Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Archived Content. Contenu archivé"

Transcription

1 ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards and has not been altered or updated since it was archived. Please contact us to request a format other than those available. L information dont il est indiqué qu elle est archivée est fournie à des fins de référence, de recherche ou de tenue de documents. Elle n est pas assujettie aux normes Web du gouvernement du Canada et elle n a pas été modifiée ou mise à jour depuis son archivage. Pour obtenir cette information dans un autre format, veuillez communiquer avec nous. This document is archival in nature and is intended for those who wish to consult archival documents made available from the collection of Public Safety Canada. Some of these documents are available in only one official language. Translation, to be provided by Public Safety Canada, is available upon request. Le présent document a une valeur archivistique et fait partie des documents d archives rendus disponibles par Sécurité publique Canada à ceux qui souhaitent consulter ces documents issus de sa collection. Certains de ces documents ne sont disponibles que dans une langue officielle. Sécurité publique Canada fournira une traduction sur demande.

2 COMMUNITY-BASED CORRECTIONS AND COMMUNITY CONSULTATION A HOW-TO-MANUAL "Community reaction is caused by a combination of community characteristics and the manner in which the group home is perceived. Community perception, in turn, is influenced by many factors, primarily the approach the group home uses in dealing with the community." Group Home Management HV Daryl Webber 9308 Ministry of the Solicitor General of Canada W Ontario Region

3 1-1 1 q 308 w t-f3 Icte This manual was prepared under contract for the Ministry of the Solicitor General of Canada, Ontario Region and is made available as submitted to the Ministry. The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of the Ministry of the Solicitor General of Canada. This document may not be published, cited or reproduced without permission of the Ministry. The manual was produced in cooperation with the Correctional Service of Canada and with the Ontario Ministry of Correctional Services. The contribution and assistance of the following individuals are gratefully acknowledged: David Arbuckle, Operation Springboard Peter Bown, John Howard Society of Newfoundland Jon Boynton, Ontario Community and Social Services Michael Crowley, Portage Ontario Diane Doherty, Correctional Service of Canada Simonne Ferguson, National Parole Board Bob Hickey, Operation Springboard Rick Looy, Ministry of Correctional Services Hugh Osier, Ministry of Correctional Services Mike Provan, Correctional Service of Canada Kay Swackhammer, Peel-Halton Elizabeth Fry Society Joyce Waters, St. Leonard's Society/Brampton Lois Williamson, Peel-Halton Elizabeth Fry Society LriBRARV MINISTRY OF THE e-xu.mat014 GENERAL OF CANADA OCT BIBLIOTHÈQUE MINISTÈRE DU SOLLICITEUR GÉNÉRAL DU CANADA OTTAWA, ONTARIO CANADA RI A OP I This document is available in French. Ce document est disponible en français. \-----' FPicight of ells document does not belong to tbe Crown. % e PrOpet ateelon ete eel tom Itl author for I m any intended use. reparbennent Les dies deer du ptésent document pas à tittat.loute utilisation du contenu du pr document dch ere approuvée préalablement par t auteur.

4 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page PREAMBLE 1 -Community Consultation -The Rationale for Community-Based Corrections - -The Young Offenders Act -Important Liaisonà SUCCESSFUL CONSULTATION 5 PROACTIVE CONSULTATION 6 CONSULTATION MECHANISMS 7 SUGGESTED APPROACHES 8 -Do your homework -Search for a location -Make offer for property/inform politicians -Send letters to residents of community -Visit neighbours -Meet with small groups upon request -Maintain profile in the community OTHER CONSIDERATIONS - Selection of Program Name - Petitions - Public Meetings and Confrontation - Change in Community Attitude - Using Community Resources - Documentation - Site Specific Facilities 18 ANSWERS TO COMMUNITY CONCERNS 21 CASE STUDY #1 29 CASE STUDY #2 32 RESOURCE GUIDE 35 APPENDICES 43

5 1 preamble In recent years, community-based agencies have experienced heightened opposition when establishing group homes. Correctional facilities * face particularly hostile responses. Thus, organizations involved in corrections face a multitude of problems which inhibit the development of such facilities in the community. Several factors appear to contribute to this opposition: - Fear of crime among Canadians has risen dramatically over the past few years although -it is. disproportionate to the actual crime rate. ~ Services for offenders tend to be perceived as more detrimental to community life than services for other special needs clients such as the disabled or the developmentally handicapped. - Studies have shown that neighbourhood hostility toward correctional facilities in the community is based on fear and lack of information.. - Communities have become active and skilled in organizing to maintain or improve the quality of community life. n j) An agency must be prepared and equipped to deal with a climate of hostility. However, attitudes vary from community to community: neighbours might be unaware of the agency's plans, they might be indifferent, or they might be entirely supportive. This manual was prepared to help agencies increase community awareness and acceptance - 11rough the process of consultation. * In this document, the term "correctional facility" refers to all correctional residential programs based in the community. Community Consultation Community consultation means many things to many people. But in the context of community corrections, consultation has a very specific meaning. The process of consultation involves: -informing all levels of community about the agency's plans -preparing neighbourhood residents -fielding questions from the community

6 2 -addressing the concerns of individuals and organizations Gaining acceptance is possible when an agency is professional, efficient and responsive to community concerns. The consultation process should include an educational component. To make informed decisions, community members need to learn about the criminal justice system. They need information about correctional services and they must be aware of the rationale behind an agency's correctional program or facility. This manual is designed to provide groups involved in the implementation of community correctional programs with suggestions that others have found helpful in managing the community consultation process. The Rationale for Community Corrections The rationale for providing correctional services in the community is well documented. (See resource guide for a list of publications.) For instance, many studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of community-based programs in reducing recidivism. Moreover, these programs are more cost-effective compared to incarceration. But, people do not perceive the need for community corrections nor do they want correctional facilities in their neighbourhoods. It is incumbent upon an agency to explain the rationale behind community corrections. Some agencies have found that presenting the options is an effective approach: ** An adult offender can be integrated into the community gradually. A community-based correctional agency places an offender in its group home or other facility a few months prior to the completion of his/her sentence. The client works or studies in preparation for a full return to community living. In addition, the client receives counselling and one-to-one attention. The client is subject to agency control and can be sent back if rules are disregarded. Finally, there is peer pressure among the clients to remain "straight". OR ** An offender serves his/her time and at the end of the sentence, is free to go out into the community. The ex-offender is then without controls or guidance. Since the person generally lacks accomodation and employment, the possibility of recidivism is greatly increased.

