs biotic AGUSTINIANO CIUDAD SALITRE SCHOOL NATURAL SCIENCE AND ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION SIXTH GRADE MAKE UP WORKSHOP NAME: COURSE: DATE: ECOSYSTEM Fill in the blanks using the word box: trophic levels environment

More information

www.irishseedsavers.ie Natural surface water on earth includes lakes, ponds, streams, rivers, estuaries, seas and oceans.

www.irishseedsavers.ie Natural surface water on earth includes lakes, ponds, streams, rivers, estuaries, seas and oceans. www.irishseedsavers.ie POND LIFE FACT SHEET Natural surface water on earth includes lakes, ponds, streams, rivers, estuaries, seas and oceans. A pond is a small body of fresh water shallow enough for sunlight

More information

Organism Interactions and Population Dynamics. 1. Which of the following interactions is an example of symbiosis?

Organism Interactions and Population Dynamics. 1. Which of the following interactions is an example of symbiosis? Organism Interactions and Population Dynamics 1. Which of the following interactions is an example of symbiosis? A. a population of hummingbirds migrates during the summer B. a mother bear feeds and protects

More information

A Biotic and Abiotic Factors

A Biotic and Abiotic Factors Ecology Project Earth s Biomes Biomes 1. Savanna 2. Temperate Grasslands 3. Desert 4. Tropical Rain Forest 5. Taiga /Boreal Forest 6. Tundra 7. Temperate Forest 8. Temperate Shrubland/Scrublands 9. Nothwestern

More information

Worksheet 1: Abiotic and Biotic Factors

Worksheet 1: Abiotic and Biotic Factors Science 10 Worksheet 1: Abiotic and Biotic Factors Additional Practice Questions Directions: Select the best answer for each of the following questions. Answers are found at the end of this document. Life

More information

Learning Objectives. Length: 60 minutes. 2. Diagram an ecosystem s organizational structure. Grades/Ages: Grades 3-7

Learning Objectives. Length: 60 minutes. 2. Diagram an ecosystem s organizational structure. Grades/Ages: Grades 3-7 Lesson 3: EXPLORE THE ECOSYSTEM OF NORTHERN MONGOLIA Length: 60 minutes Grades/Ages: Grades 3-7 Lesson Overview: Learn more about the Darhad region ecosystem and how its species are interconnected through

More information

8 th grade Review TOPIC: Ecology Do Now: Give an example of a biotic factor. Notes: (found on Ms. Harris s Carey website)

8 th grade Review TOPIC: Ecology Do Now: Give an example of a biotic factor. Notes: (found on Ms. Harris s Carey website) 8 th grade Review TOPIC: Ecology Do Now: Give an example of a biotic factor. Notes: (found on Ms. Harris s Carey website) ECOLOGY I. ECOSYSTEMS 1. ECOSYSTEM all the living & nonliving things in an environment

More information

Biology Review Chapter 1

Biology Review Chapter 1 Science 10 Biology Review Chapter 1 Name: 1. A multi-million dollar experiment called the Biosphere II was built in Tucson Arizona. This building enclosed several mechanically maintained environments.

More information

Ecosystems and Biomes

Ecosystems and Biomes Ecosystems and Biomes NEW the BIG idea Matter and energy together support life within an environment. 12.1 Ecosystems support life. 12.2 Matter cycles through ecosystems. 12.3 Energy flows through ecosystems.

More information

List and define the six levels of organization in ecology, from the most specific to the most complex. individual (organism)- a single living

List and define the six levels of organization in ecology, from the most specific to the most complex. individual (organism)- a single living List and define the six levels of organization in ecology, from the most specific to the most complex. individual (organism)- a single living organism population- a group of individuals that belong to

More information

Chapter 3 Communities, Biomes, and Ecosystems

Chapter 3 Communities, Biomes, and Ecosystems Communities, Biomes, and Ecosystems Section 1: Community Ecology Section 2: Terrestrial Biomes Section 3: Aquatic Ecosystems Click on a lesson name to select. 3.1 Community Ecology Communities A biological

More information

PLANET EARTH: Seasonal Forests

PLANET EARTH: Seasonal Forests PLANET EARTH: Seasonal Forests Teacher s Guide Grade Level: 6-8 Running Time: 42 minutes Program Description Investigate temperate forests and find some of the most elusive creatures and welladapted plant

More information

8 th Grade Science Organisms and their Environment Review

8 th Grade Science Organisms and their Environment Review 8 th Grade Science Organisms and their Environment Review #1 The tree is an example of a in the food web. Producers perform photosynthesis. A: Prey B: Decomposer C: producer D: Herbivore C. Producer #2

