Colombia Country Strategy

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Colombia Country Strategy 2013-2016"

Transcription

1 Federal Department of Economic Affairs, Education and Research EAER State Secretariat for Economic Affairs SECO Swiss Economic Cooperation and Development Colombia Country Strategy

2 Editorial Egypt, Ghana, South Africa, Indonesia, Vietnam, Colombia, Peru all rapidly expanding economies on the threshold of global market integration yet still facing the problem of poverty. These have been SECO s priority countries since 2008 and, together with Tunisia, they will remain the focus of our intervention over the next four years. All of SECO s priority countries are classifi ed as middle-income countries (MICs). As their role in the global economy expands, they continue to gain in signifi cance, for example in providing global public goods. However, despite rapid growth rates in these countries, their development remains fragile. Poverty and social disparities persist, accompanied by other global challenges such as urbanisation, infrastructure bottlenecks and unemployment. Through its economic cooperation, SECO strives to integrate its partner countries into the global economy and to foster economic growth that is both socially responsible and environmentally friendly. These approaches correspond to the main challenges facing MICs. Middle-income countries are also important regional hubs of development for neighbouring States and serve as valuable examples. SECO s activities are based on our many years of experience in international cooperation and our specifi c expertise in economic issues. Whether we are seeking to strengthen economic and fi scal policy, expand urban infrastructure and utilities, support the private sector and entrepreneurship, promote sustainable trade, or stimulate climate-friendly growth: all of our measures are aligned with Switzerland s foreign trade policy and the Federal Council s foreign policy objectives. In 2012 the Swiss Parliament passed the Message on International Cooperation. For the fi rst time, all of the tasks in international cooperation were presented in a single bill, incorporated into a joint, overall strategy. This has the overriding objective of sustainable global development that will reduce poverty and global risks. State Secretariat for Economic Affairs (SECO) SECO s Economic Cooperation and Development Accordingly, SECO s economic and trade policy Division is responsible for the planning and implementation of economic cooperation and develop- into the global economy and foster economic growth measures strive to integrate its partner countries ment activities with middle income developing countries, with countries of Eastern Europe and the friendly. The Economic and Development Division that is both socially responsible and environmentally Commonwealth of Independent States (transition bases its activities on its specifi c areas of competence and experience in promoting economic and countries) as well as the new Member States of the European Union. It coordinates Switzerland s fi scal policy, urban infrastructures and utilities, the relations with the World Bank Group, the regional private sector and entrepreneurship, sustainable development banks and the economic organizations trade and climate-friendly growth. Special emphasis of the United Nations. SECO is part of the Federal is placed on issues relating to economic governance Department of Economic Affairs, Education and and gender. SECO is headed by the State Secretary Research (EAER). Marie-Gabrielle Ineichen-Fleisch. SECO s Economic Cooperation and Development Division employs The overriding objective of Switzerland s international cooperation is sustainable global develop- 380 million Swiss francs per year. Ambassador 100 people at headquarter and spends appro ximately ment that will reduce poverty and global risks. Beatrice Maser heads the division. The present Country Strategy is based on the framework credit for economic and trade policy measures, as described in the aforementioned Message. It is determined by our areas of expertise and comparative advantages and paves the way for our continued efforts over the next four years. We fi rmly believe that, in doing so, we can support our partner countries on their development path while also making a contribution to addressing global challenges. Marie-Gabrielle Ineichen-Fleisch State Secretary, Director of SECO Beatrice Maser Ambassador, Head of Economic Cooperation and Development SECO Colombia 3

3 Abbreviations Contents AML/CFT Anti-Money Laundering/Combating the Financing of Terrorism IDP Internally Displaced People Editorial 3 APC APEC CAF CDM CHF COOF Colombian Presidential Agency for International Cooperation Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Andean Corporation Bank Clean Development Mechanism Swiss Franc Swiss Cooperation Office IFC ILO IMF IPR MDG NDP International Finance Corporation International Labour Organization International Monetary Fund Intellectual Property Rights Millennium Development Goals National Development Plan Abbreviations 4 1. Country context Political situation Economic and social situation Bilateral economic relations 10 CPC CSR EFTA EU Cleaner Production Centre Corporate Social Responsibility European Free Trade Association European Union ODA OECD PEFA PFM Official Development Assistance Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability Programme Public Financial Management 2. Development cooperation context Partner country development strategy Donor landscape Lessons learnt from FARC Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia PPP Public-Private Partnership 3. Development challenges and SECO s response 15 FATF FDI FTA Financial Action Task Force Foreign Direct Investment Free Trade Agreement REDD+ SDC SECO Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation Swiss Agency for Cooperation and Development State Secretariat of Economic Affairs 4. Financial resources Results monitoring 22 GHG GDP IBRD Green House Gas emissions Gross Domestic Product International Bank of Reconstruction and Development SME TBT/SPS USD Small and Middle-sized Enterprise Technical Barriers to Trade/Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures United States Dollar 6. Partner institutions Statistical annex 26 IDB Inter-American Development Bank WTO World Trade Organization 4 Colombia SECO s economic and trade policy measures strive to integrate its partner countries into the global economy.

4 Improved livelihoods thanks to organic and fair-trade standards in cocoa production. 1. Country context 1.1 Political situation Change in continuity: A new government with a positive reform mind-set. After two terms in office ( ) and a clear rejection by the constitutional court of the possibility of a third term, Alvaro Uribe handed over presidency to his successor Juan Manuel Santos in Santos emerged as the clear winner of the second round of the election, obtaining close to 70% of the votes. He had assumed various ministerial positions during Uribe s administration and, as former Minister of Defence, played a crucial role in implement- 1.2 Economic and social situation ing the policy of demo cratic security which resulted in a considerable weakening of the FARC (Fuerzas Arma- The official recognition of the very existence of an second only to Sudan, with some 4-5 million IDPs 2 seek- Regaining investment grade credit rating: das Revolucionarias de Colombia). While retaining the armed conflict in Colombia marked a fundamental ing refuge in the slums of large cities like Bogotá, Colombia has accomplished much in the past few years. central elements of the previous administration s eco- departure from the more confrontational stance of the Medellin or Cartagena. Military clashes between national Good economic policies have provided a higher level of nomic policy, the 80% majority in Congress of his preceding government towards a more pragmatic and forces, FARC guerrilla and former paramilitary groups macroeconomic stability and living standards have grad- national unity coalition allowed the new government conciliatory position. The municipal and regional elec- have doubled since 2008 despite serious blows to the ually risen. Combined with improved security, these fac- to initiate a broad legislative reform agenda, including tions held in October 2011 did not result in a major FARC in 2010/11, including the death of its military and tors led to a better economic environment and have sensitive key issues such as the recognition of the vic- fragmentation of political forces. The outlook for further ideological leaders. Thus, even if the guerrilla and para- contributed to Colombia regaining investment grade tims of the armed conflict and the restitution of lands. important reforms is therefore positive for the years to military groups are weakened and discredited, no end to credit rating in mid The new government also endorsed a normalization of come. 1 the conflict is in sight. On a positive note, however, the the previous tensions between the executive branch Colombian government confirmed in August 2012 that Strong macroeconomic framework: Colombia is an and the judiciary powers. Additionally, Colombia has Despite the government s efforts to regain con- it was holding exploratory talks with the FARC guerrilla upper-middle-income country, characterized by a solid resumed diplomatic relations with Ecuador and normal- trol over most of the national territory, internal with a view to possible peace negotiations. and stable economy with a large domestic market and a ized its relations with Venezuela, giving hope to revived security remains tense: Regardless of some key mili- rich natural resources endowment. Significant reforms trade relations with two traditional and important com- tary successes and persistently high levels of military Serious governance issues remain: Several corrup- implemented since the 1990s pursuing prudent fiscal mercial partners. pressure, security outside the large urban centres tion scandals involving various offices have come to management, inflation targeting and a flexible exchange remains fragile and a key challenge. Significant parts of light since Santos assumed office. The new administra- rate have led to remarkable macroeconomic stability. Colombia are still ridden with the violence associated tion has therefore embarked on significant institutional This strong macroeconomic framework helped cushion with narcotráfico (drug trafficking), and several former reforms including an increase from 13 to 16 ministries, the impact of the global economic crisis, A new government with a positive mind set. paramilitary groups have reconverted into armed gangs controlling various kinds of illegal activities in urban centres. In addition, the problem of internally displaced people (IDPs) remains a serious challenge: Colombia is the closure of some agencies and the creation of six new special national agencies, including the National Agency for International Cooperation. While the new institutional setup attempts to clarify the division of responsi- with GDP growth reaching 5.9% in 2011, compared to 1.7% in Private domestic demand, supported by higher consumer and investor confidence and access to cheap credit, has led the recovery process. On the supply bilities and competences, it could potentially create new side, the recovery was spearheaded by the oil/mining inter-institutional coordination challenges. and financial sectors in the context of moderate infla- 1 The next legislative and presidential elections are set for March and May 2014, respectively. 2 As of end 2011, around 3.9 million people were internally displaced according to the government, and around 5.3 million according to the independent Observatory on Human Rights and Displacement (CODHES). 6 Colombia Colombia 7

