Clinical Psychology (PsyD)

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1 Clinical Psychology (PsyD)

2 With knowledge and practice, realize your aspirations. a pioneer in integrative teaching and learning, CIIS is known for the following: Nationally and internationally recognized professors who expand the traditional boundaries of learning in their classes and scholarship. Study with faculty members who are committed to integrating, with academic rigor, diverse perspectives, and multiple ways of knowing. Leading-edge graduate programs in the School of Professional Psychology and the School of Consciousness and Transformation. A unique School of Undergraduate Studies that features a Bachelor of Arts Completion (BAC) program offered on weekends in a cohort format. The BAC program enables students with previously earned college credit to earn an undergraduate degree in Interdisciplinary Studies. Online graduate programs in the groundbreaking fields of Transformative Studies and Transformative Leadership that expand our borders beyond the Bay Area. Online students benefit from an international community of learners and their reflective interaction with one another. A dynamic and supportive learning community the perfect incubator for innovative ideas and study. The personal attention of faculty and our small classes enable students to express themselves with confidence. Internships in the five award-winning CIIS counseling centers and affiliated sites located throughout San Francisco. Students learn by practice under the guidance of trained supervisors. engaged and Innovative Community Creative, curious, mindful, and socially aware these are just a few of the words that describe the people of CIIS. What sets us apart is how we put those characteristics to work. We re passionate about intellectual inquiry and disciplined in our practice. We engage fully with our studies, one another, and our communities. Above all, we re open to new learning experiences, and we draw on the opportunities CIIS offers us to transform the world. a Pioneering Vision In 1968, San Francisco was the scene of a national revolution in music, politics, culture, and self-awareness. That same year Dr. Haridas Chaudhuri and his wife, Bina, established CIIS, developing an equally revolutionary approach to education. They envisioned an integral approach to higher education that drew on the inspiration of the renowned Indian philosopher Sri Aurobindo. Originally focused on the integration of Asian and Western studies, CIIS has grown to include programs that offer a broad array of multicultural perspectives. While expanding the range of its programs, CIIS has retained the intimacy of an academic community rare in U.S. higher education. At the intersection of global and personal responsibility, CIIS has been committed to fulfilling Dr. Chaudhuri s vision: Humankind can no longer be divided into exclusive segments so that the fortune of one will not affect the fortune of the other. admissions We begin accepting applications for the spring semester in September and for the fall semester in November. It is highly recommended that you submit all application materials at least two weeks before the February 1 priority deadline in order to avoid delays in having your application reviewed. Applicants who apply by the fall priority deadline will be notified of the admissions decision by April 1, with enrollment deposits required by May 1. If you are mailing your application from outside the United States, mail it at least 30 days before the department deadline. Applications are accepted after the posted deadline on a space-available basis. For information on application requirements, procedures for admissions, and program-specific application deadlines, or to complete an application online, please visit Admissions counselors ( , are pleased to answer your questions.

3 Clinical Psychology PsyD in Clinical Psychology Program Description visit us online at Academic Year California Institute of Integral Studies 1453 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA

4 Table of Contents About Clinical Psychology at CIIS...3 History...3 Mission...3 Training Philosophy: Core Values...3 Diversity...3 Importance of Relationships...4 Reflective Learning and Practice...5 Learning in Context...5 Broad Range of Scholarship...5 PsyD Program Curriculum: Eight Training Goals...6 References... 8 Full-Time Course Sequence by Semester Degree Description...11 Clinical Training and Field Placement...11 Psychotherapy Requirement Policy Regarding Student Self-Disclosure Research Training Academic Standards Course Descriptions The PsyD Community Faculty Profiles Core Faculty Adjunct Faculty...22 Student Profiles...23 Alumni Profiles...23 Admission to the Program...24 APA Accreditation, Program Statistics and Student Outcomes, Attrition, Fees, and Tuition...24 Selected Dissertation Titles...24 For further assistance, contact David Townes, Senior Admissions Counselor

5 About Clinical Psychology at CIIS History The Clinical Psychology Doctoral (PsyD) Program is one of 14 academic degree programs of California Institute of Integral Studies, a private, nonsectarian, nonprofit institution of higher learning, founded in 1968 and regionally accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges in The program admitted its first class in 1991, first awarded the PsyD degree in 2000, and gained accreditation from the American Psychological Association in 2003.* Mission The PsyD program has as its mission broad and general training in clinical psychology that prepares students for the professional practice of psychology. The curriculum and environment of the PsyD program are infused with the Seven Ideals of CIIS. Of particular importance in the PsyD curriculum are the ideals of diversity, spirituality, and multiple ways of learning and teaching. Training Philosophy: Core Values The program s training philosophy is based on the practitioner-scholar model of training that prepares students for professional practice in varying public and private contexts as active consumers of psychological science. Training under the practitioner-scholar model also equips students to evaluate, apply, and participate in contemporary psychological science. The training philosophy and curriculum goals are based on the National Council of Schools and Program of Professional Psychology s (NCSPP) competency model (Peterson et al., 1997, 2006), which emphasizes the use of the skills of disciplined inquiry in professional practice, development of the person of the trainee therapist, and reflective practice together with the scientific knowledge bases of clinical psychology. At CIIS, training in the PsyD program is guided by the following five core values: Diversity Importance of relationships Reflective learning and practice Learning in context Broad range of scholarship Diversity In keeping with the ideals of the Institute, with the NCSPP competency model, and with the demands of contemporary clinical practice, the PsyD program places diversity at the heart of the program. The program conceives of diversity broadly. Learning and reflection on human diversity cuts across the curriculum, in that every course syllabus includes a statement on how diversity is understood and addressed within the particular content and skill area of the course. Thus, students are exposed to many aspects and definitions of diversity. Of considerable importance in the program s engagement with diversity issues are students and faculty s ongoing self-reflection on how identity influences understanding of clients and effective clinical practice. The training program offers specific study in three primary areas of human difference: culture and ethnicity, religion and spirituality, and gender and sexuality. *Accredited, on probation. Clinical Psychology CIIS 3

