pathfinder edition NGPathfinder.org March 2012 Got Poison? TEACHER S GUIDE

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "pathfinder edition NGPathfinder.org March 2012 Got Poison? TEACHER S GUIDE"

Transcription

1 pathfinder edition NGPathfinder.org March 2012 Got Poison? TEHER S GUIDE

2 Dear Educator: Imagine not just reading about a sea snail that devours fish whole, but watching it in dramatic action. Imagine hearing a National Geographic Explorer tell in his own voice why he s passionate about severe weather. Now you can. This month, I am so excited to announce our new interactive editions. In these robust, engaging editions, students don t just read an article they experience it. hock full of videos, audio, photographs, and interactive graphics, the interactive editions add a new level of engagement to the issue. The interactive editions are accessible on mobile devices to support your 21st entury lassroom. March 2012 Standards in this Issue Got Poison? (Teacher s Guide pages T1-T8) nimals have body systems, structures, and functions that help them survive. nimals interact with other living things in their environment. In the Strike Zone (Teacher s Guide pages T9-T17) Scientists observe the patterns of weather to make predictions about future weather events. Energy can change from one form to another, including to light, sound, and heat. Starting in March, I invite you to check out the free sample of this month s issue at NGSP.com, then place your order for the school year. I know you ll be just as excited as we are! Shelby linsky Digital and urriculum Editor, National Geographic Explorer Super Survivors (Teacher s Guide pages T18-T25) Plants have basic needs that must be met for survival. Plants have organ systems, structures, and functions that help them survive. Plants interact with other living things in their environment. Look for these icons throughout the lesson: e- Interactive web Whiteboard Lesson edition (see nationalgeographicexplorer) Look for parts of this activity in the free IW lesson. e- edition e- edition web web Projectable Edition (see ngpathfinder.org) Use the projectable edition of this issue to enhance this activity. Website (see ngpathfinder.org) This activity refers to a resource on the website. National Geographic Explorer, Pathfinder March 2012

3 Got Poison? pages 2-3 pages 4-5 Summary Many animals use toxins poisonous substances in poison and venom to survive. In some cases, they use it to kill prey. In others, the poisons help them defend themselves. nimals deliver poisons in several ways: biting with fangs, injecting with stingers or spikes, spitting, or oozing poison from their skin. Predators mentioned in this article that use venom to hunt prey include the viper, the scorpion, the cone snail, the Komodo dragon, and the blue-ringed octopus. nimals mentioned in this article that use poisons or venom for protection include the dart frog, the slow loris, and the lionfish. pages 6-7 pages 8-9 Learning Objectives Students will: understand that animals have adaptations that help them survive; understand that animals use poisons to protect themselves and to hunt prey; summarize to aid comprehension; use alliteration in writing. heck out the new interactive edition for: an expanded viper diagram a video of a cone snail devouring a fish expanded Wild Facts Materials Needed a pack of index cards (white and multiple colors) a wall map of the world Resources Learn more about toxins: and more! See NGSP.com. National Geographic Explorer, Pathfinder Page T1 March 2012

4 Got Poison? ackground Toxins are substances made by living things that are harmful to other living things. Toxins can be found in animal venoms and poisons. poison is a toxin that is harmful or even fatal when swallowed, eaten, or inhaled. Venom is a substance that becomes toxic when it is injected, often through a bite or a stinger. There are three common types of toxins. hemotoxin affects the heart and the rest of the cardiovascular system. neurotoxin affects the brain and the rest of the nervous system. cytotoxin generally affects the cells, such as skin cells, around a wound. Many animals that use venom as a weapon are relatively small (such as a scorpion), move slowly (such as a cone snail), or are easily injured (such as a snake or jellyfish). Using venoms helps them survive by allowing them to catch food or scare predators. Komodo dragons live on the Lesser Sunda Islands of Indonesia. Researchers only recently confirmed the dragons use of venom. The viper family includes pit vipers, rattlesnakes, and copperheads. Vipers have retractable fangs that release hemotoxic venom. ll scorpions produce venom, but not all scorpion stings are deadly. Many simply cause pain. one snails are found on reefs off the coast of Southeast sia. The snail stabs its prey with a sharp tooth at the end of an extendable appendage. The blue-ringed octopus lives in the western Pacific Ocean and is common around ustralia. The octopus sneaks up on its prey and squeezes it. It then uses a beak-like protrusion to bite through the prey s shell to inject toxic saliva. Poison dart frogs are found only in the tropical forests of South and entral merica and the islands of Hawaii. Predators that try to eat the frog get a mouthful of terrible-tasting poison, and may even die. The slow loris lives in forests in Sri Lanka and southern India. It is the only known poisonous primate. The slow loris is a nocturnal animal. Scientists think one reason their toxins smell bad is to help them mark their territory it may be hard to see at night, but it s not hard to smell the toxins. The lionfish is native to the reefs of the Indian and western Pacific oceans. lthough they look fierce, they use venom in their dorsal spines for protection. To catch prey, they depend on their camouflage and quick reflexes. Fast Facts Komodo dragons are the heaviest and largest of all lizards. They can weigh more than 136 kilograms (300 pounds) and reach a length of 3 meters (10 feet). Scorpions have been known to survive without food for up to a year, but they need water. There are more than 100 species of poison dart frog. Scientists estimate that there are about 20 million National Geographic Explorer, Pathfinder Page T2 March 2012

5 Got Poison? ctivate Prior Knowledge 1. Point out that animals use poisons in two different ways to attack prey and to avoid becoming prey. 2. Draw students attention to the photo on pages 2 3. Note that this fierce-looking animal is a Komodo dragon, the world s largest lizard. 3. sk students to predict whether this animal uses venom to kill prey or to protect itself. sk them to predict how a Komodo dragon would use venom. (Possible answers: The animal looks large and fierce, so it is likely a predator. It probably uses venom to hurt or kill prey.) omprehension Strategy Summarize 1. Invite students to examine the headline and deck on pages 2 3 to predict what the article will be about. Point out the phrase like this Komodo dragon in the deck, and ask students what they think it means. Students should come to the conclusion that the article is about poisonous animals (not reptiles). sk students what kinds of animals they think will be included and record them on the board. 2. Then invite several students to orally summarize the class s predictions. Vocabulary Define Words pages To help students differentiate between the words toxin, venom, and poison, write the following definitions on the board. Toxin: a substance that is harmful to living things Poison: a substance that is harmful when living things swallow it, eat it, or breathe it in Venom: a substance that is harmful when it is injected, often by a bite or a sting 2. hallenge students to work in pairs to make Venn diagrams that show the relationship among the three words. Help students set up their Venn diagrams by putting poison and venom as the labels for the two outer sections. Then have students use the definitions to fill in the diagrams. 3. Have each pair switch Venn diagrams with another pair. In a pen or pencil of a different color, have each pair tell whether they agree or disagree with each diagram entry and why. 4. Then have the two pairs form a group of four and discuss their diagrams. Invite groups to share their conclusions and clarify any misconceptions. Language Skill lliteration 1. Define alliteration for students as the repeating of the same kind of sound at the beginning of words, such as in Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers. 2. Instruct students to scan the article s subheads. Have them identify the subheads with alliteration. 3. sk students why a writer would use alliteration in the headline or subhead of an article. (Possible answers: It s fun to read; it s catchy; it interests the reader more.) 4. hallenge students to make up their own sentences with alliteration. Put all the letters of the alphabet into a box, with the exception of q, x, and z. You may also wish to include digraphs such as ch, ph, sh, st, and th. Have each student choose from the box the sound they must use for their sentence. Give students three minutes to compose a sentence. Invite students to read their sentences aloud. The sentences can be silly and fun, as long as they correctly use alliteration. National Geographic Explorer, Pathfinder Page T3 March 2012