5 Remarkable economic performance have advanced Colombia to the second-best sovereign risk in Latin America. tion (3-4%). All of the above helped offset the current account deficit (3% of GDP) traditionally run by the country. FDI inflows have been the fastest growing of all Latin American countries, boosted by the robust expansion of exploration and production in the oil and mining sectors. Additionally, Colombia is now reaping the gains from the negotiation of several free-trade agreements (FTA) under the Uribe administration; with 10 FTAs currently in force (including the one with EFTA, which, in the case of Switzerland, became operational in 2011, and the much awaited FTA with the US, which entered into force in 2012) and the one recently signed with the EU and on-going negotiations with Panama, Israel, Turkey, the country is promoting trade diversification and integration into the world economy. The trend is now eastward, with increasing interest in an FTA with China, the signing of the FTA with Korea in July 2012, and a formal application to join APEC with a view to enhancing economic links with the Pacific Rim. All these reforms and the resulting remarkable economic performance have advanced Colombia to the second-best sovereign risk in Latin America, second only to Chile. As a testimony to Colombia s new ambitions, President Santos also presented his country s candidacy for OECD membership in spring This is likely to provide a stimulus for further economic and social reforms. Yet, despite such progress, many structural challenges to achieving balanced inclusive growth still remain. Poor public sector governance, inefficient public service delivery and a deficient tax system: Notwithstanding recent reforms, the Colombian public sector is still characterized by bureaucratic red tape, weak institutional articulation capacity and inter-institutional coordination challenges, leading to poor public service delivery. Even if the government has achieved significant progress in enhancing public finances tax revenues are growing fast in real terms and non-financial public sector net debt is relatively low (27.5% of GDP) based on solid growth and active liability management a number of challenges have not been fully addressed. Public spending remains inflexible, reliance on distortionary taxes persists and the tax revenue base is still very weak (at 11.7% of GDP, substantially below the global and even the Latin American average) due to a significant number of tax exemptions and widespread tax evasion, given the highly inefficient tax structure. Other macroeconomic challenges arise from the potential Dutch Disease effect of an appreciating real exchange rate as well as commodity price volatility, which increases economy-wide uncertainty. Considering that both national and sub-national budgets rely heavily on commodity revenues, this affects budget predictability and stability and hence the importance of further diversification of economic activity. Additional fiscal challenges relate to the government s obligation to provide health care and pensions, as well as increased economic losses and fiscal contingent liabilities as a result of recent natural disasters. Low productivity, high income inequality: Lacking productivity growth has constrained output growth, which, coupled with unequal income distribution, has left a large part of the population in poverty 3. Even if poverty levels according to national statistics fell between 2002 and 2009 from 49.7 to 37.2% and extreme poverty declined from 17.7 to 12.3% 4, Colombia s progress in reducing poverty falls far below the performance of regional peers, with poverty levels remaining relatively high given the country s income per capita. In part, this is explained by a highly unequal dis- Improving working conditions and promoting corporate social responsibility contribute to a better quality of life. tribution of income, as reflected by the Gini coefficient. Labour market rigidities and structural skill mismatches are contributing to this underutilization of a considerable section of the potential labour force. Indeed, the Colombian labour market is still characterized by persistently high unemployment (9.5% in 2011) as well as pervasive labour informality, comprising 50-70% of the labour force, depending on the definition used. Vulnerability to climate change: Colombia has been experiencing some of the heaviest rainfall in recent history, leading to widespread flooding and landslides, caused by the La niña phenomenon. More than 3.5 million people, especially the poor, have been directly affected. Economic losses are expected to have exceeded 4.3% of GDP. The fiscal cost of the disaster increased the central government deficit by 1.5% of GDP in Total emergency relief, rehabilitation and reconstruction costs have been estimated at some USD 260 billion in the next five years, but the bill could rise even further, especially on the infrastructure side. 5 Such numbers are clear evidence that Colombia is one of the countries most vulnerable to climate change 6, although it contributes only 0.37% of greenhouse gases at global level and has a clean energy mix. Further, Colombia s population has predominantly settled in the highlands (Andes mountain range) or on the coast, i.e. areas prone to flooding and unstable grounds. In addition, due to the internal conflict, urban centres have grown extremely rapidly and unsystematically in recent decades. Nowadays, 70 to 75% of the population lives in urban areas 7, challenging the provision of good public services, especially in the area of waste management. 3 According to a World Bank study, the country is the seventh most unequal country in the world (comparable to countries such as Haiti and Angola) and the second in Latin America. 4 It is to be noted that the Colombian government introduced a new poverty index methodology in 2011, taking into account multidimensional aspects of poverty. 5 See Análisis de la gestión del riesgo de desastres en Colombia, World Bank, According to the Center for Global Development, Colombia ranked 15th in the Extreme Weather Risk Country Index in Average urban population worldwide is 50%. 8 Colombia Colombia 9

6 Supporting the industrial resource efficiency, leads to increased competitiveness and a lower environmental footprint. 2. Development cooperation context 2.1 Partner country development strategy 1.3 Bilateral economic relations Excellent and fairly formalized: Bilateral economic relations can be described as excellent and fairly formalized through an array of bilateral agreements, initiated at the beginning of last century with the Treaty of Friendship, Establishment and Trade and followed by an agreement on technical and scientific cooperation in Further important milestones were the signing of the Investment Protection Agreement in 2006 and the Double Taxation Treaty in 2007, both of which have since come into force. This process culminated with the signing of a comprehensive free-trade agreement between the EFTA states and Colombia on 25 November 2008, which, in the case of Switzerland, came into force in July It covers a broad range of areas including trade in goods, trade in services, investment, intellectual property rights, government procurement, competition and cooperation. As part of the instruments establishing the free trade area, Switzerland and Colombia also ratified a bilateral arrangement on agricultural products that entered into force simultaneously to the FTA. Although trade with Colombia accounts for only 0.1% of total Swiss trade, Colombia was Switzerland s fifth most important export destination in Latin America in Trade relations have intensified in recent years, with Swiss exports to Colombia reaching CHF 344 million in 2011, up by more than 100% compared to They proved resilient and remained stable during the financial crisis. Chemicals and pharmaceuticals are the main export products (over 60%). Colombian exports to Switzerland were much more affected by the economic crisis and show major fluctuations over the past decade. They amounted to CHF 138 million in 2010, down from CHF 453 million in 2007, and rebounded again in Nevertheless, Switzerland was the 11 th largest importer of Colombian goods in 2011, accounting for 1.7% of Colombian exports. 9 Finally, Colombia is also one of the most important countries in Latin America for Swiss FDI 10, with a total stock of CHF 1.9 billion in 2010 and Swiss companies employing approximately 15,000 people in Colombia. 8 after Brazil, Mexico, Argentina and Venezuela 9 Whereas Swiss statistics have usually shown a slightly positive trade balance for Switzerland in recent years, Colombian statistics traditionally register a considerable trade surplus for Colombia due to the fact that Swiss official data do not include gold in bilateral trade statistics for confidentiality reasons but also because imported gold is, to a considerable degree, re-exported. In 2010, gold trade made up more than 27% of Swiss imports and 23% of overall exports. 10 Fifth in terms of volumes and fourth in terms of people employed. The National Development Plan Prosperity for All: The National Develop ment Plan for (NDP) is a very ambitious roadmap which translates the electoral promises of President Santos into a broad action plan and was approved by Congress in June Following the mantra of change in continuity, it essentially retains the central elements of the previous administration s economic policy, i.e. attracting foreign invest ment, fostering macroeconomic stability, addressing high unemployment and widespread informality, and improving the business environment. It was developed in close cooperation with state agencies, local authorities and civil society. The NDP is aimed at setting the guidelines for growth and improvement in the country and determines the processes to be carried out to meet these goals. 11 The NDP estimates total investment needs at USD 317 billion, of which private investment should represent 40%, mainly in the coal, oil, mining, housing construction and transport infrastructure sectors (see growth drivers below). Its guiding principle is to achieve prosperity for all through the creation of jobs, less poverty and more security. The strategy has three main pillars: (1) Sustainable Growth and Competitiveness to increase employment, (2) Equality of Opportunities for Social Prosperity to reduce poverty, and (3) Consolidation of Peace to improve security. Moreover, it highlights five cross-cutting focuses: (a) Relevance of International Relations, (b) Environ mental and Disaster Risk Management, (c) Good Governance in public policy delivery, (d) Innovation in new and existing productive activities and (e) Regional Development and convergence. 11 Such as a sustained economic growth level of above 5%, bringing an additional 2.5 million Colombians out of poverty, reducing unemployment to 9% and building one million housing units. In addition it identifies five locomotives or growth drivers : Innovation to add value to productive processes by scaling-up investments into research and development, promoting technology transfers and addressing pending regulatory bottlenecks; Agribusiness to develop world-class products and sectors to emulate the coffee precedent symbolized by the Juan Valdez trademark and particularly relevant for rural areas which suffer the most from the lack of sustainable economic opportunities; Housing, focusing on the provision of sustainable social housing; Transport infrastructure to address a serious constraint to economic development and reduce merchandise trade costs due to deficient road, port and rail capacity; Mining & Energy to generate growth and necessary income for redistribution programmes, through the responsible use of Colombian s natural resource endowment based on transparent concession procedures. The National Strategy for International Cooperation : The strategy differentiates between international cooperation received and offered by Colombia. It outlines six broad priority areas for international cooperation destined to Colombia: 1) integral risk management and sustainable reestablishment of communities affected by natural disasters, 2) equality of opportunities for democratic prosperity, 3) economic growth and competitiveness, 4) environment and sustainable development, 5) governance and 6) victims, reconciliation and human rights. Each category regroups several sub-priorities with specific potential lines of intervention. At the same time, it also presents areas where Colombia is offering international cooperation which it expects to reach USD 8 million a year. 10 Colombia Colombia 11

