arxiv: v3 [quant-ph] 5 Apr 2019

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1 Quantifying entanglement of maximal imension in bipartite mixe states arxiv: v3 [quant-ph] 5 Apr 09 Gael Sentís, Christopher Eltschka, Otfrie Gühne, 3 Marcus Huber, 4,5,6 an Jens Siewert 7,8 Departamento e Física Teórica e Historia e la Ciencia, Universia el País Vasco UPV/EHU, E Bilbao, Spain Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Regensburg, D Regensburg, Germany 3 Naturwissenschaftlich-Technische Fakultät, Universität Siegen, Siegen, Germany 4 Física Teòrica, Informació i Fenòmens Quàntics, Universitat Autonoma e Barcelona, ES-0893 Bellaterra (Barcelona), Spain 5 Group of Applie Physics, University of Geneva, Geneva 4, Switzerlan 6 Institute for Quantum Optics an Quantum Information (IQOQI), Austrian Acaemy of Sciences, A-090 Vienna, Austria 7 Departamento e Química Física, Universia el País Vasco UPV/EHU, E Bilbao, Spain 8 IKERBASQUE Basque Founation for Science, E-4803 Bilbao, Spain The Schmit coefficients capture all entanglement properties of a pure bipartite state an therefore etermine its usefulness for quantum information processing. While the quantification of the corresponing properties in mixe states is important both from a theoretical an a practical point of view, it is consierably more ifficult, an methos beyon estimates for the concurrence are elusive. In particular this hols for a quantitative assessment of the most valuable resource, the forms of entanglement that can only exist in high-imensional systems. We erive a framework for lower bouning the appropriate measure of entanglement, the so-calle G-concurrence, through few local measurements. Moreover, we show that these bouns have relevant applications also for multipartite states. PACS numbers: Mn,03.65.U Unerstaning the nature an operational uses of entanglement constitutes one of the key challenges of quantum information theory. While most algorithms that allow for a provable avantage with respect to classical computation exhibit this ubiquitous feature of quantum systems, it is not entirely clear whether it actually is require for the promising fiel of quantum computation an simulation to outperform their respective classical counterparts. Consequently much effort has been investe in unerstaning the interplay between entanglement structure an resource properties of multipartite quantum states [ 4]. One of the key results for computing with pure quantum states is the fact that, in orer to go beyon the classical realm, a large imension of entanglement is require while inee any actual continuous measure of entanglement can be rather small [5]. Whether or how this statement translates to realistic conitions, i.e., mixe-state quantum computing, is not at all clear. Here one coul imagine a spee-up without any entanglement present at all, or, on the contrary, the nee for high-imensional entanglement in a more robust sense. However, it appears intuitively clear that mixe states with substantial overlap to states, whose resource content is exponentially har to simulate classically, continue to be sufficient. To answer such questions an to ultimately gain a eeper insight into the very nature of entanglement one woul nee a thorough quantification of all possible features of mixe-state entanglement. The sheer complexity of this task makes general solutions unlikely (recall that even eciing whether or not a given state is entangle is an NP-har problem [6]). A first interesting step in this irection coul be the quantitative characterization of high-imensional entanglement, i.e., the most expensive resource in bipartite systems. One of the paraigmatic measures for the imensionality of entanglement is the Schmit number of mixe quantum states [7], for which various methos of certification exist [8 0]. However, the Schmit number in itself is not entirely significant, as even the highest possible imensionality can lie in the vicinity of completely separable states []. A robust quantification of