6 Got Poison? pages 4-5 Explore Reading Summarize e- edition 1. Display the projectable edition or hold up the magazine to indicate the diagram Poison Parts on page 5. Point out that a diagram often explains how something works and has labels to indicate its parts. web Explore Science How nimals Use Poison 1. Have students read pages 4 5. sk them to complete these sentence frames to check their comprehension of why and how animals use poisons. Some animals use venom to prey. (attack) Other animals use poisons to themselves. (defend or protect) The chemicals in poison are. (toxins) Some snakes shoot venom into prey with their. (fangs) The viper s venom comes from special in its head. (glands) The venom of a viper attacks the prey s red cells. (blood) 2. Note that by reading the text while looking closely at the parts of the diagram, the reader can find out how the snake uses its venom to subdue prey. 3. Have students use the diagram and text on page 5 to write extended captions for each label on the diagram. The captions should explain what each part does. Explore Writing Determine Sequence 1. sk students to sequence steps the viper uses to attack its prey from the time it first encounters the prey to when the viper eats it. 2. Have students come to the board to write the steps in a numbered sequence. Invite the class to compare the numbered lists and then create one for the class: 1. The viper opens its mouth. 2. The viper s fangs swing down. 3. The viper squeezes venom from its glands. 4. Venom races through the fangs. 5. The venom enters the prey. 6. The venom destroys the red blood cells of the prey. 7. The prey begins to die. 8. The viper swallows the prey. National Geographic Explorer, Pathfinder Page T4 March 2012

7 Got Poison? Explore Reading Summarize Explore Science ompare Poison Delivery Systems pages Have students read the text on pages 6 7. Instruct each student to draw one of the animals and label it with how it delivers venom fangs, sting, stab, or spit. 2. Lead students in a discussion of why each animal uses venom. Guide the discussion so that they realize all of the animals immobilize or slow down their prey so they can eat it, or so they can t be harmed by it. Emphasize that each animal on this page is a predator. 3. Point out that for all the animals here, except the Komodo dragon, the venom works very quickly. sk students why they think it s important for the venom to work quickly. (The prey has less of a chance to escape. For example, the cone snail is too slow to catch a fish. The venom stops the fish from swimming away.) Then ask students why they think the Komodo dragon might not need speedy venom. (It can track down the prey after it collapses.) 1. Instruct students to briefly summarize the Poison Spit section of the article in their own words. Remind students that a summary must give the most important points. 2. fter students write their summaries, challenge them to write a new subhead for the section using alliteration. If needed, remind students that a subhead gives a clue to what the section is about. 3. Have students share summaries and subheads with the class. Explore Writing reate a Warning Sign 1. Draw students attention to the Facts box at the bottom of page 6. Read through the facts together. 2. Tell students they will design a warning sign for a nature park based on one of the facts. To familiarize students with a warning sign, show them a line through warning sign like the one below, for No ike Riding. 3. Have students write a brief paragraph under the symbol that describes the reason for the warning and the danger of not following it. National Geographic Explorer, Pathfinder Page T5 March 2012

8 Got Poison? Explore Reading Summarize 1. sk students to summarize the reasons that animals use poisons. pages Pair students and have them compare their summaries. Then have each pair write their final summary on a piece of paper. 3. Display the summaries around the room, and have the class walk around to read them all. Explore Science Poison for Self Defense 1. Start a discussion of pages 8 9 by asking students what all of these animals have in common. Hint that it has to do with the way they use poisons. (They use poisons for self-defense rather than to attack prey.) 2. sk students to classify these animals, using sets of cards that you make ahead of time. For each set, write the names of the three animals on three different white index cards: poison dart frog, slow loris, lionfish. 3. Write the names of the three groups they belong to, with a short description of each group, on another three cards of a different color: amphibian (smooth skin; lives on land but breeds in water) mammal (covered with hair or fur; has live babies) fish (lives in water; breathes through gills; has fins) 4. Divide students into groups and give each group a set of animal and classification cards. Have them work together to match each animal with its proper group. 5. Invite groups to share their responses, and discuss the idea that many kinds of animals use poisons. 6. Then have students complete the ctivity Master. ctivity Master, page T7 4. s a class, create one final summary. Then discuss the process with students, including what changes their personal summary went through from creating it to the final class summary. 5. Invite students to send e-cards on the Explorer e- edition website (ngpathfinder.org) summarizing what they ve learned about poisonous and venomous animals. Explore Writing Why nimals Use Toxins 1. Tell students to think about the way the animals in the article use poisons or venom. 2. Have each student write a reflection piece on why so many different types of animals use poisons or venom. Students should include animals that use toxins for predation as well as those that use them for self-defense. Extend Writing ustralian nimals 1. Read aloud the Wild Fact on page 6 about ustralia and point out ustralia on a world map. 2. hallenge students to research and write about ustralia s poisonous and venomous animals, such as: the cane toad inland taipan (also called a fierce snake ) duck-billed platypus box jelly (also called a sea wasp) funnel web spider (atrax robustus) reef stonefish (Synanceia verrucosa) web 3. Have students choose three animals to highlight in a Traveler s Guide to Dangerous nimals of ustralia. National Geographic Explorer, Pathfinder Page T6 March 2012

9 Got Poison? ctivity Master Name: hoose one animal that uses poison power to hunt prey. Paste its picture and write its name in the Offense column. hoose an animal that uses poison power to protect itself. Paste its picture and write its name in the Defense column. Then fill in the rest of the chart. Offense Defense nimal Type of nimal (reptile, arachnid, amphibian, mammal, or fish) How It Delivers Poison or Venom Why It Uses Poison or Venom Kirill M/Shutterstock Elisei Shafer/Shutterstock G Tipene/shutterstock nneka/shutterstock efendy/shutterstock ngarare/shutterstock 2012 National Geographic Learning. ll rights reserved. Teachers may copy this page to distribute to their students. National Geographic Explorer, Pathfinder Page T7 March 2012

10 Got Poison? ssessment Name: Read each question. Fill in the circle next to the correct answer. 1. Why do some animals use venom? to attack prey to find mates to build homes 2. Which animal uses venom to defend itself? a pit viper a Komodo dragon a lionfish 3. Why do so many different types of animals use poisons? Poisons are a good way to get food or avoid becoming food. Poisons are easy to make, and all animals are born with them. Poisons warn other animals to stay away. 4. How does a scorpion deliver venom? It bites. It stings. It stabs. 5. How does a poison dart frog protect itself? It has poison in its saliva. It oozes poison from its skin. It bites prey with its fangs National Geographic Learning. ll rights reserved. Teachers may copy this page to distribute to their students. National Geographic Explorer, Pathfinder Page T8 March 2012

11 Got Poison? ctivity Master Name: hoose one animal that uses poison power to hunt prey. Paste its picture and write its name in the Offense column. hoose an animal that uses poison power to protect itself. Paste its picture and write its name in the Defense column. Then fill in the rest of the chart. nimal Offense Possible responses: viper; Komodo dragon; scorpion Defense Possible responses: lionfish; dart frog; slow loris Type of nimal (reptile, arachnid, amphibian, mammal, or fish) viper: reptile; dragon: reptile; scorpion: arachnid lionfish: fish; dart frog: amphibian; slow loris: mammal How It Delivers Poison or Venom viper: bite; dragon: spit; scorpion: sting lionfish: spikes; dart frog: oozes; slow loris: spit Why It Uses Poison or Venom to catch prey Kirill M/Shutterstock Elisei Shafer/Shutterstock G Tipene/shutterstock nneka/shutterstock efendy/shutterstock ngarare/shutterstock to avoid becoming prey 2012 National Geographic Learning. ll rights reserved. Teachers may copy this page to distribute to their students. National Geographic Explorer, Pathfinder Page T7 March 2012

