ASYMPTOTIC DIRECTION FOR RANDOM WALKS IN RANDOM ENVIRONMENTS arxiv:math/ v2 [math.pr] 11 Dec 2007

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1 ASYMPTOTIC DIRECTION FOR RANDOM WALKS IN RANDOM ENVIRONMENTS arxiv:math/ v2 [math.pr] 11 Dec 2007 FRANÇOIS SIMENHAUS Université Paris 7, Mathématiques, case 7012, 2, pace Jussieu, Paris, France e-mai: Abstract. In this paper we study the existence of an asymptotic direction for random waks in random i.i.d. environments RWRE. We prove that if the set of directions where the wak is transient contains a non empty open set, the wak admits an asymptotic direction. The main too to obtain this resut is the construction of a renewa structure with cones. We aso prove that RWRE admits at most two opposite asymptotic directions. Resumé: Dans cet artice, nous étudions existence d une direction asymptotique pour es marches aéatoires en miieu aéatoire i.i.d. RWRE. Nous prouvons que si ensembe des directions dans esquees a marche est transiente contient un ouvert non vide, a marche admet une direction asymptotique. La construction d une structure de renouveement avec cônes est e principa outi pour a preuve de ce résutat. Nous montrons aussi qu une RWRE admet au pus 2 directions asymptotiques opposées. MSC: 60K37; 60F15 1. Introduction and resuts In this paper, we give a characterization of random waks in random i.i.d environments having an asymptotic direction. We first describe the mode that we wi use. Fix a dimension d 1 but think more particuary of the case where d 2 because this work becomes obvious when d = 1. Let P + denote the 2d 1 dimensiona simpex, P + = {x [0, 1] 2d, 2d i=1 x i = 1}. An environment ω in Z d is an eement of Ω := P+ Zd. For any environment ω, P x,ω denotes the Markov chain with state space Z d and transition given by P x,ω X 0 = x = 1 and P x,ω X n+1 = z + e X n = z = ω z e z Z d, e Z d s.t. e = 1, n 0, where denotes the Eucidean norm in Z d. For any aw µ on P +, we define a random environment ω in Z d, random variabe on Ω with aw P := µ Zd. For any x in Z d and any fixed ω, the aw P x,ω is caed Partiay supported by CNRS UMR 7599 Probabiités et Modèes Aéatoires. 1

2 2 FRANÇOIS SIMENHAUS quenched aw. The anneaed aw P x is defined on Ω Z d N by the semi-product P x := P P x,ω. In this artice, the aw µ wi verify the assumption of strict eipticity e Z d s.t. e = 1, P a.s. µω 0 e > 0 = 1, which is weaker than the usua uniform eipticity see Remark 1. S d 1 denotes the unit circe for the Eucidean norm. For any in R d, we define the set A of transient trajectories in direction A = { im n + X n = + }, and for any ν in S d 1, B ν is defined as the set of trajectories having ν for asymptotic direction X n B ν = { im n + X n = ν}. This mode is we studied in the one dimensiona case where many sharp properties of the wak are known. However in higher dimensions the behavior of the wak is much ess we-understood. Particuary, the notion of asymptotic direction has been poory studied. In this paper, we give a description of the cass of waks having a unique asymptotic direction under the anneaed measure Theorem 1. It means that the wak is transient and escapes to infinity in a direction which has a deterministic amost surey imit. We aso prove that under the anneaed measure, a RWRE admits at most two opposite asymptotic directions Proposition 1 and Coroary 1. The proofs are based on renewa structure as in [2] or [8]. The main difficuty to obtain an asymptotic direction for a transient wak is to contro the fuctuations of the wak in the hyperpane transverse to transience direction. One way to contro those fuctuations is to introduce the foowing assumption. Assumption. in R d verifies assumption H if there exists a neighborhood V of such that V, P 0 A = 1. H When H hods, we wi note V the neighborhood given by the assumption. The main purpose of this artice is to prove the foowing theorem. Theorem 1. The foowing three statements are equivaent i There exists a non empty open set O of R d such that ii ν S d 1 s.t. O, P 0 A = 1. P 0 a.s., X n X n n ν. iii ν R d s.t. Rd ν > 0 = P 0 A = 1. Using arguments simiar to those appied in the proof of Theorem 1, we aso show Proposition 1. If ν and ν are two distinct vectors in S d 1 such that P 0 B ν P 0 B ν > 0 then ν = ν.