More information

Chapter 4 Interactions of Life Review Matching

Chapter 4 Interactions of Life Review Matching Chapter 4 Interactions of Life Review Matching a. population density i. producers q. ecosystem b. community j. ecology r. autotroph c. population k. carrying capacity s. competition d. habitat l. symbiosis

More information

Clouds and Cockatoos and Cacti, Oh My! Investigating Abiotic and Biotic Factors

Clouds and Cockatoos and Cacti, Oh My! Investigating Abiotic and Biotic Factors Clouds and Cockatoos and Cacti, Oh My! Investigating Abiotic and Biotic Factors Have you ever seen a fox dart down the street late at night, or a squirrel scurry across the fence? How often does it rain

More information

Characteristics of Terrestrial Ecosystems

Characteristics of Terrestrial Ecosystems Characteristics of Terrestrial Ecosystems Terrestrial ecosystems are land-based ecosystems. Rainforests, deciduous forests, and grasslands are all examples of terrestrial ecosystems. The Earth has many

More information

Ecology - Exchange of energy and matter

Ecology - Exchange of energy and matter - Exchange of energy and matter You should be able to: (a) briefly describe the non-cyclical nature of energy flow (b) establish the relationship of the following in food webs: producer, consumer, herbivore,

More information

Understanding Food Webs

Understanding Food Webs Understanding Food Webs Time Needed 45 Minutes Ages 3 rd to 5 th Season - Any Materials Crayons, paper, yarn, food chain sheets Lesson Outline I. Introduction to food chains and vocab 10 minutes II. Assign

More information

Principles of Ecology

Principles of Ecology 2 Principles of Ecology section 1 Organisms and Their Relationships Before You Read On the lines below, list the organisms that you have encountered today. You share the same environment with these organisms.

More information

The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens

The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens Zoo and Botanical Gardens Biome Contract Overview Students will investigate biotic and abiotic factors of different biomes by preparing a

More information

5.1 Ecosystems, Energy, and Nutrients

5.1 Ecosystems, Energy, and Nutrients CHAPTER 5 ECOSYSTEMS 5.1 Ecosystems, Energy, and Nutrients Did anyone ever ask you the question: Where do you get your energy? Energy enters our world from the Sun but how does the Sun s energy become

More information

Introduction to Ecology

Introduction to Ecology Introduction to Ecology Ecology is the scientific study of the interactions between living organisms and their environment. Scientists who study ecology are called ecologists. Because our planet has many

More information

Name: Period : Jaguar Review: Life Science

Name: Period : Jaguar Review: Life Science Name: Period : Life Sciences-Benchmark A, B, C and D Jaguar Review: Life Science 1. What is the role of the mitochondrion in cells? A. It converts sunlight to energy. B. It controls all functions of the

More information

8.11B: Investigate how ecosystems and populations in an ecosystem depend on and may compete for biotic and abiotic factors

8.11B: Investigate how ecosystems and populations in an ecosystem depend on and may compete for biotic and abiotic factors 8.11B: Investigate how ecosystems and populations in an ecosystem depend on and may compete for biotic and abiotic factors Make a new title page: Ecology Glue in a new table of contents after this title

More information

WINGS OF IMAGINATION A Standards-based Butterfly Curriculum For Grades K-6 Preliminary Outline 4_16_12

WINGS OF IMAGINATION A Standards-based Butterfly Curriculum For Grades K-6 Preliminary Outline 4_16_12 WINGS OF IMAGINATION A Standards-based Butterfly Curriculum For Grades K-6 Preliminary Outline 4_16_12 Note: The science standards in this curriculum are drawn from Content Knowledge: A Compendium of Standards

More information

Life in the Bay Getting to know the Bay s plants and animals

Life in the Bay Getting to know the Bay s plants and animals Life in the Bay Getting to know the Bay s plants and animals Over erview iew In this activity students will become acquainted with a plant or animal that lives in the San Francisco Bay. Students will research

More information

Biology Keystone (PA Core) Quiz Ecology - (BIO.B.4.1.1 ) Ecological Organization, (BIO.B.4.1.2 ) Ecosystem Characteristics, (BIO.B.4.2.

Biology Keystone (PA Core) Quiz Ecology - (BIO.B.4.1.1 ) Ecological Organization, (BIO.B.4.1.2 ) Ecosystem Characteristics, (BIO.B.4.2. Biology Keystone (PA Core) Quiz Ecology - (BIO.B.4.1.1 ) Ecological Organization, (BIO.B.4.1.2 ) Ecosystem Characteristics, (BIO.B.4.2.1 ) Energy Flow 1) Student Name: Teacher Name: Jared George Date:

More information

Ecology. Abiotic Factors: non-living physical and chemical factors which pffect the ability of organisms to survive and reproduce.