mixestate entanglement imensionality can be mae by using continuous measures of entanglement imension which possibly bear also an operational meaning, beyon the question of mere computability. For bipartite entangle states the natural caniate for this purpose is the family of concurrence monotones introuce by Gour []. For a -imensional system, there are such monotones k =,...,. The kth concurrence monotone (which we will call for short k-concurrence) vanishes for a given state if its Schmit number oes not excee k. The usual concurrence [3, 4] coincies with the -concurrence in this family (up to a normalization constant). The measure for k = quantifies to which extent the maximum Schmit number is containe in a state an is usually terme G-concurrence. While there exist various bouns for the usual concurrence [5 ], there are no mixe-state bouns for any of the other concurrences monotones, in particular not for the G-concurrence. Such a boun woul go beyon

2 giving an answer to the question whether or not a state contains entanglement of maximum imensionality. This is exactly what we achieve in this article: We first erive a general metho how this measure can be efficiently lower boune by using nonlinear witness techniques, allowing for a mixe-state quantification of G- concurrence in an experimentally feasible way. Furthermore, we fin the exact solution for the G-concurrence of the so-calle axisymmetric states [], a highly symmetric two-parameter family of mixe states. This solution provies the basis for a simple metho to fin lower bouns to the G-concurrence of arbitrary mixe states. As a byprouct, it also allows us to fin lower bouns to the istance between the state of interest an the set of separable states, an, more generally, to any set of states with boune Schmit number. Nonlinear G-concurrence witness. We commence by a brief efinition of the relevant concepts, before going to our first main theorem. For pure quantum states ψ C A C B, ψ = jk c jk jk the G-concurrence is efine as the th root of the prouct of the eigenvalues of the marginal []. Denoting the Schmit coefficients of the state as λ j 0 (i.e., ψ = j λ j a j b j ; consequently the marginal eigenvalues are λ j ), we can efine C G ( ψ ) := (λ λ λ ), () so that 0 C G ( ψ ) ψ. The extension to mixe states is straightforwar via the convex roof [3] C G (ρ) := min p j C G ( ψ j ), () where the minimum is taken over all pure-state ecompositions ρ = k p k ψ k ψ k. The iea here is to erive a tight lower boun for the G-concurrence of pure states in a form that amits a straightforwar extension to a nonlinear witness lower boun for mixe states. In spirit this work follows Refs. [7, 4, 5], that is, if a state oes not belong to a certain entanglement class, the moulus of the offiagonal elements cannot excee a certain monotonically increasing function of the iagonal elements. Using elementary algebra we arrive at our first main result (the proof is given in the Appenix), C G (ρ) B G (ρ) = j,k σ l(tr( j (( )δ jk +) jj ρ kk jσ(j) jσ(j) ρ ) ), (3) j=0 where σ l enotes the sum over all permutations of the levels of party B, excluing the ientical permutation. This general lower boun is both surprisingly simple an transparent. It is expresse via ensity matrix elements an requires the knowlege of only O( ) out of the 4 elements. While Eq. (3) is written in terms of -imensional systems, it is obvious that the boun can irectly be applie also to the ifferent bipartitions of multipartite systems, as we will see in the example below. Before we procee with a more etaile iscussion let us briefly comment that the boun (3) is tight at least for all maximally entangle states of imension, i.e., B G ( Φ ) =, where Φ := j=0 jj. By investigating the noise resistance we fin that the worst possible kin of noise for our boun is white noise, as it maximally affects the negative terms in the boun. For imension = 3, e.g., we can stuy the white-noise tolerance by consiering the state ρ(p) = p Φ Φ + p l. Inserting this state into our boun