7 3 The Young Offenders Act Since the implementation of the Young Offenders Act, public fear and hostility toward young offenders has increased. Consequently, establishing facilities for youth in conflict with the law has become exceedingly difficult in many communities. Corrections for youth differ both in philosophy and in practice from adult corrections --but this was also the case before the YOA replaced the Juvenile Delinquents Act. It is important for agencies to remind the public that young offenders are not a "new breed". When the JDA was in place, similar facilities for youth were needed and provided in the community. In providing its rationale for young offender facilities, a correctional agency may wish to emphasize the community's responsibility for its youth. Talk about the kinds of kids who get involved in crime: often these same kids have been victimized themselves. Point out that young offenders need the same kind of care, nurturing and structure as other children. Additionally, an agency can point to the many successful young offender programs currently operating in Ontario and across Canada. Important Liaisons Liaison with well-established correctional agencies and funding ministries is important for several reasons. They can provide helpful information and guidance to a less experienced agency. An agency should liaise with other correctional organizations to learn as much as possible about program development and community relations. Correctional or social service agencies may be a valuable resource for public education. They can do public speaking on your agency's behalf and they can promote your program in the community. In addition, the funding ministry is apt to have a speaker's bureau which will aid the agency's consultation process. Both the Ministry of Correctional Services and the Correctional Service of Canada send speakers out into the community. Ministries may make funds available to agencies so that a needs assessment can be carried out and to help cover the costs of printing brochures. An agency does not necessarily have to be operating a program to receive these funds. Provided that it has a board of directors and a charter number, the Correctional

8 4 Service of Canada will fund certain types of research and publicity. Depending on its client group, an agency should liaise frequently with the National Parole Board or the Ontario Board of Parole. Such contact is important because these boards are responsible for release decisions. They determine the level of supervision which is required and they can advise on the appropriateness of programming for clients.

9 5. SUCCESSFUL CONSULTATION The establishment of a correctional facility 'is an issue which genuinely affects people. Conflict between the agency and people in the community is likely, and thus, it needs to be addressed. Consultation should be a key part of any public relations strategy. The purpose of consultatijm is the consideration of a community's perspectives and opinions. Successful consultation depends upon: - participation of all sectors of society - a. spirit of openess - a positive attitude on the part of the agency - - a recognition of the importance of effective communication between the agency and the community Initial consultations with the community can stimulate ongoing dialogue and foster involvement of community members in the agency's operation. This can lead to improved programs that benefit the clients, the agency and the community.

10 6 PROACTIVE CONSULTATION When locating a correctional facility, an agency should use a proactive approach. The agency should give itself ample time to do its homework, to get to know the community, to locate a site and to complete the consultation process. Using a "steam roller" approach (locating first, confronting the community later) is not recommended by Most agencies. People appreciate being informed and consulted before the facility is established. Politicians, in particular, should be notified immediately rather than hearing of an agency's plan second-hand. If an agency buys property and opens the facility before informing the community, it gives residents a platform on which to base complaints and assertions of dishonesty. Attempt to resolve the conflict creatively and constructively, rather than relocating to an area where there is no resistance. Even if there remains some opposition and the neighbours dislike your choice of location, the facility can still be a well-functioning, integral part of the community. Community consultation involves: -Getting acquainted with the community -Choosing a consultation method or.a combination of approaches suitable to the community -Establishing a profile in the community -Appealing to specific groups -Utilizing community resources

11 7 CONSULTATION MECHANISMS There are various consultation mechanisms from which an agency may choose: o mail-out to the community i.e. information about your program o door-to-door visits with neighbours o speaking engagements to small groups (je. groups of 6-10 neighbours) o word of mouth...talking to key individuals, opinion leaders in community, obtaining grassroots support o open house o involvement of community representatives in an advisory committee or in the facility's operations media informational campaign public meetings It is common for agencies to use more than one of these strategies, since a combined approach has proven most successful in the past. Studies have shown that maintaining a low profile is the least effective method for gaining community acceptance, while systematic community education is - the most effective. The public appears to favour an open and democratic approach. Public meetings, although an option, are not generally recommended. Such meetings are not considered to be a good forum in which to address individual or group concerns. The effectiveness of consultation mechanisms depends upon an agency's ability to plan its consultation strategy according to the characteristics of the community.

12 8 SUGGESTED APPROACHES Below is.a compilation of suggested approaches by various community-based agencies and criminal justice experts. These approaches are advised in situations where the agency has "as of right" or "site specific zoning". An agency can adapt this approach to suit a particular neighbourhood. 1) DO YOUR HOMEWORK a) Become informed about the zoning by-laws. Phone city planning or the town clerk: -Do you have as of right zoning or are you apt to encounter difficulties?. -What are the distancing provisions? If the agency does not have as of right zoning, an even greater amount of community work will need to be done. At every step of the siting process, the agency should liaise with the city planning department. Attempt to work with the city planners, not against them. They can be an important source of community information. b) Learn about the community you have chosen as a potential location for your correctional facility:. -What is the socio-cultural composition? -Is the community amenable to such a facility? -Are there other group homes or community-based correctional facilities? -What has been the response to past attempts to establish these facilities? -Where the response has been negative, what are the reasons underlying this community's response? c) Become apprised of other social services in the community: -Are there crisis centres or self-help groups? -What has been the community response to these services? -Is it helpful that such services exist? d) Know the community... know its issues: -Has crime been a problem in the community? -Is crime a real or perceived problem? -What specific crimes are a problem? -What has been done to address the crime problem?, -Have property values been of concern? -What are its interest groups? i.e. ratepayers associations

13 9 This is highly important information, since an agency will have to address issues relevant to that community. Be aware of community attitudes because they can have an impact on your program. e) Determine the political climate: Will the Councillor, Alderperson, M.P.P. and M.P. be supportive of your agency? The agency should speak with local politicians at an early stage in order to determine who will or will not support you. In fact, the politicians'may have advice regarding a possible location -for the facility. If possible, get a letter of support from them, in case of subsequent'community opposition. DON'T assume that one neighbourhood will have the same response to a correctional facility as the next. Cultural, political and economic differences are certain to affect a community's reaction. i.e. one town may be in favour of group homes while a neighbouring town would strongly object. Find out about these differences before locating your facility. Getting Acquainted with the Community An agency should be familiar with the following sectors in the community: Volunteer Organizations Churches Social Services Recreational Services Local newspapers, Newsletters T.V. and Radio Stations Businesses, Business Associations such as Chamber of Commerce Politicians Police Ratepayer/Tenant Associations Unions Women's Organizations University or College Organizations Service Clubs such as the Lions or Kinsmen Planning Department of Municipality or Town Clerk in small community It is important for the correctional agency to gain the support of local opinion leaders. If support is not possible, the agency should at least know the position likely to be taken and it ought

14 1 0 to be prepared to deal with it. The development of a local contact network is an obvious advantage since it can function as a vehicle for information exchange. Local opinion leaders may include judges and lawyers. It is worthwhile for agencies to have the endorsement, written or otherwise, of these criminal justice experts. Many agencies have recognized the value of support from the local clergy. Ecumenical councils can contribute to the acceptance of an agency's correctional facility. In addition, try to gain the support and involvement of the local police. Demonstrate the need for your facility and outline your program for them. Introduce the staff and the board of directors to police representatives. Endorsement by the police can help overcome community skepticism. 2) SEARCH FOR A LOCATION The search can begin once the initial homework is complete and the agency is satisfied that the facility can be located with relative ease. Property on the periphery of a residential setting is suggested by some agencies. There is no need to locate in the middle of a residential area, since clients will benefit from the community's resources regardless of location. Other agencies suggest property in a commercial area, provided that there is good access to the community and its resources. Indeed, studies have shown that there tends to be less community opposition when commercial settings are chosen. Since there is often a stigma attached to a correctional facility, it is important that the property be as attractive as possible. Both in the selection and maintenance of a site, a message is sent to the community and to the clients that the agency and its operation are respectable. Alternatively, the agency can choose property that is an eye-sore to the community or a home that is in dire need of repair.. Beautification of run-down property enhances the community. Neighbours are likely to recognize this contribution to their neighbourhood. In some instances, it mav be advantageous to buy property which was previously used as a residential facility or group home. If neighbours are accustomed to a residence in their community, the adjustment is apt to be easier.