6 Culture and Ethnicity. The program aims to develop cultural competence in trainee psychologists, where cultural competence is understood as Whaley and Davis (2007) have described it: [C]ultural competence as a set of problem-solving skills that includes (a) the ability to recognize and understand the dynamic interplay between the heritage and adaptation dimensions of culture in shaping human behavior; (b) the ability to use the knowledge acquired about an individual s heritage and adaptational challenges to maximize the effectiveness of assessment, diagnosis, and treatment; and (c) internalization (i.e., incorporation into one s clinical problem-solving repertoire) of this process of recognition, acquisition, and use of cultural dynamics so that it can be routinely applied to diverse groups. The first stage of recognition of the dynamic interaction between adaptation and heritage dimensions of culture reflects cultural sensitivity as a precursor to cultural competence. (p. 565) One form of cultural competence focuses on trainee awareness of differences in heritage, ethnic background, and geographical origins of clients and themselves, and the ways in which this difference may influence therapeutic relationships, participation, and outcomes. Religion and Spirituality. The PsyD program takes seriously the contributions of spirituality and religion to an individual s orienting system. Our program accommodates the larger paradigm, expressed in humanistic/ existential and more recently positive psychology, that recognizes the values and ultimate concerns in which individuals are invested as variables critical to psychological health and individual well-being (Emmons, 1999; Sperry and Shafranske, 2005). With Sperry and Shafranske (2005), we recognize at least the following three functions to which religion and spirituality may contribute in people s lives: (1) coping with stress, (2) meaning making, and (3) spiritual questing or meaning seeking. Our approach is nondenominational and aims at sensitizing students to the diversity of systems of belief and practice with which clients may identify, and helping them to develop skill and confidence in addressing religious or spiritual issues when these arise in a clinical context. Gender and Sexuality. A third form of cultural competence that receives attention in the curriculum is gender and sexuality. The curriculum aims to understand these aspects of human experience as socially situated and constructed, and to go beyond limited dichotomous and heterosexist understandings. In accord with professional practice guidelines (APA, 2000), the PsyD program seeks to develop clinicians who are skilled at working with individuals and couples with differing sexualities, sexual preferences, and genders. The program is fortunate to be situated in San Francisco, where practicum training in psychotherapy with sexually diverse clients is readily available in community agencies. Importance of Relationships Human relationships are fundamental to clinical practice and clinical education. In accordance with the NCSPP model, the program holds that relationship competency involves the capacity to develop and maintain constructive working alliance with clients and includes the ability to work in collaboration with others such as peers, colleagues, students, supervisors, and members of other disciplines, consumers of services, and community organizations. (Peterson et al., 1997) This definition underscores the importance of relationships to both educational processes and clinical outcomes. In regard to the latter, research has consistently pointed to the importance of an effective therapeutic relationship to psychotherapy outcome (Horvath and Symonds, 1991; Martin, Garske, and Davis, 2000; Lambert and Barley, 2001). Therefore, students in the program are taught not only specific knowledge and techniques, but also to understand professional roles, develop and maintain empathy and curiosity about other people, handle difficult interpersonal and clinical situations, and, importantly, develop the capacity to reflect on themselves in the context of their work. 4 CIIS Clinical Psychology

7 The program also believes that relationships are essential in the learning process. As the foundation and prerequisite of the other competencies (Peterson et al., 1997), relationship competency is developed in the context of an interpersonally engaging learning environment. Peer collaboration, academic support, and clinical mentorship are emphasized through the program as central aspects of the learning environment. In this important sense, we endorse Lubin and Stricker s (1992) notion that a professional education program in clinical psychology should endeavor to create a learning environment that parallels the values which we hold for practice (p. 44). Reflective Learning and Practice Reflective learning and practice allows the how to knowledge and skills learned in specific relational contexts to be applied with intelligence, sensitivity, and effectiveness to ill-defined or novel, not previously encountered clinical problems and situations. Reflective learning and practice calls for ongoing critical reflection and self-appraisal in classroom learning as well as in clinical work at practicum and internship sites. Its development in our students is facilitated by faculty who mentor and provide role models for them (Slotnik, 1996; Svinicki, 1991). Specifically, reflective learning and practice comprises the following: (1) critical thinking, which involves awareness of perspectives and uncovering and assessment of assumptions (Seeley, 1999) one s own as well as that of the other (client, supervisor, instructor, idea, or text); (2) sensitivity to context, complexity, and subtlety, which involves awareness of cultural and other factors that define the larger context of an often ill-defined problem situation at hand (Jarvis, l992); and (3) openness to and utilization of feedback, which involves welcoming of constructive criticism, skill and willingness to take appropriate risks, and appreciation of mistakes as opportunities for learning. Our faculty members create safe learning environments for fostering these qualities and skills in their classroom teaching, supervision, dissertation work, advising, and other encounters with the students. Learning in Context The PsyD training philosophy assumes that clinical training succeeds most readily when students learn in contexts that successively approximate clinical practice. Therefore, clinical training includes cumulative and graded experiences integrating academic knowledge with practice opportunities. Such experiences include roleplay in early foundation clinical skills courses, experiential didactics in the two-year Proseminar series, two years of supervised practicum placement in one of two dozen diverse agencies throughout the San Francisco Bay Area, one to two years of internship training in California and throughout the United States, and the trainee s personal psychotherapy. One-fourth of practicum trainees each year are placed in the program s own Psychological Services Center, located in downtown San Francisco, where they work with adults, couples, and groups from diverse backgrounds and have the opportunity to develop psychological assessment skills. The PsyD program emphasis on contextual learning is congruent with the first ideal of CIIS, which affirms its goal to be an institution that practices an integral approach to learning that encompasses all aspects of learning: the intellectual, the experiential, and the applied. Broad Range of Scholarship The PsyD program values a broad range of scholarship in terms of faculty interests and expertise, in the possibilities for student dissertation topics, and in the variety of research methodologies that are taught and used in dissertation research. Faculty research interests are wide ranging and include psychological assessment, spirituality, consciousness studies, research in psychodynamic psychotherapy, and issues confronting special populations. Student dissertation topics are similarly broad. In keeping with NCSPP (Peterson et al. 2006) and APA (2005) policy statements concerning the modalities of research that are needed to strengthen a scientifically informed practice, dissertation students are encouraged to develop research using experimental and quasiexperimental research designs; qualitative studies shaped by grounded theory, phenomenology, multiple case studies, and ethnographic methodologies; and program design and program evaluation approaches, as well as meta-analyses and integrations of empirical and theoretical literatures. Clinical Psychology CIIS 5