7 2.2 Donor landscape 2.3 Lessons learnt from Aid focus and volume: Net ODA reached USD 1 eighth. 12 With the current crisis in Europe, this order is billion in fiscal year 2010 (0.5% of GDP). Against the likely to change in the coming years. It is also a declared background of 5 million IDPs and large parts of the rural objective of the Colombian national strategy for international cooperation to seek diversification of its aid area still affected by the conflict, donor grants are still heavily focused on humanitarian and social aid often in sources with an increased focus on Asia, particularly rural areas. Much of the economic development assistance is financed by multilateral loans, making SECO China, Korea and Japan. one of the very few donors in that area. Nevertheless, Multilateral assistance: The World Bank Group some other bilateral donors have broadened the scope remains the largest source of development financial of their programmes traditionally restricted to security assistance with a portfolio of roughly USD 7.5 billion, and humanitarian activities to also encompass economic development. World Bank s third-largest exposure in Latin America, principally as IBRD loans. Colombia represents the and the seventh globally. The Inter-American Development Bank s (IDB) portfolio is roughly USD 3.5 billion, Bilateral aid: Of the ten major bilateral donors, USAID still takes the lion s share, with roughly 60% of total net while the CAF s portfolio is around USD 3 billion, with ODA. The top five donors are the US, EU, Spain, Germany and the Netherlands, while Switzerland ranks loans. essentially the same characteristics, i.e. predominantly 12 Swiss ODA in Colombia encompasses the programs of SDC, foreign affairs as well as SECO, and represents approximately USD 20 million annually. Donor coordination: Donor coordination to date has generally been restricted to the humanitarian sphere, associated with the Group of 24 (G24), a group of donors pursuing the objective of intermediating in the dialogue between the government and civil society in relation to the internal conflict. The government had hitherto also played a very limited role in donor coordination, often preferring bilateral interactions. This is likely to change in the future with the establishment of a new Colombian Agency for International Development Cooperation (APC), created in November The APC is mandated to guide and assume the technical and financial coordination of ODA received and provided by Colombia. In parallel, a new Donor Group was also formed at the end of 2011, including multilateral institutions. This aims at better structuring the dialogue with the Colombian government, in particular with the APC. SECO s country strategy for Colombia had proven relevant and in line with Colombia s national development strategies. Among the major successes were the enactment of several key decrees simplifying the business environment and contributing to significant savings for the private sector at the national and sub-national level, the enactment of a new Law on Consumer Protection and the enactment of a national policy on National Disaster Risk Management. Another major outcome has been the enactment of a decree relating to the private sector s responsibilities in managing electronic waste and the launching of the first collective compliance scheme for the collection and recycling of electronic waste in Latin America. The measures supported by SECO also helped to raise awareness and transfer knowledge on various innovative issues linked to national priorities, such as the preparation of a national Green Building code, the dissemination of corporate governance tools for family businesses, as well as new capital markets regulatory regime requirements. Some important lessons can be drawn from its implementation: SECO s added value may therefore not be in terms of volume but rather in terms of specific knowhow, best practices and a network of international experts. Potential role of SECO: The financial additionality of SECO s potential interventions is at times limited because of the availability of other financial resources. Several of SECO s areas of work are addressed through huge multilateral and bilateral loans. SECO s added value may therefore not be in terms of volume but rather in terms of specific knowhow, best practices and a network of international experts. Since national procurement rules complicate access to international experts, international cooperation is often the only means of accessing that expertise for many Colombian public actors. Furthermore, well-targeted, selected activities of a high quality allowed Switzerland to gain visibility and recognition with Colombian counterparts despite its modest contribution in relative terms. 12 Colombia SECO s financial and technical assistance helps to improve drinking water and sanitation systems. Colombia 13

8 Constraints in implementing the Paris Declaration Using country systems and donor coordination has proven difficult: Use of country system: The current legal framework of international cooperation is characterized by large grey areas not conducive to and limiting the use of country sys tems for cooperation implementation. Channelling ODA through the national budget sys tem often proves administratively complicated as well as time-consuming. As a re sult, only around 10% of ODA is currently provided through the national budget and many government agencies prefer donors to set up parallel structures, which is clearly sub-optimal. The government has recognized this challenge and acknowledges it explicitly in its cooperation strategy. The APC, responsible for the effective implementation of the strategy, has vowed to streamline existing processes so as to facilitate the use of country systems. Another difficulty has been the complexity in receiving good project proposals, especially from the public sector. In part, this can be explained by their limited experience with grants / international cooperation project management (ODA in 2010 represented only 0.5% of GDP). As a result, deal sourcing and project structuring has proven more complex and time-consuming than expected. Multi-bilateral cooperation: Most multilateral agencies face shareholder pressure to increase commitments and staff location in poorer countries (IDA countries), while restricting new operations in uppermiddle-income countries to projects linked to innovation. There is therefore clear pressure to embark on more regional approaches, where IDA countries have the lion s share, but which also allow for operating in non-ida countries. This may imply an increasing difficulty in developing multi-bilateral projects in the future, as well as efficiency problems in implementing regional programmes in countries such as Colombia due to the personnel policy of multilateral institutions (hire TA staff in IDA countries only). 3. Development challenges and SECO s response Based on the context analysis, and recognizing, that a political reform agenda is key to durable systemic change, SECO s programme in Colombia aligns its interventions with the priorities as defined by the Colombian government in the NDP, the national strategy for international cooperation and related sector strategies. With its core competences, SECO is certainly well positioned to effectively and efficiently support Colombia in successfully addressing some of its key development challenges, namely in the field of institutional strengthening, promoting inclusive growth and addressing climate change and unsustainable urban development. The development of the financial sector creates new investment opportunities for Colombian and international investors. Though presented separately, the different objectives overlap to a significant extent, allowing for the creation of synergies and ensuring the overall coherence of SECO s portfolio in Colombia. Accordingly, a programme or project may address challenges and issues mentioned under different objectives. With the exception of humanitarian aid, donor coordination has been weak. Taking into account that several ministries/agencies generally work on the same issues, and multilateral institutions often support reforms with loans rather than grant money, project coordination is often inefficient and implementation prone to duplication. However, since the creation of the new National Cooperation Agency in November 2011, some promising first advances towards strengthening inter-institutional articulation and coordination can already be recorded. 14 Colombia Colombia 15

9 Objective 1: Strengthen public institutions to improve service delivery and governance Challenge: In order to fully exploit the potential opportunities, public institutions have to manage resources in a more efficient, effective and transparent way. New technologies (e.g. e-government) can help but, in addition, management capacities need to be improved and effective tools for planning and coordinating policies, programmes and projects put in place. Despite some promising reforms in recent years, bureaucratic red tape persists, and institutional articulation capacity remains generally weak combined with a low tax revenue base, negatively impacting the capacity and quality of public service delivery. Focus: SECO contributes to the institutional strengthening of the public sector with the objective of supporting a more efficient, effective and transparent management of its resources. To this end, management capacities in government institutions at all levels are improved, and effective tools for planning and coordinating policies, programmes and projects put in place with a view to ensuring stable, transparent and accountable public finances and addressing imbalances in service delivery at the national and sub-national level. This pillar also encompasses measures to further strengthen market institutions and improve the economic framework in areas such as financial, trade and business regulations, thereby facilitating the emergence of a competitive private sector. Finally, under this pillar, SECO plans to support public technical agencies in charge of implementing the government s leading initiatives (i.e. land reform) through capacity building measures. SECO contributes to the institutional strengthening of the public sector with the objective of supporting a more efficient, effective and transparent management of its resources. Proposed SECO measures: Support stable macroeconomic framework conditions through targeted implementation assistance in the realm of monetary policy (macroeconomic analysis, international reserve management, macro-prudential supervision, etc.) Contribute to an improved investment climate through targeted business environment reforms Improve the managerial capacity of selected public technical entities Support public financial management reforms with a particular emphasis on tax policy and administration (including domestic tax simplifications, natural resource taxation and green taxation), fiscal decentralization and public service delivery at a sub-national level Assist the enhancement of the regulatory and supervisory framework of financial intermediaries (pension funds, banks, insurances), including the establishment of an efficient AML/CFT framework Contribution to Colombia s country development objectives: Colombia s strategy for international cooperation defines good public governance as a key requisite to achieving its overarching goal of democratic prosperity. The proposed measures aim at supporting Colombia in its effort to advance institutional strengthening at the national and sub-national level as a means of improving governance. Given the transversal character of strong public institutions, measures under this component will also contribute to all other five priority objectives of the Colombian cooperation strategy. Objective 2: Enhance international competitiveness to achieve more inclusive growth and reduce inequalities Challenge: Colombia is characterized by one of the highest income-inequality rates globally. Despite persistently remarkable growth rates in the past decade, income and regional disparities have been rising. This is partly due to very low levels of productivity and a high concentration of economic activity in the primary resource sector and the major urban centres. Its economy is further characterized by high levels of informality, hampering competition and limiting SME access to finance and foreign markets. Therefore, the productive structure needs to be diversified and professional and technical training improved to generate more goodquality jobs and develop a more equitable society. These different constraints to private sector development need to be tackled in order to enhance Colombia s international competitiveness. Focus: SECO supports Colombia s efforts to maintain sustained and dynamic growth and for the growth pattern to become more inclusive. To this end, constraints to private sector growth are addressed, such as low factor productivity, insufficient financial market deepening and barriers to market access. The creation of a more conducive business environment will provide for more enterprises to enter the formal sector. This will reinforce SME competitiveness gains and further improve their access to finance and foreign markets. For growth to be sustainable, resources need to be used more efficiently and biodiversity preserved. Adequate entrepreneurial skills and good corporate governance further increase sustainability and positively impact economic performance. In order for growth to be more inclusive, this pillar also encompasses measures to promote innovation and the diversification of the economy to unlock new drivers for growth. Reforms of the productive structure coupled with improved vocational training are crucial for inclusive growth to generate more good-quality jobs and develop a more equitable society. SECO supports Colombia s efforts to maintain sustained and dynamic growth and for the growth pattern to become more inclusive. Proposed SECO measures: Support economic diversification Enhance Colombia s trade capacity to enable compliance with international standards and create export networks Assist the implementation of better governance structures to improve management and performance capacities of SMEs, leading to a decrease in bankruptcy/liquidation rates Support the provision of new innovative finance mechanisms to facilitate access to (longterm) financing and carbon finance Support efforts to reduce the mismatch between vocational training programmes on offer and the skills required by the market to improve employability and labour productivity Support industrial resource efficiency, leading to increased competitiveness and a lower environmental footprint Contribution to Colombia s country development objectives: Measures under this component will particularly contribute to the two priority objectives of promoting economic growth and competitiveness and encouraging equality of opportunities for democratic prosperity. 16 Colombia Colombia 17