we fin that it can revealthe presence of3-concurrenceown to p = 3 (which is close to the exact value p = 5 8, see below). However, for higher imensions the noise resistance of the G-concurrence ecreases rapily. Possibly the quality of the boun (3) can be improve by fining ifferent estimates of the G-concurrence for pure states. Interestingly, the nonlinear witness Eq. (3) is not the only possibility to estimate the quality of highimensional entanglement in a mixe bipartite state. In the following, we first escribe the exact solution of C G (ρ) for certain symmetric states. By means of this solution we can achieve an inepenent lower boun for arbitrary states. Exact solution for axisymmetric states. Families of highly symmetric states often allow for an exact solution of entanglement-relate problems [7, 8, 46]. Here we consier the axisymmetric states, a two-parameter family of -imensional mixe states [0, ]. They comprise all mixe states that have the same symmetries as Φ, that is, (i) permutation symmetry of the quits, (ii) invariance uner simultaneous exchange of two levels for both parties, that is, j A k A, j B k B, an (iii) symmetry uner simultaneous local phase rotations V(ϕ,ϕ,...,ϕ n ) = e i ϕ jg j e i ϕ jg j. Here, g j are the ( ) iagonal generators of SU(). The axisymmetric states can be written as mixtures of three states ρ axi = p Φ Φ +( p)[q ρ +( q) ρ ], ρ = ρ = m= ( ) Ψ (m) Ψ (m), jk jk (4) j k where 0 p,q, an Ψ (m) := j exp(iπjm/) jj is a maximally entangle state with phase factors. They can be represente by a

3 3 triangle. Remarkably it was foun that Schmit-number relate entanglement properties are affine functions of the fielity of ρ axi with the maximally entangle state F = Tr ( ρ axi Φ Φ ). For example, the borers of the Schmit-number classes are lines of constant fielity F (for F ). In Ref. [0] it was shown that also the -concurrence of ρ axi is an affine function of F, namely ( ) C (ρ axi ) = F for F. By using the methos from Refs. [46] an [7] we show that the exact G-concurrence for axisymmetric states is C G (ρ axi ) = max[ ( F),0]. (5) In orer to prove Eq. (5), one first notes that for symmetric mixe states it suffices to minimize C G for pure states ψ as a function of the Schmit coefficients uner the constraint of fixe fielity F = ψ Φ = Tr ( ρ axi ψ ψ ) an to convexify the resulting function (cf. Ref. [7]) C G (ρ axi ) = coc G (ψ). (6) (here, coc G (ψ) enotes the convex hull). In complete analogy with the approach in Ref. [46] one fins that the problem effectively epens only on a single parameter, the fielity F: where C G (F) = ( αβ ), (7) α = ( F F ) β = ( ) F F +., F In the Appenix we present more etails of this erivation. Moreover, we prove that the function in Eq. (7) is concavesuchthatitsconvexhullistheaffinefunction(5). We show the result in Fig. for = 4. Arbitrary states. The exact solution for axisymmetric states is interesting not only from a mathematical point of view. We can use it to obtain a lower boun on C G (ρ) for arbitrary states ρ by noting that the average over all the operations in the group of axisymmetries V ( twirling ) applie to ρ represents a projection P axi (ρ) = V VρV into the axisymmetric states [7]. On the other han, averaging over the operations V can only reuce the entanglement, so that for ρ axi (ρ) := P axi (ρ) we have a lower boun [, 9] C G [ρ axi (ρ)] C G (ρ). (8) This boun, which explicit form is given in Eq. (5), has been recently proven to hol also for fielity parameters, FIG.. The G-concurrence (re) an the -concurrence (light blue) for 4 4 axisymmetric states. The -concurrence (for pure states) is efine here as C = ( Trρ A ), where ρ A enotes the reuce state of party A. In the plane we show the axisymmetric states an the borers between the Schmit-number classes (re soli lines) which, for x > 0 are lines of constant fielity F = Tr ( ρ axi Φ ) 4 Φ 4. Here, x an y are the appropriate coorinates to parametrize the axisymmetric states in a geometry that correspons to the Hilbert-Schmit metric [0, ]. taken with respect to arbitrary states [30]. The componentsofthe symmetrizestate ρ axi (ρ) areeasilyobtaine via the relations ρ axi jk,jk = δ jk ρ axi jk,lm = δ jkδ lm ( δ jl ) ( ) a ρ aa,aa + δ jk a b ρ ab,ab (9a) (ρ aa,bb +ρ bb,aa ). (9b) a>b The symmetrization requires some care since one may lose all the entanglement by inappropriately choosing the local bases. By exploiting local unitary invariance of the G-concurrence,C G ([U A U B ]ρ[u A U B ] ) = C G (ρ)we may improve the boun by fining the best local unitaries beforeoingtheprojection(8)soastoachievethelargest C G [ρ axi (ρ)]. Clearly, this hols as well for the boun in Eq. (3). Inee, both the bouns (3) an (8) can be improve even further by observing that the G-concurrence is an SL(,C) invariant [3]. Accoring to Verstraete et al. [3] an entanglement monotone base on a local SL invariant is maximize on the so-calle normal form of the state. The hallmark of the normal form is that it has maximally mixe local ensity matrices [3, 3]. It can be foun via an algorithm escribe in [3]. Thus, an exact solution (or lower boun) for a local SL invariant like C G over a family of symmetric states can be use to calculate a lower boun of C G (ρ) for arbitrary states ρ by the following proceure [33]:

4 4 finthenormalformρ NF (ρ)(ingeneralnotnormalize to ; re-normalization is not necessary because of the homogeneity of C G of egree in the ensity matrix); if the normal form vanishes the proceure terminates an C G (ρ) = 0; apply optimal local unitaries to ρ NF (ρ) (as escribe above) which leas to ρ NF an o the projection P axi( ρ NF) =: ρ NF axi ; rea off the boun for the G-concurrence from this state C G (ρ) C G ( ρ NF axi). (0) Clearly, in orer to prouce the normal form knowlege of all the matrix elements of ρ is require. Hence improving the bouns via SL(,C) (as well as via unitary) optimization is more expensive with respect to the experimental effort. To conclue this section, we show how our results can also be use in some cases to guarantee that an arbitrary state ρ has a finite istance to any set of states with boune Schmit number in particular to the set of separable states, thus renering the compute bouns of C G (ρ) more meaningful an robust measures of the entanglement of ρ. Let S k be the set of all states with Schmit number k <, Sk axi the set of Schmit number k states in the axisymmetric family, an ρ axi the symmetrization of ρ. Then, the following inequality hols [34]: min σ S axi k ρ axi σ HS min σ S k ρ σ HS. () This inequality tells us that, given ρ, whenever its projection ρ axi lies at a finite istance with respect to the closest axisymmetric state with Schmit number k, we know that the istance between ρ an the closest Schmit number k state is at least as large. A consequence of this is that any nonzero value of the boun C G [ρ axi (ρ)] rules out the possibility of ρ being arbitrarily close to a separable state. Application of the bouns to multipartite states. While the usefulness of our bouns for the characterization of bipartite states is apparent, we woul like to point out that this is true also in the context of multiparty states. To this en, let us consier a four-qubit cluster state Cl ABCD = ( ). Each of the bipartitions (AB)(CD), (AC)(BD), an (AD)(BC) may be regare as a 4 4 system where the state of (AB)(CD) is of Schmit rank an the others have Schmit rank 4. Inee, for the latter bipartitions the state is locally equivalent to Φ 4 an has maximal G-concurrence, e.g., C G ( Cl(AC)(BD) ) =. Now we may ask how this resource behaves when noise is ae to Cl ABCD. We use the white-noise tolerance of the G-concurrence on a rank-4 bipartition as a moel to answer this question. Physically, this means we ask up to which amixture w 4 of white noise any ecomposition of the resulting state ρ ABCD = ( w) Cl ABCD Cl ABCD + w 6 l 6 contains a state of Schmit rank 4, e.g., on the bipartition (AC)(BD). The corresponing fielity is F 4 = 3 4 so that w 4 = 4 5. This is a remarkable result, as it has to be contraste with the noise tolerance of genuine multipartite entanglement (GME)forthisstate,w4 GME = 8 3 (cf.ref.