15 11 It is important that the facility "fit into" the. neighbourhood.. This is particularly true in areas that are strictly residential. If the facility looks different or stands out, then there is apt to be more hostility toward the agency and its clients. Finally, if the chosen property is located near the home of a board member or of the executive director, make it known to the community. Such a choice would illustrate to other neighbours that there is no need to fear a correctional facility. 3) MAKE OFFER FOR PROPERTY / INFORM POLITICIANS Most agencies make a conditional offer to purchase once an appropriate location has been chosen. Sometimes, conditional offers to purchase are based on board approval of the level of community acceptance. At the same time, the municipal planning department should be apprised of the location and local politicians should be informed that an offer to purchase has been made. Prior to making an offer, agencies recommend that the community research be thoroughly carried out. Generally, agencies find that they can predict the level of community acceptance when this advance work is done. Agencies consider it very important to weigh community support prior to purchasing property because it has implications both for their project and for the larger corrections community. Opposition which causes the withdrawal of an offer to purchase could have broader repercussions for public support of community corrections initiatives. Keep in mind that community education and consultation can do much to lessen a negative public response. 4) SEND LETTERS TO RESIDENTS OF COMMUNITY An informative and friendly letter should be sent to residents within four or five blocks of the facility (approximately 1,000-1,200 letters will cover the residents in the nearby area, but this will vary according to the size of the community). The letter should introduce your agency, its plans and it should explain the purpose of community-based corrections. Include favourable media clippings as well as letters of support from community organizations or politicians. In the letter, invite community members to call or meet with your agency and name a contact person. If a call is hostile, be sure

16 12 to answer it immediately. Your agency must be prepared to confront issues in an honest and direct manner. Community members will recognize this in your approach. If a language barrier exists between the agency and the community, make an attempt to inform the neighbours in their first language. For instance, you can produce a letter written in their own language or you can have your standard brochure translated for them. This is a courtesy that the community will appreciate. The agency can then be confident that the neighbours are well-informed. 5) VISIT NEIGHBOURS The letters can be distributed, in person, to immediate neighbours. Door-to-door visits within a radius of 1 to 1 1/2 blocks of the facility are suggested (approximately 300 households). In this way, neighbours are given the opportunity to ask questions and voice concerns on a one-to-one basis. Also, meeting a representative gives a face to your agency. It is suggested that the director or community coordinator make neighbourhood visits, rather than someone like a summer student or a temporary employee. For some programs, however, it may be effective to have community volunteers or parents of young offenders go door-to-door. If volunteers or parents are chosen for this task, they should be given proper training. A training session might include role-playing exercises to teach them appropriate and inappropriate responses. Additionally, the name and telephone number of the agency director should be left with the neighbours when volunteers go door-to-door. There is no need to fear confrontation or door slamming; although some residents will vent their anger, most will be glad of the opportunity to talk with you. Even though they may disagree with your agency's philosophy or choice of location, they will appreciate the effort and the personal contact. Of course, angry confrontation can occur at any time; telephone calls, door-to-door visits, small meetings etc. Most agencies have found that the "agree to disagree" approach is more effective than yelling back at those who verbally attack. them. Before Approaching the community A) Be prepared - have data to show need for facility - have letters of support - have examples of positive media reports Remember that having a quality program is important in the eyes of the community. A program of substance can sell itself.

17 13 ' B) Have information to present - prepare a brochure or information sheets - avoid rhetoric, clichés and jargon - use ordinary language A collection of single information sheets is an alternative to a brochure which covers numerous topics. Rather than inundating neighbours with too much information, information sheets can be distributed on an issue-by-issue basis i.e. property values, offender/client profile. This can be done as a follow-up to the initial letter and door-to-door visits. C) It is a mistake to flag issues that are not issues in a given neighbourhood; in other words, don't discuss safety if that is not a concern. Let the residents of the community tell you their concerns. D) Community response may be affected by the terminology used to describe an agency's program and clients. For example, some agencies use the term "person in conflict with the law" ràther than "offender" to describe their clients. These agncies have found that the word "offender" evokes a negatiye reaction. It is also suggested that "residence" be used in lieu of "group home" or "halfway house". Keep this in mind when you prepare a brochure or when you speak with community members. 6) MEET WITH SMALL GROUPS UPON REQUEST Small group meetings are more conducive to sharing information and learning than large public meetings. Direct interaction between an agency representative and a community member is not possible at a large meeting. At small meetings, individuals who ask questions will get direct answers and everyone gets an opportunity to speak. Make people feel as comfortable as possible. Limit formality and protocol at the meeting. Your agency may wish to supply coffee and doughnuts. Remember, you are not at the meeting to ask the permission of the community; where there is as of right zoning, you have a right to be in that community. The consultation process occurs out of respect for community concerns and out of a desire by the agency to share information with members of the community. Appealing to Target Groups The three primary groups which the agency may address are neighbours and community organizations, local businesses and local politicians. The agency must be prepared to address their concerns:

18 14 Neighbours and Community Organizations...are concerned about safety, peace and quiet in the neighbourhood, property values, parking, Local Businesses...are concerned about negative impact on community and resultant commercial failure. They are concerned about increased crime rate which would include vandalism, theft etc. Local Politicians...are concerned about their constituents' opinions and about representing their community. Community-based correctional agencies must demonstrate to each of these target groups how the facility will meet its needs. Where appropriate, an agency can point to the benefits of client involvement in community projects and to beautification of the chosen property. At the least, an agency must show that it will not interfere with the community. Emphasize that the program is involved with issues that directly affect the community's well-being. Problems facing the community are problems that the program is designed to help solve. Listen carefully to what opposed individuals or groups say: their concerns are valid. Answer the issues being raised honestly and carefully. Invite the opposition to help seek a solution to the problem. Be sure to acknowledge and answer any petitions. Finally, be prepared to agree to disagree. You won't be able to convince everyone. The concerns of the community should be considered even after the correctional program or facility is established: - Ensure there are no additional parking or noise problems in the neighbourhood as a result of the community-based correctional service. - Keep apprised of police records and crime statistics to know whether crime has increased in the community. - Meet with business owners to determine if the presence of the correctional facility has affected their business.