3 ASYMPTOTIC DIRECTION FOR RANDOM WALKS IN RANDOM ENVIRONMENTS 3 An obvious consequence of this proposition is the foowing coroary. Coroary 1. Under P 0, there are at most two asymptotic directions, in this case these two potentia directions are opposite each other. The cass of waks admitting an asymptotic direction has been poory studied so far. Theorem 1 gives a characterization of this cass but aso eaves unsoved some important probems reated to this notion. First, we woud ike to compare the baistic cass with the cass of waks admitting an asymptotic direction. As shown in Remark 2, if a wak admits an asymptotic direction, it aso satisfies a aw of arge numbers. However, the notion of asymptotic direction is of interest ony in the non-baistic case. Indeed, a non degenerate veocity contains more information direction and speed than the asymptotic direction direction ony whereas in the non-baistic case the asymptotic direction gives an interesting information of the behavior which is not contained in the aw of arge numbers. It is known that in dimension 1, the cass of waks admitting an asymptotic direction here it simpy means transient but a degenerate veocity is non empty. In higher dimension we have no exampe of such a wak and it might be possibe that there is none. The cass of baistic waks has been the subject of many recent artices. In the first one [8], the authors provide a strong sufficient drift condition to obtain a baistic aw of arge numbers, Kaikow s condition. Later, Sznitman improves on sufficient conditions in different works, [6] is the more recent. He introduces in this paper the conditions T γ γ 0, 1] that we wi not reca, and the condition T defined as the reaization of T γ for any γ 0, 1. According to Coroary 5.3 in [7], this condition is stricty weaker than Kaikow s criterion for d 3 and Sznitman gives an effective criterion to check it, that is the weakest condition known to assure a baistic behavior. It is aso shown in 1.13 of [6] that T γ impies that the wak has an asymptotic direction and so using Theorem 1 impies H, it is then natura to ask if H is stricty weaker than T γ or simpy equivaent. This question is particuary interesting because T γ is equivaent to T for γ 1, 1 when d 2, 2 and it is conjectured that they are equivaent for any γ 0, 1 see [6], in particuar Theorem 2.4. An answer to this question coud be a step toward comparing the baistic cass and the cass of waks admitting an asymptotic direction and then woud hep us to sove the first probem above. A third probem is that we coud not find a criterion to check assumption H, as we have for T γ. Such a criterion woud be a great hep to answer the two previous questions because condition H is easy to understand but hard to verify. Finay, notice that Coroary 1 has a version for veocities instead of asymptotic directions. More precisey, P 0 -amost surey, the imit of Xn n beongs to a set {S 1, S 2 } such that if S 1 0 then S 2 = λs 1 for some λ 0 Theorem 1.1 in [1]. However none of these two resuts can be deduced from the other one. The proofs of the resuts wi be given in the second part of this paper. We finish this section with some notation which wi be usefu in the proofs. Denote by θ n the time shift n natura number is the argument and by t x the spatia shift x in Z d is the argument. For any fixed in R d, we et T u be the hitting time of the open