12 Got Poison? ssessment Name: Read each question. Fill in the circle next to the correct answer. 1. Why do some animals use venom? to attack prey to find mates to build homes 2. Which animal uses venom to defend itself? a pit viper a Komodo dragon a lionfish 3. Why do so many different types of animals use poisons? Poisons are a good way to get food or avoid becoming food. Poisons are easy to make, and all animals are born with them. Poisons warn other animals to stay away. 4. How does a scorpion deliver venom? It bites. It stings. It oozes. 5. How does a poison dart frog protect itself? It has poison in its saliva. It oozes poison from its skin. It bites prey with its fangs National Geographic Learning. ll rights reserved. Teachers may copy this page to distribute to their students. National Geographic Explorer, Pathfinder Page T8 March 2012

13 In the Strike Zone pages Summary Lightning can form when negative charges from a cloud start toward the ground while positive charges from the ground move upward. n electric current shoots along the pathway, and we see a flash of lightning. Lightning bolts heat the air around them, which expands quickly. This action causes the sound we hear as thunder. ecause light travels faster than sound, we see the lightning before we hear the thunder. pages Lightning can zap within a cloud, from cloud to cloud, or between the clouds and the ground. Learning Objectives Students will: understand how lightning forms; understand how lightning and thunder are related; pages use sequence to aid comprehension; explore compound adjectives. Materials Needed several small beanbags slips of paper and a hat or bowl a small carpet runner poster a door with metal knob batteries, insulated wires, and light bulbs for a circuit activity Sky Lights poster heck out the new interactive edition for: an interactive lightning diagram photos from the poster a video of Tim Samaras and more! See NGSP.com. Resources Learn more about lightning and lightning safety: news/2004/06/0623_040623_lightningfacts.html Learn more about Tim Samaras: Learn more about the formation of lightning: National Geographic Explorer, Pathfinder Page T9 March 2012

14 In the Strike Zone ackground Lightning is a discharge of electricity. Most lightning forms in storm clouds, where violent updrafts and downdrafts cause drops of rain, ice, or snow to smash into each other. This movement creates positive and negative electric charges in different parts of the clouds. The bottom part of the clouds becomes negatively charged, while the ground (and objects on it) beneath the clouds becomes positively charged. Lightning bolts form as a negative charge moves downward from the bottom of a cloud and a positive charge moves upward from the ground. When they meet, there is a flow of electric current and a lightning flash. Fast Facts bout 100 cloud-to-ground lightning bolts strike Earth every second. Lightning strikes most frequently in entral frica. Florida has more lightning strikes than any other place in the United States. You can hear thunder and can be struck by lightning within 16 kilometers (10 miles) of a storm. bolt of lightning can heat the air around it to a temperature five times hotter than the sun s surface. Formation of lightning is similar to what can happen when you walk across a rug and then get a shock when you touch a metal doorknob. It is a form of static electricity. Storm clouds are not the only place lightning occurs. Lightning can also form during forest fires, volcanic eruptions, and even heavy snowstorms. s a weather scientist and National Geographic Explorer, Tim Samaras spends a lot of time each spring and summer racing around the midwestern United States. His main focus of study is severe weather events, such as tornadoes and lightning. The data he collects during weather events including air pressure, humidity, wind, and temperature helps scientists gain a better understanding of how severe storms form and move. This better understanding leads to better storm prediction, which can save lives. National Geographic Explorer, Pathfinder Page T10 March 2012

15 In the Strike Zone Language Skill Images Support Text 1. Write the headline of the article on the board. sk students what it means. ccept a few answers. (It should be difficult for students to determine what the article means from the headline alone.) 2. Have students open their magazines to pages Read the headline aloud. sk them again to tell you what the headline means. (Students should be able to tell that it is about lightning.) sk students to explain why it s easier to tell what the headline means when they re looking at the photo. (The picture of lightning bolts gives the clue. Each bolt is a lightning strike. ) 3. Explain that text and pictures often work together. Tell students to look at images for clues to words or phrases they don t understand. ctivate Prior Knowledge Illuminate Lightning 1. Display the projectable edition or hold up pages sk students if they ve ever seen lightning like this in the sky. Have students share stories and facts they already know about lightning. 2. Have students complete the K and W columns on the ctivity Master. 3. Then ask students to share their responses with the class. e- edition 4. fter reading, have students return to the chart and fill in the L column with what they have learned about lightning after reading the article. pages web e- edition web ctivity Master, page T16 Vocabulary Inter- and Intra- 1. Write the prefixes inter- and intra- on the board, along with simple definitions. (intra: inside or within; inter: between or among) 2. Reinforce the prefixes by playing a game. lear a space in the middle of the classroom. Divide students into groups, and have them sit in their groups around the empty space. Give one person in each group a beanbag. Tell students that you will call directions to pass the beanbag either inter-group or intra-group. If you call intra-group, the student holding the beanbag should pass it to another student within the same group. If you call inter-group, the student holding the beanbag should pass it to a student in a different group. Play the game until each student has received a beanbag at least once. omprehension Strategy Finding Sequences e- edition 1. On slips of paper, write the numbers 1 through as many students as you have in class. Place the slips of paper in a hat or bowl, and have each student draw a number. 2. sk students to arrange themselves in an orderly line according to the number they drew. 3. Point out that words can also tell a sequence. 4. sk students to identify the three actions described in the deck on page 10. (setting up equipment; lightning danced; thunder echoed) 5. In pairs, have students tell the order in which the events happened, and identify the sequence words that helped them know the correct order. ( setting up equipment came first as indicated by we had just started; lightning danced and thunder echoed slightly later as indicated by when. ) 6. Write a sentence that uses similar construction and time sequence on the board, such as: I had just gotten home when it started to rain. Have students identify the sequence and explain the how words indicate it. 7. sk volunteers to create other sentences with the same just when construction. web National Geographic Explorer, Pathfinder Page T11 March 2012

16 In the Strike Zone pages poster Explore Science e- edition Understanding Lightning Formation Explore Science web e- edition Understanding Types of Lightning web 1. Read the section Opposites ttract and the first paragraph of Lightning olts with students. Display the projectable edition and lead students through the diagram on page 13. If needed, clarifythat the electricity shown coming up from the ground is not electricity from the electrical towers. It s electrical charges that have been built up on the ground and objects on the ground. 2. Demonstrate static electricity for students. ring a small carpet runner to class. Make the classroom as dark as possible by turning out lights and closing shades. Have students gather near a door with a metal knob. Place the carpet on the floor nearby and walk back and forth along it several times, wearing socks and shuffling your feet as you go. ring your index finger slowly toward the metal doorknob. When it is close enough, students should see a spark go from your hand to the knob, as the electrons you picked up from the carpet discharge from your finger. e- edition 3. Tell students that what they just saw was a discharge of static electricity a spark of electric current flowing between two objects with unlike charges. 1. Examine the different types of lightning with students. Remind students of the difference between intracloud and intercloud lightning. web 2. Display the Sky Lights poster and read aloud the headline and the introductory paragraph. Have a volunteer read each extended caption. s the volunteer reads each caption, have students examine the photo. 3. On a sheet of paper, have students write whether each lightning photo shows intercloud, intracloud, or cloud-to-ground lightning. (ribbon lightning photo: cloud-to-ground; forked lightning photo: cloud-to-ground; sheet lightning photo: intracloud; anvil crawlers photo: intercloud) Invite students to share which answers they got right and wrong and to explain why the correct answer is right. 4. Extend the conversation by discussing how the name of each type of lightning fits the way it looks and behaves. (ribbon lightning: looks like a thin ribbon; forked lightning: has a forked appearance; sheet lightning: looks like sheets of bright light; anvil crawlers: seems to crawl slowly across the sky) 4. sk students how this is similar to how lightning forms. (Lightning forms when negative charges from clouds travel down and meet positive charges from the ground.) Note that when the two opposite charges meet, it is like completing a circuit along which electricity can now flow. National Geographic Explorer, Pathfinder Page T12 March 2012

