EMC VSPEX PRIVATE CLOUD

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1 EMC VSPEX PRIVATE CLOUD EMC VSPEX Abstract This document describes the EMC VSPEX Proven Infrastructure solution for private cloud deployments with technology. November 2014

2 Copyright 2014 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. Published in the USA. Published November 2014 EMC believes the information in this publication is accurate as of its publication date. The information is subject to change without notice. The information in this publication is provided as is. EMC Corporation makes no representations or warranties of any kind with respect to the information in this publication, and specifically disclaims implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. Use, copying, and distribution of any EMC software described in this publication requires an applicable software license. EMC 2, EMC, and the EMC logo are registered trademarks or trademarks of EMC Corporation in the United States and other countries. All other trademarks used herein are the property of their respective owners. For the most up-to-date listing of EMC product names, see EMC Corporation Trademarks on EMC.com. EMC VSPEX Private Cloud Part Number: H EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

3 Contents Contents Chapter 1 Executive Summary 9 Introduction Target audience Document purpose Business needs Chapter 2 Solution Overview 13 Introduction Virtualization Compute Network Storage ScaleIO software Overview Software components Software architecture Storage definitions Snapshots ScaleIO Chapter 3 Solution Technology Overview 21 Overview VSPEX Proven Infrastructures Key components Virtualization layer Overview Microsoft Hyper-V Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager Windows Server Cluster-Aware Updating Compute layer Network layer Storage layer Chapter 4 Solution Architecture Overview 31 Overview EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 3

4 Contents Solution architecture Logical architecture Key components Hardware resources Software resources Server configuration guidelines Overview Ivy Bridge series processors Hyper-V memory virtualization Memory configuration guidelines Network configuration guidelines Overview VLANs ScaleIO configuration guidelines Overview Hyper-V storage virtualization High-availability and failover Overview Virtualization layer Compute layer Network layer ScaleIO layer Chapter 5 Sizing the Environment 45 Overview Reference workload Scalability VSPEX building blocks Building block approach Validated building block Customizing the building block Planning for high availability Determining the number of building block nodes required Example Configuration sizing guidelines Overview Using the customer sizing worksheet Calculating the building block requirement Fine-tuning hardware resources EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

5 Contents Summary Chapter 6 VSPEX Solution Implementation 57 Overview Pre-deployment tasks Deployment prerequisites Customer configuration data Network implementation Preparing the network switches Configuring the infrastructure network Configuring the VLANs Completing the network cabling Installing and configuring the Microsoft Hyper-V hosts Installing the Windows hosts Installing Hyper-V and configuring failover clustering Configuring Windows host networking Planning virtual machine memory allocations Installing and configuring Microsoft SQL Server databases Overview Creating a virtual machine for SQL Server Installing Microsoft Windows on the virtual machine Installing SQL Server Configuring SQL Server for SCVMM Deploying the System Center Virtual Machine Manager server Overview Creating a SCVMM host virtual machine Installing the SCVMM guest OS Installing the SCVMM server Installing the SCVMM Admin Console Installing the SCVMM agent locally on a host Adding the Hyper-V cluster to SCVMM Creating a virtual machine in SCVMM Performing partition alignment Creating a template virtual machine Deploying virtual machines from the template Preparing and configuring the storage Preparing the installation worksheet Installing the ScaleIO components Creating and mapping volumes EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 5

6 Contents Installing the GUI Provisioning a virtual machine Summary Chapter 7 Verifying the Solution 79 Overview Post-install checklist Deploying and testing a single virtual server Verifying the redundancy of the solution components Chapter 8 System Monitoring 83 Overview Key areas to monitor Performance baseline Servers Networking ScaleIO layer Appendix A Reference Documentation 87 EMC documentation Other documentation Appendix B Customer Configuration Worksheet 89 Customer configuration worksheet Printing the worksheet Appendix C Customer Sizing Worksheet 93 Customer sizing worksheet for Private Cloud EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

7 Figures Contents Figure 1. Layout of SDS and SDC Figure 2. Protection domains Figure 3. Storage pools Figure 4. VSPEX private cloud components Figure 5. VSPEX Proven Infrastructures Figure 6. Compute layer flexibility examples Figure 7. Example of highly available network design Figure 8. ScaleIO layout Figure 9. ScaleIO SCSI device Figure 10. Logical architecture for the solution Figure 11. Hypervisor memory consumption Figure 12. Required networks for ScaleIO Figure 13. Hyper-V virtual disk types Figure 14. High availability at the virtualization layer Figure 15. Redundant power supplies Figure 16. Network layer high availability Figure 17. Automatic rebalancing when disks are added Figure 18. Automatic rebalancing when disks or nodes are removed Figure 19. Determine the maximum number of virtual machines that a building block can support Figure 20. Required resource from the reference virtual machine pool Figure 21. Sample Ethernet network architecture Figure 22. Installation Manager Home page Figure 23. Manage installation packages Figure 24. Upload installation packages Figure 25. Upload CSV file Figure 26. Installation configuration Figure 27. Monitor page Figure 28. Completed Install Operation EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 7

8 Contents Tables Table 1. Recommended 10 Gb switched Ethernet network layer Table 2. Key components Table 3. Solution hardware Table 4. Solution software Table 5. Hardware resources for the compute layer Table 6. Hardware resources for the network layer Table 7. VSPEX Private Cloud workload Table 8. Building block node configuration Table 9. Table 10. Maximum number of virtual machines per node, limited by disk capacity48 Maximum number of virtual machines per node, limited by disk performance Table 11. Redefined building block node configuration example Table 12. Example Table 13. Example Table 14. Customer sizing worksheet example Table 15. Reference virtual machine resources Table 16. Example worksheet row Table 17. Server resource component totals Table 18. Deployment process overview Table 19. Pre-deployment tasks Table 20. Deployment prerequisites checklist Table 21. Tasks for switch and network configuration Table 22. Tasks for server installation Table 23. Tasks for SQL Server database setup Table 24. Tasks for SCVMM configuration Table 25. Set up and configure a ScaleIO environment Table 26. CSV installation spreadsheet Table 27. add_volume command parameters Table 28. map_volume_to_sdc command parameters Table 29. Tasks for testing the installation Table 30. Common server information Table 31. Hyper-V server information Table 32. ScaleIO information Table 33. Network infrastructure information Table 34. VLAN information Table 35. Service accounts Table 36. Customer sizing worksheet EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

9 Chapter 1: Executive Summary Chapter 1 Executive Summary This chapter presents the following topics: Introduction Target audience Document purpose Business needs... 11

