Real-World Experience Throughout the Curriculum

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Real-World Experience Throughout the Curriculum"

Transcription

1 1997 & 1999 PHOTO DISC INC. John D. Enderle 1, Kristina M. Ropella 2, David M. Kelso 3, Brooke Hallowell 4 1 Biomedical Engineering, University of Connecticut 2 Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University 3 Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University 4 Hearing, Speech and Language Sciences, Ohio University ver two-thirds of graduating engineers Opursue industrial positions immediately following completion of their bachelor s degree. Upon entering the workforce, the rookie engineer is immediately confronted with challenges like circuit board fabrication, software validation, design reviews, functional requirements, specifications, project scheduling, project management, FDA compliance, 510Ks, clinical trials, ethical debate, patient risk, intellectual property, documentation, and a variety of other responsibilities. Having spent four or more years studying the theory of p-n doping, free-body diagrams, Laplace transforms, Fourier transforms, Kreb s cycle, and Poiseuille s law, it is no wonder that the recent graduate is frustrated by the seeming disconnect between higher education and the real world. Academicians struggle to establish that balance between theory and practice. Many fear that too much real world is simply job training. Yet, too little practical experience leaves the graduate with naive problem-solving skills and no appreciation for approximation, optimization, and error. Even everyday tasks such as calibrating a transducer, selecting the appropriate sam- March/April 2002 IEEE ENGINEERING IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY /02/$ IEEE 59

2 In most senior design courses, the emphasis is not on learning new material but rather solving large-scale, open-ended, complex, and sometimes ill-defined problems. pling frequency for collecting data from an instrument, or writing an effective memo may be beyond the experience of the biomedical engineer trained with classic science and math courses and theory-laden textbooks written for disciplines outside biomedical engineering. Given the wide spectrum of courses addressing these real-world needs, one might consider where courses fall on a reality scale. At the lowest level of the reality scale are courses using analytical tools like MATLAB, SolidWorks, Mathematica, or SIMULINK. Level two requires students working in teams to solve problems with a correct answer (like a physics or chemistry lab). Level three courses might require problems that are structured and researched by faculty but that could have multiple solutions. As one further ascends the reality scale, one finds industrial clients with fuzzy problem descriptions that require initial research to develop specifications before solutions are generated. At the top of the reality chart would be courses that address the myriad of stakeholders one finds in industry, such as the FDA, U/L, end-users as well as manufacturing, service, financial, and legal representatives. Real-world experience and exposure can be achieved through a number of mechanisms including design courses, computer simulation, laboratory experiments, guest speakers, industrial sponsorship of design projects, field trips to hospitals and medical industry, internships, and cooperative education. In this article, we describe the mechanisms currently being used in biomedical engineering curricula to create real-world experience and suggest future directions for incorporating the real world into undergraduate curricula. Real-World Experience Throughout the Curriculum From freshman design to senior capstone design, there is a myriad of real-world experiences being integrated into biomedical engineering curricula throughout the United States. This article summarizes some of the best practices in weaving real-world experiences throughout the four-year curriculum. Laboratory Courses Laboratory courses are used throughout the curriculum to give students hands-on, practical experience in basic science, computing, and engineering methods. Through laboratory investigation students learn to: measure and digitally acquire physical phenomena relevant to medicine and biology; design experiments; interpret and statistically evaluate data, write technical reports; and compare experimental observation to theory and determine, quantitatively, how protocols, conditions, and methodology may produce the observed differences. In the simplest laboratory experiences, students follow step-by-step protocols to demonstrate principles of physics or learn about biological measurement. In more advanced labs, students typically perform experiments based on open-ended clinical or research problems. Laboratory experiences may include multi-week group projects that require students to research the literature and use the instruments and equipment available in the lab to prepare a proposal for investigation. The projects may even be presented and defended orally. Computer Simulation Theory may be put into practice through modeling and computer simulation. Simulation of physiological systems may be performed using a variety of software packages such as Working Model, SIMM, LabView, Mathematica, and MATLAB. These software packages are relatively simple to use, require minimal programming skills, and allow fairly sophisticated analysis of complex systems. In most applications, students construct models of biomedical systems and compare theoretical performance to experimental observation. For example, at Johns Hopkins University [1], freshman BME students begin their studies with a course called Models for Life, where students learn how to model biological systems in a small group tutorial environment. The course emphasizes the modeling aspects of biomedical engineering, integrating the laws of physics and chemistry with mathematics to model biologic phenomena. Internships and Cooperative Education Several programs offer formalized cooperative education and internship programs to their undergraduate and graduate BME students. These programs allow students to spend one or more semesters working in industry. These internship experiences supplement classroom instruction and help students define their strengths, weaknesses, likes, and dislikes. A number of universities also offer summer research experiences for undergraduates. Many of these summer programs are funded by NSF and the Howard Hughes Institute. The BME program at University of Pennsylvania [2] offers Preceptorship in Clinical Bioengineering. This course provides lectures and in-depth exposure to a selected clinical program in the School of Medicine. Half the course time is spent participating in programs with clinical faculty, interns, residents, and researchers of a selected clinical department emphasizing areas of particular interest and applications to BME. Guest Speakers A typical undergraduate course is taught by one instructor who is expected to teach a fairly broad range of topics. Guest speakers are an excellent means for introducing expertise that is not readily available in the course instructor. When faculty bring in guest speakers or outside experts, they demonstrate to students the need for a team of experts in solving biomedical problems. Research As teacher-scholars, professors should make an effort to bring their research activities into the classroom. Professors may incorporate actual data into homework 60 IEEE ENGINEERING IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY March/April 2002

3 and computer projects or have senior design teams build instrumentation for the laboratory. Moreover, most BME programs offer one-on-one independent study allowing undergraduate students to perform research on cutting-edge topics using state-of-the-art facilities and techniques. Research and Professional Practice I and II at Tulane University [3] introduces the tools, techniques, and rules necessary to function professionally as a researcher or engineer. Field Trips The medical device industry often complains about the lack of appreciation that engineers have for the clinical environment. Too many engineers are sitting in a cubicle designing for an environment to which they have never had exposure. Some courses address this problem by providing students with tours of clinical facilities. Problem-Centered Instruction Recent findings from the BME Education Engineering Resource Center, VaNTH, [4-5] led by Vanderbilt University, suggest that students learn better when topics are presented in a problem-focused, modular format. Perhaps BME curricula should consider reformatting the traditional courses of chemistry, physics, biology, and calculus. Perhaps teams of scientists, mathematicians, physicians, and engineers might teach the material in combined fashion using a modular, problem-focused approach. Each topic is first introduced within the context of an appropriate biomedical problem. Then, the potential solutions are covered using knowledge of physics, biology, chemistry, and engineering methods. Marquette University s freshman sequence in Biomedical Engineering Methods I & II is a fully modular, team-taught course whereby each threeto four-week module addresses a biomedical problem or challenge. Each module requires six hours of laboratory giving students hands-on experience with circuit design, mechanical models, data acquisition, statistical analysis, CAD, technical writing, measurement, and teamwork [6]. process in which the students apply previously learned material to meet a stated objective. Most often, students are exposed to system-wide synthesis and analysis, critique, and evaluation for the first time. Typically, the class is divided into small teams of no more than five students. Each team meets with the course instructors and faculty advisors on a regular basis, and when appropriate, with clinicians and industrial sponsors. Some programs have teams consisting only of biomedical engineering students, while other programs offer truly interdisciplinary teams of biomedical, electrical, mechanical, and chemical engineers. For example, at Marquette University [6], all senior biomedical, electrical, and mechanical engineering students are combined into one capstone design course where students may select projects offered by any of the participating departments. Project sponsors typically request that a team be comprised of a mix of engineering disciplines. Typically, there are no required textbooks, and only a minimal number of lectures. Experts from industry, patent law, and government agencies typically provide the lecture material. Students integrate and apply knowledge from their major field of study toward a specific project. A number of biomedical engineering programs, like the University of Connecticut [7], have a full year of required senior design courses, here referred to as Design I and II. The major deliverable in Design I is a paper design with extensive modeling and computer analysis. Over the semester, students are introduced to a variety of subjects including working on teams, the design process, planning and scheduling, technical report writing, proposal writing, oral presentations, ethics in design, safety, liability, impact of economic constraints, environmental considerations, manufacturing, and marketing. Design II requires students to implement their design by completing a working model of the final product. Prototype testing of the paper design typically requires modification to meet specifications. Team Work Graduates entering the real world find that just about every project is tackled by a team of engineers, scientists, marketing experts, technicians, and other personnel. Yet, team-based projects tend to be difficult for a student without the basic team-building skills in his or her background [8]. Student learning styles differ within teams and are best described by field-independent and field-dependent learners. Field-independent learners tend to be excellent problem solvers and independent workers, people who would rather work by themselves than interact in a group. These learners typically have trouble communicating with others and need private time to clarify ideas and solutions. Field-dependent learners are excellent communicators and need the interaction of the team to clarify ideas and solutions.these learners tend to work optimally within groups, and without group interaction they would tend to fail. Senior Design In most senior design courses, the emphasis is not on learning new material but rather solving large-scale, open-ended, complex, and sometimes ill-defined problems. This is an iterative, decision-making 1. Dr. Kris Ropella and student Aaron Suminski discuss experiment design in Marquette s biocomputing laboratory. March/April 2002 IEEE ENGINEERING IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY 61