17 In the Strike Zone Explore Reading Sequence 1. Direct students to the diagram on page 13. Point out that the diagram shows the way lightning forms in steps from 1 through 6. sk students why the diagram is designed this way. (It shows the events that happen to form lightning in the order they happen.) Emphasize that it would be difficult to understand how lightning works if the steps were not read in the correct order. 2. hallenge each student to make a small diagram with four steps that explains how something works or how something is done. Give this example of four steps in making a sandwich: 1. Put one piece of bread on a plate; 2. Spread peanut butter on one piece of bread. 3. Spread jelly on the other piece of bread; 4. Place the second piece of bread on top of the first. 3. Have students share their sequences. pages (continued) Language Skill ompound djectives 1. Write the three types of lightning on the board: intercloud lightning, intracloud lightning, and cloudto-ground lightning. 2. Invite a volunteer to come to the board and underline the word lightning in each of the phrases. sk students what the other word or words in each phrase are doing for the word lightning. (They re describing it; They re adjectives.) 3. Then ask students to note what is different about the each phrase. Lead students to notice that cloud-to-ground has hyphens but intercloud and intracloud do not. If needed, remind students that inter- and intra- are prefixes, or parts added to the beginning of a word. 4. Explain that when some multi-word adjectives come before a noun, they are hyphenated. Point out that the whole phrase cloud to ground describes the lightning, and that if any of the words were missing, the phrase would mean something different. 5. Write the following phrases on the board and have students turn each into a phrase with a hyphenated compound adjective and compare their responses: the sky that is filled with clouds (the cloud-filled sky) the flowers that smell sweet (the sweet-smelling flowers) the storm that is moving across the town (the cross-town storm) Explore Writing Interpret Photos e- edition web 1. Tell students to look at the photo on page Have them write a brief response to this question: fter reading these pages, how has your understanding of the photo changed? (Paragraphs should contain information on how the lightning bolt formed and what type of lightning it is.) National Geographic Explorer, Pathfinder Page T13 March 2012

18 In the Strike Zone Explore Science Lightning and Thunder Safety 1. Point out that energy comes in many different forms, and that one type can change into another. Tell students that lightning is electrical energy that changes into two different types of energy as it streaks across the sky. Write these terms on the board: heat energy, light energy, sound energy. sk: When you hear the rumble of thunder, what type of energy has been created? (sound energy) When you see a big streak of lightning flash, what type of energy do you see? (light energy) If you were close to lightning, what type of energy might you feel? (heat energy) 2. Discuss the effects the types of energy in lightning on Earth. Emphasize that lightning can be very dangerous and precautions should be taken during thunderstorms in the area. Share the National Weather Service s rhyming warning, When thunder roars, go indoors, and have students interpret it. 3. Remind students that they should always seek shelter during a thunderstorm. sk students why they should never stand near or under a tall object when lightning is nearby. (Tall objects can attract lightning strikes.) Explore Reading Find Sequence Words e- edition pages web 1. Display the projectable edition and guide students through a rereading of the text on pages s you read, have students identify words that indicate sequence, and highlight them in the projectable edition. e- edition Have students return to the text and classify each sequence word as indicating: the beginning of a sequence (possible responses: before; beginning; since) the middle of a sequence (possible responses: in a few minutes; followed; instantly; just; when; for now) or the end of a sequence (possible responses: finally; then; the result) Have them create a chart and list words in the proper column in the table. 3. hallenge students to review the entire article to find and classify more sequence words. Explore Writing Write a Persuasive Letter 1. Have students imagine that they are weather scientists who need to secure funding to study lightning. 2. Invite students to write a letter that would persuade a grant panel to fund the project. Students should explain why studying lightning can help people stay safe. 3. Invite students to give an oral presentation of their persuasive letters to a grant panel comprised of teachers or students from another class. web Support Struggling Readers Literal and Figurative Language Read aloud the last paragraph under the subhead Weird Lightning on page 15. sk students what it means to say lightning can leave its mark. (Lightning has physical effects or effects you can see on things.) Tell students that leave its mark can also have another meaning, which is to have an effect that you can t see on something. Give this example: The invention of the electric light left its mark on the world. Point out that the electric light didn t leave a physical mark on anything, but it affected the way people live their lives. sk students to think of something that has had a great effect on their lives. Have each student write a sentence about it using the figurative phrase, left its mark. National Geographic Explorer, Pathfinder Page T14 March 2012

19 In the Strike Zone Extend Science Diagram Types of Lightning 1. Refer students to the diagram on page 13. Have them identify the type of lightning shown in the diagram. (cloud-to-ground lightning) 2. sk students to identify where the positive charges in the lightning come from. (the ground) Then ask students what happens when the negative and positive charges meet. (They complete a path and an electric current shoots up it.) 3. Lead a discussion about how intercloud and intracloud lightning might be similar or different in how they form. If needed, point out that positive charges gather at the top of storm clouds. 4. Have students work in pairs to create a diagram showing how either intracloud or intercloud lightning might form. (intracloud: The negative and positive charges within one cloud form a path. intercloud: The negative charges from one cloud form a path with the positive charges from another cloud.) Extend Science Hands-On ctivity omplete a ircuit 1. Display the diagram on page 13 in the projectable edition for reference during this activity. 2. Show students a battery, and discuss how the positive and negative ends of the battery are related to the positive and negative charges in the cloud diagram. e- edition 4. Divide students into groups and give each two wires, one battery, and one light bulb. 5. Lead students in creating a circuit by connecting a wire from the negative terminal of the battery to the light bulb and the other wire from the light bulb to the positive terminal of the battery. 6. Discuss the completed circuit and help students relate it to lightning formation. (Electricity flows from one opposite charge to the other because opposite charges attract. This path completes a circuit of moving electrical charges. When electricity moves in a complete circuit, it can do work, such as making a light bulb light up or causing a flash of lightning.) Extend Writing Write a Journal Entry 1. Review Tim Samaras activities. Tell students to think about what storm chasers do each day. 2. Have students imagine themselves as a storm chaser and write a journal entry for a day on the road chasing thunderstorms. 3. Students can work as partners or in a small group to create a dialogue among several members of a storm chaser team. Have them perform this work as a short skit. web 3. sk students to recall what happens when a path is formed between positive and negative charges in clouds. (lightning forms) Then ask students what they think will happen when a path is formed between the positive and negative charges in the battery. National Geographic Explorer, Pathfinder Page T15 March 2012

20 In the Strike Zone ctivity Master Name: Fill in the K-W-L chart below. efore reading, write what you know about lightning in the K column. Write what you want to know about lightning in the W column. fter reading, write what you learned about lightning in the L column. K W L National Geographic Explorer, Pathfinder Page T16 March 2012

4THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK

4THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 4THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK GRADE 4 ELEMENTARY-LEVEL SCIENCE TEST WRITTEN TEST JUNE 6, 2011 Student Name School Name Print your name and the name of your school on the lines above. The test

More information

Lesson 4.13: Life Science Ecosystems 1

Lesson 4.13: Life Science Ecosystems 1 Weekly Focus: Reading Comprehension Weekly Skill: Finding Evidence from Passage Lesson Summary: This week students will read two different passages with information on ecosystems. The first passage includes