10 Chapter 1: Executive Summary Introduction EMC VSPEX Proven Infrastructures are optimized for virtualizing business-critical applications. VSPEX provides modular solutions built with technologies that enable faster deployment, greater simplicity, greater choice, higher efficiency, and lower risk. This document is a comprehensive guide to the technical aspects of the VSPEX Private Cloud for Microsoft Hyper-V with EMC ScaleIO solution. It describes the solution architecture and key components, and describes how to design, size, and deploy the solution to meet the customer s needs. Target audience Document purpose Readers of this document must have the necessary training and background to install and configure a VSPEX solution based on the Microsoft Hyper-V hypervisor, EMC ScaleIO, and associated infrastructure, as required by this implementation. External references are provided where applicable, and readers should be familiar with these documents. Readers should also be familiar with the infrastructure and database security policies of the customer installation. Partners selling and sizing a VSPEX Private Cloud with EMC ScaleIO infrastructure should focus on the first five chapters of this guide. After purchase, implementers of the solution should focus on the implementation guidelines in Chapter 6, the solution validation in Chapter 7, and the monitoring guidelines in Chapter 8. This document includes an initial introduction to the VSPEX architecture, an explanation of how to modify the architecture for specific engagements, and instructions on how to effectively deploy and monitor the system. The VSPEX Private Cloud architecture provides customers with a modern system capable of hosting many virtual machines at a consistent performance level. This solution runs on a Microsoft Hyper-V virtualization layer. EMC ScaleIO software runs on top of the Hyper-V hypervisor. The compute and network components, which are defined by the VSPEX partners, are designed to be redundant and sufficiently powerful to handle the processing and data needs of the virtual machine environment. This document details server capacity minimums for CPU, memory, and network interfaces. The customer can select any server and networking hardware that meets or exceeds the stated minimums. The VSPEX Private Cloud for ScaleIO with Hyper-V solution described in this document is based on the capacity of the cluster server and on a defined reference workload. Because not every virtual machine has the same requirements, the document includes methods and guidance to adjust the system to be cost effective as deployed. A private cloud architecture is a complex system offering. This document provides prerequisite software and hardware material lists, step-by-step sizing guidance and worksheets, and verified deployment steps. After the last component is installed, the 10 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

11 Business needs Chapter 1: Executive Summary validation tests and monitoring instructions ensure that your system is running properly. Following the instructions in this document ensures an efficient and painless journey to the cloud. VSPEX solutions are built with proven technologies to create complete virtualization solutions that allow you to make informed decisions for the hypervisor, server, and networking layers. Business applications are moving into consolidated compute, network, and storage environments. EMC VSPEX Private Cloud with Microsoft Hyper-V reduces the complexity of configuring every component of a traditional deployment model. The solution simplifies integration management while maintaining application design and implementation options. It also provides unified administration while still enabling adequate control and monitoring of process separation. The business benefits of the VSPEX Private Cloud for Microsoft Hyper-V with EMC ScaleIO architectures include: An end-to-end virtualization solution to effectively use the capabilities of the unified infrastructure components Efficient virtualization of virtual machines for varied customer use cases A reliable, flexible, and scalable reference design EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 11

12 Chapter 1: Executive Summary 12 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

13 Chapter 2: Solution Overview Chapter 2 Solution Overview This chapter presents the following topics: Introduction Virtualization Compute Network Storage ScaleIO software EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 13

14 Chapter 2: Solution Overview Introduction Virtualization The VSPEX Private Cloud for Microsoft Hyper-V with EMC ScaleIO solution provides a complete system architecture capable of supporting virtual machines with a redundant server and network topology and highly-available ScaleIO software. The core services provided by the solution include virtualization, compute, networking, and ScaleIO software-defined storage. Microsoft Hyper-V is a key virtualization platform in the industry, providing flexibility and cost savings by consolidating large, inefficient server farms into nimble, reliable cloud infrastructures. Hyper-V live migration and Dynamic Optimization features make it a solid business choice. Compute Network VSPEX provides the flexibility to design and implement the customer s choice of server components. The infrastructure must meet the following requirements: Sufficient cores and memory to support the required number and types of virtual machines Sufficient network connections to enable redundant connectivity to the system switches Sufficient capacity to enable the environment to withstand a server failure and failover VSPEX provides the flexibility to design and implement the customer s choice of network components. The infrastructure must meet the following requirements: Redundant network links for the hosts, switches, and storage Traffic isolation based on industry best practices Support for link aggregation IP network switches with a minimum non-locking backplane capacity sufficient for the target number of virtual machines and their associated workloads; EMC recommends using enterprise-class IP network switches with advanced Quality of Service features. 14 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

15 Chapter 2: Solution Overview Storage ScaleIO software Data storage is at the heart of a virtualized data center. Without an effective storage solution, all progress toward virtualization and the efficiency it brings is incomplete. The virtual server infrastructure must allow storage and compute to be scalable and flexible. It must also deliver enterprise-grade availability, resilience, reliability, and adaptability. Enterprise-class data centers need robust, large-scale block storage that offers high performance and high availability to support the ever-growing base of business applications, hypervisors, file systems, and databases. The solution must have low total cost of ownership (TCO) and a stable cost/performance ratio to realize the return on investment (ROI) improvement that is expected of modern virtual data centers. EMC ScaleIO has the architecture and features that make it an ideal storage foundation for virtual data centers. Overview ScaleIO is a software-only solution that uses existing local disks and LANs to create a virtual storage area network (SAN) that has all the benefits of external storage but with reduced cost and complexity. ScaleIO software turns existing local internal storage into internal shared block storage that is comparable to, or better than, the more expensive external shared block storage. The lightweight ScaleIO software components are installed on the application hosts and communicate using a standard LAN to handle application I/O requests sent to the ScaleIO block volumes. An extremely efficient decentralized block I/O flow, combined with a distributed, sliced volume layout, results in a massively parallel I/O system that can scale to thousands of nodes. ScaleIO is designed and implemented with enterprise-grade resilience. The software features efficient, distributed, auto-healing processes that overcome media and node failures without administrator involvement. Dynamic and elastic, ScaleIO allows administrators to add or remove nodes and capacity as needed. The software immediately responds to the changes, rebalancing the storage distribution and achieving a layout that optimally suits the new configuration. Because ScaleIO is hardware agnostic, the software works efficiently with various types of server storage, networks, and hosts. Software components The ScaleIO virtual SAN software consists of three components: Meta Data Manager (MDM) Configures and monitors the ScaleIO system. The MDM can be configured in a redundant Cluster Mode, with three members on three servers, or in Single Mode on a single server. ScaleIO Data Server (SDS) Manages the capacity of a single server and acts as a back end for data access. The SDS is installed on all servers contributing storage devices to the ScaleIO system. EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 15