10 Objective 3: Strengthen climate change risk management and sustainable urban development to mitigate the impact of climate change and manage rapidly growing urbanization Proposed SECO measures: Support Colombia by enhancing its capacity with respect to environmental analysis, enabling Modality mix SECO will continue to pursue a mix of modalities. Its programme will be implemented in line with the princi- Economic governance and gender as cross-cutting issues The reinforcement of economic governance in the partner countries is an essential component of SECO s it to collect and evaluate environmental and cli- ples of Aid and Development Effectiveness: SECO will support for the integration of partner countries into the Challenge: Natural threats, like the recent flooding, mate data in an up-to-date manner seek to align its programme with the government s pri- global economy and the promotion of sustainable eco- have shown that Colombia is one of the most vulnerable Facilitate Colombia s market-readiness for new orities and to harmonize it with other donors activities. nomic growth. Economic governance comprises all insti- countries to climate change. This vulnerability is further carbon market schemes SECO s programme will be reinforced by thorough policy tutions, regulations, judiciary systems and norms that exacerbated by rapid and erratic urbanization. This calls Improve the managerial capacity of public ser- dialogue with key government partners and, whenever promote the effectiveness, non-discrimination, legiti- for strengthening disaster risk management policies and vices enterprises to enable financially sustainable possible, will refer to country systems in order to foster macy and accountability of economic activity and there- information systems in line with the newly established operation and a better public service offering ownership and effective institutions. To ensure effective fore contribute to combating corruption. The majority of National Disaster Risk Management System (SNGRD) as Support the establishment of specific environ- development cooperation, SECO is committed to build- SECO s interventions strengthen good economic gov- well as urban development and management, focusing mental regulations (e.g. Green Building Code; ing capacity and interacting closely with public and pri- ernance at public and private levels. on sustainability aspects. Indeed, the rapid pace of energy labelling) to make existing growth drivers vate actors. Assistance will be provided through a mix of growing urbanization poses specific challenges in terms sustainable modalities of technical assistance and capacity building, SECO sees gender equality as an important element of of access to water and energy services, waste manage- Support sustainable urban development and predominantly on a specific project basis, either bilater- poverty reduction and improving the economic pros- ment and sanitation, as well as urban policies and plan- planning, including water and sanitation ally, directly with the Colombian counterpart(s), or by pects of partner countries. No projects should place ning in general, so as to create greener and more sus- approaches co-financing a multilateral organization s project and women or men at a disadvantage. The gender dimen- tainable cities over time. Promote renewable energy solutions in order clearly defined and closely monitored investment pro- sion is integrated into project design and implementa- to contribute to a reduction in greenhouse gas jects. Given the public-private character of many inter- tion, where it can contribute to the greater effectiveness Focus: SECO supports Colombia in its effort to emissions ventions, particularly in the case of urban infrastructure, of SECO s projects. strengthen climate risk management policies and infor- Improve Colombia s institutional capacity to Public Private Partnership models may be an effective mation systems, focusing on climate-relevant informa- devise and implement cost-effective financial structure for efficient resource allocation and effective tion and data. This will allow Colombia to define and strategies for the fiscal protection of the state implementation, especially with a view to innovative ini- implement specific environmental policies and strate- against natural disasters tiatives. Finally, country specific measures are comple- gies in alignment with the priorities of the National Dis- mented by multi-country or even global programmes aster Risk Management System (SNGRD), in terms of co-financed by SECO and implemented generally by both adaptation to and mitigation of climate change. multilateral organizations. SECO also supports Colombia s efforts to strengthen Contribution to Colombia s country develop- sustainable urban management. Key areas of support ment objectives: The proposed measures are expected SECO s activities are complementary to those of other include integrated waste management systems includ- to contribute particularly to Colombia s objective in the Swiss cooperation actors. In addition to SECO s eco- ing sanitation, urban planning, sustainable construction priority field of environment and sustainable develop- nomic development activities, Switzerland has been and housing, as well as the promotion of renewable/ ment with its various sub-objectives, such as improved engaged in the fields of peace building and human non-conventional energies. SECO s support in this field preparedness to climate change and sustainable urban rights for over ten years. Pursuing the overall objective is aimed at contributing to the gradual emergence of development. of supporting the transformation of the internal conflict, greener and more sustainable cities over time, factoring this programme focuses its activities on the areas of in climate change risks and vulnerabilities. improved human rights, dealing with the past processes and support for the civil society. Furthermore, Colombia is also a priority country for Switzerland s humanitarian aid, focusing on protecting and improving the living conditions of the population hardest hit by the internal conflict and also on emergency relief. 18 Colombia Colombia 19

11 4. Financial resources 5. Results monitoring SECO s interventions under this strategy will be The following table provides an overview of the future economic cooperation with the proposed monitoring and evaluation indicators at the outcome level and alignment with the Colombian development objectives. strategy will be measured in relation to the projects implemented by SECO. The different projects agreed upon will contain some of these indicators. This will make SECO and the Colombian partners accountable with regard to what has been achieved by the projects implemented in the framework of this country strategy. It is not SECO s intention to measure Colombia s development objectives as a whole. financed through the Swiss Framework Credit for International Cooperation The allocation of funds to individual countries, programmes and projects will depend on the identification of suitable transactions, the absorption capacity as well as the efficiency and effectiveness of the cooperation with the relevant partners in each priority country. Planned commitments for Colombia CHF 55 million* Projected funds allocated to each strategic objective: The monitoring and evaluation indicators are selected examples; the success of implementation of this country Accordingly, the following information on planned commitments for the four-year period of this strategy is indicative. It cannot be considered a firm commitment or claimed as such by the partner country. This information serves merely as a basis for the forward spending plans that are reviewed each year. Actual disbursements will depend on various factors, such as the changes in the project portfolio and the framework conditions of the partner country. Strengthening e-waste management allows for local recovery of valuable or dangerous metals/substances and supports the development of a recycling industry. 1. Strengthening public institutions 25% 2. Enhancing international competitiveness 30% 3. Climate change risk management and sustainable urban development 45% * Colombia also benefits from regional and global initiatives financed by SECO. When these measures cannot be earmarked to a specific country, they are not accounted for in the financial projections mentioned above. SECO s overall objective for Colombia Support Colombia in its pursuit of economically, ecologically and socially sustainable growth to combat poverty and inequality and to pave the way towards beneficial and balanced integration into the world economy. Main objectives of SECO s interventions Objective 1: Strengthen public institutions to improve service delivery and governance to improve service delivery and governance Contribution by SECO s program Economic reforms and improved financial policy lead to a transparent fiscal policy and a more reliable administration of public finances in Colombia Selected indicators: Public access to key financial information; PEFA indicators Enhanced regulation and supervision of the financial sector (including in the area of AML/CFT) contribute to a stable, diversified and competitive financial market Selected indicators: Number and type of relevant measures for financial market regulation and supervision; compliance with FATF 40+9 recommendations An improved business environment and efficient regulation framework promote competitiveness Selected indicators: Doing Business Indicators; number and type of impeding procedures eliminated; number and type of reforms Improved information systems and technical capacities of public institutions support better economic policy formulation, implementation of national regulation as well as international agreements Selected indicators: Number and type of reforms; government efficiency indicators Colombia s country development objectives 13 Institutional strengthening at national and sub-national level through Transparency and accountability Effective public management Efforts to combat corruption Improved public services Strengthened monitor and evaluation systems Adequate and effective fiscal control Transversal support of the decentralization process (institutional strengthening) Support the reparation, restitution and recon ciliation process (implementation of law 1448) through Support for the consolidation of information and registry systems Technical support for cadastral information 20 Colombia Colombia 21

12 Main objectives of SECO s interventions Contribution by SECO s program Colombia s country development objectives 13 Objective 2: Enhance international competitiveness to achieve more inclusive growth and reduce inequalities to achieve more inclusive growth and to reduce inequalities Objective 3: Strengthen climate risk management and sustainable urban development to mitigate the impact of climate change and manage rapidly growing urbanization Improved access to long-term investment capital through innovative and efficient financing instruments creates new jobs Selected indicators: Number of jobs retained and created; type and number of new financing products created and in demand More efficient production capacities improve SME productivity and international competitiveness Selected indicators: Number of producers with a higher net income; number of jobs retained and created Strengthened entrepreneurship promotes the creation of new businesses and enhances the success of existing ones Selected indicators: Number of companies supported that receive a loan; number of entrepreneurs trained Improve climate change mitigation policy formulation and implementation, including information and data management Selected indicators: Number and type of policy initiatives and reforms implemented; reduction in CO 2 emissions Enhance public utilities management and overall framework conditions to improve water supply as well as solid waste and wastewater management Selected indicator: Number of people having access to improved public utilities Promote sustainable urban development and management Increased competitiveness of the economy and enhanced productivity of companies through Strengthened commercial capacity for the implementation and the benefit of trade agreements recognizing Colombia s environmental potential Deepening of training strategies and SME assistance in corporate governance, environmental management and access to finance Strengthened value chain organization focusing on adherence to international quality standards Create equal opportunities through better professional education Better climate risk management through Strengthened national and sub-national risk and climate-relevant information and management systems Design of more efficient systems of waste water management, including sludge management Better environmental urban management through: sustainable cities developmentsystems implementation of integrated waste management models 6. Partner institutions In the past, most of SECO s programmes in Colombia were carried out by its strategic partners, often multilateral institutions, with proven programme approaches and methodologies. These will remain important partners for SECO in Colombia. However, with a local presence now in Colombia, SECO will increasingly work directly with local partners, both public and private. Indeed, certain national and sub-national public entities, the national umbrella organization of the chambers of commerce, selected chambers of commerce and selected business associations have already become important Colombia is a highly urbanized country with 70-75% of the population living in urban areas posing specific challenges in terms of providing good public services. project partners, directly or indirectly. These partnerships will be further strengthened under the present strategy. This is particularly true for measures related to the private sector development. Private sector support is crucial for the sustainability and effectiveness of such reforms. Their success depends largely on their ability to address and respond to effective private sector needs. It is therefore indispensable that these requirements be adequately taken into account and for the private sector to participate in the reform process. Selected indicator: Number and type of relevant measures Increase financial resilience to natural disasters and improve the capacity to meet post-disaster funding needs without compromising fiscal balances Selected indicators: Type and number of new financing products created and in demand The strategy will be monitored on an annual basis, with the following purposes: Institutional learning: Documentation and replication of best practices or lessons learnt Monitoring of relevance, topicality, efficiency and effectiveness of SECO s programmes and projects (and corrections/adaptations where necessary) Accountability: between the field and headquarters to the public to the partner country SECO s strategy is aligned with the development strategy of Colombia. Therefore, the annual country strategy monitoring also seeks to verify that SECO s portfolio does indeed contribute to the achievement of Colombia s development goals. Adaptive or corrective measures will be implemented if major changes occur in the country context or development goals. 13 Based on Colombia s national strategy for international cooperation Colombia Colombia 23