Ecology. Abiotic Factors: non-living physical and chemical factors which pffect the ability of organisms to survive and reproduce. Biotic vs. Abiotic Ecology Abiotic Factors: non-living physical and chemical factors which pffect the ability of organisms to survive and reproduce. Some Abiotic Factors light intensity temperature range

More information

Title: Create A New Animal. Grade Level: 3 rd -5 th. Subject: Biology. Time: 60-90 minutes

Title: Create A New Animal. Grade Level: 3 rd -5 th. Subject: Biology. Time: 60-90 minutes Title: Create A New Animal Grade Level: 3 rd -5 th Subject: Biology Time: 60-90 minutes Objective: Students will better understand physical adaptations of certain animals, and how those adaptations increase

More information

Ecosystems and Food Webs

Ecosystems and Food Webs Ecosystems and Food Webs How do AIS affect our lakes? Background Information All things on the planet both living and nonliving interact. An Ecosystem is defined as the set of elements, living and nonliving,

More information

Food Webs and Food Chains Grade Five

Food Webs and Food Chains Grade Five Ohio Standards Connection: Life Sciences Benchmark B Analyze plant and animal structures and functions needed for survival and describe the flow of energy through a system that all organisms use to survive.

More information

Ohio Plants & Animals

Ohio Plants & Animals Ohio Plants & Animals GOAL: To study and observe local plants and animals in various life stages and habitats. Small Group Procedures Concept: A field experience is enhanced when students are able to focus

More information

Habitat Loss. Key Stage 1 & 2. Aims and Objectives. What is a habitat? Find out more at

Habitat Loss. Key Stage 1 & 2. Aims and Objectives. What is a habitat? Find out more at Key Stage 1 & 2 Aims and Objectives Understand what a habitat is Understand the important role of plants and animals within a habitat Focus on issues that cause habitats to decline Establish how we can

More information

aerobic cellular respiration a process by which organisms convert sugar into usable energy (SRB, IG)

aerobic cellular respiration a process by which organisms convert sugar into usable energy (SRB, IG) FOSS Populations and Ecosystems, Second Edition Glossary abiotic nonliving (SRB, aerobic cellular respiration a process by which organisms convert sugar into usable energy (SRB, aquatic of the water (SRB,

More information

The Living & Non-Living Wetland

The Living & Non-Living Wetland The Living & Non-Living Wetland Grade Level Kindergarten to Second Learner Objectives Students will: Understand and define living and non living Identify three examples of living and non living things

More information

THE ECOSYSTEM - Biomes

THE ECOSYSTEM - Biomes Biomes The Ecosystem - Biomes Side 2 THE ECOSYSTEM - Biomes By the end of this topic you should be able to:- SYLLABUS STATEMENT ASSESSMENT STATEMENT CHECK NOTES 2.4 BIOMES 2.4.1 Define the term biome.

More information

Name Class Date WHAT I KNOW. life by observing many different kinds of life forms. sunlight for their energy. Other animals eat food to get energy.

Name Class Date WHAT I KNOW. life by observing many different kinds of life forms. sunlight for their energy. Other animals eat food to get energy. The Biosphere Matter of Energy, Interdependence in Nature Q: How do Earth s living and nonliving parts interact and affect the survival of organisms? 3.1 How do we study life? WHAT I KNOW SAMPLE ANSWER:

More information

Plants, like all other living organisms have basic needs: a source of nutrition (food),

Plants, like all other living organisms have basic needs: a source of nutrition (food), WHAT PLANTS NEED IN ORDER TO SURVIVE AND GROW: WATER Grades 3 6 I. Introduction Plants, like all other living organisms have basic needs: a source of nutrition (food), water, space in which to live, air,

More information

STAAR Science Tutorial 52 TEK 8.11D: Food Webs & Symbiosis

STAAR Science Tutorial 52 TEK 8.11D: Food Webs & Symbiosis Name: Teacher: Pd. Date: STAAR Science Tutorial 52 TEK 8.11D: Food Webs & Symbiosis TEK 8.11A: Describe producer/consumer, predator/prey, and parasite/host relationships as they occur in food webs within

More information

Table of Contents Diagnostic Pre-test Lesson 5: Habitats Lesson 1: Biomes Lesson 6: Living Organisms Lesson 2: Aquatic Biomes Lesson 7: Plants

Table of Contents Diagnostic Pre-test Lesson 5: Habitats Lesson 1: Biomes Lesson 6: Living Organisms Lesson 2: Aquatic Biomes Lesson 7: Plants Table of Contents Diagnostic Pre-test..................5 Lesson 1: Biomes A Biome Experiment............... 11 What Are Biomes?................. 12 Comparing Biomes................ 13 Biomes Vocabulary................