16 Chapter 2: Solution Overview ScaleIO Data Client (SDC) SDC is a lightweight device driver located on each host whose applications or file system requires access to the ScaleIO virtual SAN block devices. The SDC exposes block devices representing the ScaleIO volumes that are mapped to that host. Software architecture Storage and compute convergence ScaleIO converges the storage and application layers. The hosts that run applications can be the same hosts used to realize shared storage, yielding a wall-to-wall, single layer of hosts. Because the same hosts run applications and provide storage for the virtual SAN, the SDC and SDS are typically both installed on each of the participating hosts, as shown in Figure 1. Figure 1. Layout of SDS and SDC The ScaleIO software components are designed and implemented to consume the minimum computing resources required for operation, and to have a negligible effect on the applications running on the hosts. Pure block storage implementation ScaleIO implements a pure block storage layout. The architecture and data paths are optimized for block storage access needs. For example, when an application submits a read I/O request to the SDC, the SDC deduces which SDS is responsible for the specified volume address and then interacts directly with that SDS. The SDS reads the data (by issuing a single read I/O request to the local storage, or by fetching the data from the cache in a cache-hit scenario), and returns the result to the SDC. The SDC provides the read data to the application. This simple implementation consumes as few resources as necessary. The data moves over the network exactly once, and SDS storage receives only one I/O request. The write I/O flow is similarly simple and efficient. ScaleIO offers optimal I/O efficiency, unlike some block storage systems that run on top of a file system or on top of object storage that runs on top of a local file system. Massively parallel, scale-out I/O architecture ScaleIO can scale to a large number of nodes, thus breaking the traditional scalability barrier of block storage. Because the SDCs propagate I/O requests directly to the relevant SDSs, there is no central point through which the requests move and a 16 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

17 Chapter 2: Solution Overview potential bottleneck is avoided. This decentralized data flow is important to the linearly scalable performance of ScaleIO. A large ScaleIO configuration results in a massively parallel system. The more servers or disks the system has, the greater the number of parallel channels that are available for I/O traffic. Hardware agnostic ScaleIO is platform agnostic and works with existing underlying hardware resources. In addition to its compatibility with various types of disks, networks, and hosts, ScaleIO can take advantage of the write buffer of existing local RAID controller cards; it can also run on servers that do not have a local RAID controller card. ScaleIO supports many options for SDS local storage, including internal disks, directly attached external disks, virtual disks exposed by an internal RAID controller, and partitions within such disks. Partitions are useful for combining system boot partitions with ScaleIO capacity on the same raw disks. If the system already has a large, mostly unused partition, ScaleIO does not require disk repartitioning. The SDS can use a file within that partition as its storage space. Clustered and striped volume layout A ScaleIO volume is a block device that is exposed to one or more hosts. It is the equivalent of a logical unit in a SCSI environment. ScaleIO breaks each volume into a large number of data chunks. These data chunks are scattered across the SDS cluster s nodes and disks in a fully balanced manner. This layout minimizes hot spots across the cluster and enables scaling of the overall I/O performance of the system through the addition of nodes or disks. Furthermore, this layout enables a single application that is accessing a single volume to use the full IOPS of all the cluster s disks. This flexible, dynamic allocation of shared performance resources is one of the major advantages of converged scale-out storage. Volume mapping and volume sharing The volumes that ScaleIO exposes to the application clients can be mapped to one or more clients running in different hosts, and mapping can be changed dynamically if necessary. ScaleIO volumes can be used by applications that expect sharedeverything block access and by applications that expect shared-nothing or sharednothing-with-failover access. Storage definitions When configuring a ScaleIO system, the protection domain and storage pool link the physical layer with the virtualization layer. Protection domain A large ScaleIO system can be divided into multiple protection domains, each of which contains a set of SDSs, as shown in Figure 2. ScaleIO volumes are assigned to specific protection domains. Protection domains can be used to mitigate the risk of a dual point of failure in a two-copy scheme, or the risk of a triple point of failure in a three-copy scheme. EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 17

18 Chapter 2: Solution Overview Figure 2. Protection domains For example, if two SDSs in different protection domains fail simultaneously, the data is still available. Just as incumbent storage systems can overcome a large number of simultaneous disk failures if they do not occur within the same shelf, ScaleIO can overcome a large number of simultaneous disk or node failures if they do not occur within the same protection domain. Storage pool A storage pool is a subset of physical storage devices in a protection domain. Each storage device belongs to one (and only one) storage pool. Newly generated protection domains have one default storage pool. When a volume is configured over the virtualization layer, the volume is distributed over all devices residing in the same storage pool. This allows more than one failure in the system without losing data. Figure 3 shows a protection domain with three storage pools. Because a storage pool can withstand the loss of one of its members, three failures in different storage pools in this configuration do not cause data loss. 18 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

19 Chapter 2: Solution Overview Figure 3. Storage pools Snapshots ScaleIO enables you to take snapshots of existing volumes. Each snapshot is essentially a volume of its own. For each ScaleIO volume, you can create multiple fully rewritable, redirect-on-write snapshots. The snapshot hierarchy is very flexible. For example, you can create a snapshot of a snapshot; you can also delete a volume and retain its snapshots. ScaleIO fully supports all expected restore functions. You can use ScaleIO to take a set of consistent snapshots of a given set of volumes across multiple servers. You can also take a snapshot of the entire cluster s volumes in a consistent manner. If crash consistency is acceptable, there is no need to stop, pause, or freeze I/O traffic to hosts, for any application activities, during snapshot creation. ScaleIO 1.3 ScaleIO 1.3 includes the following features: Thick and thin provisioning ScaleIO 1.3 supports both thick and thin provisioning. Thin provisioning provides on-demand storage provisioning and much quicker setup and startup times. EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 19

20 Chapter 2: Solution Overview Fault sets ScaleIO mirroring ensures high data availability. If an SDS goes down, the mirrored data is immediately available from another SDS. ScaleIO 1.3 enables you to define a fault set, which is a group of SDSs that are likely to go down together. For example, you could configure a fault set for all SDSs that are powered in the same rack, to ensure that mirroring takes place outside of the fault set. RAM read cache The RAM read cache feature allocates space on the storage devices for caching reads or writes. You can configure RAM cache for an entire storage pool or in individual SDSs. When RAM read cache is enabled at the storage pool level, all SDSs in the storage pool have caching enabled. By default, the RAM cache size is 128 MB in all the SDSs. You can disable caching, or change the RAM allocation for caching, on a per-sds basis. Graphical User Interface (GUI) The GUI enables you to perform standard configuration and maintenance activities, as well as to monitor the storage system s health and performance. You can use the GUI to view the entire system and to drill down to individual elements. OpenStack support ScaleIO includes a Cinder driver that interfaces with OpenStack to present volumes to OpenStack as block devices that are available for block storage. ScaleIO also includes an OpenStack Nova driver for handling compute and instance volume-related operations. The Nova driver executes the volume operations by communicating with the backend ScaleIO MDM through the ScaleIO REST Gateway. 20 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