19 15 7) MAINTAIN PROFILE IN THE COMMUNITY The maintenance of a high profile in the community can have a detrimental effect in some cases. Each correctional agency must judge its own situation. If a high profile is desirable, there are numerous ways an agency can be active in the community. After the opening of your facility, follow-up activities might include an open house, a barbeque or picnic, or a baseball game for clients and neighbours. Community Participation in Planning and Development - People in the community need to believe that the facility belongs there: a sense of *ownership or responsibility for the service is an important part of the consultation process. Studies have shown that community participation in the planning and development of a correctional program can help to stem the tide of hostility, if present. Involving an immediate neighbour as a board member should be a standard strategy. A community advisory board or a community liaison committee may be an appropriate and effective way to channel the energies of would-be opponents, because this type of activity has a specific focus. Community committees provide an opportunity for real and 'substantial input on the part of local residents. The creation of such a committee allows a cross-section of the community to act in a monitoring capacity. Representatives from the church, business, police, social work agencies, neighbourhood residents and politicians can help to evaluate and develop the program. Through involvement with community committees, members gain a higher level of awareness of the criminal justice system. Optimally, neighbours an other concerned citizens may help to promote community-based corrections. Getting Involved in the Community Neighbours often complain that correctional facilities do nothing for their communities. But, when agencies promote community involvement for clients and staff, they are generally more successful in gaining acceptance because they appear to belong. Some agency directors feel that it is extremely important to give something back to the community in exchange for community acceptance. When this is the case, clients and staff are encouraged to participate in volunteer tasks. In fact, some agencies incorporate community work in their programs and/or establish participation as a criterion for client eligibility.

20 16 ' Although each agency must determine what kinds of projects are suitable in a given community, these are some suggested activities: -neighbourhood clean-up -recycling drive rspeaking engagements at schools -services to the elderly -car 'wash with proce:ds donated to community -Christmas party for underpriviledged children Everyone benefits from this involvement. For the community, the advantages are obvibus. The agency also gains credibility and community respect. Finally, clients gain a sense of belonging when they feel that they have contributed to their neighbourhôbd. In short, citizen responsibility is engendered through community life. Planning for Effective Use of Volunteers Historically, volunteers have been the essence of community-based corrections and today, volunteers continue to be an integral part of community correctional agencies. Indeed, without volunteers, some agencies could not exist. If an agency or a group home is newly established, a volunteer program should be in place as soon as a community-based program is operational: -Define the tasks of volunteers -Provide accurate, realistic information to volunteers during recruitment -Screen volunteers: determine their motivation and expectations -Provide volunteer training Offers of assistance by members of the community should not be ignored. Keep in mind that a volunteer program can help to channel the energy of opposed individuals. Speaking to the community Public speaking is an obvious method of educating people about community corrections. It is important for an agency to have a speaker's bureau in place: this ensures that speaking engagements can be arranged when requested. An agency must also develop its resources to enable speakers to do their jobs efficiently: - develop a list of audio-visual material for the speakers - make audio-visual equipment available to them

21 17 - develop an information kit (stats, data etc.) to help speakers - provide some form of training on making presentations Agencies should record all speaking engagements in their files for future reference. * Bringing Clie-.ts to Speaking Engagements * In some cases, it may be appropriate for an adult or young offender to attend a community meeting or speaking engagement. It gives the client an opportunity to tell his or her story and to explain why he or she needs the facility.. The community, in turn, will be able to put a human face to a stereotype. Church congregations and high school students are recommended audiences for presentations by ex-offenders. This method of breaking down stereotypes and reducing fear may not work in all communities, however. Media and Public Relations If your agency wants media coverage, make sure you approach the media first with a positive angle they can take. Familiarize yourself with newspaper and television reporters who normally cover human interest stories: approach them with your success stories. With your input and assistance, an inte'rested reporter could do an informative series on correctional issues. Make your resources available to people in the media. Don't allow your initial contact with the media to involve negative coverage. If a hostile community reaction attracts their attention first, that is what they will report. Keep in mind that it is the correctional community's responsibility to educate the media. Some suggestions for good media and public relations: -Press kits should be available for reporters -Public service announcements should concentrate on the community service angle -Press releases should be issued only for noteworthy events (such as an open house) -Ask to be invited on a radio or television talk show -Use the community cable network to broadcast a program on your agency's program or on the criminal justice system One more way to ensure continuity and communication with the community is through a newsletter. In addition, special events such as a barbeque or picnic help to maintain contact with neighbours. Public relations should be a constant effort.

22 18 OTHER CONSIDERATIONS 1) Selection of program name Your facility's name is a symbol which should evoke respect and good will in the community. The endorsement of a respectable organization or individual is advantageous because it indicates support and approval to the community. Naming your correctional facility after a popular organization or person can mean immediate community acceptance. 2) Petitions - A petition opposin your facility can indicate a high level of organized community hostility; on the other hand, a petition may represent no more than the efforts of a minority of neighbours. In fact, the petition organizers might not be prepared to take any further action and some who have signed the petition may have felt a neighbourly obligation to do so. If your agency receives a copy of the petition, you can respond to it in a variety of ways. Here are some suggestions: * To acknowledge the petition, send letters to neighbours. Invite them to phone with their individual concerns. * Using the names and the addresses of the petitioners, locate their phone numbers in the telephone directory. Call them and explain that your agency is sincerely concerned about neighbourhood opposition. Find out the source of their op -msition and try to talk through the issues. * Send a letter to the organizer of the petition. Invite the person to meet with you to discuss your agency's plans. * Find out from the organized opposition how your agency can demonstrate that the facility will be safe and will not cause the neighbourhood to deteriorate. Think in terms of conflict resolution-- is there a mutually agreeable solution?

23 19 3) Public Meetings and Confrontation If a municipality requires your agency to hold a public meeting and if the community is hostile toward the correctional facility, individuals representing the agency should be prepared to deal with the opposition. Outbreaks of temper are not uncommon at public meetings, and anger will most likely be directed at agency representatives. Studies have shown that attitudes toward community residences are based on emotional rather than rational responses, so presentation of facts may not suffice to curb hostility. Understanding the basis of a negative community attitude enables one to deal with a hostile response. Once again, the "agree to. disagree" approach is suggested by some agencies. Any public meetings should have a well-planned, diversified and informative agenda. Before the meeting, clarify who will chair the meeting. Will it be a representative from your agency, the city planning department or the ratepayer's association? Ideally, the chairperson should be a recognized, credible member of the community with plenty of experience in managing large 9atherings. If your agency has not planned the agenda, request an opportunity to approve the schedule and content before the meeting date. 4) Change in community attitude Most problems happen before, rather than after, the establishment of a correctional facility. Initially when the community is informed, opposition is heightened and anger is vented. After the facility is operational and neighbours see that there has been no dramatic change, negative attitudes will moderate. In fact, most organizations find that opposition drops off almost entirely within a few months of the opening. 5) Using Community Resources People should be made aware of the advantages of having a correctional facility in their community. A correctional facility can contribute to the economy of a community in many ways. For instance, staff can and should be hired from the community. Local grocers, suppliers, and other businesses also benefit when goods and services are purchased within the community. 6) Documentation From the beginning, an agency is advised to document all contacts with the community. Documentation should include telephone calls, letters, door-to-door visits, meetings and speaking engagements. These records will be helpful if the agency is challenged to prove its consultation process.