8 PsyD Program Curriculum: Eight Training Goals In order to realize the core values of the PsyD program training philosophy, the PsyD curriculum is organized around eight more-specific training goals, each with correlated knowledge, skill, and attitude objectives. The program goals are realized through multiple in-house and extramural learning activities, including coursework, practica, internship, supervision, personal psychotherapy, and dissertation. The eight program goals are as follows: Scientific foundations of clinical psychology Research and evaluation Diversity and identity Intervention Relationship Supervision and consultation Assessment and diagnosis Ethics and professional practice Scientific Foundations of Clinical Psychology. These involve contemporary knowledge bases of the biological, developmental, cognitive, affective, and social foundations of human functioning found in peer-reviewed scientific journals, along with critical thinking skills necessary to appreciate and critique ongoing scientific developments. This goal also encompasses knowledge of the history of psychology and the many systems of thinking that have emerged in varying historical and social contexts. Overall, in their acquisition of scientific foundations, students are expected to develop an understanding of what constitutes psychological science as a source of consensually verifiable, replicable, and universally communicable information (Peterson et al., 2006). Research and Evaluation. These skills emerge during ongoing, disciplined inquiries that inform and are informed by students clinical work. In accord with NCSPP descriptions of the local clinical scientist (Peterson et al., 2006; Stricker and Trierweiler, 1995), the PsyD program trains developing practitioners to engage the challenge of the human condition directly, starting with the needs of each client and bringing the best available theoretical conceptions and research evidence, along with individual and collective professional experience, to bear in studying and improving the client s functional condition. Through engagement in problem identification and the acquisition, organization, and interpretation of information pertaining to psychological phenomena, students gain specific skills that prepare them to be users of research in the conduct of informed clinical practice. Diversity and Identity. This goal includes a knowledge base concerning human differences in terms of gender, sexuality, culture, race, ethnicity, ability status, age, spirituality and religion, and class, as well as ongoing self-reflection on how one s own identity influences understanding of clients and effective clinical practice. The goal also includes an appreciation the dynamics of power, privilege, oppression, and historical social structures in the lives of clients and their therapists (Peterson et al., 2006). Intervention. Intervention is essential to the development of practitioner-scholar identity and is viewed as a complex process that demands integration of all other goals and objectives. Success in this area involves becoming grounded in theory, research, and application of best available psychological interventions. It encompasses activities that promote, restore, sustain, and/or enhance positive functioning and a sense of well-being in clients (p. 23, Peterson et al., 2006). It also involves application of a broad range of clinical skills, such as establishing a positive therapeutic relationship and becoming effective in selection, implementation, evaluation, and modification of therapeutic process. 6 CIIS Clinical Psychology

9 Relationship. Relationship is described by Peterson et al. (2006) as the foundation and prerequisite of the other competencies and requires six essential attitudes: intellectual curiosity, open-mindedness, belief in the capacity for change in human attitudes, appreciation of diversity, integrity, and a belief in the value of self-awareness (p. 27). Inherent in this competency is a capacity to develop and tend to ongoing healthy therapeutic alliances with clients. This competency s broader aspects include the capacity for collaborative work with the full range of individuals with whom a clinical psychologist may work: colleagues/peers, supervisors/ supervisees, professionals in other disciplines, students, governmental agencies, and community organizations. Initially, the student at CIIS learns the essential attitudes and skills of this competency with peers and professors in foundational coursework in interpersonal skill development, self-reflection in experiential learning, and feedback from peers and instructors. As the students move through their training, they develop advanced competency in the creation of working alliances in the supervisory relationship, as a client themselves, in participation in empirical research projects, in team building at clinical training sites, and as presenters in conference and workshops. Supervision and Consultation. Supervision is defined by Peterson et al. (2006) as a form of management blended with teaching in the context of a relationship directed to the enhancement of competence in the supervisee (p. 28). Peterson et al. (2006) describe consultation as a collaborative interaction between the professional psychologist and one or more clients or colleagues,... in which the professional psychologist has no direct control of the actual change process (p. 28). Students typically begin to learn the role as supervisee in their first practicum. In their practica and internship, they are exposed to professionals in the role of supervisor. In supervision coursework, they practice aspects of the role of supervisor themselves in role-play. In the course of advanced field placements and internship, students learn consultation in their position as a multidisciplinary team member as well as in their role as consultant to allied professionals and laypeople affiliated with their sites. Assessment and Diagnosis. This process is interwoven with all other aspects of professional practice, such as intervention and supervision. It is an ongoing, interactive, and inclusive process that serves to describe, conceptualize, characterize, and predict relevant aspects of clients and their presenting concerns. It also takes into account clients cultural context, as well as integrating information about clients limitations and dysfunctions with their strengths and competencies (Peterson et al., 2006). Consequently, students are expected to develop a strong foundation in conceptualizations of psychopathology and wellness, psychological measurement, logic of clinical inference, and complexities of emic and etic influences (e.g., use of standardized tests in diverse sociocultural contexts). A thorough assessment and diagnostic evaluation, whether it be formal (e.g., involving the use of standardized psychological or neuropsychological testing batteries) or less formal (e.g., based on unstructured clinical interviews and behavioral observations), is viewed as a prerequisite for all clinical activities. Ethics and Professional Practice. These principles involve a knowledge base of ethical and legal standards, a personal commitment to ethical conduct and professionalism, and a competence to act in ways that communicate respect for oneself, one s clients, one s colleagues, and the profession of clinical psychology. For CIIS students, different ethical principles become relevant as [these] professional psychologists move through multiple roles (Peterson et al., 2006, p. 30), such as practicum student, clinical intern, and dissertation researcher. Students are expected to develop knowledge and skill as well as an internalized ethical sense that transcends specific clinical and research standards. These competencies will enable the student to confront complicated ethical dilemmas with a thorough and well-reasoned decision-making style. Peterson et al. (2006) emphasize that preparation in professional psychology involves the education of the personal and professional selves of students so as to develop the habits of reflective practice and lifelong learning (p. 30). CIIS students are expected to develop awareness of self, commitment to lifelong learning, and a professional demeanor that is conscientiously applied through the wide array of their professional roles. Clinical Psychology CIIS 7