21 Chapter 3: Solution Technology Overview Chapter 3 Solution Technology Overview This chapter presents the following topics: Overview VSPEX Proven Infrastructures Key components Virtualization layer Compute layer Network layer Storage layer EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 21

22 Chapter 3: Solution Technology Overview Overview This chapter provides an overview of the VSPEX Private Cloud for Microsoft Hyper-V with EMC ScaleIO solution and the key technologies used in the solution. The solution has been designed and proven by EMC to provide virtualization, server, network, and storage resources that enable customers to deploy a small-scale architecture and scale it as their business needs change. Figure 4 shows the solution components. Virtual servers Virtualization components. Hypervisor Virtual servers Network connections Supporting infrastructure SDS/SDC SDS/SDC Compute components Storage components Network SDS/SDC Storage network Network components Figure 4. VSPEX private cloud components VSPEX Proven Infrastructures VSPEX Proven Infrastructures are modular, virtualized infrastructures validated by EMC and delivered by EMC partners. They include virtualization, server, network, and storage layers, as shown in Figure 5. Customers can choose the virtualization, server, and network technologies that best fit their environment, while ScaleIO storage systems provide the storage layer. VSPEX delivers faster deployment, greater simplicity and choice, higher efficiency, and lower risk when compared to the challenges and complexity of building an IT infrastructure from scratch. Validation by EMC ensures predictable performance and eliminates planning, sizing, and configuration burdens. 22 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

23 Chapter 3: Solution Technology Overview Figure 5. VSPEX Proven Infrastructures Key components Virtualization layer The key components of this solution include: Virtualization layer Decouples the physical implementation of resources from the applications that use the resources. Compute layer Provides memory and processing resources for the virtualization layer software and for the applications running in the private cloud. Network layer Connects private cloud users to the resources in the cloud and connects the storage layer to the compute layer. Storage layer Provides storage to implement the private cloud. The ScaleIO component implements a pure block storage layout with converged nodes to support storage capacity. Overview The virtualization layer is a key component of any server virtualization or private cloud solution. It decouples the application resource requirements from the underlying physical resources that serve them. This enables greater flexibility in the application layer by eliminating hardware downtime for maintenance. It also allows the physical EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 23

24 Chapter 3: Solution Technology Overview system to change without affecting the hosted applications. In a server virtualization or private cloud use case, the virtualization layer enables multiple independent virtual machines to share the same physical hardware, instead of being directly implemented on dedicated hardware. Microsoft Hyper-V Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager Windows Server Cluster-Aware Updating Hyper-V is the hypervisor-based virtualization role of Microsoft Windows Server and provides the virtualization platform for this solution. Hyper-V live migration and live storage migration enable seamless movement of virtual machines or virtual machines files between Hyper-V servers or storage systems, transparently and with minimal performance impact. Hyper-V works with Windows Server 2012 Failover Clustering and Cluster Shared Volumes (CSVs) to provide high availability in a virtualized infrastructure, significantly increasing the availability of virtual machines during planned and unplanned downtime. Configure Failover Clustering on the Hyper-V host to monitor virtual machine health and to migrate virtual machines between cluster nodes. Hyper-V Replica provides asynchronous replication of virtual machines between two Hyper-V hosts at separate sites. Hyper-V replicas protect business applications in the Hyper-V environment from downtime associated with an outage at a single site. Hyper-V snapshots provide consistent point-in-time views of a virtual machine and enables users to revert the virtual machine to a previous point-in-time if necessary. Snapshots function as the source for backups, test and development activities, and other use cases. Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager (SCVMM) is a centralized management platform that enables data center administrators to configure and manage virtualized host, networking, and storage resources, and to create and deploy virtual machines and services to private clouds. SCVMM simplifies provisioning, management, and monitoring in the Hyper-V environment. Cluster-Aware Updating (CAU) enables updating of cluster nodes with little or no loss of availability. CAU is integrated with Windows Server Update Services (WSUS), and can be automated using PowerShell. Compute layer The choice of a server platform for a VSPEX infrastructure is not only based on the technical requirements of the environment, but on the supportability of the platform, existing relationships with the server provider, advanced performance and management features, and many other factors. For these reasons, EMC VSPEX solutions are designed to run on a wide variety of server platforms. Instead of requiring a specific number of servers with a specific set of requirements, VSPEX defines the minimum requirements for the number of processor cores and the amount of RAM. 24 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

25 Chapter 3: Solution Technology Overview ScaleIO components are designed to work with a minimum of three server nodes. The physical server node, running Microsoft Hyper-V, can host workloads other than the ScaleIO virtual machine. For VSPEX systems, EMC recommends a maximum of four virtual CPUs per physical core in a virtual machine environment. For example, a server node with eight physical cores can support up to 32 virtual machines. Examples 1 and 2 demonstrate how to determine the number of nodes you need to deploy to meet specific CPU resource requirements, based on an 8-core reference server node. Example 3 demonstrates how you can implement the same compute layer requirements using different numbers and types of servers. Example 1 A customer wants to move a small, custom-built application server into the VSPEX with ScaleIO virtual infrastructure. The server is currently running on a physical system with 24 processors. Using the 8-core reference server node, the compute layer needs the CPUs of three reference server nodes to meet the customer s requirement. Example 2 A customer wants to move the database server for a point-of-sale system into the VSPEX with ScaleIO virtual infrastructure. The server is currently running on a physical system with 32 processors. Using an 8-core reference server node, the compute layer needs the CPUs of four reference server nodes to meet the customer s requirement. Example 3 The example in Figure 6 shows two different implementations of the same compute layer requirements. The required resources are 25 processor cores and 200 GB RAM. One customer might want to implement these resources by using white-box servers containing 16 processor cores and 64 GB of RAM, while another customer might want to use higher-end servers with 12 processor cores and 144 GB of RAM. The first customer needs four servers, while the other customer needs three. Note: To enable high-availability for the compute layer, each customer needs one additional server to ensure that the system has enough capability to maintain business operations when a server fails. EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 25