[35]). Itshows, as expecte, that a well-specifie resource of multipartite entanglement behaves ifferently from GME. This iscussion is straightforwarly extene to linear cluster states of large (even) number N of qubits. The existence of bipartitions with full Schmit rank is one of their important properties [36]. In that case, the maximum Schmit rank across the bipartitions is = (N/), an hence w N (N/). Recall that for linear N-qubit cluster states wn GME (N/3) (N/3) [37]. That is, while the noise tolerance of GME in large linear cluster states is practically perfect, the maximum Schmit-rank resource becomes exponentially fragile with increasing N. Conclusions. We have presente two inepenent quantification methos for high-imensional entanglement, i.e., of the resource characterize by the maximum number of non-vanishing Schmit coefficients, in bipartite mixe states. This is achieve by estimates of the G-concurrence via a nonlinear witness on the one han, an by an exact solution for axisymmetric states on the other han. Our nonlinear witness Eq.(3) extens the possibility to etect entanglement of Schmit number [5] to maximum Schmit number. At the same time, this nonlinear witness (3), as well as the projection witness (8), is quantitative [38] an can be experimentally etermine by measuring a number of observables of orer which is consierably smaller than 4, the number of all parameters of the state. This shows that the evelope methos are suitable also to provie a quantitative analysis of recent efforts at proucing highimensionally entangle states in the lab. The fact that Schmit numbers equal to the system imension were certifie e.g. in Refs. [39 4] implies that the respective G-concurrence will be nonzero an the ata taken shoul suffice to apply our methos. Due to the possibility of SL(,C) optimization, entanglement etection through our approach is superior compare to merely using an optimal Schmit number witness. However, exploiting this possibility requires complete knowlege of the state parameters. Moreover, we have outline how our methos can be applie also in the investigation of multipartite entanglement. We have shown that the resource of maximum Schmit number across the bipartitions of N-qubit cluster states is exponentially fragile with respect to the amixture of white noise. In ai-

5 5 tion, we mention that, in principle, it is possible to efine a genuine multipartite G-concurrence in analogy with Ref. [7] in orer to quantitatively escribe the Schmitnumber vectors of a multipartite system [43, 44]. Finally, we note that similar techniques to the ones we evelop in the first part coul potentially be use to lower boun any quantity that can be expresse as a polynomial of state coefficients, such as other SL invariants [3, 45]. Acknowlegments. We thank C. Jebarathinam for pointing out an error in Eq. (4) in the publishe version of this manuscript. This work was fune by ERC Starting Grant 58647/GEDENTQOPT(G.S.), the German Research Founation within SPP 386 (C.E.), the FQXi Fun (Silicon Valley Community Founation), the German Research Founation (DFG), an ERC Consoliator Grant 68307/TempoQ (O.G.), by Austrian Science Fun (FWF) through the START project Y879- N7, Swiss National Science Founation (AMBIZIONE Z00P-635), Spanish MINECO(Project No. FIS P), an the Generalitat e Catalunya CIRIT, Project No. 04-SGR-966 (M.H.), by Basque Government grant IT-47-0, MINECO grants FIS C03-0, FIS C03-03 an FIS P, an UPV/EHU program UFI /55(G.S. an J.S.). The authors woul like to thank G. Tóth for stimulating iscussions, an J. Fabian an K. Richter for their support. APPENDIX The nonlinear witness for the G-concurrence Given an arbitrary pure state ψ = i,j c ij ij, its G-concurrence can be compute as C G ( ψ ) = (λ λ λ ) = etc, () where the λ i are its Schmit coefficients (i.e. ψ = i λ i α i β i ), an c is a matrix with elements c ij. We can use the triangle