10 Students achieve these training goals by completing a 90-unit degree that takes an average of five years to complete and leads to the PsyD degree. The curriculum includes the following: Scientific Foundations (13 units) Research Design, Statistics, and Dissertation (14 units) Diagnosis and Assessment (12 units) Diversity (9 units) Clinical Specialization Courses (35 units) Psychology Electives (7 units) Practicum I, Practicum II, and Internship Coursework in the structured curriculum is completed in three years of full-time study, followed by one year of internship. Students may choose to take one year prior to internship to complete their dissertation research. Many students opt to complete the dissertation following completion of the internship. PsyD graduates will have completed all predoctoral requirements for licensure in California and most other states, though applicants are urged to investigate licensure requirements in their home state. References American Psychological Association. (2000). Guidelines for psychotherapy with lesbian, gay, and bisexual clients. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. American Psychological Association. (2005). Policy Statement on Evidence-based Practice in Psychology. Retrieved September 12, 2009, from Emmons, R. A. (1999). The psychology of ultimate concerns: Motivation and spirituality in personality. New York, NY: Guilford Press. Horvath, A. O., and Symonds, B. D. (1991). The relation between working alliance and outcome in psychotherapy: A meta-analysis. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 38, Jarvis, P. (1992). Reflective Practice and Nursing. Nurse Education Today, 12: Kenkel, M. B., and Peterson, R. L. (2009). Competency-based education for professional psychology. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. Lambert, M. J., and Barley, D. E. (2001). Research summary on the therapeutic relationship and psychotherapy outcome. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 38(4), Lubin, M., and Stricker, G. (1992). Teaching the core curriculum. In R. L. Peterson et al. (eds.), The core curriculum in professional psychology, Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. Martin, D. J., Garske, J. P., and Davis, M. K. (2000). Relation of the therapeutic alliance with outcome and other variables: A meta-analytic review. Journal of Counseling and Clinical Psychology, 68(3), Peterson, R. L., et al. (1997). The National Council of Schools and Programs of Professional Psychology educational model. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 28, Peterson, R. L., et al. (2006). The National Council of Schools and Programs of Professional Psychology educational model. Training and Education in Professional Psychology, S(1), Seeley, K. (1999). Cultural psychotherapy: Working with culture in the clinical encounter. Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson. 8 CIIS Clinical Psychology

11 Slotnik, H.B. (1996). How doctors learn: the role of clinical problems across the medical school-to-practice continuum. Academic Medicine, 71(1), Sperry, L., and Shafranske, E. P. (2005). Spiritually oriented psychotherapy. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. Stricker, G., and Trierweiler, S. J. (1995). The local clinical scientist: A bridge between science and practice. American Psychologist, 50(12), Svinicki, M. D. (1991). Practical implications of cognitive theories. In R. Mengis and M. Savinki (eds.), College teaching: From theory to practice. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Whaley, A. L., and Davis, K. E. (2007). Cultural competence and evidence-based practice in mental health services: A complementary perspective. American Psychologist, 62(6), Clinical Psychology CIIS 9

12 Full-Time Course Sequence by Semester Courses must be completed in sequence during three years of full-time coursework. G-1: Fall Semester G-1: Spring Semester G-1: Summer Semester Foundation I: Adult: Ind/Couples (3) Foundation II: Child and Family (3) Foundation III: Group (3) Lifespan Development (3) Psychopathology (3) Culture and Ethnicity (3) Professional Ethics (2) Assessment I: Cognitive (3) Assessment II: Objective (3) Assessment III: Projective (3) Assessment I: Cog Lab (0) Theory/Prac: Psychodynamic (3) Theory/Prac: Humanistic and Existential (3) Theory/Prac: Cognitive-Behavioral (3) Total: 15 units Total: 12 units Total: 10 units G-1 TOTAL: 37 units G-2: Fall Semester G-2: Spring Semester G-2: Summer Semester Proseminar IA (3) Proseminar IB (3) History/Systems of Psych (1) Research Design and Stat I (3) Research Design and Stat II (3) Gender and Sexuality (3) Research Design and Stat I Lab (0) Biological Bases (3) Psychopharmacology (1) Social Psychology (3) Intro Dissertation Research (2) Tx Alcohol/Chemical Dep (1) Cognitive /Affective (3) Practicum I (0) Practicum I (0) Practicum I (0) Total: 12 units Total: 11 units Total: 6 units G-2 TOTAL: 29 units G-3: Fall Semester G-3: Spring Semester G-3: Summer Session Proseminar IIA (3) Proseminar IIB (3) Dissertation Research (2) Dissertation Research 2) Dissertation Research (2) Elective (3) Elective (3) Elective (1) Supervision and Consultation (2) Religion and Spirituality (3) Practicum II (0) Practicum II (0) Practicum II (0) Total: 10 units Total: 11 units Total: 3 units G-3 TOTAL: 24 units G-4: Fall Semester G-4: Spring Semester G-4: Summer Session Internship (0) Internship (0) Internship (0) G-2 and G-3 Practica are ~20 hours/week of supervised clinical experience at a PsyD-approved site. Pre-doctoral internship may be one year full-time or two years half-time at an APPIC or CAPIC site. Psychology Electives (7 units) may be completed in the PsyD program or one of the Master s in Counseling Psychology programs. Total: 90 units minimum required coursework. 10 CIIS Clinical Psychology