26 Chapter 3: Solution Technology Overview Figure 6. Compute layer flexibility examples Apply the following best practices in the compute layer: Use identical, or at least compatible, servers. VSPEX implements hypervisorlevel high-availability technologies that may require similar instruction sets on the underlying physical hardware. By implementing VSPEX on identical server units, you can minimize compatibility problems in this area. When implementing high availability at the hypervisor layer, the largest virtual machine you can create is constrained by the smallest physical server in the environment. Implement the available high-availability features in the virtualization layer, and ensure that the compute layer has sufficient resources to accommodate at least single server failures. This enables the implementation of minimaldowntime upgrades and tolerance for single unit failures. 26 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

27 Chapter 3: Solution Technology Overview Within the boundaries of these recommendations and best practices, the VSPEX compute layer can be flexible to meet your specific needs. Ensure that there are sufficient processor cores and RAM per core to meet the needs of the target environment. Network layer The infrastructure network requires redundant network links for each Hyper-V host. This configuration provides both redundancy and additional network bandwidth. This is a required configuration regardless of whether the network infrastructure for the solution already exists, or you are deploying it alongside other components of the solution. The ScaleIO network creates a Redundant Array of Independent Nodes (RAIN) topology between the server nodes, distributing data so that the loss of a single node does not affect data availability. This topology requires ScaleIO nodes to send data to other nodes to maintain consistency. A high-speed, low-latency IP network is required for this to work correctly. We 1 created the test environment with redundant 10 Gb Ethernet networks. The network was not heavily used during testing at small scale points. For that reason, at small points of scale you can implement the solution using 1 Gb networks. However, EMC recommends a 10 GbE IP network designed for high availability, as shown in Table 1. Table 1. Recommended 10 Gb switched Ethernet network layer Nodes 10 Gb switched Ethernet 1 Gb switched Ethernet Recommended Possible 7 Not recommended Figure 7 shows an example of this highly available network topology. 1 In this guide, we refers to the EMC Solutions engineering team that validated the solution. EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 27

28 Chapter 3: Solution Technology Overview Figure 7. Example of highly available network design This validated solution uses virtual local area networks (VLANs) to segregate network traffic of various types to improve throughput, manageability, application separation, high-availability, and security. Storage layer ScaleIO, as shown in Figure 8, is implemented as a software layer that takes over the existing local storage on a server, combines that with storage from other servers in the environment, and presents LUNs from the aggregated storage for use by the virtual environment. The LUNs are usable as a type of CSV in Hyper-V Failover Cluster Manager environments. 28 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

29 Chapter 3: Solution Technology Overview Figure 8. ScaleIO layout In Hyper-V environments, both the SDS and the SDC sit inside the hypervisor. Nothing is installed at the guest layer and ScaleIO is not dependent on the operating system. This means that you install ScaleIO to only one location; also, there is only one build to maintain and test. In a Windows environment, a ScaleIO SCSI disk device looks like any other local disk device, as shown Figure 9. Figure 9. ScaleIO SCSI device EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 29

30 Chapter 3: Solution Technology Overview 30 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

31 Chapter 4: Solution Architecture Overview Chapter 4 Solution Architecture Overview This chapter presents the following topics: Overview Solution architecture Server configuration guidelines Network configuration guidelines ScaleIO configuration guidelines High-availability and failover EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 31

32 Chapter 4: Solution Architecture Overview Overview This chapter provides a detailed guide to the architecture and key components of the VSPEX Private Cloud for Microsoft Hyper-V with EMC ScaleIO solution, including configuration guidelines for the compute, networking, virtualization, and storage layers. VSPEX solutions are designed to run on a wide variety of server platforms. VSPEX defines the minimum CPU and memory resources required, but not a specific server type or configuration. You can use any server platform and configuration that meets or exceeds the minimum requirements. EMC validated the specified ScaleIO architecture, together with a system that meets the server and network requirements, to deliver high levels of performance and a highly available architecture for your private cloud deployment. Solution architecture Logical architecture The VSPEX Private Cloud for Microsoft Hyper-V with EMC ScaleIO solution validates the solution infrastructure for various numbers of virtual machines. Note: VSPEX uses a reference workload to describe and define a virtual machine. Therefore, one physical or virtual server in an existing environment may not be equal to one virtual machine in a VSPEX solution. Evaluate your workload in terms of the reference workload to arrive at an appropriate point of scale for your deployment. Refer to VSPEX building blocks for detailed information.. Virtual server 1 Virtual server n Microsoft Windows 2012 R2 Hyper-V virtual servers vcenter Server DNS Server EMC ScaleIO SQL Server Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V cluster Storage network Active Directory Server Shared infrastructure 10 GbE IP Network Figure 10. Logical architecture for the solution 32 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

33 Chapter 4: Solution Architecture Overview The solution uses EMC ScaleIO software and Microsoft Hyper-V to provide the storage and virtualization platforms respectively in a Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2 environment. Key components The solution architecture includes the following key components: Microsoft Hyper-V Provides a common virtualization layer to host the server environment. Hyper-V provides a highly available infrastructure through features such as: Live migration Provides live migration of virtual machines within a virtual infrastructure cluster, with no virtual machine downtime or service disruption. Failover Clustering High Availability (HA) Detects and provides rapid recovery for a failed virtual machine in a cluster Dynamic Optimization (DO) Provides load balancing of computing capacity in a cluster with support of SCVMM. ScaleIO Provides the storage layer to host and store applications. Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager (SCVMM) SCVMM is not required for this solution. However, if deployed, SCVMM (or its corresponding functionality in Microsoft System Center Essentials) simplifies provisioning, management, and monitoring of the Hyper-V environment. Microsoft SQL Server 2012 SCVMM requires a SQL Server database instance to store configuration and monitoring details. DNS Server Domain Name Service (DNS) performs name resolution for the various solution components. The solution uses Microsoft DNS Server running on Windows Server 2012 R2. Active Directory Server Various solution components require Active Directory services to function properly. The Microsoft Active Directory service runs on Windows Server 2012 R2. IP network A standard Ethernet network, with redundant cabling and switching, carries all network traffic. A shared IP network carries user and management traffic. Table 2 summarizes the key components of the solution. Table 2. Key components VSPEX layer Application layer and virtualization layer Compute layer Components Microsoft Hyper-V virtualization with: Microsoft Windows 2012 R2 Hyper-V Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager (SCVMM) Hyper-V Failover Clustering and High Availability VSPEX defines the minimum amount of compute layer resources required but allows the customer to implement the requirements using any server hardware that meets these requirements. EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 33