More information

Unit: Plants & Animals (Grade 2)

Unit: Plants & Animals (Grade 2) Unit: Plants & Animals (Grade 2) Content Area: Science Course(s): Science Time Period: 8 weeks Length: Weeks Status: Published Unit Overview Students will determine the life cycles of plants and animals

More information

Fry Instant Word List

Fry Instant Word List First 100 Instant Words the had out than of by many first and words then water a but them been to not these called in what so who is all some oil you were her sit that we would now it when make find he

More information

Dinosaur Extinction Theories. Student Packet

Dinosaur Extinction Theories. Student Packet Dinosaur Extinction Theories Student Packet 1 Dinosaur Extinction Theories Introduction Why did the dinosaurs become extinct? What happened over 65 million years ago to kill a species that had survived

More information

Fry Instant Words High Frequency Words

Fry Instant Words High Frequency Words Fry Instant Words High Frequency Words The Fry list of 600 words are the most frequently used words for reading and writing. The words are listed in rank order. First Hundred Group 1 Group 2 Group 3 Group

More information

Adaptations 4.10A. predator: an animal that hunts and eats other animals Rice University All Rights Reserved

Adaptations 4.10A. predator: an animal that hunts and eats other animals Rice University All Rights Reserved A penguin swims through icy cold waters. It has special feathers that layer like shingles on a roof. These tightly packed feathers keep out cold water and keep its body heat in. The penguin also has special

More information

food webs reflect look out! what do you think?

food webs reflect look out! what do you think? reflect Imagine for a moment that you stay after school one day to clean up the classroom. While cleaning, you move some plants away from the sunny windows. A week later, you remember to move the plants

More information

Grade 4 Book 5. Life and Living 2 Animals and their Habitats 1

Grade 4 Book 5. Life and Living 2 Animals and their Habitats 1 Grade 4 Book 5 Life and Living 2 Animals and their Habitats 1 1 Animals and their habitats 1 The wild things of this earth are not ours to do with as we please. They have been given to us in trust, and

More information

Habitat Comparison at the Garden

Habitat Comparison at the Garden Habitat Comparison at the Garden Several types of habitats are represented at the Atlanta Botanical Garden: tropical rainforest, desert, temperate deciduous forest and wetlands. During this activity students

More information

Temperature affects water in the air.

Temperature affects water in the air. KEY CONCEPT Most clouds form as air rises and cools. BEFORE, you learned Water vapor circulates from Earth to the atmosphere Warm air is less dense than cool air and tends to rise NOW, you will learn How

More information

3 Types of Interactions

3 Types of Interactions CHAPTER 1 3 Types of Interactions SECTION Interactions of Living Things BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: What determines an area s carrying capacity?

More information

Reptiles and Amphibians Can you tell fact from fiction?

Reptiles and Amphibians Can you tell fact from fiction? Reptiles and Amphibians Can you tell fact from fiction? In Cold Blood Pre-Visitation Activity Time: 30 45 minutes Grades: K 8 Summary: This pre-visitation activity is a 35 question reptile and amphibian

More information

reflect extinct: describes a species that has completely died out

reflect extinct: describes a species that has completely died out reflect For hundreds of millions of years, dinosaurs roamed the planet. Some weighed up to 80 tons. Some were taller than a 6-story building. Then, starting about 65 million years ago, the dinosaurs went

More information

Geography Fieldwork at Birmingham Botanical Gardens. Key Stages 3 & 4

Geography Fieldwork at Birmingham Botanical Gardens. Key Stages 3 & 4 Geography Fieldwork at Birmingham Botanical Gardens Key Stages 3 & 4 Introduction These worksheets have been designed so that you can select from them in order to create your own booklet, tailored to your

More information

Elena Álvarez Gómez Mª Carmen Moreno González 2º BACHILLERATO C

Elena Álvarez Gómez Mª Carmen Moreno González 2º BACHILLERATO C Elena Álvarez Gómez Mª Carmen Moreno González 2º BACHILLERATO C Page - Introduction: poisonous animals..1-2 - Insects: bees...3 - Arachnids: scorpions...4 - Mammals: platypus.5 - Jellyfishes: sea wasp...

More information

Hudson Explorers. Frog Quest Activity Guide

Hudson Explorers. Frog Quest Activity Guide Hudson Explorers Frog Activity Guide Frog Introduction Dear Educator, Welcome! Today you and your group will learn all about frogs and how they grow and live at Hudson Gardens. You will find an Activity

More information

Who Am I? Who Am I? Amphibian. Mammal

Who Am I? Who Am I? Amphibian. Mammal Amphibian Mammal I am one of the only types of animal that can learn behaviors from copying my parents. I m a warm blooded vertebrate that can live in many different climates. I am often characterized

More information

Lesson 1. Objectives: ocus: Subjects:

Lesson 1. Objectives: ocus: Subjects: Lesson 1 The Web of Life Objectives: 1. Understand the concept of an ecosystem. 2. Understand the interdependence of members of an ecosystem. Subjects: 1. Ecology 2. Language 3. Art MATERIALS: Copies of

More information

NATURE PHYSICS: AN INTRODUCTION TO THUNDER AND LIGHTNING

NATURE PHYSICS: AN INTRODUCTION TO THUNDER AND LIGHTNING NATURE PHYSICS: AN INTRODUCTION TO THUNDER AND LIGHTNING A Greek philosopher and scientist named Aristotle thought the sound was caused by clouds colliding. Some Native Americans believed the sound was

More information

4 th Grade Science Unit B: Life Sciences Chapter 3: Flow of Energy and Matter Lesson 1: How does energy flow?

4 th Grade Science Unit B: Life Sciences Chapter 3: Flow of Energy and Matter Lesson 1: How does energy flow? 4 th Grade Science Unit B: Life Sciences Chapter 3: Flow of Energy and Matter Lesson 1: How does energy flow? ecosystem Ecosystem is the living and nonliving things and the way they interact in an environment.

More information

Fry Phrases Set 1. TeacherHelpForParents.com help for all areas of your child s education

Fry Phrases Set 1. TeacherHelpForParents.com help for all areas of your child s education Set 1 The people Write it down By the water Who will make it? You and I What will they do? He called me. We had their dog. What did they say? When would you go? No way A number of people One or two How

More information

Activity 1.4: Nature Walk & Ecosystem Introduction

Activity 1.4: Nature Walk & Ecosystem Introduction Activity 1.4: Nature Walk & Ecosystem Introduction Grades 7 9 Description: Part 1: Nature Walk Students take a walk through nature, make observations of their surroundings, and learn or review what a food

More information

Superstars Building Fry List Fluency

Superstars Building Fry List Fluency Sight Word Superstars Building Fry List Fluency By Jennifer Bates http://finallyinfirst.blogspot.com/ How I use this program I developed this program because I noticed many of my students were still trying

More information

Natural Resources. Air and Water Resources

Natural Resources. Air and Water Resources Natural Resources Key Concepts Why is it important to manage air and water resources wisely? How can individuals help manage air and water resources wisely? Air and Water Resources What do you think? Read

More information

Exhibit Inquiry. Rainforest. Aug 11

Exhibit Inquiry. Rainforest. Aug 11 Exhibit Inquiry Exhibit Inquiry Have students look for the following exhibits related to living things during their visit to the Ontario Science Centre: Where to go: (Level 6) What it's about: Tropical

More information

Observing animals. Year 3. South Australian Museum Education Program. Crustacean. Insect. Fish. Arachnid. Reptile. Amphibian.