24 20 7) Site Specific Facilities When as of right zoning is not available in a municipality, a site specific amendment hearing is held. If this is the case, the agency must disclose everything in its plans. The function and operatin of the community-based correctional facility should be fully explained to the municipality. Municipal representatives need to know that all possible controls are in place. The agency should address the following issues: * criteria for clients * the screenind process * provisions for staffing and supervision Explain the rationale behind community-based correctional services and the goals of the agency. The options should be stated clearly to the municipality. It should be stressed that a correctional institution does not necessarily prepare an offender for life in the community whereas a community-based agency or group home does.

25 21 ANSWERS TO COMMUNITY CONCERNS An agency must be prepared to answer a range of questions from community members. Addressing issues of concern serves a dual purpose: first, it helps to allay community fear and hostility and second, it is a method of educating the public about criminal justice and correctional issues. FORMATS for addressing community concerns include: - question & answer handout sheets - small meetings with neighbours - door-to-door visits - telephone calls - large meetings ' - mailing letters - community education seminars or workshops The following information sheets are designed to assist agency representatives in answering some common questions.

26 22 1) WHY COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS? Why our community? (Why not their community?) What ii a community-based correctional facility? group home? People often want to know why offenders are released into the community. They perceive this as an unsafe practice and do not understand the rationale behind parole. People need to be encouraged to play a positive role in community corrections. Depending on your audience, you can simply explain the benefits of gradual reintegration or you could give an elaborate explanation of the parole system. Neighbours may agree with the philosophy and may understand the need for community corrections, but they wonder why their neighbourhood has been chosen. People are quick to point out that very affluent neighbourhoods do not have group homes. Explain why this is the case: primarily, real estate in affluent areas is unaffordable. Also, correctional agencies generally prefer to locate in average, middle-class neighbourhoods because these communities reflect the standard of living of most Canadians. Some'people insist that group homes should be located in the country; this thinking is derived from a belief that remotely situated facilities would ensure the general public's safety. An agency should explain that urban locations allow residents to make use of and benefit from local community resources and services. The basic query, "Why community corrections?", leads to a number of related questions. For instance people may ask, "What is a correctional facility, a group home or a halfway house?" When questions are raised about the function of a community-based correctional facility, these are some points to highlight: 1) The function of all community-based correctional facilities is to reintroduce inmates into the community. A community correctional facility provides supervision and guidance while the person gradually re-adjusts to society. These residential and counselling services may be provided by either a private or public organization. 2) The service provided by an agency will help residents to become responsible, law-abiding citizens. While taking part in the program, clients will pursue academic courses, vocational training, or they will be employed in the community. In effect, they will acquire the resources and confidence to help them lead independent lives in the community.

27 23 3) In sanie cases, a lifeskills program is offered to provide clients with skills and knowledge that most people take for granted. Banking, budgeting, housekeeping, cooking, personal hygiene, and literacy training are some of the topics covered in a lifeskills program. 4) It is the goal of a community residence to become an integral part of its neighbourhoo.:. The residents go to work or school, they shop and attend church. Often they do volunteer work or they participate in community activities. The residents can be a real asset to a community, if.given the chance.

28 24. 2) WHO ARE THE CLIENTS? How many will there be? How are they selected? The clientele will depend upon the plans and the objectives of the particular correctional agency. The clients may be young or adult offenders; they may be male or female. Explain that these people were incarcerated, and that now, they have been granted parole either by the National Parole Board or by the Ontario Board of Parole. In the case of young offenders, they are placed in residences by the courts. In some cases, agencies do not admit clients who have committed violent crimes. Make it clear to the community what types offenders your agency deals with. Normally, the clients have requested to come to the community correctional facilityi they want to be there. They want the opportunity to, someday, lead an independent life. Therefore, all residents must agree to obey the house rules. For instance, no alcohol or drugs are allowed in the house and clients must abide by a curfew. The usual number of clients in any given group home is ten, although the number may be greater or smaller, depending on demand and on the local by-laws. They may stay from 1 month to two years. Adult clients are selected through a stringent screening process. They are chosen by their potential to do well in the program. Also taken into consideration is the ability of the program to meet the client's needs. If there is a significant risk of recidivism or violent behaviour, most agencies will reject such clients. Generally speaking, the clients are from the community in question. They are not brought in from other areas.

29 25 3) WILL WE BE SAFE? Will our children be safe? Are the staff well qualified? The issue of safety and security is usually the foremost concern of neighbourhood residents. This can probably be attributed to the fact that most citizens are unaware of the strict controls and eligibility requirements employed by correctional agencies. Community members should be reassured of the following measures to ensure their safety; - government regulations which enforce safety precautions and procedures - government inspections - community-based correctional agency's high standards - strict screening.of and intake procedure for clients - curfew regulations - staffing and qualifications of staff If neighbours are particularly concerned about the competency of the staff, an agency should be prepared to show staff résumés. Also, invite the neighbours to meet the staff so that they may discuss their own background and qualifications. The existence of a correctional facility in a community will not cause the crime rate to increase; studies bear this out. Neighbours should be informed that their children will be as safe as the adults in the community. Residents should present no threat to the people in the neighbourhood. In most correctional residences, clients must follow a daily schedule of chores, work or school. The staff are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to supervise their activities. People may be surprised to learn that a residence employs a large staff including a house Coordinator or Director, program workers, counsellors/social worke..- s and a cook. At all hours, a supervisor is present and awake, for the safety of the residents and the community. Most agencies review their clients' progress and behaviour on a regular basis. If the rules are broken, the client may be sent back to the correctional institution or to another facility. Another safety measure that agencies should mention is government inspection and scrutiny. The funding ministries conduct regular inspections of community-based residences. Municipal offices also inspect facilities to ensure that zoning, health, safety and building regulations are met.

30 The safety of the program can be compared to a scenario in which inmates are released with no obligation to participate in a community-based program. Describe the agency's program as a controlled alternative to unsupervised reintegration. Finally, encourage members of the public to tour community facilities. A guided tour may help to assuage the fears of a concerned citizen. 26

31 27 4) WILL OUR PROPERTY VALUES DECREASE? Will there be more noise and traffic congestion? There are approximately 17 studies that show there is no impact on property values when a group home locates in a neighbourhood. Again and again it has been proven that group homes do not cause neighbourhood real estatz values to tumble in the long term. Even the property situated next door will not depreciate. This is the case regardless of the city or town in question. The reasons that real estate values are unaffected are simple: Property which is purchased or leased by an agency is usually well-maintained; fùnding ensures this. Often the property is renovated and its value is augmented. This may, in turn, cause neighbouring homes to increase in value. Property values are not affected because the facility appears "normal": it looks like any other home on the block. The appearance of the home meets neighbourhood standards and it blends into the surroundings. Because it is a home, a community residence has a family-like atmosphere. Noise is rarely a problem because house rules prohibit loud and.obnoxious behaviour. Profane language is generally not tolerated. Residents are expected to be quiet, well-groomed and well-behaved. In other words, community-based correctional residences operate like most family households and are not obvious in the community. In many cases, group homes are located on the periphery of a residential setting or on a major arterial road. Although staff come and go, there is no greater amount of traffic. Agencies should be prepared to list a number of recent and pertinent studies that a concerned citizen can consult.