More information

Bio EOC Topics for Ecology, Evolution and Natural Selection:

Bio EOC Topics for Ecology, Evolution and Natural Selection: Bio EOC Topics for Ecology, Evolution and Natural Selection: UEvolutionU Difference between macroevolution and microevolution Sexual reproduction and natural selection are mechanisms of microevolution

More information

Suggested Sequence. Layers of Biomes a. Layers of the Subtropical/ Tropical Forest b. Layers of the Forest c. Layers of the Ocean

Suggested Sequence. Layers of Biomes a. Layers of the Subtropical/ Tropical Forest b. Layers of the Forest c. Layers of the Ocean Suggested Sequence I. Introduction a. Names of Biomes b. What Am I? biomes c. Elements of a Biome (1 and 2) II. III. Abiotic Sequence a. Soil Composition b. Soil Horizons c. Rock Cycle d. Water Cycle e.

More information

Level Description Example 1. Organism 2. Population 3. Community 4. Ecosystem 5. Biosphere. Organism Population Community Ecosystem Biosphere

Level Description Example 1. Organism 2. Population 3. Community 4. Ecosystem 5. Biosphere. Organism Population Community Ecosystem Biosphere Main Idea: Ecologists study environments at different levels of organization. Write a description of each level of organization in the table. Also, provide an example for each level. Level Description

More information

AP Biology Unit I: Ecological Interactions

AP Biology Unit I: Ecological Interactions AP Biology Unit I: Ecological Interactions Essential knowledge 1.C.1: Speciation and extinction have occurred throughout the Earth s history. Species extinction rates are rapid at times of ecological stress.

More information

Ecology Module B, Anchor 4

Ecology Module B, Anchor 4 Ecology Module B, Anchor 4 Key Concepts: - The biological influences on organisms are called biotic factors. The physical components of an ecosystem are called abiotic factors. - Primary producers are

More information

Ecology limiting factors plant limiting factors field mouse nitrogen nitrogen ALL nitrogen returned to soil process major role; mutualism

Ecology limiting factors plant limiting factors field mouse nitrogen nitrogen ALL nitrogen returned to soil process major role; mutualism Ecology List some limiting factors that would affect a plant (such as a corn plant) population. Light, carbon dioxide concentration, temperature, nutrients in soil, water List some limiting factors that

More information

Key Idea 2: Ecosystems

Key Idea 2: Ecosystems Key Idea 2: Ecosystems Ecosystems An ecosystem is a living community of plants and animals sharing an environment with non-living elements such as climate and soil. An example of a small scale ecosystem

More information

In this lesson, students will identify a local plant community and make a variety of

In this lesson, students will identify a local plant community and make a variety of MAKING COMMUNITY MEASUREMENTS: ABIOTIC FACTORS Grades 3 6 I. Introduction In this lesson, students will identify a local plant community and make a variety of measurements, preferably during two different

More information

Biomes. Biomes. Animals and plants have narrow ranges of tolerance to abiotic factors

Biomes. Biomes. Animals and plants have narrow ranges of tolerance to abiotic factors Biomes What defines a biome? Where are the lines drawn? What are the major controlling factors? What about aquatic biomes Biomes Animals and plants have narrow ranges of tolerance to abiotic factors This

More information

Communities, Biomes, and Ecosystems

Communities, Biomes, and Ecosystems Communities, Biomes, and Ecosystems Before You Read Before you read the chapter, respond to these statements. 1. Write an A if you agree with the statement. 2. Write a D if you disagree with the statement.

More information

Life Science Study Guide. Environment Everything that surrounds and influences (has an effect on) an organism.

Life Science Study Guide. Environment Everything that surrounds and influences (has an effect on) an organism. Life Science Study Guide Environment Everything that surrounds and influences (has an effect on) an organism. Organism Any living thing, including plants and animals. Environmental Factor An environmental

More information

Lesson 1: Make the Connection

Lesson 1: Make the Connection Lesson 1: Make the Connection Activity: Students work with paper cutouts to learn about the parts of a food chain, specifically herbivores, carnivores, and producers. Grade level: 4-8 Subjects: Science,

More information

Southern Nevada Regional Professional Development Program. Desert Unit-Food Chains

Southern Nevada Regional Professional Development Program. Desert Unit-Food Chains 3-5 Life Science 3-5 Earth Science 3-5 Nature and History Southern Nevada Regional Professional Development Program Desert Unit-Food Chains www.saskschools.ca INTRODUCTION According to the Clark County

More information