Observing animals. Year 3. South Australian Museum Education Program. Crustacean. Insect. Fish. Arachnid. Reptile. Amphibian. Observing Animals Observing animals Year 3 This Outreach Education Program for schools is made possible by the partnership between the South Australian Museum and the Department of Education and Children

More information

Key Idea 2: Ecosystems

Key Idea 2: Ecosystems Key Idea 2: Ecosystems Ecosystems An ecosystem is a living community of plants and animals sharing an environment with non-living elements such as climate and soil. An example of a small scale ecosystem

More information

Teacher Guide for FAST-R Passage: FAST-R: Formative Assessments of Student Thinking in Reading. Storms. Nonfiction

Teacher Guide for FAST-R Passage: FAST-R: Formative Assessments of Student Thinking in Reading. Storms. Nonfiction Teacher Guide for FAST-R Passage: FAST-R: Formative Assessments of Student Thinking in Reading At a Glance Approximate Grade Range: 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Genre: Nonfiction Topic: Nonfiction article describing

More information

PUSD High Frequency Word List

PUSD High Frequency Word List PUSD High Frequency Word List For Reading and Spelling Grades K-5 High Frequency or instant words are important because: 1. You can t read a sentence or a paragraph without knowing at least the most common.

More information

Anatomy and Physiology of Leaves

Anatomy and Physiology of Leaves I. Leaf Structure and Anatomy Anatomy and Physiology of Leaves A. Structural Features of the Leaf Question: How do plants respire? Plants must take in CO 2 from the atmosphere in order to photosynthesize.

More information

Kindergarten Science Units Life Science Plants and Animals

Kindergarten Science Units Life Science Plants and Animals Kindergarten Science Units Life Science Plants and Animals How do certain characteristics of plants and animals help them to survive? How do plants and animals change during their life cycles? How are

More information

Exploring the differences between animals!

Exploring the differences between animals! Exploring the differences between animals! Created by- Lindsay Watson School- University of South Carolina Grade Level- Second Subject- Science Science Standard: 2-2.2 Classify animals (including mammals,

More information

Lesson 10 Succession. Overview. Students will: Content Background. Ti m e : 2 Cl a s s Pe r i o d s

Lesson 10 Succession. Overview. Students will: Content Background. Ti m e : 2 Cl a s s Pe r i o d s Lesson 10 Succession Overview Now that students have learned about the diversity of life and the complexity and differences in ecosystems and biomes, they will observe what happens when an ecosystem is

More information

Focus: Students explore habitats and communities: what they are, how they interrelate, and how humans affect them.

Focus: Students explore habitats and communities: what they are, how they interrelate, and how humans affect them. T E A C H E R S N O T E S Focus: Students explore habitats and communities: what they are, how they interrelate, and how humans affect them. Learning Goals: Students will have opportunities to learn how

More information

2. What kind of energy is stored in food? A. chemical energy B. heat energy C. kinetic energy D. light energy

2. What kind of energy is stored in food? A. chemical energy B. heat energy C. kinetic energy D. light energy Assessment Bank Matter and Energy in Living Things SC.8.L.18.4 1. What is energy? A. anything that takes up space B. anything that has mass C. the ability to conduct current D. the ability to do work 2.

More information

Introduction and Pretest

Introduction and Pretest Introduction and Pretest PREPARATION It s recommended that the students complete the five proofreading lessons in the Writer s Guide before beginning this unit. The pretest in this introduction to the

More information

Fry Instant Phrases. Give them to me. Then we will go.

Fry Instant Phrases. Give them to me. Then we will go. Fry Instant Phrases The words in these phrases come from Dr. Edward Fry s Instant Word List (High Frequency Words). According to Fry, the first 300 words in the list represent about 67% of all the words

More information

Righteous Reptiles. Learn more at Lesson Overview GRADE LEVEL. Grades 2-4 TIME ALLOTMENT. Two 45-minute class periods OVERVIEW

Righteous Reptiles. Learn more at  Lesson Overview GRADE LEVEL. Grades 2-4 TIME ALLOTMENT. Two 45-minute class periods OVERVIEW Righteous Reptiles Lesson Overview GRADE LEVEL Grades 2-4 TIME ALLOTMENT Two 45-minute class periods OVERVIEW This lesson introduces students to some fascinating members of the reptile kingdom, focusing

More information

ELEMENTARY-LEVEL SCIENCE TEST

ELEMENTARY-LEVEL SCIENCE TEST 4THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK SPRING 2008 GRADE 4 ELEMENTARY-LEVEL SCIENCE TEST WRITTEN TEST Student Name School Name Print your name and the name of your school on the lines above. The test

More information

Unit 16.4: Plant Adaptations and Responses

Unit 16.4: Plant Adaptations and Responses Unit 16.4: Plant Adaptations and Responses Lesson Objectives Explain how plants have adapted to a diversity of environments. Identify types of plant responses to environmental stimuli. Vocabulary epiphyte

More information

Year 2 Science: The Human Body Resource Pack

Year 2 Science: The Human Body Resource Pack Year 2 Science: The Human Body Resource Pack Body Systems II Body Systems Digestion our bodies break down food and use Skeletal system the skeleton is made up of bones that support our the nutrients to

More information

Lesson Plan Two - Ecosystems

Lesson Plan Two - Ecosystems Lesson Plan Two - Ecosystems Summary Students discuss what living things need to survive. They identify the abiotic and biotic components of an ecosystem and describe the roles and interactions of producers

More information

NOTE TO TEACHER: It is appropriate to introduce the mitochondria (where energy is made) as a major structure common to all cells.

NOTE TO TEACHER: It is appropriate to introduce the mitochondria (where energy is made) as a major structure common to all cells. 5.2.1 Recall the cell as the smallest unit of life and identify its major structures (including cell membrane, cytoplasm, nucleus, and vacuole). Taxonomy level: 1.1 and 1.2-A Remember Factual Knowledge

More information

The Tropical Rainforest: Nature s Hothouse Educational Handout

The Tropical Rainforest: Nature s Hothouse Educational Handout The Tropical Rainforest: Nature s Hothouse Educational Handout The canopy is almost a solid layer of leaves - only 2% of the sunlight reaches the forest floor. Many people still rely on the rainforest

More information

www.irishseedsavers.ie Natural surface water on earth includes lakes, ponds, streams, rivers, estuaries, seas and oceans.

www.irishseedsavers.ie Natural surface water on earth includes lakes, ponds, streams, rivers, estuaries, seas and oceans. www.irishseedsavers.ie POND LIFE FACT SHEET Natural surface water on earth includes lakes, ponds, streams, rivers, estuaries, seas and oceans. A pond is a small body of fresh water shallow enough for sunlight

More information

Time Frame: 1 lesson (45 minutes)

Time Frame: 1 lesson (45 minutes) TEKS-Based Activity for Grade 4 Patterns and Adaptations in Plants and Animals Description: In this activity, students research natural regions of Texas for patterns and adaptations in native plants and

More information

Zoo Connections Curriculum

Zoo Connections Curriculum Zoo Connections Curriculum We Like to Move It, Move It: Classifying animals by features 1 st grade Curriculum is aligned with the Mississippi Academic Framework. Lessons and support material are provided

More information

4. Which choice below lists the biomes in order from lowest precipitation amounts to highest precipitation amounts?

4. Which choice below lists the biomes in order from lowest precipitation amounts to highest precipitation amounts? Ecosystems and Biomes 1. All of the living organisms in a forest plus their environment is an example of A. a biome. B. a community. C. a population. D. an ecosystem. 2. Which of the following best describes

More information

Summary Booklet Topic 8 Weather Patterns

Summary Booklet Topic 8 Weather Patterns Kingdom Schools Science Department Grade 5- Term 2 Name: Date: Section: Summary Booklet Topic 8 Weather Patterns Lesson 1 :How does Air move? Skill 8-1: Understand that air pressure is related to altitude,