4 Any biomedical engineering subject could be taught more effectively if students approached it the same way they do freshman projects. On a team-based project, each student has tasks that he or she is responsible for successfully completing, and team success depends on each team member completing his or her own tasks. Naturally, team success depends on each team member communicating progress on a regular basis. This interaction is vital for the team to complete the project. Communication Throughout the design process, students are required to document their work through a series of required written assignments as well as a bound, project notebook. For the final report, documenting the design project involves integrating each of the required reports into a single final document. Students are often expected to record weekly progress in bound, legal notebooks and on a website [9]. Many graded written reports are required throughout the first semester, culminating in a final report for the project. Successive updating over multiple reports allows the students to improve their writing skills. The web is being used more often to report project progress and communicate with the sponsors and clients. Students are also required to give oral presentations such as weekly design reviews to fellow team members and faculty advisors and end-of-semester formal presentations to the entire class and clients. At Boston University, the BME program has a senior project conference, which draws representatives from more than 50 biomedical companies and local hospitals, providing a professional style forum for every student to present his or her project orally [10]. From simple PowerPoint presentations and web pages logging project status, to Microsoft Project for timelines and project planning, to modeling and simulation software, to NetMeeting and video conferencing for distant clients and collaborations, computer technology and the web will continue to facilitate the design process and communication. Timelines and Team Meetings Oftentimes, one or more students on a team are less industrious than others, which can result in a less than satisfactory but still passable project, or a project that is unsatisfactory [11]. While the training in team skills (use of a timeline and team meetings) can reduce the possibility of the latter case, this case is still an unpleasant possibility. Timeline development by the team is usually vital for success, eliminates most management issues, and allows the instructor to monitor the activities by student team members. For this to be a success, activities for each week need to be documented for each team member, with best success when there are five to ten activities per team member each week. When this is done, the team knows what needs to be done and will be successful in completing the project. Evaluation Methods of evaluation vary considerably across programs, but most allow for both team grades and individual grades. In most courses, a student is individually accountable for his or her own grade. In a course with team-based accomplishments, grading is based on the success of the team and possibly the success of each individual on that team. One or more faculty typically grade written reports required throughout the semester. In some cases, clients other than faculty contribute to the evaluation process. Oral presentations may be evaluated by class members external to the presenting design team. In addition to faculty evaluations of individual and team performance, students may receive peer evaluations. Some programs even use formal written exams as part of the evaluation process. Freshman Design Freshman courses expose students to the design process, which involves gathering information, structuring problems, generating alternatives, testing concepts in the lab, and getting user feedback. The process is just as applicable to a bubble gum dispenser as it is to an angioplasty catheter, but students are much more engaged by a real problem in their field than by one that is just an exercise. Teaching design at the freshman level has taught us a number of important lessons: 1) Skills such as critical thinking, teamwork, decision making, and so forth can be learned by freshman; 2) we need to teach these in new ways, as coaching is often times more effective than lecturing; and 3) real problems really motivate students to learn engineering science. Many in engineering education have not considered skills such as teamwork and decision making to be within their domain. Others have doubted if freshmen are mature enough to learn these habits of mind. The evidence now suggests that freshmen are capable of learning these skills and they are most effectively taught in the context of engineering design. Fostering these skills, however, requires engineering professors to interact with freshmen the way they do with their graduate students. These are learned not by memorizing, but by practicing. And we can only see how well the students are doing by closely observing their behavior and the outcomes of their work. Quizzes and exams need to be replaced by open-ended problems and laboratory research. These lessons are best learned through team and individual work with coaching by the instructor, not by lectures and reading assignments. Finally, solving real problems for real people causes students to push themselves to higher levels of performance. This is not surprising to those who have studied how people learn. When learning is organized around authentic problems and projects, students learn faster and retain more [12]. This lesson is not limited to design courses. Any biomedical engineering subject could be taught more effectively if students approached it the same way they do freshman projects. Fundamentals At the core of any introductory course is the design process itself and the tools used to generate solutions. The process involves: 1) gathering information about us- 62 IEEE ENGINEERING IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY March/April 2002

5 ers, products, and technologies; 2) defining complex problems by breaking them down into manageable pieces; 3) generating alternative designs that address a wide spectrum of user needs; 4) selecting the best approaches based on well-defined criteria; and 5) testing concepts in the laboratory and in the field. Students learn quickly that the process in not linear and sequential. Steps can be done in parallel, and they are repeated as new information or as ideas surface. Freshmen see that decisions must be made with incomplete and fuzzy information. They also find, as do practicing engineers, that time and a team s skill set are major constraints to finding working solutions. For each of these steps, there are tools and techniques that make design a true discipline. These tools include brainstorming, objectives trees, Duncker diagrams, performance criteria specification, requirements matrices, and morphological charts. There are a number of textbooks that provide an excellent introduction to design [13]. Freshmen should also be introduced to project management techniques such as defining tasks, estimating times, and developing schedules. They should also learn how to divide responsibilities, schedule and conduct meetings, and evaluate individual and team performance. Selecting Project While BME students learn the most from biomedical problems, this is not necessarily the only criterion for finding good projects. Equally important is that they appear to be real, meaning that they address apparently unsolved problems that may have a number of alternative solutions. The problems need to be complex enough that there can be many different ways of defining them. The solution, more often than not, depends to a great extent on how the team specified the problem. If a team thinks physicians are their most important users, they may develop a completely different device compared to a team that is focused on the needs of the patients. Pilot Programs Arizona State University s Introduction to Engineering Design is one of the most innovative courses developed under the coalition s initiative [14]. Its goals are to show how engineers approach and solve problems and to increase awareness of and interest in the types of problems confronted by engineers. It also strives to demonstrate that solving equations is just one of many tools used to design systems that satisfy human needs. Freshmen learn how to use the design process along with engineering and physical principles to formulate and solve a problem, implement the solution, and document the process. They get to know the customer and how to document customer needs and expectations in the form of specifications. Freshmen work in teams and learn about team dynamics, communication, social norms, and conflict management. The course teaches students how to teach themselves, set goals, assess their progress, and manage their time. It also covers communication skills, including how to organize and present oral and written reports and how to use graphical representations. Johns Hopkins University is leading the field in teaching BME design to freshmen. It has recently developed a two-semester course in which six to eight freshmen work on a team led by a senior who is assisted by two sophomores and two juniors [15]. In the first semester, teams are asked to predict how the body will respond to various stresses. After studying textbooks and borrowing or building the required monitors and sensors, they spend a day at Six Flags, an amusement park, measuring both physiologic and physical variables. Having collected the data, they report on how roller coasters affect the baroreflex or how gravity affects heart rate and blood pressure. In the second semester, teams work for clients on the medical school staff. They design systems to analyze EEGs, measure fluxes through the endothelial cell barrier, assist blind people in navigating, or report when a police officer has been shot. Grades in the course are determined primarily by the students themselves. Team members evaluate each other, their leader, and themselves. Hopkins now offers BME design courses all four years, so that by the senior year, when they work on industry-sponsored projects, students can have had three years of experience in teamwork on open-ended problems. Northwestern University s freshman course is a model for integrating communications into design as well as challenging students with real problems [16]. Engineering and writing faculty jointly teach the two-quarter sequence [17]. Students receive credit for both an engineering course and a writing course. The writing faculty members are not just paper graders, they have co-developed the course with the school of engineering, they teach along side the engineering faculty in the small-group sessions, Many in engineering education have not considered skills such as teamwork and decision making to be within their domain. and they have insured that most lessons are taught by coaching instead of lecture. In the second quarter, when students move from web-based projects to more domain-related ones, they continue to work for real clients on real problems. The teams are not exclusively BMEs, they will typically also include MEs or EEs with an interest in biomedical problems. The BME projects could be part of a peritoneal dialysis system for Baxter or a prosthetic for a handicapped individual. Assessment A national trend in postsecondary education toward heightened consumer consciousness and increased demands for accountability of educators parallels a national trend in the healthcare industry toward increased accountability of those who work in all aspects of medically related services. Making Our Focus Real, Not Bureaucratic All regional accrediting agencies in the Unites States now require extensive outcomes assessment plans for all colleges and universities as well as individual academic departments [18]. The Accrediting Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) has launched efforts to increase accountability of educational programs through an increased focus on assessment of student learning outcomes. One of the dangers of having such demands imposed by regulatory agencies is that efforts may be perceived by educators as a bureaucratic chore, thrust upon them by administrators and requiring detailed March/April 2002 IEEE ENGINEERING IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY 63