13 Abbreviation Local partners APC Bancoldex Confecamaras CAMACOL CNPMLTA DIAN DNP MADS MCIT MHCP MINMINAS MINTIC MVCT UNGRD Swiss partners COMCO EMPA FiBL IPI SIFEM SIPPO Swiss-contact International partners AFD HEID IDB IFC ILO IMF ITC KFW PPIAF (WB) UNCTAD UNIDO UNDP USAID WB Institution Agencia Presidencial de Cooperación Internacional Banco de Comercio Exterior de Colombia Confederación de Cámaras de Comercio de Colombia Cámara Colombiana de Construcción Centro Nacional de Producción más Limpia y Tecnologías Ambientales Dirección de Aduanas e Impuestos Nacionales Departamento Nacional de Planeación Ministerio de Ambiente y Desarrollo Sostenible Ministerio de Comercio, Industria y Turismo Ministerio de Hacienda y Crédito Publico Ministerio de Minas y Energía Ministerio de Tecnologías de Información y las Comunicaciones Ministerio de Vivienda, Ciudad y Territorio ProExport Superintendencia Financiera Superintendencia de Industria y Comercio Superintendencia de Sociedades Unidad Nacional para la Gestión de Riesgo en Desastres Swiss Competition Commission Federal Material Testing Laboratory Swiss Research Institute for Organic Agriculture Swiss Federal Institute for Intellectual Property Swiss Investment Fund for Emerging Markets Swiss Import Promotion Programme Swisscontact Foundation Agence Française de Développement Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies Inter-American Development Bank International Finance Cooperation International Labour Organization International Monetary Fund International Trade Centre Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau Public Private Infrastructure Advisory Facility United Nations Conference on Trade and Development United Nations Industrial Development Organization United Nation Development Programme United States Agency for International Development World Bank 7. Statistical annex The following data from the respective years are based on statistics from the World Bank and other international bodies, including the IMF 14, the World Economic Forum, the ILO and the UNDP. Sustainable Growth* Strengthened integration in the world economy* 2012 (proj.) 2013 (proj.) GDP per capita (current international USD) Real GDP growth (annual %) Global Competitiveness Index (rank) External Debt Stocks (% of GDP) Government Gross Debt (% of GDP) Gross Capital Formation (% of GDP) Inflation, average consumer prices (annual %) Domestic credit provided by banking sector (% of GDP) Interest rate spread Exports of goods and services (E) (% of GDP) Imports of goods and services (I) (% of GDP) FDI (net inflows, BoP, current USD) (millions) International Monetary Fund, World Economic Outlook Database, April Lending rate minus deposit rate (%) 24 Colombia Colombia 25

14 Reduction of disparities* Notes Gini index Unemployment rate (%), labour force survey Poverty headcount ratio at national poverty line (% of population) Improved water source, urban (% of population with access) Improved sanitation facilities, urban (% of population) Access to electricity (%) 93.6 Improvement of economic governance* Ease of Doing Business (rank) Trade Across Borders (rank) Governance Indicators of the World Bank: 17 a) Government Effectiveness (%) b) Regulatory Quality (%) c) Rule of Law (%) d) Control of Corruption (%) Improvement of environmental conditions* CO 2 emissions / population (tonnes per capita) Share of renewable energy of TPES (%) Energy use per unit of GDP (tonnes of oil equivalent per thousand US dollars) * Missing data due to one of the following reasons: Depending on source, no projections available Statistics collected only on perennial base Data for the respective year not yet available 16 A value of 0 represents absolute equality, and a value of 100 absolute inequality. 17 Percentile rank indicates the percentage of countries worldwide that rate below the selected country. Higher values indicate better governance ratings. 18 The GDP data have been compiled for individual countries at market prices in local currency and annual rates. These data have been scaled up/down to the price levels of 2000 and then converted to US dollars using the yearly average exchange rates of 2000 or purchasing power parities (PPPs). 26 Colombia Colombia 27

15 Federal Department of Economic Affairs, Education and Research EAER State Secretariat for Economic Affairs SECO Imprint Federal Department of Economic Affairs, Education and Research (EAER) State Secretariat for Economic Affairs SECO Holzikofenweg 36 CH-3003 Berne Phone Editing/Coordination: SECO Cooperation Graphic Design/Concept: Casalini, Berne Project Photos: SECO/Alejandro Chaparro Copies may be ordered from Phone Berne 2013

SIERRA LEONE UPDATES FROM THE INSTANBUL PRIORITY AREAS OF ACTION

SIERRA LEONE UPDATES FROM THE INSTANBUL PRIORITY AREAS OF ACTION SIERRA LEONE UPDATES FROM THE INSTANBUL PRIORITY AREAS OF ACTION 1 OUTLINE OF PRESENTATION Recent Developments Istanbul Priority Areas of Action Poverty Levels Agenda for Prosperity Challenges Conclusion

More information

FROM BILLIONS TO TRILLIONS:

FROM BILLIONS TO TRILLIONS: FROM BILLIONS TO TRILLIONS: MDB Contributions to Financing for Development In 2015, the international community is due to agree on a new set of comprehensive and universal sustainable development goals

More information

Rwanda. Strategy for Sweden s development cooperation with 2015 2019 MFA

Rwanda. Strategy for Sweden s development cooperation with 2015 2019 MFA MINISTRY FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS, SWEDEN UTRIKESDEPARTEMENTET Strategy for Sweden s development cooperation with Rwanda 2015 2019 MFA 103 39 Stockholm Telephone: +46 8 405 10 00, Web site: www.ud.se Cover:

More information

Following decades of instability and several natural disasters,

Following decades of instability and several natural disasters, IDA at Work Nicaragua: Innovative Approaches Reach the Poor in Remote Rural Areas IDA is helping Nicaragua to scale-up its model interventions for tacking rural poverty Following decades of instability

More information

Communiqué. G20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors Meeting 14-15 April 2016, Washington D.C.

Communiqué. G20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors Meeting 14-15 April 2016, Washington D.C. Communiqué G20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors Meeting 14-15 April 2016, Washington D.C. 1. The global recovery continues and the financial markets have recovered most of the ground lost earlier

More information

Public Information Notice (PIN) No. 01/94 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE September 19, 2001 International Monetary Fund 700 19 th Street, NW Washington, D. C. 20431 USA IMF Concludes 2001 Article IV Consultation

More information

The World We Want. A North-East Asian Youth Vision

The World We Want. A North-East Asian Youth Vision The World We Want A North-East Asian Youth Vision This Declaration was handed to His Excellency Kim Sung-hwan, Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade of the Republic of Korea, in Seoul on 9 th of January

More information

Recommendation for a COUNCIL RECOMMENDATION. on Poland s 2014 national reform programme

Recommendation for a COUNCIL RECOMMENDATION. on Poland s 2014 national reform programme EUROPEAN COMMISSION Brussels, 2.6.2014 COM(2014) 422 final Recommendation for a COUNCIL RECOMMENDATION on Poland s 2014 national reform programme and delivering a Council opinion on Poland s 2014 convergence

More information

NOTE FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE WORLD BANK

NOTE FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE WORLD BANK DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE (Joint Ministerial Committee of the Boards of Governors of the Bank and the Fund On the Transfer of Real Resources to Developing Countries) INTERNATIONAL BANK FOR WORLD BANK RECONSTRUCTION

More information

ICC 105 19 Rev. 1. 16 October 2012 Original: English. International Coffee Council 109 th Session 24 28 September 2012 London, United Kingdom

ICC 105 19 Rev. 1. 16 October 2012 Original: English. International Coffee Council 109 th Session 24 28 September 2012 London, United Kingdom ICC 105 19 Rev. 1 16 October 2012 Original: English E International Coffee Council 109 th Session 24 28 September 2012 London, United Kingdom Strategic action plan for the International Coffee Organization

More information

10 Business Recommendations for Productivity, Prosperity, and Inclusive Growth

10 Business Recommendations for Productivity, Prosperity, and Inclusive Growth 10 Business Recommendations for Productivity, Prosperity, and Inclusive Growth BIAC Statement to the OECD Ministerial Council Meeting 2016 1-2 June 2016, Paris BIAC speaks for business at the OECD. Established

More information

Governor's Statement No. 34 October 9, 2015. Statement by the Hon. BARRY WHITESIDE, Governor of the Bank and the Fund for the REPUBLIC OF FIJI

Governor's Statement No. 34 October 9, 2015. Statement by the Hon. BARRY WHITESIDE, Governor of the Bank and the Fund for the REPUBLIC OF FIJI Governor's Statement No. 34 October 9, 2015 Statement by the Hon. BARRY WHITESIDE, Governor of the Bank and the Fund for the REPUBLIC OF FIJI Statement by the Hon. Mr. Barry Whiteside, Governor of the

More information

Security Council. United Nations S/2008/434

Security Council. United Nations S/2008/434 United Nations S/2008/434 Security Council Distr.: General 3 July 2008 Original: English Special report of the Secretary-General pursuant to Security Council resolution 1806 (2008) on the United Nations

More information

Summary. Developing with Jobs

Summary. Developing with Jobs Do not publish or DiStribute before 00:01 Gmt on tuesday 27 may 2014 Summary Developing with Jobs World of Work Report 2014 Developing with jobs Executive Summary INTERNATIONAL LABOUR ORGANIZATION RESEARCH

More information

I. GROWTH, COMPETITIVENESS AND JOBS A. THE EUROPEAN SEMESTER

I. GROWTH, COMPETITIVENESS AND JOBS A. THE EUROPEAN SEMESTER 17.3 The European economy is recovering, after several years of limited or even negative growth. The recovery is expected to strengthen this year. The European Council had an exchange of views on the economic

More information

UNITED NATIONS INDEPENDENT EXPERT ON THE QUESTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND EXTREME POVERTY

UNITED NATIONS INDEPENDENT EXPERT ON THE QUESTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND EXTREME POVERTY UNITED NATIONS INDEPENDENT EXPERT ON THE QUESTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND EXTREME POVERTY Questionnaire JAN/2011 Post-crisis adjustment and fiscal consolidation processes (2010 onwards) 1. Has your country

More information

Mr. Chairman, Mr. President, distinguished Governors, ladies and gentlemen,

Mr. Chairman, Mr. President, distinguished Governors, ladies and gentlemen, Statement by Mr. Jun AZUMI, Minister of Finance of Japan, at the Forty-Fifth Annual Meeting of the Board of Governors of the Asian Development Bank (Manila, Philippines, May 4, 2012) 1. Introduction Mr.