34 Chapter 4: Solution Architecture Overview VSPEX layer Network layer Storage layer Components VSPEX defines the minimum number of network ports required for the solution and provides general guidance on network architecture, but allows the customer to implement the requirements using any network hardware that meets these requirements. EMC ScaleIO Hardware resources Table 3 lists the hardware used in this solution. Table 3. Solution hardware Component Microsoft Hyper-V servers CPU Memory Network Configuration 1 vcpu per virtual machine Maximum of 4 vcpus per physical core* 2 GB RAM per virtual machine 2 GB RAM for each physical server for the hypervisor 2 x 10 GbE NICs per server Note: Add at least one server to the minimum requirements to implement Hyper-V HA functionality and meet the minimum number of nodes requirement. Network infrastructure Minimum switching capacity 2 physical network switches 2 x 10 GbE ports per Hyper-V server Note: EMC recommends a 10 GbE network infrastructure for the solution and we validated the solution with this network infrastructure. 1 GbE is acceptable for a small number of nodes (see Table 1), if bandwidth and redundancy are sufficient to meet the solution s minimum requirements. Shared infrastructure A typical customer environment has already configured infrastructure services such as Active Directory and DNS. The setup of these services is beyond the scope of this guide. If implementing the solution without existing infrastructure, the minimum requirements are: 2 physical servers 16 GB RAM per server 4 processor cores per server 2 x 1 GbE ports per server Note: These resources can be migrated into VSPEX post-deployment; however, they must exist before VSPEX can be deployed. * For Intel Ivy Bridge or later processors, use eight vcpus per physical core. 34 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

35 Chapter 4: Solution Architecture Overview Software resources Table 4 lists the software used in this solution. Table 4. Solution software Software Microsoft Hyper-V Microsoft Windows Server Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager Microsoft SQL Server ScaleIO Configuration Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter Edition Note: Datacenter Edition is necessary to support the number of virtual machines in this solution. Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard Edition Note: Any supported operating system for Microsoft System Center is acceptable. Version 2012 R2 Standard Edition Note: Any supported database for SCVMM is acceptable. ScaleIO virtual machines MDM/Tie-Breaker SDS ScaleIO 1.3 SDC Virtual machines (used for validation, but not required for deployment) Base operating system Microsoft Window Server 2012 R2 Datacenter Edition Server configuration guidelines Overview Ivy Bridge series processors When designing and ordering the compute layer of this VSPEX solution, several factors can affect the final purchase. For example: If a system workload is well understood, then virtualization features such as memory ballooning and transparent page sharing can reduce the aggregate memory requirement. You can reduce the number of vcpus if the virtual machine pool does not have a high level of peak or concurrent usage. Conversely, if the deployed applications are highly computational, you might need to increase the number of CPUs and the amount of memory. Testing on the Intel Ivy Bridge series processors demonstrated significant increases in virtual machine density from the server resource perspective. If your server deployment uses Ivy Bridge processors, EMC recommends increasing the vcpu/pcpu ratio from 4:1 to 8:1. This essentially halves the number of server cores required to host the reference virtual machines. EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 35

36 Chapter 4: Solution Architecture Overview Current VSPEX sizing guidelines require a maximum virtual CPU core to physical CPU core ratio of 4:1, with a maximum 8:1 ratio for Ivy Bridge or later processors. This ratio is based on an average sampling of CPU technologies available at the time of testing. As CPU technologies advance, OEM server vendors that are VSPEX partners might suggest different (normally higher) ratios. Follow the updated guidance from the server vendor. Note: Customers can choose any CPU model that meets the minimum VSPEX requirements. Results will vary depending on a specific workload. Table 5 lists the hardware resources used for the compute layer. Table 5. Hardware resources for the compute layer Component Microsoft Hyper-V servers CPU Memory Network Configuration 1 vcpu per virtual machine Maximum of 4 vcpus per physical core 2 GB RAM per virtual machine 2 GB RAM reservation per Microsoft Hyper-V host 2 x 10 GbE NICs per server Note: Add at least one server to the minimum requirements to implement Hyper-V HA functionality and meet the minimum number of nodes requirement. Note: EMC recommends using a 10 GbE network, or an equivalent 1 GbE network infrastructure provided that the underlying requirements for bandwidth and redundancy are met. Hyper-V memory virtualization Microsoft Hyper-V has several advanced features that help maximize performance and overall resource utilization. The most important features relate to memory management. This section describes some of these features, and the items to consider when using these features in a VSPEX environment. Figure 11 illustrates how a single hypervisor consumes memory from a pool of resources. Hyper-V memory management features such as Dynamic Memory and Smart Paging can reduce total memory usage and increase consolidation ratios in the hypervisor. 36 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

37 Chapter 4: Solution Architecture Overview Figure 11. Hypervisor memory consumption Dynamic Memory and Smart Paging Dynamic Memory increases physical memory efficiency by treating memory as a shared resource, dynamically allocating it to virtual machines, and reclaiming unused memory from idle virtual machines. Administrators can dynamically adjust the amount of memory used by each virtual machine at any time. With Dynamic Memory, Hyper-V allows more virtual machines than the available physical memory can support. This introduces the risk that there might not be sufficient physical memory available to restart a virtual machine if required. Smart Paging is a memory management technique that uses disk resources as a temporary memory replacement when more memory is required to restart a virtual machine. Non-Uniform Memory Access Non-Uniform Memory Access (NUMA) is a multinode technology that enables a CPU to access remote-node memory. Because this type of memory access degrades performance, Windows Server 2012 uses processor affinity, which pins threads to a single CPU, to avoid remote-node memory access. This feature is available to the host and to the virtual machines, where it provides improved performance in symmetrical multiprocessor (SMP) environments. Memory configuration guidelines Hyper-V memory overhead Virtualized memory has some associated overhead, including the memory consumed by the Hyper-V the parent partition and additional overhead for each virtual machine. Leave at least 2 GB memory for the Hyper-V parent partition in this solution. EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 37

38 Chapter 4: Solution Architecture Overview Virtual machine memory Each virtual machine in this solution is assigned 2 GB memory in fixed mode. Network configuration guidelines Overview This section provides guidelines for setting up a redundant, highly available network configuration. The guidelines consider VLANs and the ScaleIO network layer. Table 6 details the network resource requirements. Table 6. Hardware resources for the network layer Component Network infrastructure for Block Minimum switching capacity Configuration IP network 2 physical LAN switches Two 10 GbE ports per Hyper-V server Note: The solution can use a 1 GbE network if the underlying bandwidth and redundancy requirements are met. VLANs Isolate network traffic so that management traffic, traffic between hosts and storage, and traffic between hosts and clients all move over isolated networks. Physical isolation might be required in some cases for regulatory or policy compliance reasons. Logical isolation with VLANs is sufficient in many cases. EMC recommends separating the network into two types for security and increased efficiency: A management network, used to connect and manage the ScaleIO environment. This network is generally connected to the client management network. Because this network has less I/O traffic, EMC recommends a 1 GbE network. An internal data network, used for communication between the ScaleIO components. This is generally a 10 GbE network. In this solution, we used one VLAN for client access and one VLAN for management. Figure 12 depicts the VLANs and the network connectivity requirements for a ScaleIO environment. 38 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