6 Students must be taught how to put theory into practice and how to adapt when real-world behavior cannot be adequately described by existing theory. and time-consuming documentation. Thus, there is a tendency in many academic units to engage in assessment practices that are not truly meaningful [19]. Although what constitutes ideal outcomes assessment practice is largely dependent on the particular program and institution in which that practice is implemented, there are at least some accurate generalities regarding what constitutes a meaningful program. A meaningful program, for example, is designed to enhance an educational mission in specific, practical, measurable ways, with the goal of improving effectiveness. It also involves all of a program s faculty and students, not just administrators or designated report writers. Furthermore, the results of meaningful assessment programs are used to foster real modifications in a program [19]. Within the realm of engineering design-project experiences, a meaningful approach to educational outcomes may lead to: a) improvements in the learning of engineering students and, consequently, b) improved knowledge, design, and technology to benefit individuals in need. The Need for Demonstrated Outcomes Associated with Design Experiences There is a lack of documented solid empirical support for the efficacy and validity of biomedical design project experiences and the specific aspects of implementing those experiences. Concerted efforts to improve learning, assessment methods, and data collection concerning pedagogic efficacy of design project experiences will enhance student learning while benefiting the community of consumers of biomedical engineering design projects. Articulating Targeted Outcomes The development and use of educational assessment methods from an outcomes perspective encourages educators to articulate clearly the important changes they expect to occur in our students as they develop, not just in terms of the acquisition of theory and fact but in terms of the gaining of functional abilities that will enrich their professional practice and personal lives. A logical first step in increasing the likelihood of achieving such goals is for instructors to be very clear about what it is that they want their students to know and achieve as a result of design project experiences. ABET s requirements for the engineering design experiences in particular provide direction in areas that are essential to assess when monitoring the value of engineering design project experiences. For example, the following are considered fundamental elements of the design process: establishment of objectives and criteria, synthesis, analysis, construction, testing, and evaluation. Furthermore, according to ABET, specific targeted outcomes associated with engineering design projects should include: development of student creativity, use of open-ended problems, development and use of modern design theory and methodology, formulation of design problem statements and specifications, consideration of alternative solutions, feasibility considerations, production processes, concurrent engineering design, and detailed system descriptions. The accrediting board additionally stipulates that it is essential to include a variety of realistic constraints, such as economic factors, safety, reliability, aesthetics, ethics, and social impact. Essential questions for educators, students and consumers to consider are: Are there outcomes, in addition to those specified by ABET, that instructors target in their roles as facilitators of design projects? If so, what are they? Is the faculty consistently and clearly articulating to students what it is that they are expected to learn and become? If not, by what specific means might they more clearly convey to them what it is they are to learn and demonstrate? Assessing Assessment of Targeted Outcomes Once faculty members have an extensive list of targeted outcomes for design project experiences, and once they have solid means of communicating those targeted outcomes to students, it is essential that they address the following questions: Are each of those targeted outcomes held to be important being assessed? How may instructors best characterize evidence that students effectively attain desired outcomes? Are there ways in which students performance within any of these areas might be more validly assessed? Are instructors providing thorough evaluative feedback to students such that their assessments continue to shape learning experiences? How might improved formative assessment of students throughout the design experience be used to improve learning? Conclusions Mechanisms for preparing biomedical engineering students for real-world problem solving are numerous. Failure to incorporate such real-world experiences throughout the curriculum creates frustration for the student, particularly for the freshman or sophomore undergraduate who lacks the experience to draw a connection between theory and practice. Upon graduation, the biomedical engineer is suddenly confronted with real-world problems and design challenges that require a team of experts, project planning and execution, regulatory and quality control, financial support, and a satisfied customer. Too often, graduates are unprepared for this transition to real-world engineering. In designing a curriculum to prepare students for future challenges, engineering instructors continually ask, What is the best practice? Good design engineers ask, What are the best ways to measure success? The weighting and relevance attached to summative metrics such as starting salaries, employer reports of alumni performance, alumni surveys, rankings of U.S. News and World Report, and licensing exams are important, if difficult, considerations. Only recently have engineering programs been required to 64 IEEE ENGINEERING IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY March/April 2002