4 4 FRANÇOIS SIMENHAUS haf-space {x Z d, x > u} T u = inf{n > 0, X n > u}, and D the return time of the wak behind the starting point D = inf{n > 0, X n X 0 }. Notice that these two definitions are quite different from those used in [8]. We compete into an orthogona basis e 2,...,e d, such that for every i in 2, d, e i = 1. For a i 2, d we define the foowing two vectors: i α = + αe i and i α = αe i. 1 For a positive rea α we can define the convex cone C α by d C α = {x Z d, x i α 0 and x i α 0}. i=2 We aso define the exit time Dα of the cone C α, shifted at the starting point of the wak, D α = inf{n 0, i 2, d, X n i α < X 0 i α or X n i α < X 0 i α}. Notice that under P 0, Dα can aso be defined in the foowing way, P 0 a.s., D α = inf{n 0, X n / C α}. 2. Proofs Proof of Theorem 1. The first step of the proof is the foowing emma, where it is proved that under H the wak has a positive probabiity never to exit a cone Cα for α sma enough. Lemma 1. Let be a vector in R d satisfying H then, for any choice of an orthogona basis, e 2,..., e d with e i = 1 for any i in 2, d, there exist some α 0 > 0 such that, α α 0 P 0 D α = > 0. 2 Proof. Fix a basis satisfying the assumption of the emma. We wi first show that there exists a random variabe α 1 > 0 such that P 0 D α 1 = D = = 1. 3 Since V is an open set, there exist some α 2 > 0 such that for every i 2, d : i α 2 V and i α 2 V. For these 2d 2 directions, we use the renewa structure described in section 1 of [8]. The choice of the parameter a in this structure has no importance and can be done arbitrariy. Remember that, for any fixed direction, the first renewa time τ of [8] is the first time the wak reaches a new record in direction, and ater never backtracks.

5 ASYMPTOTIC DIRECTION FOR RANDOM WALKS IN RANDOM ENVIRONMENTS 5 Remark 1. In [8], as in further references, uniform eipticity is assumed. When we quote these artices, we have verified that this stronger assumption is not necessary or can be reaxed as in [11]. Using H we obtain that for each i 2, d, P 0 A i α 2 = P0 From Proposition 1.2 in [8]: A i α 2 = 1. τ 2 α 2 τ d α 2 τ 2 α 2 τ d α 2 < P 0 a.s. Using a proof very cose to Proposition 1.2 in [8] see aso Theorem 3 in [4] we obtain P 0 D = > 0 and so: τ 2 α 2 τ d α 2 τ 2 α 2 τ d α 2 < P 0 D = a.s. 4 We now define the foowing variabes: N = inf{n 0 1, n n 0, X n C α 2 }, C = M = inf X n, 1 n N sup 1 n N From 4, it is cear that: d X n e i 2. i=2 P 0 D = a.s., N <, C > 0 and M <. inf = + We now define α 1 = C M α 2 notice that α 1 is random, using Cauchy-Schwarz inequaity for n N and the definition of N and Cα for n N, we obtain: P 0 D = a.s., i 2, d n 0, X n i α 1 = X n + α 1 X n e i 0, which ends the proof of 3. It is cear that α < α impies C α C α, and so and X n i α 1 = X n α 1 X n e i 0. im P 0 {D α = } = P 0 {Dα = }. α 0 α>0 From 3, we have α>0 {D α = } P 0 a.s. = {D = }. Since P 0 D = > 0, this concudes the proof of Lemma 1.