13 Degree Description Clinical Training and Field Placement Clinical training in CIIS s PsyD program is fully integrated with the academic work. After completing qualifying first-year courses and receiving satisfactory faculty evaluation, each student gains at least two years of practicum experience in community agencies. The typical supervised practicum experience requires 20 hours a week at the training site. A minimum of one hour per week of individual supervision by a licensed psychologist, group supervision, and didactic trainings are offered at these off-campus sites. At the same time, students complete companion proseminar courses at CIIS with a core faculty member; prosems support integration of theory, research, and clinical materials from classroom learning with the real-world experience of psychotherapy in clinical settings. Prosem is the heart of clinical training in the PsyD program. Here students receive intensive, individually focused training and mentorship in small yearlong groups. The PsyD program maintains relationships with more than two dozen agencies in the San Francisco Bay Area where second- and third-year students may apply for practicum training. Students apply to sites that match their interests and skill level; they are urged to obtain differing training experiences. Students learn about available practicum opportunities by perusing a searchable departmental database that contains information about client populations, therapeutic modalities, location, and other aspects of the training offered. Sites are visited on a rotating basis by PsyD faculty. New sites are approved as they become available. The following is a sampling of sites where PsyD practicum trainees have been placed in recent years: Psychological Services Center Bay Area Addiction and Treatment Center Institute on Aging Richmond Area Multi Service Pacific Institute Portia Bell Hume Center Youth and Family Enrichment Services Haight Ashbury Psychological Services Instituto Familiar de la Raza Marina Counseling Center S.F. Child Abuse Prevention Alameda Family Services Berkeley Mental Health Castilleja School Children s Hospital Autism and Intervention East Bay Agency for Children Learning Services of Northern California Mission Integrated Services Center New Leaf Oakes Children s Center San Mateo County Mental Health Southeast Child and Family Center Tenderloin Outpatient Clinic UC Davis CAARE UCSF Infant-Parent Program VA Northern California Clinical Psychology CIIS 11

14 When all required coursework and two practica have been completed, students may begin the clinical internship at an approved training site. Specific sites are listed on websites of the California Psychology Internship Council (CAPIC) and the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC). The internship may be one year of full-time or two years of half-time work and must be completed within two and a half years from the beginning date. Trainees are placed in supervised professional work in different service settings located in the San Francisco Bay Area and elsewhere in the United States. In the settings, students deepen their skills in offering a variety of psychological services, including treatment planning and psychotherapy, psychological assessment, case consultation, and supervision often working in multidisciplinary teams across the spectrum of psychopathologies as they are presented in diverse populations. Support for the process of selecting, applying for, and completing practicum and internship experiences is offered by the PsyD Training Director, Assistant Director of Clinical Training, and Placement Coordinator. The program maintains a database of training sites, describing their staff, client population, and therapeutic modalities. Students choose training sites based on their own goals and interests, with the assistance of the PsyD Placement Team. Psychotherapy Requirement The PsyD program requires, as a condition of completing the doctorate, a minimum of 45 hours of personal psychotherapy from a non-faculty licensed psychologist. Personal therapy is most useful when it accompanies academic studies, but previous therapy experience will be accepted toward meeting the requirement if completed within five years of admission. At least one-half of these hours must be in individual therapy. Personal therapy complements clinical training and promotes self-knowledge and self-awareness. Additional details about this training requirement appear in the PsyD Program Student Handbook. Policy Regarding Student Self-Disclosure The professional training philosophy of the PsyD program is predicated on the notion that an effective psychologist must be a whole person. Self-reflection is a necessary and required part of training that helps the psychologist-in-training to better understand and empathize with future clients experience. Such reflection is a significant component of one s personal and professional development as an effective and sensitive instrument of change. Students regularly engage in coursework that involves self-disclosure and personal study of the content of that self-disclosure. Students are expected to reflect on their past and present personal experiences during the course of classes and program-related activities, in oral and/or in written assignments. Particular or specific information is not required to be disclosed, nor is student progress in the program based on the disclosure of any specific information (except as mandated by ethical codes or law). Research Training The mission of the PsyD program is to train psychology practitioners rather than researchers. However, all PsyD graduates will have mastered research skills sufficient to produce a clinical dissertation and adequate to prepare them to be proficient consumers of psychological science. To that end, research training in the PsyD curriculum is offered in a cumulative sequence, beginning with coursework in statistics, research design, and skill building in both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. At the end of the second year, students demonstrate competence in reading and critiquing research publications during the Oral Research Competency Exam. Following successful completion of the exam, students go on to dissertation research seminars that guide them from proposal writing to data gathering to dissertation completion. Research training in the PsyD program is notable in the breadth of topics chosen by students, including, for example, treatment outcome studies, applied program evaluation studies, studies of underserved populations, and studies of psychospiritual issues, as well as the range of research methodologies employed. 12 CIIS Clinical Psychology