7 formally assess the outcomes of their educational processes. Many biomedical engineering programs continually assess and remold their curricula to enhance their educational missions in specific, practical, measurable ways, with the goals of improving the effectiveness of training and education. However, these assessments have typically been somewhat informal and randomly distributed. Even with NSF s solid commitment to engineering design project experiences, and widespread enthusiasm about this experiential approach to learning and service, there is a lack of documented solid empirical support for the efficacy and validity of design project experiences and the specific aspects of implementing those experiences. If biomedical engineering programs are to prepare students to solve biomedical problems that impact a wide range of economic, environmental, ethical, legal, and social issues, students must be taught how to put theory into practice and how to adapt when real-world behavior cannot be adequately described by existing theory. Every educational tool, from textbooks, to lab experiments, to homework, to capstone design projects, should seek to incorporate some aspect of real-world implementation and problem solving. Acknowledgment Portions of the work presented were funded in part by the National Science Foundation under grant numbers BES and John D. Enderle received the B.S., M.E., and Ph.D. degrees in biomedical engineering and M.E. degree in electrical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York, in 1975, 1977, 1980, and 1978, respectively. After completing his Ph.D. studies, he was a senior staff member at PAR Technology Corporation, Rome, New York, from 1979 to From , Enderle was a faculty member in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Coordinator for Biomedical Engineering at North Dakota State University (NDSU), Fargo, North Dakota. He joined the National Science Foundation as Program Director for Biomedical Engineering & Research Aiding Persons with Disabilities Program from January 1994 through June In January 1995, he joined the faculty of the University of Connecticut (UConn) as professor and head of the Electrical & Systems Engineering Department. In June 1997, he became the director of the Biomedical Engineering Program at UConn. Dr. Enderle is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical & Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the current editor-in-chief of IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine, a past-president of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS), EMBS Conference Chair for the 22nd Annual International Conference of the IEEE EMBS and World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering in 2000, Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE), an ABET Program Evaluator for Bioengineering Programs, a member of the American Society for Engineering Education and Biomedical Engineering Division Chair for 2005, and a senior member of the Biomedical Engineering Society. He has also been a Teaching Fellow at the University of Connecticut since His research interests include modeling physiological systems, system identification, signal processing, and control theory. Kristina M. Ropella received her B.S. degree in biomedical engineering from Marquette University (Milwaukee, WI) in 1985 and her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, both in biomedical engineering, from Northwestern University (Evanston, IL) in 1987 and 1989, respectively. Ropella is currently an associate professor of biomedical engineering at Marquette University where she has been a member of the faculty since Her research interests are in physiologic signal processing, electrophysiology of heart and brain, cardiac arrhythmias, and functional magnetic resonance imaging. She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in biomedical signal processing, statistical time-series analysis, biomedical computing, biomedical instrumentation design. and modeling of dynamic systems. She is a past recipient of the Marquette University Robert and Mary Gettel Faculty Award for Teaching Excellence. She directs several educational programs, including the Functional Imaging Program, a joint doctoral degree program offered by Marquette University and the Medical College of Wisconsin, and a new undergraduate major in biocomputer engineering. At Marquette, she also co-directs the cooperative education program in biomedical engineering and new initiatives in continuing education for local medical device companies. She is a senior member of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society and has served on the Administrative Committee, chairing both the strategic planning and education subcommittees. She currently serves on the Biomedical Engineering Society Board and chairs the student affairs committee. She is also a member of the North American Society for Pacing and Electrophysiology, the International Society for Computerized Electrocardiology, the American Society for Engineering Education, Sigma Xi, and Tau Beta Pi. She serves on the editorial board for the IEEE Press biomedical engineering series, and she has served as track chair and session chair for a number of education and university-industry related sessions at the EMBS, BMES, and ASEE society meetings. David M. Kelso received a B.S. degree in engineering sciences from Purdue University in He received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in biomedical engineering from Northwestern University in 1972 and 1974, respectively. He spent almost 20 years in the medical device industry at Nuclear Chicago, Abbott Laboratories, Pandex Laboratories, and Baxter International. His engineering teams produced one of the first microprocessor-controlled immunoassay analyzers in 1977, the first fully automated therapeutic drug analyzer in 1981, and a high-throughput blood screening system in He was a co-founder of Pandex Laboratories and served as president until it was acquired by Baxter in Joining the faculty of Northwestern University in 1992, he co-developed a freshman design program in general engineering and teaches the senior capstone course. His research interests are focused on high-throughput DNA and protein array technologies. Brooke Hallowell, Ph.D., CCC/SLP, is associate dean of Research and Sponsored Programs in Health and Human Services and associate professor of Neurogenic Communication Disorders at Ohio University. She holds a Ph.D. in speech-language pathology and audiol- March/April 2002 IEEE ENGINEERING IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY 65

8 ogy from the University of Iowa, an M.S. in speech-language pathology and audiology from Lamar University, and an A.B. in cognitive sciences from Brown University. She has been engaged in collaborative engineering senior design work since 1997, and she is co-principal investigator with John Enderle on two grant projects on Projects to Aid Persons with Disabilities funded by the National Science Foundation. Hallowell is engaged in ongoing research on assessment and pedagogic effectiveness related to biomedical engineering design experiences for undergraduates. Additionally, she is active in research related to neurogenic communication disorders in adults and in developing technology for improved diagnostic assessment of patients with complex neurological conditions. Much of her research is sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. She is vice president of the Stoke and Aphasia Society of India, chair of the national Joint Committee on Educational Assessment, and conference chair for the Council of Academic Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders. References/Endnotes [1] [2] [3] [4] J.D. Bransford, A.L. Brown, and R.R. Cocking, Eds., How People Learn. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, [5] [6] [7] [8] J.D. Enderle, W. Pruehsner, J. Macione, and B. Hallowell, Using a multidisciplinary team approach in biomedical engineering senior design, Biomed. Sci. Instrument., vol. 36, pp , [9] J.D. Enderle, A.F. Browne, and M.B. Hallowell, A Web based approach in biomedical engineering design education, Biomed. Sci. Instrument., vol. 34, pp , [10] [11] W. Pruehsner J.D. Enderle, Use of timelines in senior design An efficient project management tool for faculty, Biomed. Sci. Instrument., vol. 36, pp , [12] J.D. Bransford, A.L. Brown, and R.R. Cocking, Eds., How People Learn. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, [13] K.T. Ulrich and S.D. Eppinger, Product Design and Development, 2nd ed. New York: McGraw-Hill. 1999; C.L. Dym and P.L. Little, Engineering Design: A Project-Based Introduction. New York: Wiley, [14] [15] pastprojects.htm [16] P.B. Hirsch, B. Shwom, J. Anderson, G. Olson, D. Kelso, and J.E. Colgate, Engineering design and communication: Jump-starting the engineering curriculum, ASEE 1998 Conference, Session 3253, Seattle, WA, June 28 - July 1, [17] B. Shwom, P. Hirsch, J. Anderson, C. Yarnoff, and D. Kelso, Using multi-disciplinary teams to teach communication to engineers, or Practicing what we preach, ASEE 2000 Conference, Session 2461, St. Louis, MO, June 18-21, [18] B. Hallowell and N. Lund, Fostering program improvements through a focus on educational outcomes (in Council of Graduate Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders), in Proc. 19th Ann. Conf. Graduate Education, 1998, pp [19] B. Hallowell, Formative and summative outcomes assessment: What do we mean by doing it with meaning? in Proc. Twenty-First Ann. Conf. Graduate Education, 2000, pp IEEE ENGINEERING IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY March/April 2002

AC 2007-2230: DEVELOPING STUDENT DESIGN AND PROFESSIONAL SKILLS IN AN UNDERGRADUATE BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM

AC 2007-2230: DEVELOPING STUDENT DESIGN AND PROFESSIONAL SKILLS IN AN UNDERGRADUATE BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM AC 2007-2230: DEVELOPING STUDENT DESIGN AND PROFESSIONAL SKILLS IN AN UNDERGRADUATE BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM Donna Ebenstein, Bucknell University Joseph Tranquillo, Bucknell University Daniel

More information

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING Baccalaureate Study in Engineering Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING Baccalaureate Study in Engineering Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING Baccalaureate Study in Engineering Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes Overall Description of the School of Engineering The School of Engineering offers bachelor s degree

More information

A Design Paradigm in Undergraduate Electrical Engineering Curriculum

A Design Paradigm in Undergraduate Electrical Engineering Curriculum A Design Paradigm in Undergraduate Electrical Engineering Curriculum Habib Rahman Saint Louis University Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering McDonnell Douglas Hall, 3450 Lindell Boulevard

More information

Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering Continuous Improvement Guide

Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering Continuous Improvement Guide Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering Continuous Improvement Guide The intent of this document is to assist faculty, staff, students, and constituents of the Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering in

More information

Work in Progress: Providing Diverse Opportunities for Capstone Projects in Biomedical Engineering

Work in Progress: Providing Diverse Opportunities for Capstone Projects in Biomedical Engineering Paper ID #12365 Work in Progress: Providing Diverse Opportunities for Capstone Projects in Biomedical Engineering Dr. Mansoor Nasir, Lawrence Technological University Dr. Mansoor Nasir received his B.Sc.

More information

Engineering Design and Communication: A Foundational Course for Freshmen

Engineering Design and Communication: A Foundational Course for Freshmen Engineering Design and Communication 107 Engineering Design and Communication: A Foundational Course for Freshmen Barbara Shwom, Penny Hirsch, Charles Yarnoff, John Anderson The Writing Program, Northwestern

More information

AC 2009-1549: ACTIVE-LEARNING EXPERIENCES ON MEDICAL DEVICES FOR MANUFACTURING AND NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT

AC 2009-1549: ACTIVE-LEARNING EXPERIENCES ON MEDICAL DEVICES FOR MANUFACTURING AND NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT AC 2009-1549: ACTIVE-LEARNING EXPERIENCES ON MEDICAL DEVICES FOR MANUFACTURING AND NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT Susana Lai-Yuen, University of South Florida Susana K. Lai-Yuen is an Assistant Professor of Industrial

More information

Recent Curriculum Changes in Engineering Science and Mechanics at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University*

Recent Curriculum Changes in Engineering Science and Mechanics at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University* Int. J. Engng Ed. Vol. 16, No. 5, pp. 436±440, 2000 0949-149X/91 $3.00+0.00 Printed in Great Britain. # 2000 TEMPUS Publications. Recent Curriculum Changes in Engineering Science and Mechanics at Virginia

More information

Sarah A. Rajala Ernest W. & Mary Ann Deavenport, Jr. Chair and Dean Bagley College of Engineering Mississippi State University Mississippi State, MS

Sarah A. Rajala Ernest W. & Mary Ann Deavenport, Jr. Chair and Dean Bagley College of Engineering Mississippi State University Mississippi State, MS Sarah A. Rajala Ernest W. & Mary Ann Deavenport, Jr. Chair and Dean Bagley College of Engineering Mississippi State University Mississippi State, MS 39762 USA November 8, 2012 Background: North Carolina

More information

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical and Computer Engineering Roobik Gharabagi, Ph.D., Chair (gharabr@slu.edu) Faculty: Will Ebel, Ph.D. (ebelwj@slu.edu) Armineh Khalili, M.S.E.E. (khalilia@slu.edu) Huliyar S. Mallikarjuna, Ph.D.