More information

Preparation of the Informal Ministerial Meeting of Ministers responsible for Cohesion Policy, Milan 10 October 2014

Preparation of the Informal Ministerial Meeting of Ministers responsible for Cohesion Policy, Milan 10 October 2014 Preparation of the Informal Ministerial Meeting of Ministers responsible for Cohesion Policy, Milan 10 October 2014 Cohesion Policy and economic governance: complementing each other Background paper September

More information

ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises. I. Introduction

ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises. I. Introduction ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises I. Introduction I.1 Current Challenge: Most countries in the region are undergoing reforms that are opening their economies to greater

More information

Brisbane Action Plan

Brisbane Action Plan Brisbane Action Plan November 2014 A Blueprint for Growth The Brisbane Action Plan outlines the individual and collective actions that we are taking in pursuit of strong, sustainable and balanced growth,

More information

SEVENTY-SIXTH MEETING WASHINGTON, DC OCTOBER

SEVENTY-SIXTH MEETING WASHINGTON, DC OCTOBER DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE (Joint Ministerial Committee of the Boards of Governors of the Bank and the Fund on the Transfer of Real Resources to Developing Countries) SEVENTY-SIXTH MEETING WASHINGTON, DC OCTOBER

More information

STATEMENT BY THE PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE OF BOLIVARIAN REPUBLIC OF VENEZUELA AMBASSADOR JORGE VALERO

STATEMENT BY THE PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE OF BOLIVARIAN REPUBLIC OF VENEZUELA AMBASSADOR JORGE VALERO STATEMENT BY THE PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE OF BOLIVARIAN REPUBLIC OF VENEZUELA AMBASSADOR JORGE VALERO SOUTH CONFERENCE 2015 AND THE SOUTH: PREPARING FOR A YEAR OF UNCERTAINTY AND INTERNATIONAL SUMMITS

More information

THE RETURN OF CAPITAL EXPENDITURE OR CAPEX CYCLE IN MALAYSIA

THE RETURN OF CAPITAL EXPENDITURE OR CAPEX CYCLE IN MALAYSIA PUBLIC BANK BERHAD ECONOMICS DIVISION MENARA PUBLIC BANK 146 JALAN AMPANG 50450 KUALA LUMPUR TEL : 03 2176 6000/666 FAX : 03 2163 9929 Public Bank Economic Review is published bi monthly by Economics Division,

More information

For a Green Economy Tomorrow, Private Sector Development Today will Tip the Scales!

For a Green Economy Tomorrow, Private Sector Development Today will Tip the Scales! DCED Green Growth Working Group For a Green Economy Tomorrow, Private Sector Development Today will Tip the Scales! The Rio+20 summit in June 2012 will further substantiate the concept of sustainable development

More information

Framework. Australia s Aid Program to Papua New Guinea

Framework. Australia s Aid Program to Papua New Guinea Framework Australia s Aid Program to Papua New Guinea 21 October 2002 Our Unique Development Partnership our close bilateral ties are reflected in our aid program Enduring ties bind Papua New Guinea with

More information

A full report of our recent meeting will be distributed to all the delegations. Let me briefly summarize some of the most salient conclusions.

A full report of our recent meeting will be distributed to all the delegations. Let me briefly summarize some of the most salient conclusions. Statement by the Executive Secretary of the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean, ECLAC, Dr. José Antonio Ocampo, in the name of Regional Commissions of the United Nations It is a great

More information

Facilitating Remittances to Help Families and Small Businesses

Facilitating Remittances to Help Families and Small Businesses G8 ACTION PLAN: APPLYING THE POWER OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP TO THE ERADICATION OF POVERTY The UN Commission on the Private Sector and Development has stressed that poverty alleviation requires a strong private

More information

THE PROCESS OF PLANNING AND INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR POVERTY REDUCTION STRATEGY: THE CASE OF UGANDA.

THE PROCESS OF PLANNING AND INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR POVERTY REDUCTION STRATEGY: THE CASE OF UGANDA. THE PROCESS OF PLANNING AND INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR POVERTY REDUCTION STRATEGY: THE CASE OF UGANDA. By Margaret Kakande Poverty Analyst Ministry of Finance, Planning and Economic Development, Government

More information

BOARDS OF GOVERNORS 2002 ANNUAL MEETINGS WASHINGTON, D.C.

BOARDS OF GOVERNORS 2002 ANNUAL MEETINGS WASHINGTON, D.C. BOARDS OF GOVERNORS 2002 ANNUAL MEETINGS WASHINGTON, D.C. INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND WORLD BANK GROUP INTERNATIONAL BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT INTERNATIONAL FINANCE CORPORATION INTERNATIONAL

More information

Preparing for Scaled-up Climate Financing: New Business Opportunities for Green Growth

Preparing for Scaled-up Climate Financing: New Business Opportunities for Green Growth SUMMARY WORKSHOP REPORT Preparing for Scaled-up Climate Financing: New Business Opportunities for Green Growth An Asia Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS) Partnership Workshop on Financing for Green

More information

IOE PERSPECTIVES ON THE POST 2015 DEVELOPMENT AGENDA JANUARY 2013

IOE PERSPECTIVES ON THE POST 2015 DEVELOPMENT AGENDA JANUARY 2013 IOE PERSPECTIVES ON THE POST 2015 DEVELOPMENT AGENDA JANUARY 2013 INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATION OF EMPLOYERS Disclaimer Articles posted on the website are made available by the UNCTAD secretariat in the form

More information

Evolution of informal employment in the Dominican Republic

Evolution of informal employment in the Dominican Republic NOTES O N FORMALIZATION Evolution of informal employment in the Dominican Republic According to official estimates, between 2005 and 2010, informal employment fell from 58,6% to 47,9% as a proportion of

More information

Ministerie van Toerisme, Economische Zaken, Verkeer en Telecommunicatie Ministry of Tourism, Economic Affairs, Transport and Telecommunication

Ministerie van Toerisme, Economische Zaken, Verkeer en Telecommunicatie Ministry of Tourism, Economic Affairs, Transport and Telecommunication SME Policy Framework for St. Maarten May, 2014 Department of Economic Affairs, Transportation & P. 1 of 16 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Introduction 2. SME Developments in St. Maarten 2.1 Definition 2.2 Government

More information

JOBS FOR EUROPE: THE EMPLOYMENT POLICY CONFERENCE. Brussels, 6-7 September 2012 Plenary session

JOBS FOR EUROPE: THE EMPLOYMENT POLICY CONFERENCE. Brussels, 6-7 September 2012 Plenary session JOBS FOR EUROPE: THE EMPLOYMENT POLICY CONFERENCE Brussels, 6-7 September 2012 Plenary session Keynote speech Minister Elsa Fornero Thursday 6 September 12.45 Dear Commissioner, dear Speakers, Ladies and

More information

Strategy for selective cooperation with. India. January 2009 December 2013

Strategy for selective cooperation with. India. January 2009 December 2013 Strategy for selective cooperation with India January 2009 December 2013 1 Ministry for Foreign Affairs 9 July 2009 Annex to UF2009/46329/ASO Strategy for selective cooperation with India for the period

More information

CURRENT ACCOUNT: THE REGIONAL DEVELOPMENTS AND TRENDS

CURRENT ACCOUNT: THE REGIONAL DEVELOPMENTS AND TRENDS CURRENT ACCOUNT: THE REGIONAL DEVELOPMENTS AND TRENDS Prepared by Armenuhi Burnazyan and Arevik Aleksanyan In our project we tried to analyze Current Account (CA) balance trends for Armenia, Georgia and

More information

Questions and Answers on the European Commission Communication: The Paris Protocol A blueprint for tackling global climate change beyond 2020

Questions and Answers on the European Commission Communication: The Paris Protocol A blueprint for tackling global climate change beyond 2020 European Commission - Fact Sheet Questions and Answers on the European Commission Communication: The Paris Protocol A blueprint for tackling global climate change beyond 2020 Brussels, 25 February 2015

More information

Launch of the Economic Survey of Germany Remarks by Angel Gurría, Secretary-General OECD 13 May 2014 Berlin, Germany

Launch of the Economic Survey of Germany Remarks by Angel Gurría, Secretary-General OECD 13 May 2014 Berlin, Germany Launch of the Economic Survey of Germany Remarks by Angel Gurría, Secretary-General OECD 13 May 2014 Berlin, Germany (As prepared for delivery) Minister, Ladies and Gentlemen, It is a great pleasure to

More information

I am pleased to represent the World Bank Group on this important and critical occasion.

I am pleased to represent the World Bank Group on this important and critical occasion. Burundi Development Partners Conference October 29-30 Geneva, Switzerland Session: Interventions by the Sponsors of the Conference Remarks by Philippe Dongier Country Director: Burundi, Tanzania, Uganda

More information

Ministerial Statement. Beijing, China, 2 Sep 2014. 2014 - APEC Energy Ministerial Meeting. Beijing Declaration

Ministerial Statement. Beijing, China, 2 Sep 2014. 2014 - APEC Energy Ministerial Meeting. Beijing Declaration Ministerial Statement Beijing, China, 2 Sep 2014 2014 - APEC Energy Ministerial Meeting Beijing Declaration Joining Hands Toward Sustainable Energy Development in the Asia-Pacific Region 1. We, the Energy

More information

MACROECONOMIC AND FISCAL ASSESSMENT

MACROECONOMIC AND FISCAL ASSESSMENT Public Sector Financial Management Program (RRP SAM 46384) A. BACKGROUND MACROECONOMIC AND FISCAL ASSESSMENT 1. Samoa is composed of about 10 islands, 4 inhabited, and several uninhabited islets situated

More information

Anti-Crisis Stimulus Package for Economic Recovery

Anti-Crisis Stimulus Package for Economic Recovery Anti-Crisis Stimulus Package for Economic Recovery (Developing Efficient State Debt Management Policy) The project is implemented in the framework of The East-West Management Institute s (EWMI) Policy,

More information

International Monetary and Financial Committee

International Monetary and Financial Committee International Monetary and Financial Committee Twenty-Seventh Meeting April 20, 2013 Statement by Koen Geens, Minister of Finance, Ministere des Finances, Belgium On behalf of Armenia, Belgium, Bosnia

More information

International environmental governance. Bali Strategic Plan for Technology Support and Capacity-building

International environmental governance. Bali Strategic Plan for Technology Support and Capacity-building UNITED NATIONS UNEP/GC.23/6/Add.1 EP Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme Distr.: General 23 December 2004 Original: English Twenty-third session of the Governing Council/ Global

More information

The Mexican Economy: Facts and Opportunities

The Mexican Economy: Facts and Opportunities Manuel Sánchez Santander Global Fixed Income Summit London, England, September 20, 2012 Contents 1 Structural features 2 Recent developments and outlook 3 Inflation and monetary policy 4 Economic challenges