inequality twice to lower boun the eterminant as etc = sgn(σ) c iσ(i) (3) σ i= i=c ii σ l sgn(σ) c iσ(i) (4) i= ii i=c c iσ(i), (5) σ l i= where σ = l is the ientity permutation. Now, let us rename i= c ii X an σ e i= c iσ(i) Y. For any two positive numbers X,Y, it is immeiate to check that f X Y X Y g. Inee, if X < Y, the inequality is trivially satisfie. On the other han, if X Y 0, we just have to look at the convexity of f an g. At the extreme points of this interval, i.e. when Y = 0, X, the inequality is saturate. To see what happens in between, we compute the secon erivatives of f an g with respect to Y, for an arbitrary X: f f Y = ( ) Y, (6) g g Y = ( ) (X Y). (7) We reaily see that f 0 an g 0 for, which means that f is convex an g is concave, thus f g an we can write etc c ii c iσ(i). (8) i= σ l i= It will prove useful to further lower the boun by replacing the positive term in the r.h.s. of Eq. (8) by a bilinear function of the coefficients c ii, namely c ii α c ii c jj β c ii (9) i= i j i= for some real coefficients α an β. In orer to prove this new inequality, we begin by rewriting it as c ii α c ii (α+β) i= i= c ii. (0) i= Note that the moulus makes it completely inepenent on complex phases, hence we can consier the coefficients c ii to be real for the rest of this proof. Furthermore, the inequality is scale invariant, so we eliberatively fix i= c ii = an, once again, we rewrite P({c ii }) αs +α+β P min (S) αs +α+β 0, () where we have efine P({x i }) i= x i, an P min (S) = min {xi}: i x i =; i xi=s P({x i }) for a set of arbitrary parameters {x i } [0,]. It is clear that P min (S ) = 0, since one can choose x = 0 an still fin aset {x i } i= that fulfils the requireconitions. As we increase the value of S above this threshol, the minimum shoul still be attaine when x is as close to zero as possible. Such minimal value of x is irectly obtaine by solving the simpler minimization min {xi}x, subject to the original constraints. This is a straightforwar calculation via Lagrange multipliers. The corresponing Lagrangian is ( ) ( ) L = x λ x i S + µ x i, i= i=

6 6 where λ, µ are Lagrange multipliers, an its symmetry alreay tells us that all the x i< have to be equally value. We fin x i = λ/µ for i <, an x = (λ )/µ. The multipliers are λ = µs +, µ = ± S. We see from the form of µ that S. In terms of S an, an extreme value of i x i is attaine when the coefficients are x i< = S ± ( S )/( ), () x = S ( S )( ). (3) The first solution correspons to the minimum. We now proveeq.() by solvingfor α an β the more restrictive set of inequalities αs +α+β 0, S < (4) P L (S) αs +α+β 0, S, (5) where P L (S) is a linear lower boun of P min (S) that is tight at the extreme values of the interval S. The function P L (S) exists if P min (S) is a fully concave function. One can reaily check that this is inee the case, for the equation min(s) (P min (S) ) S = 0 P hasnosolutionintherelevantomain, hencethereareno inflection points. Then one only has to observe the sign of an intermeiate point, e.g. P min ( /). Such function approaches zero exclusively in the asymptotic limit, an it is negative for any other (finite) value of 3, hence P min ( /) is always negative an therefore P min (S) is a concave function of S, for any. Taking into account that P min (S ) = 0 an P min ( ) = /, we may then write P L (S) as P L (S) = S ( ). (6) Fining values of α an β such that Eqs. (4) an (5) hol is straightforwar. By, e.g., emaning that Eq.(5) be tight for S =, we get ri of one parameter. We obtain β = α( ) /. Then, imposing that Eq. (4) be tight for S = yiels α = /, an thus β = /. With these values of α an β, we can guarantee that Eq. () is satisfie for all S. Summing up, we useeqs.(8) an (9) to lower-boun the G-concurrence of an arbitrary bipartite pure state ψ as C G ( ψ ) C G ( ψ ), where C G ( ψ ) = c ii c jj ( ) c ii c iσ(i). i j i= σ l i= (7) The lower boun for the convex roof extension to mixe states, C G (ρ), hence follows: C G (ρ) = min p k C G ( ψ k ) min p k C G ( ψ k ) k k min p k c k iic k jj max p k ( ) c k ii + c k iσ(i) k i j k i= σ l i= = ii ρ jj ( ) ii ρ jj max p k c k iσ(i) i j i= σ l k i= ii ρ jj ( ) ii ρ jj ( ) iσ(i) ρ iσ(i), (8) i j i= σ l i= where for the last inequality we have use the subaitivity of the root function to write ( p k k i=c k iσ(i) p k k i= ( i= k c k iσ(i) ) p k c k iσ(i) ). (9)