More information

1. Professional employment in areas such as the medical device industry, engineering consulting, and biotechnology;

1. Professional employment in areas such as the medical device industry, engineering consulting, and biotechnology; Class Years 2017 and Beyond Undergraduate Program The objectives of the undergraduate program in biomedical engineering are as follows: 1. Professional employment in areas such as the medical device industry,

More information

Electrical and Computer Engineering Undergraduate Advising Manual

Electrical and Computer Engineering Undergraduate Advising Manual Electrical and Computer Engineering Undergraduate Advising Manual Department of Engineering University of Massachusetts Boston Revised: October 5, 2015 Table of Contents 1. Introduction... 3 2. Mission

More information

Curricular Vision. I. Introduction:

Curricular Vision. I. Introduction: Curricular Vision The Olin College Curricular Vision, which served as a guide for curricular development at Olin College, was written in the fall of 2001by David V. Kerns, who was provost of the college

More information

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee College of Engineering & Applied Science

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee College of Engineering & Applied Science University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee College of Engineering & Applied Science Request for Authorization to Implement a Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering A. ABSTRACT: The proposed Bachelor of Science

More information

Academic Program Models for Undergraduate Biomedical Engineering

Academic Program Models for Undergraduate Biomedical Engineering Academic Program Models for Undergraduate Biomedical Engineering Shankar M. Krishnan, Ph.D. Chair, Dept. of BME & H.C. Lord Chair Professor WIT, Boston, USA INTRODUCTION Global population is increasing.

More information

2. SUMMER ADVISEMENT AND ORIENTATION PERIODS FOR NEWLY ADMITTED FRESHMEN AND TRANSFER STUDENTS

2. SUMMER ADVISEMENT AND ORIENTATION PERIODS FOR NEWLY ADMITTED FRESHMEN AND TRANSFER STUDENTS Chemistry Department Policy Assessment: Undergraduate Programs 1. MISSION STATEMENT The Chemistry Department offers academic programs which provide students with a liberal arts background and the theoretical

More information

2006-2167: PREPARING BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERS FOR CAREER ADVANCEMENT: THE HEALTHCARE TECHNOLOGIES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

2006-2167: PREPARING BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERS FOR CAREER ADVANCEMENT: THE HEALTHCARE TECHNOLOGIES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM 2006-2167: PREPARING BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERS FOR CAREER ADVANCEMENT: THE HEALTHCARE TECHNOLOGIES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Jay Goldberg, Marquette University Dr. Goldberg is the Director of the Healthcare Technologies

More information

BS Environmental Science (2013-2014)

BS Environmental Science (2013-2014) BS Environmental Science (2013-2014) Program Information Point of Contact Brian M. Morgan (brian.morgan@marshall.edu) Support for University and College Missions Marshall University is a multi-campus public

More information

The Department of Bioengineering

The Department of Bioengineering The Department of Bioengineering 226 Engineering Research Building Box 19138 817-272-2249 www.uta.edu/bioengineering Overview The Department of Bioengineering offers a Bachelor of Science (BS) degree in

More information

ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL TOOLS FOR EDUCATION IN CHEMICAL AND BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING ANALYSIS

ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL TOOLS FOR EDUCATION IN CHEMICAL AND BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING ANALYSIS ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL TOOLS FOR EDUCATION IN CHEMICAL AND BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING ANALYSIS Proposal for the FSU Student Technology Fee Proposal Program Submitted by Department of Chemical and Biomedical

More information

Biology meets Engineering

Biology meets Engineering UIC Bioengineering What is Bioengineering? Biology meets Engineering The term bioengineering is often used interchangeably with: Biomedical Engineering synonymous (as far as accreditation goes ABET) Biological

More information

Experiences in Updating the ECE Curriculum with Signal Processing First and Kolb/4MAT Pedagogy*

Experiences in Updating the ECE Curriculum with Signal Processing First and Kolb/4MAT Pedagogy* Experiences in Updating the ECE Curriculum with Signal Processing First and Kolb/4MAT Pedagogy* G. Plett, R. Ziemer, M. Ciletti, R. Dandapani, T. Kalkur, and M. Wickert ECE Department, University of Colorado

More information

Electronic Engineering Technology Program Exit Examination as an ABET and Self-Assessment Tool

Electronic Engineering Technology Program Exit Examination as an ABET and Self-Assessment Tool Electronic Engineering Technology Program Exit Examination as an ABET and Self-Assessment Tool Graham Thomas, Ph.D. Texas Southern University Shahryar Darayan, Ph.D. Texas Southern University Abstract

More information

OREGON INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Mechanical Engineering Program Assessment 2007-08. October 16, 2008 INTRODUCTION PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT

OREGON INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Mechanical Engineering Program Assessment 2007-08. October 16, 2008 INTRODUCTION PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT OREGON INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Mechanical Engineering Program Assessment 2007-08 October 16, 2008 INTRODUCTION The Mechanical Engineering Program within the Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering and

More information

Psychology Professor Joe W. Hatcher; Associate Professor Kristine A. Kovack-Lesh (Chair) Visiting Professor Jason M. Cowell

Psychology Professor Joe W. Hatcher; Associate Professor Kristine A. Kovack-Lesh (Chair) Visiting Professor Jason M. Cowell Psychology Professor Joe W. Hatcher; Associate Professor Kristine A. Kovack-Lesh (Chair) Visiting Professor Jason M. Cowell Departmental Mission Statement: The Department of Psychology seeks for its students

More information

University of Nevada, Reno, Mechanical Engineering Department. 2005 ABET Program Outcome and Assessment

University of Nevada, Reno, Mechanical Engineering Department. 2005 ABET Program Outcome and Assessment 2005 ABET Program Outcome and Assessment 3. Program Outcomes and Assessment Program Outcomes We define our program educational outcomes as statements that describe what students are expected to be able

More information

CHEMISTRY, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (B.S.) WITH A CONCENTRATION IN CHEMICAL SCIENCE

CHEMISTRY, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (B.S.) WITH A CONCENTRATION IN CHEMICAL SCIENCE VCU CHEMISTRY, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (B.S.) WITH A CONCENTRATION IN CHEMICAL SCIENCE The curriculum in chemistry prepares students for graduate study in chemistry and related fields and for admission to

More information

ELEC 4000 - SENIOR DESIGN PROJECTS Spring Semester, 2014 Dr. Dean

ELEC 4000 - SENIOR DESIGN PROJECTS Spring Semester, 2014 Dr. Dean ELEC 4000 - SENIOR DESIGN PROJECTS Spring Semester, 2014 Dr. Dean 2011 Catalog Data: ELEC 4000. SENIOR DESIGN PROJECTS (3). Pr. ELEC 3040 or ELEC 3050 or ELEC 3060, and departmental approval. A capstone

More information

engineering AND Technology Degree programs

engineering AND Technology Degree programs engineering AND Technology Degree programs Aeronautical engineering Technology Associate in Applied Science (AAS) Degree The AAS aeronautical engineering technology program stresses the fundamentals of

More information

REGISTRATION CRITERIA FOR CFP BOARD REGISTERED PROGRAMS

REGISTRATION CRITERIA FOR CFP BOARD REGISTERED PROGRAMS REGISTRATION CRITERIA FOR CFP BOARD REGISTERED PROGRAMS Registration Criteria for CFP Board Registered Programs (Updated March, 2013) The following section contains the financial planning program registration

More information

Please email this completed form as an attachment to d-oaa@jan.ucc.nau.edu.