15 Academic Standards All students must maintain satisfactory progress toward the degree and comply with all PsyD program policies. Academic performance in all courses in the PsyD program is evaluated on a letter grade basis. Program policies and curricula are subject to ongoing review and revision. Students should refer to their particular Program Agreement for the year in which they matriculate for specific degree requirements. A more detailed description of the program and its policies appears in the PsyD Program Student Handbook, available from the program office. Course Descriptions PSY 5001: Biological Bases of Clinical Practice (3 units) This course offers a foundational introduction to biological psychology with special reference to clinical implications. Course content includes the following: functional neuroanatomy and gross brain organization; neural functioning; arousal mechanisms and sleep; sensory-motor systems; memory and learning processes; emotional experience; and consciousness, orientation, and awareness. The course fulfills APA accreditation expectations and state licensing requirements by providing a broad and general overview of biological psychology. PSY 5002: Culture and Ethnicity in Clinical Practice (3 units) One of three required courses in the Diversity sequence, this course covers theory, historical and contemporary research, and best clinical practice related to multiculturalism and the impact of culture and difference on psychotherapy. It provides the necessary level of knowledge and understanding of cultural, sociopolitical frameworks and multicultural issues related to race and ethnicity for beginning clinical practice. PSY 5014: Gender and Sexuality in Clinical Practice (3 units) One of three required courses in the Diversity sequence, this course examines theory, historical and contemporary research, and best clinical practice related to gender identity and sexuality. Students will gain knowledge and attitudes necessary for working with sexuality in a clinical context and for understanding treatment issues unique to gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgender-identified persons. PSY 5019: Religion and Spirituality in Clinical Practice (3 units) One of three required courses in the Diversity sequence, this course examines theory, historical and contemporary research, and best clinical practice related to religion and spirituality. Spirituality is understood as a common aspect of human experience that presents in the therapeutic context. Students acquire knowledge and attitudes necessary for recognizing and addressing spiritual issues in the therapeutic context and for responding sensitively to religious beliefs of clients. PSY 5105: Psychopharmacology (1 unit) This course examines the range of contemporary psychopharmacological interventions for various DSM-IV diagnostic categories, including antidepressants, antianxiety drugs, mood stabilizers, and antipsychotics. Neurobiological mechanisms underlying psychopathology and pharmacological interventions are discussed. PSY 5401 and PSYL 5401: Research Design and Statistics I (3 units) This course focuses on statistical methods of analysis used in the conduct of quantitative research. Students develop analytical skills and critical thinking to guide interpretation and critical appraisal of the psychological research literature, including understanding of probability and hypothesis testing, power and effect size, correlational and regression analysis (including multiple regression), ANOVA and factor analysis, and chi-square methods. The laboratory section is devoted to use of SPSS software for statistical analysis of class-generated data. Clinical Psychology CIIS 13

16 PSY 5402: Research Design and Statistics II (3 units) This course is the second in the PsyD research sequence. It offers a review of research designs and strategies for quantitative approaches involving groups and single participants. Research and issues related to evidencebased practice of psychology are addressed. The course includes an introduction to qualitative research and data reduction methods, program evaluation, research ethics, guided practice in interviewing, and consensual coding. PSY 5504: Theories and Practice of Psychotherapy: Humanistic and Existential (3 units) One of the Theories and Practice sequence in PsyD, this course offers an overview and critical appraisal of contemporary theory and practice of humanistic and existential psychology, in terms of direct work with individuals as well as relevant philosophical interface with social issues. PSY 5502: Theories and Practice of Psychotherapy: Psychodynamic (3 units) One of the Theories and Practice sequence in PsyD, this course offers an overview of classical and contemporary psychodynamic theories and practice, using social, clinical, cultural, and historical examples to illustrate concepts. Theoretical perspectives include the following: Classical (Freudian) theory, Ego-Psychology (Neo-Freudian), Object Relations Theory, Self Psychology, Analytical Psychology (Jungian), Interpersonal Psychoanalysis, Attachment Theory, and Feminist Psychoanalysis. PSY 5503: Theories and Practice of Psychotherapy: Cognitive-Behavioral (3 units) One of the Theories and Practice sequence in PsyD, this course examines cognitive-behavioral methods, with an emphasis on understanding and managing behavior through appropriate selection of techniques. Core concepts are derived from classical behaviorism and recast in terms of contemporary empirically supported cognitivebehavioral practice. PSY 5505: Theories and Practice of Psychotherapy: Emerging Methods (3 units) This elective course examines the best available scholarship on emerging therapeutic methods, such as mindfulness-based methods and dialectic behavior therapy. Course content varies depending on current best practices in psychotherapy and on the expertise of the instructor. PSY 5601: Psychopathology (3 units) In this course, students learn the DSM-IV-TR system of diagnosis as well as various critiques of this approach. Students come to understand varying approaches to psychopathology, including cognitive-behavioral, psychodynamic, humanistic/existential/transpersonal, family and systems, and sociocultural perspectives. PSY 5602: Treatment of Alcoholism and Chemical Dependence (1 unit) This course begins by developing a foundation for assessment and treatment of substance abuse. In this process, an attempt is made to deepen student perspectives on how concerns about substance use fit into broader clinical practice. Course topics include the following: models of substance abuse and dependence, substance abuse and family systems, modes of assessment, typical presentation of users in psychotherapy, and modes of treatment. PSY 5703: Professional Ethics for Psychologists (2 units) In this course, students will learn how to apply the American Psychological Association s Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct to the practice of psychologists and psychologists-in-training over a broad spectrum of professional roles and responsibilities, as well as learn how to make decisions about ethical practice as psychologists in complex or difficult situations. Learning is guided by the APA Ethics Code Preamble, which identifies core ethical principles: Beneficence and Nonmaleficence, Fidelity and Responsibility, Integrity, Justice, and Respect for People s Rights and Dignity. 14 CIIS Clinical Psychology