More information

1 Everything Is Connected

1 Everything Is Connected CHAPTER 1 1 Everything Is Connected SECTION Interactions of Living Things BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: What do organisms in an ecosystem depend

More information

Virginia Gardener http://www.hort.vt.edu/envirohort

Virginia Gardener http://www.hort.vt.edu/envirohort The Virginia Gardener http://www.hort.vt.edu/envirohort Name Help Sheets: Things Plants Need There are certain things that every living thing needs in order to live and grow. Just like you, plants need

More information

Plant Adaptations/Variations

Plant Adaptations/Variations Plant Adaptations/Variations Plants have adaptations to help them survive and thrive in different environments. Adaptations are special features that allow a plant or animal to live in a particular place

More information

Rain Forests. America's. Web of Life. Rain Forest Ecology. Prince William Network's OVERVIEW OBJECTIVES SUBJECTS

Rain Forests. America's. Web of Life. Rain Forest Ecology. Prince William Network's OVERVIEW OBJECTIVES SUBJECTS Rain Forest Ecology National Science Education Standards Standard C: Life Sciences Populations and ecosystems. Standard C: Life Sciences Diversity and adaptation of organisms. Standard F: Science in Personal

More information

Characteristics of Terrestrial Ecosystems

Characteristics of Terrestrial Ecosystems Characteristics of Terrestrial Ecosystems Terrestrial ecosystems are land-based ecosystems. Rainforests, deciduous forests, and grasslands are all examples of terrestrial ecosystems. The Earth has many

More information

Energy flow & Biomes. Pay particular attention to the diagrams

Energy flow & Biomes. Pay particular attention to the diagrams Energy flow & Biomes Pay particular attention to the diagrams Bacteria feed at EVERY trophic level! Energy Movement Remember that organisms store energy to be used Stored energy is then taken by an organism

More information

Science Fact & Fun: Making Sense of It Teacher s Guide

Science Fact & Fun: Making Sense of It Teacher s Guide Teacher s Guide Grade Level: K-3 Curriculum Focus: Life Science Lesson Duration: Two class periods Program Description Science Fact & Fun: Making Sense of It Our senses are important scientific tools.

More information

Dear Teachers: Welcome to dynamic science

Dear Teachers: Welcome to dynamic science Educator s Resource Guide GRADES 6 8 Dear Teachers: Welcome to dynamic science activities inspired by the IMAX film. These materials, created by Scholastic Inc., IMAX Corporation, and Warner Bros. Pictures,

More information

XVI. Science and Technology/Engineering, Grade 5

XVI. Science and Technology/Engineering, Grade 5 XVI. Science and Technology/Engineering, Grade 5 Grade 5 Science and Technology/Engineering Test The spring 2014 grade 5 Science and Technology/Engineering test was based on learning standards in the four

More information

Food Chains. reflect. energy: what is needed to do work or cause change. What is eating what in this simplified food chain?

Food Chains. reflect. energy: what is needed to do work or cause change. What is eating what in this simplified food chain? reflect Have you ever seen a picture that shows a little fish about to be eaten by a big fish? Sometimes the big fish has an even bigger fish behind it. This is a simple food chain. A food chain is the

More information

ENVIRONMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND EFFECTS

ENVIRONMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND EFFECTS reflect Try opening a jar, turning a doorknob, or writing a sentence without using your thumb. All of a sudden, it is not easy to do these simple tasks. The thumb is one of the most important parts of

More information

6. Which of the following is not a basic need off all animals a. food b. *friends c. water d. protection from predators. NAME SOL 4.

6. Which of the following is not a basic need off all animals a. food b. *friends c. water d. protection from predators. NAME SOL 4. NAME SOL 4.5 REVIEW - Revised Habitats, Niches and Adaptations POPULATION A group of the same species living in the same place at the same time. COMMUNITY-- All of the populations that live in the same

More information

Animal Adaptations Investigation (K-3)

Animal Adaptations Investigation (K-3) Animal Adaptations Investigation (K-3) At a glance Students explore the Zoo in search of animals that fit certain categories and discover their adaptations. Time requirement One Zoo visit of at least 60

More information

Eye of the Storm: Chasing Storms with Warren Faidley

Eye of the Storm: Chasing Storms with Warren Faidley Eye of the Storm: Chasing Storms with Warren Faidley BUILD BACKGROUND Theme 1, Grade 5 California State Standards Reading Vocabulary and Concept Development 1.2 Use word origins to determine the meaning

More information

WEATHER, CLIMATE AND ADAPTATIONS OF ANIMALS TO CLIMATE

WEATHER, CLIMATE AND ADAPTATIONS OF ANIMALS TO CLIMATE 7 WEATHER, CLIMATE AND ADAPTATIONS OF ANIMALS TO CLIMATE TEXTBOOK QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS Q.1. Why weather changes so frequently? Ans. All changes in the weather are caused by the sun. The movement of the

More information

What is energy? In this section...

What is energy? In this section... What is energy? Energy is the power or ability to do work. It makes things change, it does things for us. Everything we do is connected to energy in one form or another. Inside our bodies energy makes

More information

OAT Practice 5 th Grade Science Life Science. Brought to you by:

OAT Practice 5 th Grade Science Life Science. Brought to you by: OAT Practice 5 th Grade Science Life Science Brought to you by: Many plants and animals live in and around the pond. One year the pond dried up. 1) Which organism in the pond ecosystem was still able to

More information

autotroph Encyclopedic Entry producer

autotroph Encyclopedic Entry producer This website would like to remind you: Your browser (Safari 7) is out of date. Update your browser for more security, comfort and the best experience on this site. Encyclopedic Entry autotroph producer

More information

YOUR KNOWLEDGE. Cambridge University Press 978-1-107-61526-7 - Unlock: Reading and Writing Sills 3 Carolyn Westbrook Excerpt More information

YOUR KNOWLEDGE. Cambridge University Press 978-1-107-61526-7 - Unlock: Reading and Writing Sills 3 Carolyn Westbrook Excerpt More information ANIMALS UNIT 1 YOUR KNOWLEDGE Work with a partner. Discuss the questions below. 1 Is it better to see animals in a zoo or in the wild? Why? 2 Are there more wild animals in your country now or were there

More information

3.12A: Cause & Effect: Historical Events

3.12A: Cause & Effect: Historical Events 3.12A: Cause & Effect: Historical Events Side One: Introducing the Skill STEP 3 Directions: Introduce the Skill TUTOR: Read these bullets aloud o One way informational text authors organize the information

More information

Adaptations. 1 of 21

Adaptations. 1 of 21 Adaptations 1 of 21 Learning Intentions I will have a clearer understanding of the way in which animals and plants are adapted to their environments in order to survive I can consider the effects that

More information

ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES

ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES reflect How do you respond to environmental changes? Maybe you wear different types of clothes in different seasons. Maybe you only ride your bike during certain times of the year. What if you moved to

More information

Name Date. Food Webs: The Sahara Desert

Name Date. Food Webs: The Sahara Desert Maggie s Weekly Lesson Pack! Name Date Food Webs: The Sahara Desert The Sahara Desert We think of very cold areas as harsh environments. But hot areas can be harsh environments, too. The Sahara Desert,

More information

Field Trip Guide: Meat Mississippi s Predators

Field Trip Guide: Meat Mississippi s Predators Field Trip Guide: Meat Mississippi s Predators Welcome: This trip will focus on both the Zoo s fiercest and most timid animals. As a guide, you will use questioning techniques to help students learn about

More information

How do organisms interact?