32 28 5) WHAT CAN WE DO IF THERE ARE PROBLEMS? Who do we complain to?. Who is funding the facility? First and foremost, the agency should inform the community that it will respond to all rasonable complaints immediately. An agency should make available the names of key individuals so that concerned citizens will know where to take their complaints. The house Coordinator and the Executive Director of the agency should be the first to respond to a complaint. Community member's should have the opportunity to participate th the planning and program development of a correctional facility when it is located in their community. This can help to avert problems before they arise. A Community Advisory Board or a Board of Directors provides 'an avenue through which neighbours can have some influence on the program and the facility. This also provides a sounding board for neighbours who percieve that there is a problem. The agency ought to assure concerned citizens that adequate funding has been allocated. This way, the property is maintained, the staff are well-paid and decent programs are provided. The financing ministry should be named in case a neighbour wishes to complain directly to the ministry.

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Measuring Policing Complexity: A Research Based Agenda

Measuring Policing Complexity: A Research Based Agenda ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Survey on use of Taser International 21ft cartridges

Survey on use of Taser International 21ft cartridges ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Involving Parents in the School - Ministry of Education Tips http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/parents/involvement/gettingstarted.html

Involving Parents in the School - Ministry of Education Tips http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/parents/involvement/gettingstarted.html Involving Parents in the School - Ministry of Education Tips http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/parents/involvement/gettingstarted.html We believe that good schools are even better when parents are involved

More information

Community Legal Information Association of PEI. Prince Edward Island, Inc.

Community Legal Information Association of PEI. Prince Edward Island, Inc. Community Legal Information Association of Prince Edward Island, Inc. Sentencing This pamphlet gives you some information about sentencing in criminal court. If you are charged with a criminal offence,

More information

PUBLIC RELATIONS BULLETIN 17 MUNICIPAL RECREATION. Onatario Ministry of Tourism and Recreation

PUBLIC RELATIONS BULLETIN 17 MUNICIPAL RECREATION. Onatario Ministry of Tourism and Recreation PUBLIC RELATIONS BULLETIN 17 MUNICIPAL RECREATION Onatario Ministry of Tourism and Recreation What is Public Relations? What is the Purpose of PR? What Does PR Involve? What Resources are Available? Are

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Glossary. To seize a person under authority of the law. Police officers can make arrests

Glossary. To seize a person under authority of the law. Police officers can make arrests Criminal Law Glossary Arrest Charge Convicted Court Crime/Offence Crown Attorney or Prosecutor Criminal Custody Guilty Illegal Innocent Lawyer To seize a person under authority of the law. Police officers

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

SECTION ONE: OVERVIEW

SECTION ONE: OVERVIEW SECTION ONE: OVERVIEW A. Program Goals And Objectives The Nova Scotia Restorative Justice Program has four goals. The Program aims to: 1. Reduce recidivism 2. Increase victim satisfaction 3. Strengthen

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

TIPS FOR THE EX-OFFENDER

TIPS FOR THE EX-OFFENDER TIPS FOR THE EX-OFFENDER Dealing with potential employers is never an easy task for clients with criminal records. Ex-offenders who lie on the application may get hired, and then get fired if their record

More information

ILMC Tool Box Series 1.5. General Industrial Series. Effective Communication and Public Relations. 1. Introduction

ILMC Tool Box Series 1.5. General Industrial Series. Effective Communication and Public Relations. 1. Introduction 1. Introduction The shifting of management focus towards 'stakeholders' rather than 'shareholders' has lead to the change in business communication and public relations. Public relations which is defined

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMUNICATION GUIDELINES

SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMUNICATION GUIDELINES SECTION E: COMMUNICATION SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMUNICATION GUIDELINES INDIVIDUAL TRUSTEE SCHOOL STAFF MEMBER PARENT SCHOOL COUNCIL TEACHER PRINCIPAL AREA SUPERINTENDENT CHIEF SUPERINTENDENT BOARD OF TRUSTEES

More information

As part of their course on law and/or sociology in this module, participants will be able to:

As part of their course on law and/or sociology in this module, participants will be able to: Correctional Service Service correctionnel Service correctionnel Correctional Service Law Correctional Service : At the Heart of Criminal Justice Description The Correctional Service of : At the Heart

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Report on Practicum Placement - Community Services & Youth Court By Whitney Larsen, August 2004

Report on Practicum Placement - Community Services & Youth Court By Whitney Larsen, August 2004 Report on Practicum Placement - Community Services & Youth Court By Whitney Larsen, August 2004 1. Introduction The John Howard Society is a non-profit community agency with a mission to Bridge the gap

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

AIA Design Assistance Team (DAT) Media and Public Relations Plan

AIA Design Assistance Team (DAT) Media and Public Relations Plan AIA Design Assistance Team (DAT) Media and Public Relations Plan A carefully developed public relations program is essential to the long-term effectiveness of a Design Assistance Team effort and can help

More information

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL SYSTEM

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL SYSTEM COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL SYSTEM Updated March 2015 COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL SYSTEM The Mission of Extension is: to provide information

More information

CHAPTER 6 CORRECTIONAL SERVICE

CHAPTER 6 CORRECTIONAL SERVICE CHAPTER 6 CORRECTIONAL SERVICE I. INTRODUCTION The administration of penal institutions and the treatment of inmates are regulated by such basic laws and regulations as the Act on Penal Detention Facilities

More information

Community Education Workshop Parents and The Youth Justice Act Length of Session: 2 hours

Community Education Workshop Parents and The Youth Justice Act Length of Session: 2 hours Workshop Objectives: At the end of the session each parent/guardian will be able to: 1. Understand their child s legal rights and their role in regards to the Youth Justice Act 2. Understand their legal

More information

Courts & Our Legal System

Courts & Our Legal System Courts & Our Legal System 2012 (Version 1.0) This booklet has been prepared, published and distributed by the Public Legal Education Association of Saskatchewan (PLEA). The purpose of PLEA and this booklet

More information

SAMPLE INTERVIEW QUESTIONS TEACHER S MASTER

SAMPLE INTERVIEW QUESTIONS TEACHER S MASTER C-12 INFORMATION SHEET SAMPLE INTERVIEW QUESTIONS TEACHER S MASTER QUESTIONS ABOUT YOU Tell Me a Little about Yourself. The interviewers want to know if you are well adjusted, work well with others, have

More information

Nanaimo Restorative Justice Program

Nanaimo Restorative Justice Program Nanaimo Restorative Justice Program International Centre for Criminal Law Reform and Criminal Justice Policy 1822 East Mall, Vancouver British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z1 Tel: 1 (604) 822-9875 Fax: 1 (604)

More information

Citizenship. Programme of study for key stage 3 and attainment target (This is an extract from The National Curriculum 2007)

Citizenship. Programme of study for key stage 3 and attainment target (This is an extract from The National Curriculum 2007) Citizenship Programme of study for key stage 3 and attainment target (This is an extract from The National Curriculum 2007) Crown copyright 2007 Qualifications and Curriculum Authority 2007 Curriculum

More information

Powers of Attorney. This booklet contains forms for Continuing Power of Attorney for Property and Power of Attorney for Personal Care