Please email this completed form as an attachment to d-oaa@jan.ucc.nau.edu. Annual Report on Degree Program Assessment of Student Learning University Assessment Committee Office of Academic Assessment Purpose: The purpose of the Annual Report on Degree Program Assessment of Student

More information

INNOVATION. Campus Box 154 P.O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364 Website: http://cam.ucdenver.edu/ncmf

INNOVATION. Campus Box 154 P.O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364 Website: http://cam.ucdenver.edu/ncmf EDUCATION RESEARCH INNOVATION Campus Box 154 P.O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364 Website: http://cam.ucdenver.edu/ncmf Email: ncmf@ucdenver.edu Phone: 303.315.5850 Fax: 303.832.0483 JEFF M. SMITH, m.s.

More information

Doctoral Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders

Doctoral Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders Website: http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/grcat/programcsdi.cfm#audphd Doctoral Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders The doctoral programs are designed for advanced scholars with interest in communication

More information

The Civil Engineering Systems Course at Georgia Institute of Technology. Adjo Amekudzi, Ph.D. 1 Michael Meyer, Ph.D., P.E. 2

The Civil Engineering Systems Course at Georgia Institute of Technology. Adjo Amekudzi, Ph.D. 1 Michael Meyer, Ph.D., P.E. 2 The Civil Engineering Systems Course at Georgia Institute of Technology Adjo Amekudzi, Ph.D. 1 Michael Meyer, Ph.D., P.E. 2 Abstract A course entitled Civil Engineering Systems was introduced in the fall

More information

Jean Chen, Assistant Director, Office of Institutional Research University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202-7106

Jean Chen, Assistant Director, Office of Institutional Research University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202-7106 Educational Technology in Introductory College Physics Teaching and Learning: The Importance of Students Perception and Performance Jean Chen, Assistant Director, Office of Institutional Research University

More information

ABET Outcomes Assessment

ABET Outcomes Assessment Worcester Polytechnic Institute ABET Outcomes Assessment Civil and Environmental Engineering Department A report submitted by the Working Committee: Leonard D. Albano Robert A. D Andrea Paul P. Mathisen

More information

Notes on Modifying an EET Associate Degree Curriculum to Improve Graduate Placement

Notes on Modifying an EET Associate Degree Curriculum to Improve Graduate Placement Session 1448 Notes on Modifying an EET Associate Degree Curriculum to Improve Graduate Placement James Stewart, William Lin DeVry College of Technology North Brunswick, New Jersey / Purdue School of Engineering

More information

Approximately 50 new undergraduate biomedical

Approximately 50 new undergraduate biomedical BME Education 1997 MASTER SERIES The ABCs of Preparing for ABET Accreditation Issues for Biomedical Engineering Programs Undergoing the Engineering Criteria Review Process JOHN ENDERLE, JOHN GASSERT, SUSAN

More information

NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL STATE UNIVERSITY

NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL STATE UNIVERSITY NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL STATE UNIVERSITY Built Environment Construction Management Robert B. Pyle, Department Chair 2013-2014 Common program outcomes and student learning outcomes for

More information

METROPOLITAN COLLEGE. Goals and Student Assessment Outcomes Measures. Graduate Degree Programs

METROPOLITAN COLLEGE. Goals and Student Assessment Outcomes Measures. Graduate Degree Programs METROPOLITAN COLLEGE Goals and Student Assessment Outcomes Measures for Graduate Degree Programs TABLE OF CONTENTS Overview... 3 Degrees Master of Arts in Human Resource Management. 4-10 Human Resource

More information

Industrial Engineering Definition of Tuning

Industrial Engineering Definition of Tuning Industrial Engineering Definition of Tuning Tuning is a faculty-led pilot project designed to define what students must know, understand, and be able to demonstrate after completing a degree in a specific

More information

AC 2009-2493: A PROPOSED APPLIED ENGINEERING DEGREE AT EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

AC 2009-2493: A PROPOSED APPLIED ENGINEERING DEGREE AT EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY AC 2009-2493: A PROPOSED APPLIED ENGINEERING DEGREE AT EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY Moderick Greenfield, Eastern Michigan University American Society for Engineering Education, 2009 Page 14.94.1 A Future

More information

Healthy People 2020 and Education For Health Successful Practices in Undergraduate Public Health Programs

Healthy People 2020 and Education For Health Successful Practices in Undergraduate Public Health Programs University of Massachusetts Amherst Amherst, MA Undergraduate Degree in Public Health Sciences Bachelor in Science & 4 Plus 1 BS/MPH http://www.umass.edu/sphhs/public_health/academics/undergraduate/index.html

More information

Learning Outcomes Assessment for Building Construction Management

Learning Outcomes Assessment for Building Construction Management Learning Outcomes Assessment for Building Construction Management Building Construction Management Learning Outcomes 1. The student is prepared to assume an entry level professional constructor s role

More information

Multimedia Systems Engineering

Multimedia Systems Engineering Appendix 3.11 Multimedia Systems Engineering Major Profile MASSEY UNIVERSITY BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING with HONOURS Multimedia Systems Engineering Major Profile Description and Competency Framework 2009

More information

AC 2010-1885: DEVELOPMENT OF A MASTERS DEGREE ON SUSTAINABILITY MANAGEMENT

AC 2010-1885: DEVELOPMENT OF A MASTERS DEGREE ON SUSTAINABILITY MANAGEMENT AC 2010-1885: DEVELOPMENT OF A MASTERS DEGREE ON SUSTAINABILITY MANAGEMENT Shekar Viswanathan, National University, San Diego Howard Evans, National University, San Diego American Society for Engineering

More information

Mechanical Engineering Program Annual Program Improvement Report 2014-2015

Mechanical Engineering Program Annual Program Improvement Report 2014-2015 Mechanical Engineering Program Annual Program Improvement Report 2014-2015 Prepared by Joseph P. Greene, Ph.D. Professor and Department Chair of the Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering and Sustainable

More information

Business - General Information

Business - General Information Manhattan College 1 Business - General Information Historical Note In September 1926, a two-year program of courses in business was offered to qualified students who had completed two years in Arts and

More information

SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY AND A&M COLLEGE BATON ROUGE, LOUISIANA

SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY AND A&M COLLEGE BATON ROUGE, LOUISIANA MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NURSING (MSN) COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 600. THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS OF ADVANCED NURSING (Credit, 3 hours). A systematic examination of the concepts of nursing, human beings, health, and

More information

Graduate Studies in Biomedical Sciences

Graduate Studies in Biomedical Sciences Graduate Studies in Biomedical Sciences The graduate program in Biomedical Sciences is designed to provide a multidisciplinary educational and training environment that will prepare them for independent

More information

Assessment Processes. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Fall 2014

Assessment Processes. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Fall 2014 Assessment Processes Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Fall 2014 Introduction The assessment process in the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Department at Utah State University

More information

Developing and Implementing an Innovative First Year Program for 1000 Students

Developing and Implementing an Innovative First Year Program for 1000 Students Paper #1108 Session 2793 Developing and Implementing an Innovative First Year Program for 1000 Students Audeen W. Fentiman, John T. Demel, Richard J. Freuler, Robert J. Gustafson, and John A. Merrill College

More information

Engineering Design and Communication: Jump-starting the Engineering Curriculum

Engineering Design and Communication: Jump-starting the Engineering Curriculum Session 3253 Engineering Design and Communication: Jump-starting the Engineering Curriculum P. Hirsch, B. Shwom, J. Anderson, G. Olson, D. Kelso, J.E. Colgate Northwestern University Abstract: A new course

More information

BS Biochemistry Program Learning Outcomes Assessments

BS Biochemistry Program Learning Outcomes Assessments BS Biochemistry Program Learning Outcomes Assessments Student Learning and Success A. Significance of findings from learning outcomes assessments Program-Level Learning Outcomes (PLOs) At the completion