7 7 G-concurrence of axisymmetric states Derivation of Eq. (7) As mentione in the main text, the proof procees through a minimization of the entanglement measure uner consieration(here the G-concurrence) on pure states first. Consier therefore ψ C C with its Schmit ecomposition ψ = j=0 λ j a j b j. The minimization of C G ( ψ ) is uner the conition that the fielity of ψ with the maximally entangle state Φ = j=0 jj be fixe, Φ ψ = F ψ. We use a fact note by Terhal an Vollbrecht [46] that thelargestvalueofthefielityf ψ = Φ ψ isobtaine if the Schmit bases {a j }, {b k } coincie with the computational basis. With this choice of bases, the only remaining parameters are the Schmit coefficients λ j, an λ j = F ψ. (30) j We are intereste in non-vanishing C G ( ψ ), therefore we can assume λ j 0. Further, we have the normalization λ j =. (3) j Since x / ismonotonous, wecan just minimize the prouct λ λ λ. By introucing Lagrange multipliers A an B for the conitions above, we arrive at the equations λ j λ n B = A, j =,...,. (3) n j We can use any two of the Eqs. (3) to obtain (λ j λ k ) λ j λ k n j,k λ n B = 0, (33) which can be satisfie if λ j = λ k or λ j λ k n j,k λ n = B. Now consier three coefficients λ j, λ k an λ l such that λ j λ k an λ j λ l. From Eq. (33) we have λ j λ k λ l n j,k,l λ n = B an λ jλ l λ k n j,k,l λ n = B, so that the left-han sies must agree, from which it follows that λ k = λ l. Therefore, there can be at most two ifferent values for the λ n, λ =... = λ m = α, λ m+ =... = λ = β. (34) By inserting this into the conitions (30), (3) one obtains mα+( m)β = F ψ (35) mα +( m)β =. (36) For given m, those equations are solve by Fψ m α ± = ± Fψ m Fψ m β ± = Fψ m (37). (38) For m = 0 an m = there is no general solution; further, we see that it is sufficient to consier m <. We know from the axisymmetric states that F ψ ; what remains to o is to etermine the m an the sign for the best lower boun. To this en, we check the erivatives α m, β m an fin that for the + sign both α an β have their minimum for maximum m, i.e., m = (whereas the - sign gives m = ). Both solutions can be mappe to one another. By choosing the - sign an m = we fin Eq. (7), as well as the corresponing α an β. Concavity of the pure-state minimum In this section we prove the concavity of Eq. (7). We have where C G = ( αβ ) (39) ( ) = B B( ), (40) B := ( )β = ( +( )F + ) F( F). (4) Thelast linehereis obtainebysubstituting α(f), β(f), see Eq. (7). The secon erivative of C G with respect to F is (up to constant positive prefactors for fixe imension > )

8 8 C G F ( B F B ( ) ( B + F ( ) ( B + F B = ( ) B 3 B ) ( B ) B + )( )( B ( B ) ) ) ( [ B F B( B)( B) B )+ ( ) B ( )] F. (4) As the prefactor in the last line is positive we only nee the signofthe termin squarebrackets[...]in orertoecie about the sign of the secon erivative. Now we use the explicit expression for B(F) in Eq. (4) to calculate the erivatives with respect to F. After some algebra we fin for the square bracket in Eq. (4) [...] = B( B) (43) F( F) [ ] F( F) ( B) ( ). Again, the first factor is positive. Now we substitute the expression for B(F), Eq.