17 PSY 5704: Foundational Clinical Skills: Adult: Individual and Couples (3 units) This course is one of three foundation clinical skills courses in PsyD, offered in the first semester of graduate work. Students master basic clinical skills needed to begin working with adult clients, individually and in couples, through classroom role-plays and other experiential methods. Core topics include, among others, clinical interview and interview formats, empathy and establishing rapport, basic diagnosis and development of treatment targets, history taking, and stages of change. PSY 5705: Foundation Clinical Skills: Child and Family (3 units) One of three foundation clinical skills courses in PsyD, this course offers an introduction to child and adolescent psychotherapy in the context of the family: theoretical orientations, conceptualizing common presenting problems, developmentally appropriate practices, diagnostic and treatment strategies, and ethical issues. Emphasis is put on developmental, familial, and cultural factors relevant to treatment. PSY 5706: Foundational Clinical Skills: Group Intervention (2 units) This course, one of three foundation clinical skills courses in PsyD, exposes students to the dynamics and processes of intensive small-group interaction, grounded in a socio-psychological perspective. Experiencebased learning of principles of group process using a T-group format involves here-and-now communication and learning through interpersonal interaction. The course offers an introduction to group facilitation and leadership skills with application to group psychotherapy and other varieties of groups. PSY 6192: Social Psychology (3 units) In this foundation course, students master current theory and research in social psychology, including interpersonal processes, identity development, attitudes and influence, prejudice, stereotypes, diversity, peace and conflict, and social cognition. The course fulfills APA accreditation expectations and state licensing requirements by providing a broad and general overview of social psychology. PSY 6201: Lifespan Development (3 units) In this course, students acquire knowledge about individual psychological development throughout the lifespan, including theory, and research concerning physical, cognitive, affective, and social growth, with special attention to diversity, gender, and sexual orientation aspects. The course fulfills APA accreditation expectations and state licensing requirements by providing a broad and general overview of developmental psychology. PSY 6301: Cognitive and Affective Foundations of Behavior (3 units) In this course, students master knowledge of current theory and research on perception, learning, memory, conscious and unconscious processing, theory of mind, simple and complex emotion, and language, as well contemporary theories of normative and nonnormative affective development. Attention is given to cultural differences in fundamental cognitive and affective processes and to how these processes influence clinical practice. The course fulfills APA accreditation expectations and state licensing requirements by providing a broad and general overview of cognitive and affective knowledge bases. PSY 6503: History and Systems of Psychology (1 unit) This course reviews the origin and evolution of psychology as a discipline, emphasizing philosophic influences, schools of thought and three streams in psychology, and interdisciplinary crosscurrents. Consideration is given to the evolution of clinical psychology theory, practice, and training through the 20th century. PSY 6601: Psychological Assessment I: Cognitive and Intelligence Testing (3 units) The course offers an overview of theories of intelligence, followed by an introduction to standard scores and intelligence test development and practice in administering, scoring, and interpretation of widely used tests for assessing child and adult intelligence and learning disabilities. Tests receiving special attention are current versions of WISC and WAIS. Corequisite: PSYL 6601 Clinical Psychology CIIS 15

18 PSYL 6601: Psychological Assessment I: Cognitive and Intelligence Testing Lab (0 units) The experiential portion of Psychological Assessment I. Corequisite: PSY 6601 PSY 6602: Psychological Assessment II: Objective Personality Measures (3 units) The course is designed to provide knowledge on theoretical perspectives on personality and psychopathology as well as provide necessary levels of understanding of psychometric properties of psychological tests, major issues, and debates concerning ethical, multicultural, and cross-cultural applications of psychological tests. Theory and practice of administration, scoring, interpretation, and application of objective measures of personality, including the MMPI-2, MCMI-III, 16 PF, NEO-PI-R, PAI, and Myers-Briggs. Prerequisite: PSY 6601 Corequisite: PSYL 6602 PSYL 6602: Psychological Assessment II Lab (0 units) The experiential portion of Psychological Assessment II. Corequisite: PSY 6602 PSY 6726: Professional Seminar I: Case Formulation and Treatment Planning A (3 units) This seminar provides case presentation and consultation for students currently completing supervised clinical practicum in community agencies. Didactic content includes treatment planning, first sessions and termination, consent, continuing assessment, case formulation, sustaining a therapeutic relationship, developing a professional persona, and boundaries and self-disclosure. Prerequisite: Second-year standing; approval of instructor Corequisite: PSY 6776 PSY 6727: Professional Seminar I: Case Formulation and Treatment Planning B (3 units) This seminar provides case presentation and consultation for students currently completing supervised clinical practicum in community agencies. Didactic content includes treatment planning, first sessions and termination, consent, continuing assessment, case formulation, sustaining a therapeutic relationship, developing a professional persona, and boundaries and self-disclosure. Prerequisite: PSY 6726; second-year standing; approval of instructor Corequisite: PSY 6776 PSY 6728: Professional Seminar II: Advanced Clinical Skills A (3 units) The objective of this course is to promote the continuing development of advanced clinical skills in five broad areas: treatment planning, case formulation, understanding of therapeutic relationships, development of a therapeutic sensibility, and case discussion/consultation skills. Prerequisite: PSY 6727; third-year standing; approval of instructor Corequisite: PSY 6777 PSY 6729: Professional Seminar II: Advanced Clinical Skills B (3 units) The objective of this course is to promote the continuing development of advanced clinical skills in five broad areas: treatment planning, case formulation, understanding of therapeutic relationships, development of a therapeutic sensibility, and case discussion/consultation skills. Prerequisite: Third-year standing and concurrent second-level practicum; approval of the instructor. Prerequisite: PSY 6728 Corequisite: PSY 6777 PSY 6776: Practicum I (0 units) PsyD students completing their first-level practicum in a community agency or in the Psychological Services Center register for Practicum I during all academic semesters of their placement. Corequisite: PSY 6726 or PSY CIIS Clinical Psychology