39 Chapter 4: Solution Architecture Overview Client access network Servers... Storage network Management Management network Network Figure 12. Required networks for ScaleIO You can use the client access network to communicate with the ScaleIO infrastructure. The network provides communication between each ScaleIO node. Administrators use the management network as a dedicated way to access the management connections on the ScaleIO software components, network switches, and hosts. Note: Some best practices need additional network isolation for cluster traffic, virtualization layer communication, and other features. Implement these additional networks if necessary. ScaleIO configuration guidelines Overview This section provides guidelines for setting up the storage layer of the solution to provide high availability and the expected level of performance. Microsoft Hyper-V supports more than one method of storage when hosting virtual machines. The ScaleIO solution is based on block protocols, and the ScaleIO layer described in this section uses all current best practices. A customer or architect with the necessary training and background can make modifications based on their understanding of the system s usage and load if required. However, the building blocks described in Chapter 5: Sizing the Environment ensure acceptable performance. Hyper-V storage virtualization Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V and Failover Clustering use Cluster Shared Volumes v2 and VHDX features to virtualize storage presented from an external shared storage system to the host virtual machines. In Figure 13, the ScaleIO volumes present blockbased LUNs (as CSVs) to the Windows hosts to host the virtual machines. EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 39

40 Chapter 4: Solution Architecture Overview Figure 13. Hyper-V virtual disk types CSV A CSV is a shared disk containing a New Technology File System (NTFS) volume that is accessible to all nodes of a Windows Failover Cluster. It can be deployed over any SCSI-based local or network storage. Pass-through disks Windows Server 2012 also supports pass-through disks, which enable a virtual machine to access a physical disk that is mapped to a host that does not have a volume configured on it. VHDX Hyper-V in Windows Server 2012 contains an update to the VHD format called VHDX, which has much greater capacity and built-in resiliency. The main features of the VHDX format are: Support for virtual hard disk storage capacity of up to 64 TB Additional protection against data corruption during power failures by logging updates to the VHDX metadata structures Optimal structure alignment of the virtual hard disk format to suit large sector disks The VHDX format also has the following features: Larger block size for dynamic and differential disks, which enables the disks to better meet the needs of the workload A 4 KB logical-sector virtual disk that enables increased performance when used by applications and workloads that are designed for 4 KB sectors The ability to store custom file metadata that the user might want to record, such as the operating system version or applied updates Space reclamation features that can result in smaller file sizes and enable the underlying physical storage device to reclaim unused space (for example, TRIM requires direct-attached storage or SCSI disks and TRIM-compatible hardware) 40 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

41 Chapter 4: Solution Architecture Overview High-availability and failover Overview Virtualization layer This VSPEX solution provides a highly available virtualized server, network, and storage infrastructure. When implemented in accordance with this guide, the solution enables business operations to survive single-unit failures with little or no negative impact. Configure high availability in the virtualization layer, and enable the hypervisor to restart failed virtual machines automatically. Figure 14 illustrates the hypervisor layer responding to a failure in the compute layer. Figure 14. High availability at the virtualization layer Implementing high availability at the virtualization layer ensures that, even in the event of a hardware failure, the infrastructure will attempt to keep as many services running as possible. Compute layer While the choice of servers to implement in the compute layer is flexible, use enterprise-class servers designed for the data center. This type of server has redundant power supplies, as shown in Figure 15. Connect these servers to separate power distribution units (PDUs) in accordance with your server vendor s best practices. Figure 15. Redundant power supplies To configure high availability in the virtualization layer, configure the compute layer with enough resources to meet the needs of the environment, even with a server failure, as shown in Figure 14. EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 41

42 L1 L2 L1 L2 MGMT 0 MGMT 1 MGMT 0 MGMT 1 CONSOLE CONSOLE `STAT `STAT Cisco Nexus 5020 PS1 PS2 Cisco Nexus 5020 PS1 PS v-6A 50~60Hz v-6A 50~60Hz Chapter 4: Solution Architecture Overview Network layer Each Windows host has multiple connections to user and Ethernet networks to guard against link failures, as shown in Figure 16. Spread these connections across multiple Ethernet switches to guard against component failure in the network. SLOT3 SLOT2 SLOT3 SLOT2 Server connects to multiple switches Network Switches connect to each other Figure 16. Network layer high availability ScaleIO layer Redundancy scheme and rebuild process ScaleIO uses a mirroring scheme to protect data against disk and node failures. The ScaleIO architecture supports a distributed two-copy scheme. If an SDS node or SDS disk fails, applications can continue to access ScaleIO volumes; their data is still available through the remaining mirrors. ScaleIO immediately starts a seamless rebuild process to create another mirror for the data chunks that were lost in the failure. During the rebuild process, ScaleIO copies those data chunks to free areas across the SDS cluster, so it is not necessary to add any capacity to the system. The surviving SDS cluster nodes carry out the rebuild process by using the aggregated disk and network bandwidth of the cluster. The process is fast and minimizes both exposure time and application performance degradation. After the rebuild, all the data is fully mirrored and healthy again. If a failed node rejoins the cluster before the rebuild process is completed, ScaleIO dynamically uses data from the rejoined node to further minimize the exposure time and the use of resources. This capability is important for overcoming short outages efficiently. Elasticity and rebalancing Unlike many other systems, a ScaleIO cluster is extremely elastic. Administrators can add and remove capacity and nodes on the fly during I/O operations. When a cluster is expanded with new capacity (such as new SDSs or new disks added to existing SDSs), ScaleIO immediately rebalances the storage by seamlessly 42 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

43 Chapter 4: Solution Architecture Overview migrating data chunks from the existing SDSs to the new SDSs or disks. This migration does not affect the applications, which continue to access the data stored in the migrating chunks. By the end of the rebalancing process, all the ScaleIO volumes are spread across all the SDSs and disks, including the newly added ones, in an optimally balanced manner, as shown in Figure 17. Thus, adding SDSs or disks not only increases the available capacity but also increases the performance of the applications as they access their volumes. Figure 17. Automatic rebalancing when disks are added When an administrator decreases capacity (for example, by removing SDSs or removing disks from SDSs), ScaleIO performs a seamless migration that rebalances the data across the remaining SDSs and disks in the cluster, as shown in Figure 18. Figure 18. Automatic rebalancing when disks or nodes are removed Notes: In all types of rebalancing, ScaleIO migrates the least amount of data possible. ScaleIO is sufficiently flexible to accept new requests to add or remove capacity while still rebalancing previous capacity additions and removals. To maintain data availability, remove only one node at a time. EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 43