More information

School of Management and Information Systems

School of Management and Information Systems School of Management and Information Systems Business and Management Systems Information Science and Technology 176 Business and Management Systems Business and Management Systems Bachelor of Science Business

More information

Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering (BSCoE) Essential Ideas

Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering (BSCoE) Essential Ideas Mission Statement Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering (BSCoE) Essential Ideas The mission statement for the Computer Engineering program as modified and adopted by the engineering faculty on July

More information

A Novel Graduate Program in Healthcare Technologies Management

A Novel Graduate Program in Healthcare Technologies Management Session 1609 A Novel Graduate Program in Healthcare Technologies Management Jay R. Goldberg, William R. Hendee Marquette University/Medical College of Wisconsin Steven R. Krogull Medical College of Wisconsin

More information

HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAMS OF STUDY

HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAMS OF STUDY HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAMS OF STUDY 2013-2014 CONTENTS INTRODUCTION.. 3 EMPLOYMENT PROJECTIONS 3 ALIGNMENT TO POST- SECONDARY EDUCATION 4 STUDENT MOTIVATION & INTEREST.. 5 PATHWAYS & SCHEDULING. 6 Graduation

More information

CHEMISTRY, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (B.S.) WITH A CONCENTRATION IN BIOCHEMISTRY

CHEMISTRY, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (B.S.) WITH A CONCENTRATION IN BIOCHEMISTRY VCU CHEMISTRY, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (B.S.) WITH A CONCENTRATION IN BIOCHEMISTRY The curriculum in chemistry prepares students for graduate study in chemistry and related fields and for admission to schools

More information

Mission/Vision/Strategic Plan Audiology and Speech-Language Sciences 2011-2016

Mission/Vision/Strategic Plan Audiology and Speech-Language Sciences 2011-2016 1 Mission/Vision/Strategic Plan Audiology and Speech-Language Sciences 2011-2016 UNC Mission Statement The University of Northern Colorado shall be a comprehensive baccalaureate and specialized graduate

More information

Analysis of the Effectiveness of Online Learning in a Graduate Engineering Math Course

Analysis of the Effectiveness of Online Learning in a Graduate Engineering Math Course The Journal of Interactive Online Learning Volume 1, Number 3, Winter 2003 www.ncolr.org ISSN: 1541-4914 Analysis of the Effectiveness of Online Learning in a Graduate Engineering Math Course Charles L.

More information

UMD Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

UMD Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering UMD Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Indices and Standards for Tenure and Promotion to Professor as Required by Section 7.12 of the Board of Regents Policy on Faculty Tenure (June 10,

More information

CSM. Biomedical Physics Program

CSM. Biomedical Physics Program Student Outcomes Assessment Plan (SOAP) I. Mission Statement CSM Biomedical Physics Program The mission of the Undergraduate Biomedical Physics Program at Fresno State is to provide students with a rigorous

More information

Example of a Well-Designed Course in: COMMUNICATION DISORDERS

Example of a Well-Designed Course in: COMMUNICATION DISORDERS Website: Designlearning.org Example of a Well-Designed Course in: COMMUNICATION DISORDERS Name: Jennifer C. Dalton, Ph.D. Name of Institution: Appalachian State University 1. Specific Context The subject

More information

AC 2007-1659: DEVELOPING AN UNDERSTANDING OF INSTRUCTORS DESIGN LEARNING PHILOSOPHIES IN A SERVICE-LEARNING CONTEXT

AC 2007-1659: DEVELOPING AN UNDERSTANDING OF INSTRUCTORS DESIGN LEARNING PHILOSOPHIES IN A SERVICE-LEARNING CONTEXT AC 2007-1659: DEVELOPING AN UNDERSTANDING OF INSTRUCTORS DESIGN LEARNING PHILOSOPHIES IN A SERVICE-LEARNING CONTEXT Carla Zoltowski, Purdue University CARLA B. ZOLTOWSKI is Education Administrator of the

More information

Meaning, Quality, and Integrity Degree Statement for Mechanical Engineering Program

Meaning, Quality, and Integrity Degree Statement for Mechanical Engineering Program Meaning, Quality, and Integrity Degree Statement for Mechanical Engineering Program The Mechanical Engineering Department offers one undergraduate degree: Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering.

More information

This program is found to be viable, see report for commendations, concerns, and recommendations.

This program is found to be viable, see report for commendations, concerns, and recommendations. UCC Program Review Committee summary of review Program Department of Mechanical Engineering This program includes the following degrees and certificates: B.S. in Mechanical Engineering M.S. in Mechanical

More information

Department of Bioengineering. Master s Student Handbook. Graduate Group in Bioengineering University of Pennsylvania

Department of Bioengineering. Master s Student Handbook. Graduate Group in Bioengineering University of Pennsylvania Department of Bioengineering Master s Student Handbook Graduate Group in Bioengineering University of Pennsylvania INTRODUCTION... 2 UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA... 3 BIOENGINEERING OVERVIEW... 3 GOAL AND

More information

Biomedical Engineering Key Content Survey The 1 st Step in a Delphi Study to determine the core undergraduate BME curriculum

Biomedical Engineering Key Content Survey The 1 st Step in a Delphi Study to determine the core undergraduate BME curriculum Biomedical Engineering Key Content Survey The 1 st Step in a Delphi Study to determine the core undergraduate BME curriculum David W. Gatchell 1,4, Robert A. Linsenmeier 1,2,4, Thomas R. Harris 3,4 Departments

More information

Change the requirements for the Management Major and Minor

Change the requirements for the Management Major and Minor APC Document 25 (MGMT): Change the requirements for the Management Major and Minor Effective Date: Fall 2015 1. Delete: On pages 200-201: Bachelor of Science in Management The program leading to the B.S.

More information

Delta Courses. *The College Classroom. The College Classroom: International Students, International Faculty. Diversity in the College Classroom

Delta Courses. *The College Classroom. The College Classroom: International Students, International Faculty. Diversity in the College Classroom COURSE CATALOG Contents Introduction... 3 Delta Courses... 4 The College Classroom... 4 The College Classroom: International Students, International Faculty... 4 Diversity in the College Classroom... 4

More information

ECE Undergraduate Program Handbook

ECE Undergraduate Program Handbook ECE Undergraduate Program Handbook 2014-2015 Academic Year The handbook is updated every year. Students and faculty should always use the latest version of the handbook. Version F14 1 Table of Contents

More information

Professional Doctorate Program in Medical Physics (DMP) University of Cincinnati. Program Assessment. August 2014

Professional Doctorate Program in Medical Physics (DMP) University of Cincinnati. Program Assessment. August 2014 Professional Doctorate Program in Medical Physics (DMP) University of Cincinnati Program Assessment August 2014 Program Director Howard R. Elson, Ph.D. Barrett Cancer Center 513-584-9092 howard.elson@uc.edu

More information

Courses for Grade 11 Students All students are required to select eight (8) courses:

Courses for Grade 11 Students All students are required to select eight (8) courses: Courses for Grade 11 Students All students are required to select eight (8) courses: ADVANCED ENGLISH 11 (compulsory or other level) Advanced English 11 is an intensive program of study that offers a challenging

More information

SIMULATION FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE MAJORS: A PRELIMINARY REPORT

SIMULATION FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE MAJORS: A PRELIMINARY REPORT Proceedings of the 1996 Winter Sirn71lation Conference ed. J. M. Charnes, D. J. Morrice, D. T. Brunner, and J. J. SnTain SIMULATION FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE MAJORS: A PRELIMINARY REPORT ABSTRACT With the support

More information

Teaching Requirements through Interdisciplinary Projects

Teaching Requirements through Interdisciplinary Projects Teaching Requirements through Interdisciplinary Projects Deepti Suri, Eric Durant Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Milwaukee School of Engineering 1025 North Broadway Milwaukee,

More information

Academic/Instructional Methodologies and Delivery Systems. Classroom Instruction

Academic/Instructional Methodologies and Delivery Systems. Classroom Instruction Academic/Instructional Methodologies and Delivery Systems ITT Technical Institutes are institutes of higher learning that are committed to offering quality undergraduate and continuing education locally,