More information

Brief on Climate Change Finance

Brief on Climate Change Finance Brief on Climate Change Finance Introduction Climate change is a complex policy issue with major implications in terms of finance. All actions to address climate change ultimately involve costs. Funding

More information

Terms of reference for multi-year and single-year expert meetings*

Terms of reference for multi-year and single-year expert meetings* Distr.: Restricted 3 December 2012 English only TD/B/EX(56)/CRP.2 Trade and Development Board Fifty-sixth executive session Geneva, 3 4 December 2012 Agenda item 6 Terms of reference for multi-year and

More information

Policy recommendations on urban strategic planning

Policy recommendations on urban strategic planning Policy recommendations on urban strategic planning They are conceived as key orientations to ensure local government s access to strategic planning and concerns different actors represented by the following

More information

TAXATION AND AID FOR DOMESTIC RESOURCE MOBILIZATION (D.R.M.) AID: HELPING OR HARMING DOMESTIC RESOURCE MOBILIZATION IN AFRICA

TAXATION AND AID FOR DOMESTIC RESOURCE MOBILIZATION (D.R.M.) AID: HELPING OR HARMING DOMESTIC RESOURCE MOBILIZATION IN AFRICA TAXATION AND AID FOR DOMESTIC RESOURCE MOBILIZATION (D.R.M.) AID: HELPING OR HARMING DOMESTIC RESOURCE MOBILIZATION IN AFRICA My presentation deals with i. Definition and Importance of Domestic Resource

More information

NATIONAL TREASURY STRATEGIC PLAN 2011/14

NATIONAL TREASURY STRATEGIC PLAN 2011/14 NATIONAL TREASURY STRATEGIC PLAN 2011/14 PRESENTATION TO PARLIAMENTARY FINANCE COMMITTEES Presenter: Lungisa Fuzile Director General, National Treasury 31 May 2011 TREASURY AIMS AND OBJECTIVES Chapter

More information

IASC Inter-Agency Standing Committee

IASC Inter-Agency Standing Committee IASC Inter-Agency Standing Committee Global Health Cluster Guidance Note Promotion and Advocacy for Stronger National and Local Capacities in Health Emergency Preparedness and Risk Reduction 1. Background

More information

21 PROGRESSIVE PROPOSALS FOR COP21 approved by the PES Presidency on 9 October, to be adopted by PES Leaders on 21 October in Paris

21 PROGRESSIVE PROPOSALS FOR COP21 approved by the PES Presidency on 9 October, to be adopted by PES Leaders on 21 October in Paris 21 PROGRESSIVE PROPOSALS FOR COP21 approved by the PES Presidency on 9 October, to be adopted by PES Leaders on 21 October in Paris The world community will have the unique opportunity to tackle dangerous

More information

Recommendation for a COUNCIL RECOMMENDATION. on the 2015 National Reform Programme of Bulgaria

Recommendation for a COUNCIL RECOMMENDATION. on the 2015 National Reform Programme of Bulgaria EUROPEAN COMMISSION Brussels, 13.5.2015 COM(2015) 253 final Recommendation for a COUNCIL RECOMMENDATION on the 2015 National Reform Programme of Bulgaria and delivering a Council opinion on the 2015 Convergence

More information

Having undertaken a general discussion on the basis of Report IV, Small and medium-sized enterprises and decent and productive employment creation,

Having undertaken a general discussion on the basis of Report IV, Small and medium-sized enterprises and decent and productive employment creation, International Labour Conference Provisional Record 104th Session, Geneva, June 2015 11-1 Fourth item on the agenda: Small and medium-sized enterprises and decent and productive employment creation Reports

More information

Haiti s Economic Development since 2004/05 and Macroeconomic Outlook

Haiti s Economic Development since 2004/05 and Macroeconomic Outlook Haiti s Economic Development since 2004/05 and Macroeconomic Outlook By Ugo Fasano Former IMF Resident Representative in Haiti the American-Haitian Chamber of Commerce Port-au-Prince, July 1, 2009 Plan

More information

Strategy for development cooperation with. Indonesia. April 2009 December 2013

Strategy for development cooperation with. Indonesia. April 2009 December 2013 Strategy for development cooperation with Indonesia April 2009 December 2013 Government Offices of Sweden Ministry for Foreign Affairs PM 25 June 2009 UF2009/44625 44625/ASO Department for Asia and the

More information

Ministerial Declaration of The Hague on Water Security in the 21st Century

Ministerial Declaration of The Hague on Water Security in the 21st Century Ministerial Declaration of The Hague on Water Security in the 21st Century 1. Water is vital for the life and health of people and ecosystems and a basic requirement for the development of countries, but

More information

Outline. 1. Climate and energy: where do we stand? 2. Why a new framework for 2030? 3. How it works. 4. Main challenges. 5.

Outline. 1. Climate and energy: where do we stand? 2. Why a new framework for 2030? 3. How it works. 4. Main challenges. 5. 1 Outline 1. Climate and energy: where do we stand? 2. Why a new framework for 2030? 3. How it works 4. Main challenges 5. and benefits 6. Other key points 7. Next steps 2 1. Climate and energy: where

More information

10721/16 GSC/lt 1 DGB 2B

10721/16 GSC/lt 1 DGB 2B Council of the European Union Brussels, 28 June 2016 (OR. en) 10721/16 OUTCOME OF PROCEEDINGS From: General Secretariat of the Council On: 28 June 2016 To: Delegations No. prev. doc.: 10320/16 REV 1 Subject:

More information

GLOBAL ALLIANCE FOR CLIMATE-SMART AGRICULTURE (GACSA)

GLOBAL ALLIANCE FOR CLIMATE-SMART AGRICULTURE (GACSA) GLOBAL ALLIANCE FOR CLIMATE-SMART AGRICULTURE (GACSA) FRAMEWORK DOCUMENT Version 01 :: 1 September 2014 I Vision 1. In today s world there is enough food produced for all to be well-fed, but one person

More information

Central Banks and the Development Agenda The CBN Experience Sadiq Usman 1 Presentation Outline 2 Slide Introduction Brief on Nigeria The recent Banking Crisis CBN Developmental Activities CBN Interventions

More information

economies to develop and share their own plans to reduce average transaction costs of remittances to five percent.

economies to develop and share their own plans to reduce average transaction costs of remittances to five percent. 2015 APEC Finance Ministers Statement 1. We, the Finance Ministers of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation convened our 22 nd meeting in Mactan, Cebu, Philippines on 10-11 September 2015 under the Chairmanship

More information

Sundsvall Statement on Supportive Environments for Health

Sundsvall Statement on Supportive Environments for Health Sundsvall Statement on Supportive Environments for Health Third International Conference on Health Promotion, Sundsvall, Sweden, 9-15 June 1991 The Third International Conference on Health Promotion: Supportive

More information

Delegations will find attached the draft Council conclusions on a Capital Markets Union, as prepared by the Economic and Financial Committee.

Delegations will find attached the draft Council conclusions on a Capital Markets Union, as prepared by the Economic and Financial Committee. Council of the European Union Brussels, 16 June 2015 (OR. en) 9852/15 EF 110 ECOFIN 473 SURE 14 UEM 223 NOTE From: To: Subject: General Secretariat of the Council Permanenet Representatives Committee (Part

More information

Economic Overview. East Asia managed to weather the global recession by relying on export-oriented

Economic Overview. East Asia managed to weather the global recession by relying on export-oriented Economic Overview Economic growth remains strong in East Asia and retains healthy momentum thanks to strong commodity prices and increases in exports. leads the region in growth and its GDP is expected

More information

THE GROUP OF 8 EXTERNAL DEBT CANCELLATION Effects and implications for Guyana

THE GROUP OF 8 EXTERNAL DEBT CANCELLATION Effects and implications for Guyana THE GROUP OF 8 EXTERNAL DEBT CANCELLATION Effects and implications for Guyana Introduction Guyana is one of the most indebted emerging market economies in the world. In 2004, its total public external

More information

Informal Meeting of EU Environment Ministers Background document Session Green growth: greening the European Semester and the EU 2020 Strategy

Informal Meeting of EU Environment Ministers Background document Session Green growth: greening the European Semester and the EU 2020 Strategy Informal Meeting of EU Environment Ministers Background document Session Green growth: greening the European Semester and the EU 2020 Strategy 1) Introduction Milan, 16July 2014-15.00-18.00 The European

More information

THE COUNTRY STRATEGY OF THE INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENT BANK for the Russian Federation

THE COUNTRY STRATEGY OF THE INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENT BANK for the Russian Federation THE COUNTRY STRATEGY OF THE INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENT BANK for the Russian Federation (Main provisions) This country strategy for 2013-2015 has been drawn up as an elaboration of the Development Strategy

More information

HUMANITARIAN. Food 11. Health 4 Shelter 4 Other 7 OECD/DAC

HUMANITARIAN. Food 11. Health 4 Shelter 4 Other 7 OECD/DAC #094 DENMARK Group 1 PRINCIPLED PARTNERS OFFICIAL DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE HRI 2011 Ranking 2nd 0.90% AID of GNI of ODA P4 6.2% US $32 6.95 P5 7.62 7.12 7.49 P3 7.90 P1 5.35 P2 Per person AID DISTRIBUTION

More information

JOINT MDB CLIMATE FINANCE TRACKING

JOINT MDB CLIMATE FINANCE TRACKING JOINT MDB CLIMATE FINANCE TRACKING Jan-Willem van de Ven Senior Carbon Manager Consultation on Development and Climate Change OECD-CPI event, Warsaw, 19 November 2013 European Bank for Reconstruction and

More information

Y20 Russia 2013 Delegates Declaration

Y20 Russia 2013 Delegates Declaration Y20 Russia 2013 Delegates Declaration We, the delegates of Y20 Russia 2013, Convened in Saint Petersburg on 18-21 June 2013 in order to address major imbalances in the areas of global finance and sustainable

More information

Hong Kong Declaration on Sustainable Development for Cities

Hong Kong Declaration on Sustainable Development for Cities Hong Kong Declaration on Sustainable Development for Cities 1. We, the representatives of national and local governments, community groups, the scientific community, professional institutions, business,