6 6 FRANÇOIS SIMENHAUS We wi now construct a renewa structure in the same spirit as in [8] or [2]. The idea is to define a time where the wak reaches a new record in the direction and never goes out of a cone aso oriented in direction after. In [8], the wak moves from one sab to the next one, here, as in [2] or [3], the wak wi move from one cone to the next one. From Lemma 1, we know that we can choose α sma enough so that P 0 D α = > 0. We define now the two stopping time sequences S k k 0 and R k k 0, and the sequence of successive maxima M k k 0 S 0 = inf{n 0, X n > X 0 }, R 0 = Dα θ S 0 +S 0, M 0 = sup{ X n, 0 n R 0 }. And for a k 0: S k+1 = T Mk, R k+1 = D α θ Sk+1 + S k+1, M k+1 = sup{ X n, 0 n R k+1 }, K = inf{k 0, S k <, R k = }. On the set K <, we aso define: τ 1 = S K. The random time τ 1 is caed the first cone renewa time, and wi not be confused with τ introduced above. Under assumption H, S 0 R 0 < S 1 R 1 < < S n R n <. 5 Proposition 2. Under assumption H, Proof. For a k 1, P 0 a.s. K <. P 0 R k < = E[E 0,ω [S k <, D α θ Sk < ]] = x Z d E[E 0,ω [S k <, X Sk = x, D α θ Sk < ]]. Using Markov property we obtain, P 0 R k < = x Z d E [ E 0,ω [S k <, X Sk = x]e x,ω [D α < ]]. For every x in Z d, the variabes E 0,ω [S k <, X Sk = x] and E x,ω [Dα < ] are respectivey σ{ω y, y < x} and σ{ω y, y t x C α} measurabe. As this two σ-fieds are independent, P 0 R k < = x Z d E 0 [S k <, X Sk = x]e x [D α < ] = P 0 S k < P 0 D α < = P 0 R k 1 < P 0 D α <.

7 ASYMPTOTIC DIRECTION FOR RANDOM WALKS IN RANDOM ENVIRONMENTS 7 By induction, we obtain, P 0 R k < = P 0 D α < k+1. In view of 5, this concudes the proof. We now define a sequence of renewa time τ k k 1 by the foowing recursive reation: Using Proposition 2, we have: τ k+1 = τ 1 X. + τ k X τ1 +. X τ1. 6 k 0, τ k <. Proposition 3. Under assumption H, X τ1,τ 1, X τ1 + τ 2 X τ1, τ2 τ 1,..., Xτk + τ k+1 X τk, τk+1 τ k are independent variabes under P 0 and for k 1, X τk + τ k+1 X τk, τk+1 τ k are distributed ike X τ1,τ 1 under P 0 D α =. The proof is simiar to that of Coroary 1.5 in [8] and wi not be repeated here. For the cassica renewa structure, Zerner proved that E 0 [X τ1 ] is finite and computes its vaue. We provide here the same resut but for a renewa structure with cones. Fix a direction with integer coordinates a 1,...,a d such that their greatest common divisor, gcda 1,...,a d = 1. Assume that H is satisfied for. Compete in an orthogona basis, e 2,..., e d such that for every i in 2, d, e i = 1. By Lemma 1, we can choose α sma enough so that P 0 Dα = > 0 and construct the associated renewa structure that is described above. Lemma 2. Under assumption H, E 0 [X τ1 D α = ] = 1 P 0 D α =. Proof. This proof foows an unpubished argument of M. Zerner but can be found in Lemma p265 of [10]. Since gcd a 1,...,a d = 1, we have {x, x Z d } = Z. For a i > 0, P 0 { k 1, X τk = i} = E [ [ E 0,ω {XTi 1 = x, Dα θ T i 1 = } ]] = {x Z d,x =i} {x Z d,x =i} E [ E 0,ω [ XTi 1 = x ] E x,ω [ D α = ]] 7 = P 0 D α =. 8 We used the strong Markov property in 7. In 8, we notice that E 0,ω XTi 1 = x is σ{ω y, y < x} measurabe and