Powers of Attorney. This booklet contains forms for Continuing Power of Attorney for Property and Power of Attorney for Personal Care Powers of Attorney This booklet contains forms for Continuing Power of Attorney for Property and Power of Attorney for Personal Care Ministry of the Attorney General NOT FOR SALE Table of Contents Ontario's

More information

Guidelines for Information Sharing related to the Youth Criminal Justice Act (2003)

Guidelines for Information Sharing related to the Youth Criminal Justice Act (2003) Guidelines for Information Sharing related to the Youth Criminal Justice Act (2003) For School Division and Young Offender Programs Personnel April 2011 Prepared by the Ministries of Education and Corrections,

More information

Expanding Sources of Support in the Workplace: Introducing EAPs to Community Mental Health Care Providers of Vocational Services

Expanding Sources of Support in the Workplace: Introducing EAPs to Community Mental Health Care Providers of Vocational Services Expanding Sources of Support in the Workplace: Introducing EAPs to Community Mental Health Care Providers of Vocational Services GOAL: The goal of this training is to help community mental health care

More information

Community Education Workshop Youth Criminal Justice Act/ Youth rights Length of Session: 2 hours

Community Education Workshop Youth Criminal Justice Act/ Youth rights Length of Session: 2 hours Workshop Objectives: At the end of the session each participant will be able to: 1. Understand their legal obligations when stopped and questioned by the Police 2. Understand their legal rights if arrested

More information

HIRING A MAIN STREET MANAGER

HIRING A MAIN STREET MANAGER HIRING A MAIN STREET MANAGER The following information contains general guidelines for hiring a Main Street project manager and includes an outline of the selection process, sample interview and reference

More information

Child Abuse, Child Neglect. What Parents Should Know If They Are Investigated

Child Abuse, Child Neglect. What Parents Should Know If They Are Investigated Child Abuse, Child Neglect What Parents Should Know If They Are Investigated Written by South Carolina Appleseed Legal Justice Center with editing and assistance from the Children s Law Center and the

More information

PRELIMINARY REPORT: THE PRACTICE OF KNOWLEDGE BROKERING IN CANADA S HEALTH SYSTEM*

PRELIMINARY REPORT: THE PRACTICE OF KNOWLEDGE BROKERING IN CANADA S HEALTH SYSTEM* PRELIMINARY REPORT: THE PRACTICE OF KNOWLEDGE BROKERING IN CANADA S HEALTH SYSTEM* A report based on a CHSRF national consultation July 2003 Canadian Health Services Research Foundation *This document

More information

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

More information

Citizenship. (This is an extract from The National Curriculum 2007) Crown copyright 2007 Qualifications and Curriculum Authority 2007

Citizenship. (This is an extract from The National Curriculum 2007) Crown copyright 2007 Qualifications and Curriculum Authority 2007 Citizenship Programme of study for key stage 4 (This is an extract from The National Curriculum 2007) Crown copyright 2007 Qualifications and Curriculum Authority 2007 Curriculum aims Learning and undertaking

More information

5. PROMOTING COMPLIANCE

5. PROMOTING COMPLIANCE 5. PROMOTING COMPLIANCE INTRODUCTION Compliance promotion is any activity that encourages voluntary compliance with environmental requirements. Promotion helps overcome some of the barriers to compliance

More information

Child Custody, Access, and Parenting Plans

Child Custody, Access, and Parenting Plans Family Law Series Separation and Divorce Child Custody, Access, and Parenting Plans nyul/123rf.com Cathy Yeulet/123RF.COM February 2012 If you speak French In many cases, you have the right to government

More information

Performance Evaluation Rating Descriptions

Performance Evaluation Rating Descriptions The following rating descriptions are examples of the behaviors employees would be demonstrating at each of the four levels of performance. These examples should assist the supervisor and employee during

More information

RESOURCE PACK REFLECTIVE EXERCISES & TOP TIPS

RESOURCE PACK REFLECTIVE EXERCISES & TOP TIPS FAMILY SUPPORT NETWORK RESOURCE PACK REFLECTIVE EXERCISES & TOP TIPS for Peer Led Family Support Groups April 2010 Introduction This resource pack is for members of family support groups and family support

More information

How Community Advisory Boards Can Assist the Work of the Justice System

How Community Advisory Boards Can Assist the Work of the Justice System How Community Advisory Boards Can Assist the Work of the Justice System Community engagement is an essential component of a well-functioning justice system. By strategically engaging the public, justice

More information

IMMIGRATION Canada. Rehabilitation For Persons Who Are Inadmissible to Canada Because of Past Criminal Activity. Table of Contents.

IMMIGRATION Canada. Rehabilitation For Persons Who Are Inadmissible to Canada Because of Past Criminal Activity. Table of Contents. Citizenship and Immigration Canada Citoyenneté et Immigration Canada IMMIGRATION Canada Rehabilitation For Persons Who Are Inadmissible to Canada Because of Past Criminal Activity Table of Contents Overview.........................

More information

P.E.A.C.E. Parent Education and Co-parenting Effectively. A Guide to Mediation for Custody and Visitation

P.E.A.C.E. Parent Education and Co-parenting Effectively. A Guide to Mediation for Custody and Visitation P.E.A.C.E. Parent Education and Co-parenting Effectively A Guide to Mediation for Custody and Visitation COMMON GROUND YOU BOTH ARE THE EXPERTS WHERE YOUR CHILDREN ARE CONCERNED AND YOU BOTH LOVE YOUR

More information

PAROLE/PROBATION OFFICER

PAROLE/PROBATION OFFICER JOB DESCRIPTION MICHIGAN CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION JOB SPECIFICATION PAROLE/PROBATION OFFICER Employees in this job function as professional representatives of the Department of Corrections in the parole,

More information

Most of them are managed by Juridical Persons for Offenders Rehabilitation Services.

Most of them are managed by Juridical Persons for Offenders Rehabilitation Services. First of all, on behalf of all UNAFEI staff, I am very grateful to the Ministry of Justice of the People s Republic of China, the Institute for Crime Prevention, Beijing Municipal Bureau of Justice, the

More information

Alaska Natives Combating Substance Abuse and Related Violence Through Self-Healing: A Report for the People

Alaska Natives Combating Substance Abuse and Related Violence Through Self-Healing: A Report for the People Alaska Natives Combating Substance Abuse and Related Violence Through Self-Healing: A Report for the People Appendix A Bristol Bay Women s Conference Draft Recommendations to Stop Violence Recommendations

More information

Questions and answers

Questions and answers Questions and answers Questions and answers TABLE OF CONTENTS Respect for Human Rights and Freedoms 4 Services in English and Anglophone Rights 6 Education 10 Public Signs and Commercial Advertising 14

More information

3Crime. Restorative Justice. Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General. Preventing Crime. Building Safe Communities.