How do organisms interact? Lesson 1 Energy Flow in Ecosystems Lesson 2 Relationships in Ecosystems Lesson 3 Adaptation and Survival How do organisms interact? ecosystem population community food chain food web predator prey energy

More information

FIRST GRADE AIR AND WEATHER STUDY

FIRST GRADE AIR AND WEATHER STUDY CLASS: AIR AND WEATHER: AIR PRESSURE Students will learn that air exerts pressure on all matter through a variety of hands-on experiments and teacher-led demonstrations. Capturing Air For this teacher

More information

-* -* -* -* reflecting. A~fion ~ynop i. Gl) ~ linking to real world

-* -* -* -* reflecting. A~fion ~ynop i. Gl) ~ linking to real world Afion ynop i Students make food webs of their study site, then trace how a change in one population could affect other populations within the web. Session 1 1. Show a food web made by a team of ecologists.

More information

5.1 Ecosystems, Energy, and Nutrients

5.1 Ecosystems, Energy, and Nutrients CHAPTER 5 ECOSYSTEMS 5.1 Ecosystems, Energy, and Nutrients Did anyone ever ask you the question: Where do you get your energy? Energy enters our world from the Sun but how does the Sun s energy become

More information

Plant Adaptations By Cindy Grigg

Plant Adaptations By Cindy Grigg Plant Adaptations By Cindy Grigg 1 What's the strangest place you've ever seen a plant growing? It sometimes seems as though plants can grow everywhere. You see them growing in your house, in your yard,

More information

Focus: Students explore changes in daily and seasonal cycles, and how changes in these cycles affect living things.

Focus: Students explore changes in daily and seasonal cycles, and how changes in these cycles affect living things. T E A C H E R S N O T E S Focus: Students explore changes in daily and seasonal cycles, and how changes in these cycles affect living things. Learning Goals: Students will have opportunities to learn how

More information

7 Energy Flow Through an Ecosystem investigation 2 c l a s s se s s i o n s

7 Energy Flow Through an Ecosystem investigation 2 c l a s s se s s i o n s 7 Energy Flow Through an Ecosystem investigation 2 c l a s s se s s i o n s Overview Students create a food web of a kelp forest ecosystem with which they explore the flow of energy between ecosystem organisms.

More information

Food Webs and Food Chains Grade Five

Food Webs and Food Chains Grade Five Ohio Standards Connection: Life Sciences Benchmark B Analyze plant and animal structures and functions needed for survival and describe the flow of energy through a system that all organisms use to survive.

More information

All About Adaptations Grade 5/One 45 min. class period

All About Adaptations Grade 5/One 45 min. class period All About Adaptations Grade 5/One 45 min. class period Instructional Unit Objectives: By progressing through the unit, the student will: -Comprehend the meaning of adaptation and list examples of adaptations

More information

... Date Starting your search in the Rainforest if it s open, keep an eye out for:

... Date Starting your search in the Rainforest if it s open, keep an eye out for: Museum-Wide Reptiles include turtles, lizards, snakes, crocodiles, and all of their relatives. There are over 9,000 different kinds of reptiles with amazing adaptations that help them find food and protect

More information

Structures of animals

Structures of animals Structures of animals Name: All animals have been designed with different parts, which we call structures, that make up their bodies. Each of these structures is important as it is used to perform a specific

More information

Static Electricity. Section 4.2. Explaining Static Electricity

Static Electricity. Section 4.2. Explaining Static Electricity CHAPTER 4 Section 4.2 Static Electricity Key Terms static electricity attract repel discharges You pull a shirt out of the clean laundry basket and some other clothing is stuck to it. You drag your feet

More information

Pond Vocabulary Words and Meanings

Pond Vocabulary Words and Meanings Pond Vocabulary Words and Meanings Adapt: to adjust to a use or situation Aquatic: from or in the water Bacteria: tiny organisms, too small to be seen with the naked eye Carnivore: an animal that eats

More information

Inside atoms + + Democritus

Inside atoms + + Democritus Inside atoms I magine breaking up an object into smaller and smaller pieces. Eventually, the object cannot be broken up any further. It is a bit like breaking down a brick wall. In the end you just have

More information

A Teacher s Guide to Animal Senses Grades PreK-2

A Teacher s Guide to Animal Senses Grades PreK-2 A Teacher s Guide to Animal Senses Grades PreK-2 Description: Our five senses help us interpret the world around us. Senses also allow animals to see, feel, hear, taste, and smell. Information from these

More information

Lesson Plan for Introduction to Electricity

Lesson Plan for Introduction to Electricity Lesson Plan for Introduction to Electricity Last Updated: 01/16/2009 Updated by: Science For Kids Electricity Lesson 1 Table of Contents Lesson Summary... 3 Lesson Information... 4 Activity Descriptions

More information

Teaching Text Features

Teaching Text Features Guide Teaching Text Features with Wet Weather Handbook from Seeds of Science/Roots of Reading Book Summary Introduction Wet Weather Handbook is a reference book about eight different kinds of wet weather:

More information

by Erik Lehnhoff, Walt Woolbaugh, and Lisa Rew

by Erik Lehnhoff, Walt Woolbaugh, and Lisa Rew Designing the Perfect Plant Activities to Investigate Plant Ecology Plant ecology is an important subject that often receives little attention in middle school, as more time during science classes is devoted

More information

Grouping animals - Classification Teacher Notes/ Activity/Worksheets

Grouping animals - Classification Teacher Notes/ Activity/Worksheets Grouping animals - Classification Teacher Notes/ Activity/Worksheets What can we offer At Hamilton Zoo we can provide educational opportunities for students of all levels. This programme gives students

More information

Interactive science Notebook Setup. and

Interactive science Notebook Setup. and Interactive science Notebook Setup and 18 Easy to Use Strategies for the Entire Year Designed specifically for science interactive notebooks. Can be printed in color or in black on colored paper. Includes

More information

Activity 5 Predator/Prey Interaction Food Chains and Food Webs

Activity 5 Predator/Prey Interaction Food Chains and Food Webs Activity 5 Predator/Prey Interaction Food Chains and Food Webs Objectives Students will investigate predator-prey interactions using a variety of small vertebrate predators. Students will examine prey

More information

Elementary School Sea Turtle Lesson Plan Developed by Cathy Payne

Elementary School Sea Turtle Lesson Plan Developed by Cathy Payne Elementary School Sea Turtle Lesson Plan Developed by Cathy Payne Background: Elementary school-aged children are very drawn to stories, both fiction and nonfiction, about sea turtles, but there are limited

More information

COACHES & OFFICIALS NEED A SAFETY PLAN!

COACHES & OFFICIALS NEED A SAFETY PLAN! Lightning Facts Each year, 67 people are killed by lightning in the United States on average. This is higher than tornadoes and hurricanes, and only second to flash flooding deaths. It is estimated that

More information

American Beech. Shelter: Beech trees live in shady to sunny places. Food: They make their food from sunlight. This process is called photosynthesis.

American Beech. Shelter: Beech trees live in shady to sunny places. Food: They make their food from sunlight. This process is called photosynthesis. American Beech Shelter: Beech trees live in shady to sunny places. Food: They make their food from sunlight. This process is called photosynthesis. Size: 18 24 meters (60 80 feet) tall Kind of Organism:

More information

What other body parts do sharks have that help them swim?

What other body parts do sharks have that help them swim? Galleria: Sharks Look out for the sharks swimming overhead! Most sharks are great swimmers and their bodies are built for speed. What body shape do these sharks have in order to help them be such fast

More information

reflect look out! organisms: living things

reflect look out! organisms: living things reflect Imagine that a student in your school fell down and is having difficulty breathing. Sirens wail as an ambulance pulls into the school parking lot. The emergency workers rush over to help the student.

More information