8 8 FRANÇOIS SIMENHAUS E x,ω D α = is σ{ω y, y t x C α} measurabe and that those two σ-fieds are independent. We wi now compute the same vaue in another way. im P 0{ k 1, X τk = i} = im P 0 { k 2, X τk = i} i i = im P 0 { k 2, X τk X τ1 = i n, X τ1 = n} i n 1 = im P 0 { k 2, X τk X τ1 = i n} P 0 X τ1 = n. i n 1 Notice aso that the first equaity is true because P 0 X τ1 > i 0 i. Using now the renewa theorem Coroary 10.2 p76 in [9] we obtain im P 1 0 { k 2, X τk X τ1 = i n} = i E 0 [X τ2 X τ1 ]. The dominated convergence theorem eads to im P 0 { k 1, X τk = i} = i 1 E 0 [X τ2 X τ1 ]. Comparing this resut with 8, we easiy obtain Lemma 2. We have now a the toos to prove Theorem 1. We wi first use the two emmas to prove that i impies ii. We choose with rationa coordinates in the open set O. It is cear that satisfies assumption H. Actuay, we can aso assume, without oss of generaity, that has integer coordinates and that their greatest common divisor is 1. Indeed, there is λ rationa such that λ has integer coordinates with greatest common divisor equa to 1, and of course, λ aso satisfies H. We compete into an orthogona basis e 2,...,e d, such that for every i in 2, d, e i = 1. Using Lemma 1, we choose α sma enough so that P 0 D α = > 0. We can now use the renewa structure with cones and we have from Lemma 2 that: [ E 0 Xτ1 Dα = ] 1 = <. P 0 Dα = From the definition of the cone renewa structure, there is some constant cα > 0 such that, P 0 Dα = a.s., for any time n, X n cαx n, 9 and so using Lemma 2, [ E 0 Xτ1 Dα = ] <. 10 We can now appy the aw of arge numbers, and obtain X τk k E [ 0 Xτ1 Dα = ] P 0 a.s. 11 n [ As E 0 Xτ1 Dα = ] > 0, [ X τk X τk E 0 Xτ1 Dα = ] def = ν P n E 0 [X τ1 Dα 0 a.s. 12 = ]

9 ASYMPTOTIC DIRECTION FOR RANDOM WALKS IN RANDOM ENVIRONMENTS 9 To compete the proof, we have to contro the behavior of the wak between the renewa times. For each natura n, we introduce the index k n such that, τ kn n < τ kn+1. Reca that if Z n is an i.i.d. sequence of variabes with finite expectation, Bore- Cantei Lemma assures that Zn converges amost surey to 0. From 9, Lemma 2 and n Proposition 3, the sequence sup X τk +n τ k+1 X τk k 1 is i.i.d with finite expectation n and we can appy the previous remark to obtain: sup X τk +n τ k+1 X τk n k k P 0 a.s. 13 Using equation 12 and 13, we study the convergence in ii, By Proposition 2 and 6, As X n k n, 13 eads to: X n X n = X n X τkn X n + X τ kn k n k n n P 0 a.s. X n X τkn X n To contro the second term in 14, we simpy write X τkn k n X n X τkn k n Using 11 and 13, we obtain, k n X n. 14 n 0 P 0 a.s. 15 X n k n X τ kn k n + X n X τkn. k n X n k n E [ 0 Xτ1 Dα = ] P 0 a.s. n We finay obtain the desired convergence : X n X n ν = E [ 0 Xτ1 Dα = ] n E 0 [X τ1 Dα = ] P 0 a.s. The end of the proof of Theorem 1 is easy: it is obvious that iii impies i and so we just have to show that ii impies iii. Let be a direction such that ν > 0. It is known since [8] Lemma 1.1 that P 0 A A foows a 0 1 aw under assumption of uniform eipticity, but we use here Proposition 3 in [11] where the same resut is proved under the weaker assumption of strict eipticity. If P 0 A A = 0, it is known that the wak under P 0 osciates, im sup X n = im inf X n = + P 0 a.s. n n