More information

Physics in the Pre-pharmacy Curriculum

Physics in the Pre-pharmacy Curriculum Physics in the Pre-pharmacy Curriculum Richard P. McCall St. Louis College of Pharmacy, 4588 Parkview Place, St. Louis MO 63110 This study presents the results of a survey of the 81 colleges of pharmacy

More information

Vanderbilt University Biomedical Informatics Graduate Program (VU-BMIP) Proposal Executive Summary

Vanderbilt University Biomedical Informatics Graduate Program (VU-BMIP) Proposal Executive Summary Vanderbilt University Biomedical Informatics Graduate Program (VU-BMIP) Proposal Executive Summary Unique among academic health centers, Vanderbilt University Medical Center entrusts its Informatics Center

More information

AC 2011-1734: ART2STEM: BUILDING A STEM WORKFORCE AT THE MIDDLE SCHOOL LEVEL

AC 2011-1734: ART2STEM: BUILDING A STEM WORKFORCE AT THE MIDDLE SCHOOL LEVEL AC 2011-1734: ART2STEM: BUILDING A STEM WORKFORCE AT THE MIDDLE SCHOOL LEVEL Sydney Rogers, Alignment Nashville Sydney Rogers is the Executive Director of Alignment Nashville, a non-profit dedicated to

More information

MSU Departmental Assessment Plan 2007-2009

MSU Departmental Assessment Plan 2007-2009 Department: Psychology MSU Departmental Assessment Plan 2007-2009 Department Head: Richard A. Block Assessment Coordinator: Richard A. Block Degrees/Majors/Options Offered by Department B.S. in Psychology

More information

Strategic Plan 2012-2017. Department of Communication Disorders. Minot State University

Strategic Plan 2012-2017. Department of Communication Disorders. Minot State University Strategic Plan 2012-2017 Department of Communication Disorders Minot State University Mission of the Department of Communication Disorders The mission of the Department of Communication Disorders is to

More information

Bioethics Education in Professional Science Master s Programs at California State University Channel Islands

Bioethics Education in Professional Science Master s Programs at California State University Channel Islands ETHICS AND THE PSM Bioethics Education in Professional Science Master s Programs at California State University Channel Islands Ching-Hua Wang, M.D., Ph.D., Director of MS Biotechnology and Bioinformatics

More information

Essays on Teaching Excellence

Essays on Teaching Excellence Essays on Teaching Excellence Toward the Best in the Academy A Publication of The Professional & Organizational Development Network in Higher Education Vol. 19, No. 5, 2007-2008 Building Assignments that

More information

Master of Arts in Teaching/Science Education Master of Arts in Teaching/Mathematics Education

Master of Arts in Teaching/Science Education Master of Arts in Teaching/Mathematics Education Master of Arts in Teaching/Science Education Master of Arts in Teaching/Mathematics Education Assessment F12-S13 FOR ACADEMIC YEAR: 2012-2013 PROGRAM: MAT/Science and Mathematics Education SCHOOL: NS&M

More information

AC 2012-3560: FROM DEFENSE TO DEGREE: INTEGRATING MILI- TARY VETERANS INTO ENGINEERING PROGRAMS

AC 2012-3560: FROM DEFENSE TO DEGREE: INTEGRATING MILI- TARY VETERANS INTO ENGINEERING PROGRAMS AC 2012-3560: FROM DEFENSE TO DEGREE: INTEGRATING MILI- TARY VETERANS INTO ENGINEERING PROGRAMS Dr. David L. Soldan, Kansas State University Dr. Noel N. Schulz, Kansas State University Dr. Don Gruenbacher,

More information

Mechanical Engineering Program. Policies and Procedures

Mechanical Engineering Program. Policies and Procedures Mechanical Engineering Program Policies and Procedures For M.S. and Ph.D. Degrees in Mechanical Engineering At the University of California, Merced Submitted by: Ashlie Martini Chair of the Mechanical

More information

2015-2016 Academic Catalog

2015-2016 Academic Catalog 2015-2016 Academic Catalog Autism Behavioral Studies Professors: Kuykendall, Rowe, Director Assistant Professors: Fetherston, Mitchell, Sharma, Sullivan Bachelor of Science in Autism Behavioral Studies

More information

UNDERWATER ROBOTS: A MODEL FOR INTERDISCIPLINARY ENGAGED LEARNING AT ELON. Sirena Hargrove-Leak Department of Physics Dual Degree Engineering Program

UNDERWATER ROBOTS: A MODEL FOR INTERDISCIPLINARY ENGAGED LEARNING AT ELON. Sirena Hargrove-Leak Department of Physics Dual Degree Engineering Program UNDERWATER ROBOTS: A MODEL FOR INTERDISCIPLINARY ENGAGED LEARNING AT ELON Sirena Hargrove-Leak Department of Physics Dual Degree Engineering Program ABSTRACT Designing and building a Remotely Operated

More information

Department of Accounting, Finance, & Economics

Department of Accounting, Finance, & Economics Department of Accounting, Finance, & Economics Assessment Report 2010-2011 Mission/Purpose The mission of the Department of Accounting, Finance and Economics is to provide a quality education in accounting,

More information

Clarke College. Major Requirements

Clarke College. Major Requirements 136 Clarke College Computer Science Mission In an increasingly technical world, the computer science department strives to bring technological understanding and contemporary professional skills to the

More information

Compass Point Competency-Based Education

Compass Point Competency-Based Education Compass Point Competency-Based Education By Marie A. Cini, PhD Provost and Senior Vice President, Academic Affairs University of Maryland University College Competency-based education has become a hot

More information

DEPARTMENTAL PLAN FOR ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING

DEPARTMENTAL PLAN FOR ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING DEPARTMENTAL PLAN FOR ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING 2014-2015 ACADEMIC YEAR Department: Mechanical Engineering Program: Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Mechanical Engineering / Combined B.S. and Master

More information

ABET TAC CIP Report for the Academic Year 20010 2011. Mechanical Engineering Technology (MET) Program

ABET TAC CIP Report for the Academic Year 20010 2011. Mechanical Engineering Technology (MET) Program ABET TAC CIP Report for the Academic Year 20010 2011 Mechanical Engineering Technology (MET) Program I. Introduction This document reports the findings and proposed changes resulting from analysis of data

More information

Computer Engineering Undergraduate Program (CpE) Assessment report

Computer Engineering Undergraduate Program (CpE) Assessment report Computer Engineering Undergraduate Program (CpE) Assessment report During the academic year 2009/2010 the CpE program changed the undergraduate program educational objectives based on recommendations from

More information

CRITERIA FOR ACCREDITING ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMS

CRITERIA FOR ACCREDITING ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMS CRITERIA FOR ACCREDITING ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMS Effective for Reviews During the 2013-2014 Accreditation Cycle Incorporates all changes approved by the ABET Board of Directors as of October 27,

More information

A Downsized, Laboratory-Intensive Curriculum in Electrical Engineering

A Downsized, Laboratory-Intensive Curriculum in Electrical Engineering A Downsized, Laboratory-Intensive Curriculum in Electrical Engineering T. W. Martin and W. D. Brown Department of Electrical Engineering University of Arkansas Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 Abstract - The

More information

Teaching Signals and Systems through Portfolios, Writing, and Independent Learning

Teaching Signals and Systems through Portfolios, Writing, and Independent Learning Session 2632 Teaching Signals and Systems through Portfolios, Writing, and Independent Learning Richard Vaz, Nicholas Arcolano WPI I. Introduction This paper describes an integrated approach to outcome-driven

More information

CRITERIA FOR ACCREDITING ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMS

CRITERIA FOR ACCREDITING ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMS CRITERIA FOR ACCREDITING ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMS Effective for Evaluations During the 2011-2012 Accreditation Cycle Incorporates all changes approved by the ABET Board of Directors as of October

More information

5 June 2011 Review of the Neuroscience & Behavior Program at Wesleyan University

5 June 2011 Review of the Neuroscience & Behavior Program at Wesleyan University 5 June 2011 Review of the Neuroscience & Behavior Program at Wesleyan University External Review Committee Andrew Bass, Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior, and Associate Vice Provost for Research,

More information