3Crime. Restorative Justice. Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General. Preventing Crime. Building Safe Communities. Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General Victim Services & Crime Prevention 3Crime Prevention Information Series Restorative Justice Preventing Crime. Building Safe Communities. Crime Prevention

More information

Citizen Leadership happens when citizens have power, influence and responsibility to make decisions

Citizen Leadership happens when citizens have power, influence and responsibility to make decisions Citizen Leadership happens when citizens have power, influence and responsibility to make decisions Principles and Standards of Citizen Leadership By the Changing Lives User and Carer Forum including What

More information

Interviewing Practice = Preparation

Interviewing Practice = Preparation Interviewing Practice = Preparation What is the Purpose of an Interview? STUDENT An interview is a two-way exchange, a conversation, in which both participants have some goals. The Interviewer wants to

More information

Ontario Justice Education Network Restorative Justice in the Criminal Context

Ontario Justice Education Network Restorative Justice in the Criminal Context Ontario Justice Education Network Restorative Justice in the Criminal Context WHAT IS RESTORATIVE JUSTICE? Restorative justice is based on the principle that criminal behaviour harms not only the victim(s)

More information

ENGAGING YOUR COMMUNITY

ENGAGING YOUR COMMUNITY ENGAGING YOUR COMMUNITY INTRODUCTION Recovery from addiction to alcohol and other drugs benefits everyone families, friends, neighbors, and the person who gets into recovery. It is a reality for millions

More information

Using the TUC Manifesto for Disability Equality. A guide for trade union activists

Using the TUC Manifesto for Disability Equality. A guide for trade union activists Using the TUC Manifesto for Disability Equality A guide for trade union activists Section one Why a manifesto? Trade unions campaign for a better future for all. The TUC s new Manifesto for Disability

More information

Project: Youth Criminal Justice Workshop

Project: Youth Criminal Justice Workshop Ontario Justice Education Network Project: Youth Criminal Justice Workshop Classroom Presentation Resources & Lesson Plan 1 Youth Criminal Justice Workshop Project In class, youth criminal justice workshops

More information

Child Abuse, Child Neglect:

Child Abuse, Child Neglect: Child Abuse, Child Neglect: What Out of Home Caregivers Should Know if They Are Investigated Written by South Carolina Appleseed Legal Justice Center With editing and assistance from the Children s Law

More information

After the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, President Bush

After the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, President Bush Citizen Involvement in Homeland Security After the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, President Bush challenged all Americans to become involved in local homeland security efforts. Citizen Corps

More information

Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security Career Cluster Criminal Justice Essentials Course Number:

Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security Career Cluster Criminal Justice Essentials Course Number: Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security Career Cluster Criminal Justice Essentials Course Number: 43.45100 Course Description: Criminal Justice Essentials provides an overview of the criminal justice

More information

PARENT GUIDE TO THE JUVENILE COURT CHIPS PROCESS

PARENT GUIDE TO THE JUVENILE COURT CHIPS PROCESS PARENT GUIDE TO THE JUVENILE COURT CHIPS PROCESS INTRODUCTION This booklet has been prepared to help parents gain a better understanding of what to expect in Juvenile Court CHIPS proceedings (Chapter 48

More information

Transitional Kindergarten Parent Engagement Toolkit

Transitional Kindergarten Parent Engagement Toolkit Transitional Kindergarten Parent Engagement Toolkit A Parent Outreach and Communications Resource for School Districts and Local Education Agencies Implementing Transitional Kindergarten The Kindergarten

More information

15 Principles of Project Management Success

15 Principles of Project Management Success 15 Principles of Project Management Success Project management knowledge, tools and processes are not enough to make your project succeed. You need to get away from your desk and get your hands dirty.

More information

Juvenile Delinquency Proceedings and Your Child. A Guide for Parents and Guardians

Juvenile Delinquency Proceedings and Your Child. A Guide for Parents and Guardians Juvenile Delinquency Proceedings and Your Child A Guide for Parents and Guardians NOTICE TO READER This brochure provides basic information about family court procedures relating to juvenile delinquency

More information

A Parent s Guide. Talking with your child about alcohol and other drugs. Helping our Communities to be Healthier

A Parent s Guide. Talking with your child about alcohol and other drugs. Helping our Communities to be Healthier A Parent s Guide Talking with your child about alcohol and other drugs Helping our Communities to be Healthier ISBN # 978-1-55471-238-0 CNB - 6569 1. Introduction Most of our children do not end up abusing

More information

PREAMBLE TO GUIDELINES FOR MEDIATION IN CASES INVOLVING ISSUES OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

PREAMBLE TO GUIDELINES FOR MEDIATION IN CASES INVOLVING ISSUES OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE PREAMBLE TO GUIDELINES FOR MEDIATION IN CASES INVOLVING ISSUES OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE The Committee on Ethics of the Georgia Commission on Dispute Resolution studied the issue of mediation in cases involving

More information

Suite Overview...2. Glossary...8. Functional Map.11. List of Standards..15. Youth Work Standards 16. Signposting to other Standards...

Suite Overview...2. Glossary...8. Functional Map.11. List of Standards..15. Youth Work Standards 16. Signposting to other Standards... LSI YW00 Youth Work National Occupational Standards Introduction Youth Work National Occupational Standards Introduction Contents: Suite Overview...2 Glossary......8 Functional Map.11 List of Standards..15

More information

3 of 138 DOCUMENTS. Copyright (c) 2000 The University of Texas School of Law American Journal of Criminal Law. Summer, 2000. 27 Am. J. Crim. L.

3 of 138 DOCUMENTS. Copyright (c) 2000 The University of Texas School of Law American Journal of Criminal Law. Summer, 2000. 27 Am. J. Crim. L. Page 1 3 of 138 DOCUMENTS Copyright (c) 2000 The University of Texas School of Law American Journal of Criminal Law Summer, 2000 27 Am. J. Crim. L. 433 LENGTH: 4112 words BOOK NOTE: Bringing the Tools

More information

5 Introduction The booklet aims to answer common questions victims have about parole and how the Parole Board works. It should help you understand how the Parole Board makes its decisions, what a Victim

More information

III. EDUCATION A. BACKGROUND

III. EDUCATION A. BACKGROUND Education 201 III. EDUCATION A. BACKGROUND Public awareness of the importance of intellectual property in the information age is essential to the successful implementation and growth of the NII. The average

More information

Juvenile Defense Attorneys and Family Engagement:

Juvenile Defense Attorneys and Family Engagement: Juvenile Defense Attorneys and Family Engagement: Same Team, Different Roles When a child gets arrested, the entire family is implicated and some family members are even brought into the juvenile court

More information

Mental Health First Aid and the National Standard for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace: A Lesson in Implementation

Mental Health First Aid and the National Standard for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace: A Lesson in Implementation Mental Health First Aid and the National Standard for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace: A Lesson in Implementation Maureen Carnegie Sjors Reijers Samuel Breau Mental Health First Aid Project

More information

California Conservation Corps. Corpsmember Advisory Board. Handbook

California Conservation Corps. Corpsmember Advisory Board. Handbook California Conservation Corps Corpsmember Advisory Board Handbook Last updated on January 26, 2010 Table of Contents Introduction..........................................................................

More information

Safe & Caring Schools Policy Revised 2013

Safe & Caring Schools Policy Revised 2013 Safe & Caring Schools Policy Revised 2013 1. Background and Purpose Increased public awareness and concern regarding the societal issues of bullying and violent behaviour among youth prompted the Department

More information