10 10 FRANÇOIS SIMENHAUS This is not possibe in view of ii and so P 0 A A = 1. But because of ii, P 0 A = 0, and we can concude P 0 A = 1. Remark 2. From the proof of Theorem 1, we know that if a wak has an asymptotic direction, we can construct a renewa structure with cones and E[X τ1 D α = ] is finite. We can then easiy derive a aw of arge numbers, namey X n n E 0 [X τ1 Dα = ] def = µ P n E 0 [τ 1 Dα 0 a.s. = ] However this imit can be zero if and ony if E 0 [τ 1 Dα = ] = + and, in this case, the asymptotic direction is an interesting information about the wak s behaviour. Remark 3. If a wak admits an asymptotic direction, we know that the wak is transient in any direction satisfying ν > 0. For any such, we can consider a sab renewa structure defined as the cone renewa structure except that in the definitions of R k k 0, S k k 0 and M k k 0, Dα is repaced by D = inf{n > 0, X n < X 0 } this construction is very simiar to that of [8]. For any k 1, τk wi denote the k-th sab renewa time. The variabes X τ k+1 X τ k k 1 are i.i.d., and the purpose of this remark is to show that the expectation of their norm, E 0 [ X τ 1 D = ] is finite. From Coroary 3 in [5], it is enough to prove that X τ k k k 1 is bounded P 0 amost surey 1. For any k 1, we introduce Jk = sup{j 1, τ j τk } sup = 0. As P 0 -amost surey τ k k 1 is increasing, we have im Jk = P 0 a.s. 16 k Notice that a cone renewa time is aso a sab renewa time and as a consequence P 0 -a.s. for arge k so that Jk 1: X τ k k = X X τ τ k Jk k The norm of the first term is bounded by cα Xτ Jk+1 Jk k P 0 a.s X τ Jk. k Jk Xτ Jk. From the same argument as in 13, cα Xτ j+1 Xτ j converges P j 0 -amost surey to 0, and using 16, we obtain the P 0 -amost surey convergence of the first term to 0. Rewriting the second term X τjk k = X τ Jk Jk Jk k, 1 The resut in [5] is for d = 1. Considering a the coordinates separatey, the caim in arbitrary dimension foows.

11 ASYMPTOTIC DIRECTION FOR RANDOM WALKS IN RANDOM ENVIRONMENTS 11 from 17,16 and 11 we obtain that the second term is amost surey bounded as k goes to infinity. Proof of Proposition 1. Suppose that the proposition is fase and ca ν and ν two vectors of S d 1 different and non opposite such that P 0 B ν P 0 B ν > 0, then we wi show that ν 0 such that P 0 B ν0 B ν B ν = 1, 18 what estabishes, of course, a contradiction. First, notice that for ν S d 1 with P 0 B ν > 0 we have, R d such that ν > 0, P 0 A B ν = Indeed, from the 0 1 aw P 0 A A = 1 just notice that the wak does not osciate aong direction on B ν, event of positive probabiity, but since B ν { N s.t. n N, X n > 0}, we have B ν A, P 0 -amost surey, which impies 19. The set V = { R d, ν > 0} { R d, ν > 0} is non empty and open and from 19 it has the property, V, P 0 A B ν B ν = 1. H From now on, we fix 0 in V. The property H is simiar to assumption H and the proof of 18 wi be adapted from that of Theorem 1. In fact, we wi use the cone renewa structure on A 0 and show ν 0 s.t. P 0 B ν0 A 0 = 1, 20 which is stronger that 18. Before the proof, notice that if P 0 B ν B ν = 1, we can easiy concude using Theorem 1, but the proof is not that obvious if P 0 B ν B ν < 1. In order to construct a renewa structure with cones on the event A 0 of positive probabiity, we have to show that there exists α > 0 such that P 0 D 0 α = > 0. We wi use a proof very cose to the one of Lemma 1 except that we wi work on the event {B ν B ν } and show the stronger resut P 0 D 0 α =, B ν B ν > 0. Our first step wi be to prove that P 0 D 0 =, B ν B ν > We argue by contradiction and assume the eft hand side of 21 is zero. By transationinvariance, it hods P x D 0 =, B ν B ν = 0 for any x in Z d, which means x Z d, P a.s., P x,ω D 0 =, B ν B ν = 0, and aso P a.s., x Z d, P x,ω D 0 =, B ν B ν = 0. We denote by D 0 n the n-th backtrack time of the wak, defined by the foowing recursive reation D 0 1 = D 0, D 0 n = D 0 θ D 0 n 11 {D 0 n 1 < } + 1 {D 0 n 1 = }, n 2.