19 PSY 6777: Practicum II (0 units) PsyD students completing their second-level practicum in a community agency or in the Psychological Services Center register for Practicum II during all academic semesters of their placement. Corequisite: PSY 6728 or PSY 6729 PSY 6778: Practicum III (0 units) This is an optional third practicum experience, which is arranged by the student in an approved practicum site. It requires permission of the Assistant Director of Clinical Training. PSY 6900: Introduction to Dissertation Research (2 units) In this course, students begin work on the doctoral dissertation process by developing their dissertation proposal. The course provides support for problem selection, review and critical appraisal of relevant literature, design of appropriate research methodology, plans for data analysis, and locating and beginning work with their Dissertation Chair. PSY 7000: Dissertation Proposal Writing (2 units) Only students who have not advanced to candidacy by the fall of their second year should register for this course. PSY 7000 allows students to continue writing the dissertation proposal. Cannot be taken more than twice, after which the student must advance to candidacy. Prerequisite: PSY 6900 PSY 7033: Supervision and Consultation (2 units) Students learn contemporary approaches to supervision and consultation, reflecting on their own experience of being supervised and role-playing supervision of other clinicians in training. The distinction between supervision and consultation is highlighted, as are the appropriate occasions and uses of each. Course content is designed to prepare clinicians for work as clinical supervisors. PSY 7575: Buddhism and Psychotherapy (2 units) The course surveys principles and practice of major schools of Buddhism: Theravada, Zen, and Tibetan. Focus is on central themes such as the nature of self, suffering, insight, and liberation, with comparisons and contrasts with Western psychotherapy and personality theories. PSY 7603: Psychological Assessment III: Projective Personality Measures (3 units) This course aims to provide an integrative theoretical framework for the comprehension of projective responses based upon clinical and clinical developmental theory. Students acquire experience with administration, scoring, and interpretation of projective measures, including the Rorschach and Exner s comprehensive coding system, the Thematic Apperception Test, and sentence-completion methods, along with report writing. Prerequisite: PSY 6602 PSY 7810: Child Health and Psychopathology (3 units) The seminar covers emotional, psychological, and behavioral health, problems, and psychopathology in children, integrating theories of primary prevention and psychopathology, as well as linkage to healthy development and effective treatment. PSY 7900: Dissertation Research (2 units) Students register for this course with their Dissertation Chair as they conduct dissertation research and write the final dissertation. Prerequisites: PSY 6900; advancement to candidacy; permission of the instructor PSY 7906: Neuropsychological Assessment (3 units) This course will introduce the field of neuropsychology and neuropsychological assessment. After reviewing functional neuroanatomy, the operating assumptions and models of neuropsychology as they relate to human behavior, cognition, and emotion will be discussed. Students receive exposure to contemporary methods of neuropsychological assessment. Prerequisite: PSY 6601 Clinical Psychology CIIS 17

20 PSY 8410: Fantasy and Dreams in Psychotherapy (2 units) The course examines how to employ the client s fantasy and dreams for constructive change in psychotherapy. This course examines theories of symbolism, dream interpretation, and use of dreams in clinical practice. Students are expected to provide dreams or fantasy material from clients or others. PSY 8511: Object Relations (3 units) This seminar covers the history, the development, and critical appraisal of object relations models of psychotherapy, with emphasis on early character formation and borderline psychopathology. The works of Klein, Mahler, Kernberg, the ego psychology school, and the British school (Fairbairn, Winnicott) are examined. Prerequisite: PSY 5502 PSY 8513: Psychotherapy of Trauma and Abuse (3 units) This seminar covers psychotherapy of individuals who have been emotionally, sexually, or physically traumatized. Diagnosis, dynamics, and assessment of trauma from a developmental/psychodynamic perspective are examined, using social, clinical, cultural, and historical examples in conjunction with myth and fairy tale to illustrate concepts. Prerequisite: PSY 5502 PSY 8514: Taoist and Existential Approaches to Psychotherapy (2 units) This course is an intensive seminar on the Taoist and existentialist perspectives on the human predicament and the means to its resolution, particularly in terms of theory and practice in psychotherapy. Prerequisite: PSY 5704 PSY 8515: Psychology of Jung: Theory and Practice (3 units) This seminar covers theories, techniques, and critical appraisal of psychotherapy from the perspective of Jung s analytic psychology. Prerequisite: PSY 5502 PSY 8520: Psychology of Women (3 units) This seminar covers theory and research in the psychology of women and gender issues, including psychological aspects of women s spirituality. PSY 8780: Child and Adolescent Assessment (3 units) This seminar covers theory and methods of psychological assessment of children and adolescents, including test administration, scoring, interpretation, and reporting of common measures used to assess child and adolescent functioning across developmental levels. Prerequisite: PSY 6601 PSY 8799: Independent Study (1 3 units) Coursework that extends a student s field of inquiry beyond current CIIS courses. Requires a syllabus and contract signed by the student and faculty member, and approved by the department chair. PSY 9110: Advanced Theory Seminar (2 3 units) The seminar allows intensive and advanced consideration of established bodies of clinical theory and therapeutic approaches, as well as emerging theories. Topics will vary from year to year. PSY 9599: Internship (Half-Time) (0 units) Students who are completing their predoctoral internship should register for PSY 9599 during each semester that they are in their placement. Six-semester repeat limit. PSY 9699: Internship (Full-Time) (0 units) Students who are completing their predoctoral internship should register for PSY 9699 during each semester that they are in their placement. Three-semester repeat limit. 18 CIIS Clinical Psychology

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