(4), in ( B) which yiels [ [...] = ] F B( B) ( ) F F( F) 0, an thus conclues the proof. Proof of Eq. () (44) Consier a family of states M that are invariant uner a group G of entanglement-preserving transformations, that is, ρ g := gρg = ρ for g G an ρ M. Let Sk G M be the set of states that are symmetric uner G an have Schmit number k ( k < ), an S k the set of all Schmit number k states. Given an arbitrary state ρ, the minimum istance with respect to the closest Schmit number k state, σ, is min ρ σ p = ρ σ p = g ρ g σg p σ S k p g(ρ g σg ) = ρ G σg p min ρ G σ p, (45) σ Sk G where we have use the triangle inequality in the secon line, X G := ggxg, an p is anyschatten p-norm with p. [] R. Horoecki, P. Horoecki, M. Horoecki, an K. Horoecki, Rev. Mo. Phys. 8, 865 (009). [] O. Gühne an G. Tóth, Phys. Rep. 474, (009). [3] C. Eltschka an J. Siewert, J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 47, (04). [4] J. Gool, A. Riera, L. el Rio, M. Huber, an P. Skrzypczyk, J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 49, 4300 (06). [5] M. van en Nest, Phys. Rev. Lett. 0, (03). [6] S. Gharibian, Quant. Inf. Comp. 0, 343 (00). [7] B.M. Terhal an P. Horoecki, Phys. Rev. A 6, (000). [8] A. Sanpera, D. Bruß, M. Lewenstein, Phys. Rev. A 63, 05030(R) (00). [9] N. Brunner, S. Pironio, A. Acín, N. Gisin, A.A. Méthot, an V. Scarani, Phys. Rev. Lett. 00, 0503 (008). [0] A. C. Daa, J. Leach, G. S. Buller, M. J. Pagett, an E. Anersson, Nat. Phys. 7, 677 (0). [] T.-C. Wei an P.M. Golbart, Phys. Rev. A 68, (003). [] G. Gour, Phys. Rev. A 7, 038 (005). [3] S. Albeverio an S.M. Fei, J. Opt. B 3, 3 (00). [4] P. Rungta, V. Buzek, C.M. Caves, M. Hillery, an G.J. Milburn, Phys. Rev. A 64, 0435 (00). [5] K. Chen, S. Albeverio, an S.M. Fei, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, (005). [6] M.-J. Zhao, Z.-G. Li, S.-M. Fei, an Z.-X. Wang, J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 43, 7503 (00). [7] Z.-H. Ma, Z.-H. Chen, J.-L. Chen, C. Spengler, A. Gabriel, an M. Huber, Phys. Rev. A 83, 0635 (0). [8] S.M. Hashemi Rafsanjani, M. Huber, C.J. Broabent, J.H. Eberly, Phys. Rev. A 86, (0). [9] Z.-H. Chen, Z.-H. Ma, O. Gühne, an S. Severini Phys. Rev. Lett. 09, (0). [0] C. Eltschka, G. Tóth, an J. Siewert, Phys. Rev. A 9, 0337 (05). [] F. Mintert, M. Kuś, an A. Buchleitner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 9, 6790 (004). [] C. Eltschka an J. Siewert, Phys. Rev. Lett., (03). [3] A. Uhlmann, Entropy, 799 (00). [4] O. Gühne an M. Seevinck, New J. Phys., (00). [5] M. Huber, F. Mintert, A. Gabriel, an B.C. Hiesmayr, Phys. Rev. Lett. 04, 050 (00).

9 9 [6] B.M. Terhal an K.G.H. Vollbrecht, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 65 (000). [7] K.G.H. Vollbrecht an R.F. Werner, Phys. Rev. A 64, (00). [8] L.E. Buchholz, T. Moroer, an O. Gühne, Ann. Phys. (Berlin) 58, 78 (06). [9] G. Vial, J. Mo. Opt. 47, 355 (000). [30] See version 3 of C. Zhang, S. Yu, Q. Chen, H. Yuan, an C.H. Oh, arxiv: v3, Phys. Rev. A 94, 0435 (06). [3] F. Verstraete, J. Dehaene, an B. DeMoor, Phys. Rev. A 68, 003 (003). [3] J.M. Leinaas, J. Myrheim, an E. Ovrum, Phys. Rev. A 74, 033 (006). [33] C. Eltschka an J. Siewert, Sci. Rep., 94 (0). [34] We mention that Eq. () hols true for any symmetric family an any appropriate istance measure. See the Appenix for a proof. [35] O. Gühne, B. Jungnitsch, T. Moroer, an Y.S. Weinstein, Phys. Rev. A 84, 0539 (0). [36] M. Hein, W. Dür, J. Eisert, R.Raussenorf, M. v..nest, an H.J. Briegel, in: G. Casati, D.L. Shepelyansky, P. Zoller, an G. Benenti (es.), Proceeings of the International School of Physics Enrico Fermi, Vol. 6, p. 5 (IOS Press, 006). [37] B. Jungnitsch, T. Moroer, an O. Gühne, Phys. Rev. Lett. 06, 9050 (0). [38] J. Eisert, F.G.S.L. Branão, an K.M.R. Auenaert, New. J. Phys. 9, 46 (007). [39] M. Krenn, R. Fickler, M. Huber, R. Lapkiewicz, W. Plick, S. Ramelow, an A. Zeilinger, Phys. Rev. A 87, 036 (03). [40] R. Fickler, R. Lapkiewicz, M. Huber, M. P. J. Lavery, M. J. Pagett, an A. Zeilinger, Nat. Comm. 5, 450 (04). [4] Ch. Schäff, R. Polster, M. Huber, S. Ramelow, an A. Zeilinger, Optica, 53 (05). [4] M. Malik, M. Erhar, M. Huber, M. Krenn, R. Fickler, an A. Zeilinger, Nat. Photon. 0, 48 (06). [43] M. Huber an J.I. e Vicente, Phys. Rev. Lett. 0, (03). [44] M. Huber, M. Perarnau-Llobet, an J.I. e Vicente, Phys. Rev. A 88, 0438 (03). [45] V. Coffman, J. Kunu, an W. K. Wootters, Phys. Rev. A 6, (000). [46] B.M. Terhal an K.G.H. Vollbrecht, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 65 (000).

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