12 12 FRANÇOIS SIMENHAUS Notice that for any n 1, {D 0 n <, D 0 n+1 =, B ν B ν } = {D 0 n <, D 0 n = m, X m = x} {D 0 θ m =, im x Z d m 1 k We can then use the Markov property to show that P a.s., for any n 1, P 0,ω D 0 n <, D 0 n+1 =, B ν B ν = X k x X k x {ν, ν }}. x Z d P 0,ω D 0 n <, X D 0 n = xp x,ωd 0 =, B ν B ν. We finay obtain P 0 D 0 n <, n 1 B ν B ν = 1. This estabishes a contradiction with H and concudes the proof of 21. It is possibe to choose α > 0 such that for every i 2, d : i α V and i α V, in the notations of 1 with = 0. From 19 and Proposition 1.2 in [8], it is cear that amost surey on {B ν B ν } {D 0 = }, τ 2 α τ d α τ 2 α τ d α <. We can then foow the end of the proof of Lemma 1 and we obtain: {D 0 α =, B ν B ν } P 0 a.s. = {D 0 =, B ν B ν }, α>0 and hence we can fix α > 0 such that, P 0 D 0 α =, B ν B ν > 0. We wi now show that on A 0 this is much easier than on B ν B ν, the wak admits amost surey a unique asymptotic direction. We use the same renewa structure with cones as in the proof of Theorem 1. Foowing the proof of Proposition 1.2 in [8], we obtain Proposition 4. Under assumption H, P 0 a.s., A 0 = {K < } = {τ 1 < }. We aso adopt the notation Q 0 to denote the probabiity measure P 0 A 0. The proof of Coroary 1.5 in [8] eads to, Proposition 5. Under assumption H, X τ1,τ 1, X τ1 + τ 2 X τ1, τ2 τ 1,..., Xτk + τ k+1 X τk, τk+1 τ k are independent variabes under Q 0 and for k 1, X τk + τ k+1 X τk, τk+1 τ k are distributed ike X τ1,τ 1 under P 0 D 0 α =. Using again Lemma p265 in [10], we aso have Lemma 3. Under assumption H, E Q0 [X τ1 D α = ] = 1 P 0 D α =.

13 ASYMPTOTIC DIRECTION FOR RANDOM WALKS IN RANDOM ENVIRONMENTS 13 We have now a the toos to foow the proof of Theorem 1 except that Q 0 repaces P 0. We obtain the existence of ν 0 satisfying 18. Acknowedgments: I wish to thank my Ph.D. supervisor Francis Comets for his hep and suggestions. I am aso gratefu to the anonymous referee for his remarks and comments. References [1] Noam Berger. On the imiting veocity of high-dimensona random wak in random environment. arxiv:math.pr/ [2] Francis Comets and Ofer Zeitouni. A aw of arge numbers for random waks in random mixing environments. Ann. Probab., 321B: , [3] Francis Comets and Ofer Zeitouni. Gaussian fuctuations for random waks in random mixing environments. Israe Journa of Mathematics, 148:87 114, [4] Steven A. Kaikow. Generaized random wak in a random environment. Ann. Probab., 95: , [5] Harry Kesten. The imit points of a normaized random wak. Ann. Math. Statist., 41: , [6] Aain-So Sznitman. An effective criterion for baistic behavior of random waks in random environment. Probab. Theory Reated Fieds, 1224: , [7] Aain-So Sznitman. On new exampes of baistic random waks in random environment. Ann. Probab., 311: , [8] Aain-So Sznitman and Martin Zerner. A aw of arge numbers for random waks in random environment. Ann. Probab., 274: , [9] Hermann Thorisson. Couping, stationarity, and regeneration. Probabiity and its Appications New York. Springer-Verag, New York, [10] Ofer Zeitouni. Random waks in random environment. In Lectures on probabiity theory and statistics, voume 1837 of Lecture Notes in Math., pages Springer, Berin, [11] Martin P. W. Zerner and Franz Merk. A zero-one aw for panar random waks in random environment. Ann. Probab., 294: , 2001.

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