More information

Long-term Planning Framework Peruvian Red Cross 2012

Long-term Planning Framework Peruvian Red Cross 2012 Long-term Planning Framework Peruvian Red Cross 2012 The Peruvian Red Cross delivered relief items to the most vulnerable persons in the highlands of Peru affected by a cold front in 2011. Source: Peruvian

More information

Mexico Trade and Economic Overview (June 2015)

Mexico Trade and Economic Overview (June 2015) Mexico Trade and Economic Overview (June 2015) 1. Economic performance The Mexican economy is highly concentrated in services, accounting for 62% of GDP, then industry 34% and agriculture only 4%. Mexico

More information

Trends in Foreign Direct Investment Inflows

Trends in Foreign Direct Investment Inflows Trends in Foreign Direct Investment Inflows This article briefly examines recent trends in foreign direct investment in Australia, both in the context of the longer-term perspective and relative to the

More information

Recommendation for a COUNCIL RECOMMENDATION. on the Netherlands 2012 national reform programme

Recommendation for a COUNCIL RECOMMENDATION. on the Netherlands 2012 national reform programme EUROPEAN COMMISSION Brussels, XXX COM(2012) 322 PROVISIONAL VERSION Recommendation for a COUNCIL RECOMMENDATION on the Netherlands 2012 national reform programme and delivering a Council opinion on the

More information

Latin America and COP20

Latin America and COP20 ESSAY cities, Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) increasingly try to engage in global environmental issues, particularly with regards to the challenge of climate change. Latin America and the Caribbean

More information

Source: Colombian Biennial Update Report, IDEAM 2015

Source: Colombian Biennial Update Report, IDEAM 2015 Pursuant to decisions 1/CP.19 and 1/CP.20 of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), the Republic of Colombia is pleased to present its Intended Nationally Determined Contribution

More information

The Healthy Asia Pacific 2020 Roadmap INTRODUCTION: THE HEALTHY ASIA PACIFIC 2020 INITIATIVE

The Healthy Asia Pacific 2020 Roadmap INTRODUCTION: THE HEALTHY ASIA PACIFIC 2020 INITIATIVE The Healthy Asia Pacific 2020 Roadmap INTRODUCTION: THE HEALTHY ASIA PACIFIC 2020 INITIATIVE In the 2014 APEC Leader s Declaration and Joint Ministerial Statement, it is recognized that the prospect of

More information

INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION: INNOVATIONS AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE

INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION: INNOVATIONS AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE 1 INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION: INNOVATIONS AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE CALL FOR APPLICATIONS Deadline for receipt of applications: December 1 st at midnight - Paris time. L Agence Française de Développement (AFD)

More information

Recommendation for a COUNCIL RECOMMENDATION. on the 2015 National Reform Programme of Portugal

Recommendation for a COUNCIL RECOMMENDATION. on the 2015 National Reform Programme of Portugal EUROPEAN COMMISSION Brussels, 13.5.2015 COM(2015) 271 final Recommendation for a COUNCIL RECOMMENDATION on the 2015 National Reform Programme of Portugal and delivering a Council opinion on the 2015 Stability

More information

Council of the European Union Brussels, 21 September 2015 (OR. en)

Council of the European Union Brussels, 21 September 2015 (OR. en) Council of the European Union Brussels, 21 September 2015 (OR. en) Interinstitutional File: 2015/0051 (NLE) 11360/15 LEGISLATIVE ACTS AND OTHER INSTRUMTS Subject: SOC 479 EMPL 316 ECOFIN 642 EDUC 236 JEUN

More information

Intervention on behalf of Denmark, Norway and Ireland on the occasion of the Open Working Group on Sustainable Development Goals meeting on

Intervention on behalf of Denmark, Norway and Ireland on the occasion of the Open Working Group on Sustainable Development Goals meeting on Intervention on behalf of Denmark, Norway and Ireland on the occasion of the Open Working Group on Sustainable Development Goals meeting on Sustainable Consumption and Production, including Chemicals and

More information

RIA Novosti Press Meeting. Economic Outlook and Policy Challenges for Russia in 2012. Odd Per Brekk Senior Resident Representative.

RIA Novosti Press Meeting. Economic Outlook and Policy Challenges for Russia in 2012. Odd Per Brekk Senior Resident Representative. RIA Novosti Press Meeting Economic Outlook and Policy Challenges for Russia in 2012 Odd Per Brekk Senior Resident Representative January 26, 2012 This morning I will start with introductory remarks on

More information

Optional Protocol on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography

Optional Protocol on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child CRC/C/OPSC/VEN/CO/1 Distr.: General 19 September 2014 Original: English ADVANCE UNEDITED VERSION Committee on the Rights of the Child Optional Protocol

More information

I. COUNTRY CONTEXT. A. Political and Social Context

I. COUNTRY CONTEXT. A. Political and Social Context A. Political and Social Context I. COUNTRY CONTEXT 1. Turkey s economic development has global significance, given its size, role as a regional power, and strategic location, bridging East and West. Turkey

More information

The BMZ initiative for an International Tax Compact. Keynote speech, held at the International Tax Compact Workshop (Brussels, 25-26 January 2010)

The BMZ initiative for an International Tax Compact. Keynote speech, held at the International Tax Compact Workshop (Brussels, 25-26 January 2010) Dr. Ulla Mikota Deputy Director General German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) The BMZ initiative for an International Tax Compact Keynote speech, held at the International

More information

Southeast Asia Development: A Japanese Perspective

Southeast Asia Development: A Japanese Perspective Southeast Asia Development: A Japanese Perspective Masahiro Kawai Graduate School of Public Policy University of Tokyo Past is Prologue for Southeast Asia Development: Japan and U.S. Perspectives Carnegie

More information

Overview of East Asia Infrastructure Trends and Challenges

Overview of East Asia Infrastructure Trends and Challenges Overview of East Asia Infrastructure Trends and Challenges Christian Delvoie. Director, Knowledge Strategy Group, The World Bank Until September 28: Director, Sustainable Development, East Asia and Pacific

More information

REPORT OF THE CONFERENCE OF THE PARTIES ON ITS SEVENTH SESSION, HELD AT MARRAKESH FROM 29 OCTOBER TO 10 NOVEMBER 2001 Addendum

REPORT OF THE CONFERENCE OF THE PARTIES ON ITS SEVENTH SESSION, HELD AT MARRAKESH FROM 29 OCTOBER TO 10 NOVEMBER 2001 Addendum UNITED NATIONS Distr. GENERAL FCCC/CP/2001/13/Add.1 21 January 2002 Original: ENGLISH CONFERENCE OF THE PARTIES REPORT OF THE CONFERENCE OF THE PARTIES ON ITS SEVENTH SESSION, HELD AT MARRAKESH FROM 29

More information

2015 Article IV Consultation with Sweden Concluding Statement of the IMF Mission

2015 Article IV Consultation with Sweden Concluding Statement of the IMF Mission 2015 Article IV Consultation with Sweden Concluding Statement of the IMF Mission Sweden s economy is performing well. But housing prices and household debt are elevated and rising and unemployment is high

More information

DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY DRAFT REVISED NATIONAL FOREST POLICY OF MALAWI

DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY DRAFT REVISED NATIONAL FOREST POLICY OF MALAWI DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY DRAFT REVISED NATIONAL FOREST POLICY OF MALAWI July, 2013 1. Foreword 2. Preface 3. Introduction 4. Policy linkages 5. Broad Policy Direction 6. Policy Priority Areas Provides the

More information

(COSAC) CONTRIBUTION OF THE XLI COSAC

(COSAC) CONTRIBUTION OF THE XLI COSAC Conference of Community and European Affairs Committees of Parliaments of the European Union (COSAC) CONTRIBUTION OF THE XLI COSAC Prague, 10-12 May 2009 1. Current Economic and Financial Situation 1.1

More information

NINETY-FIRST MEETING WASHINGTON, D.C. APRIL

NINETY-FIRST MEETING WASHINGTON, D.C. APRIL DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE (Joint Ministerial Committee of the Boards of Governors of the Bank and the Fund on the Transfer of Real Resources to Developing Countries) NINETY-FIRST MEETING WASHINGTON, D.C. APRIL

More information

Prosperity Fund Creating Conditions for Global Growth Turkey Programme Strategy (2015-16)

Prosperity Fund Creating Conditions for Global Growth Turkey Programme Strategy (2015-16) Prosperity Fund Creating Conditions for Global Growth Turkey Programme Strategy (2015-16) Contents Introduction & Context Programme Objectives and Indicators General Guidance Notes Programme Structure

More information

Trinidad and Tobago Strategic Actions for Children and GOTT-UNICEF Work Plan 2013-2014 1

Trinidad and Tobago Strategic Actions for Children and GOTT-UNICEF Work Plan 2013-2014 1 Trinidad and Tobago Strategic Actions for Children and GOTT-UNICEF Work Plan 2013-2014 1 The Trinidad and Tobago Strategic Actions for Children and the Government of Trinidad and Tobago-UNICEF Work Plan

More information

X. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 1/

X. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 1/ 1/ X. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 1/ 10.1 Overview of World Economy Latest indicators are increasingly suggesting that the significant contraction in economic activity has come to an end, notably

More information

of European Municipal Leaders at the Turn of the 21 st Century

of European Municipal Leaders at the Turn of the 21 st Century The Hannover Call of European Municipal Leaders at the Turn of the 21 st Century A. PREAMBLE We, 250 municipal leaders from 36 European countries and neighbouring regions, have convened at the Hannover

More information

Major Economies Business Forum: Perspectives on the Upcoming UN Framework Convention on Climate Change COP-17/CMP-7 Meetings in Durban, South Africa

Major Economies Business Forum: Perspectives on the Upcoming UN Framework Convention on Climate Change COP-17/CMP-7 Meetings in Durban, South Africa Major Economies Business Forum: Perspectives on the Upcoming UN Framework Convention on Climate Change COP-17/CMP-7 Meetings in Durban, South Africa The Major Economies Business Forum on Energy Security

More information

COMMISSION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITIES. COMMISSION REGULATION (EC) No /..

COMMISSION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITIES. COMMISSION REGULATION (EC) No /.. EN EN EN COMMISSION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITIES Brussels, XX/XX/2007 COM(2006) XXX COMMISSION REGULATION (EC) No /.. of [ ] implementing Council Regulation (EC) No 1085/2006 establishing an instrument

More information