44 Chapter 4: Solution Architecture Overview 44 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

45 Chapter 5: Sizing the Environment Chapter 5 Sizing the Environment This chapter presents the following topics: Overview Reference workload Scalability VSPEX building blocks Planning for high availability Determining the number of building block nodes required Configuration sizing guidelines EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 45

46 Chapter 5: Sizing the Environment Overview This chapter describes how to design and size the VSPEX Private Cloud for Microsoft Hyper-V with EMC ScaleIO solution to meet the customer s needs. Sizing the environment includes designing the nodes for the ScaleIO environment and specifying the number of nodes. This chapter provides the findings from the solution testing and validation as to how variations in node size and number affect the maximum number of supported servers. The virtual machines used in the sizing calculations correspond to the definition of the reference workload (reference virtual machine) for the VSPEX Private Cloud. Reference workload When you move an existing server to a virtual infrastructure, you can gain efficiency by rightsizing the virtual hardware resources assigned to that system. Each VSPEX Proven Infrastructure balances the storage, network, and compute resources needed for a set number of virtual machines, as validated by EMC. In practice, each virtual machine has its own requirements that rarely fit a pre-defined specification. To simplify sizing the solution, VSPEX defines a reference workload, which represents a unit of measure for quantifying the resources in the solution reference architecture. By comparing the customer s actual usage to this reference workload, you can determine how to size the solution. For VSPEX Private Cloud solutions, the reference workload is defined as a single virtual machine with the characteristics shown in Table 7. Table 7. VSPEX Private Cloud workload Parameter Virtual machine OS Virtual CPUs 1 Virtual CPUs per physical core (maximum) 4 Memory per virtual machine Value Windows Server 2012 R2 2 GB IOPS per virtual machine 25 I/O pattern Fully random skew = 0.5 I/O read percentage 67% Virtual machine storage capacity 100 GB This solution uses the VSPEX Private Cloud reference virtual machine for sizing the customer environment in the same way that the reference virtual machine is used in VSPEX Private Cloud solutions for the EMC VNX platform. For further information, refer to EMC VSPEX Private Cloud: Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2 with Hyper-V for up to 1000 Virtual Machines. 46 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

47 Chapter 5: Sizing the Environment Scalability VSPEX building blocks ScaleIO is designed to scale from three to thousands of nodes. Unlike most traditional storage systems, as the number of servers grows, so do capacity, throughput, and IOPS. Performance scales linearly with the growth of the deployment. Whenever additional storage and compute resources (such as servers and drives) are needed, you can add them modularly. Storage and compute resources grow together so that the balance between them is maintained. Building block approach Sizing the system to meet the virtual server application requirements is a complicated process. When applications generate I/O, several components serve that I/O for example, server CPU, server dynamic random access memory (DRAM) cache, and disks. Customers must consider various factors when planning and scaling their storage system to balance capacity, performance, and cost for their applications. VSPEX uses a building block approach to reduce complexity. A building block consists of one server node that is configured and validated to support a certain number of virtual servers in the VSPEX architecture. Each building block node combines several local disk spindles to contribute a shared ScaleIO volume to support the needs of the private cloud environment. The SDS and the SDC are both installed on each building block node to contribute the local disk to the ScaleIO storage pool and expose ScaleIO shared block volumes to run the virtual machines. Validated building block The configuration of the validated reference building block includes the memory size and the number of physical CPU cores and disk spindles shown in Table 8. This configuration provides a flexible solution for VSPEX sizing. Table 8. Building block node configuration Physical CPU cores Memory (GB) SAS drives (10k rpm) SAS capacity (GB) The building block configuration contains six SAS disks per node. The validated solution models these drives at 600 GB each. Solution testing revealed that drive capacity, rather than drive performance, limits the node configuration for a VSPEX Private Cloud and the number of reference virtual machines that a building block can support. The reference building block memory can support 31 reference virtual machines; but the reference building block disk capacity can support only 12 virtual machines, as shown in Table 9. Customizing the building block provides information about how to customize the building block configuration. EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 47

48 Chapter 5: Sizing the Environment Customizing the building block The reference building block provides a starting point for planning a virtual infrastructure. You can customize the building block node to meet specific customer needs. Table 8 defines the CPU, memory, and disk configuration for the validated reference building block. This VSPEX solution provides additional options for the building block node configuration. Users can redefine the building block with different configurations. The number of virtual machines that the building block can support changes when the building block configuration is redefined. You must consider CPU capability, memory capability, disk capacity, and IOPS to calculate the number of virtual machines that the new building block can support. CPU capability For VSPEX systems, EMC recommends a maximum of four virtual CPUs for each physical core in a virtual machine environment. For example, a server node with 16 physical cores can support up to 64 virtual machines. Memory capability When sizing the memory for a server node, you must consider both the ScaleIO virtual machine and the hypervisor. ScaleIO reserves 2 GB RAM for the hypervisor. EMC recommends that you do not use memory overcommit in this solution. Note: ScaleIO 1.3 introduces a new RAM cache feature, which uses the SDS RAM. By default, the SDS RAM size is 128 MB. Disk capacity ScaleIO uses a RAIN topology to ensure data availability. In general, the capacity available is a function of the capacity per node (formatted capacity) and the number of nodes available. Assuming N nodes and C TB of capacity per server, the storage available, S, is: (N 1) C S = 2 This formula accounts for two copies of the data and the ability to survive a single node failure. The values in Table 9 assume that the CPU and memory resources of each node are sufficient to support the virtual machines. Each node contains six disks. Table 9. Maximum number of virtual machines per node, limited by disk capacity 10k rpm SAS drives Number of virtual machines , EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

49 IOPS Chapter 5: Sizing the Environment The primary method for adding IOPS capability to a node, without considering cache technologies, is to increase either the number of disk units or the speed of those units. Table 10 shows the number of virtual machines supported with four, six, or eight SAS drives per node. Table 10. Maximum number of virtual machines per node, limited by disk performance 10k rpm SAS drives Number of virtual machines Note: The values in Table 10 assume that the CPU and memory resources of each node are sufficient to support the virtual machines. The capacity of each disk is 600 GB. Determining the maximum number of virtual machines supported After the entire configuration is defined for a customized building block node, calculate the number of virtual machines that each component can support to determine the number of virtual machines that the building block node can support. For example, consider the redefined building block configuration in Table 11. Table 11. Redefined building block node configuration example Physical CPU cores Memory (GB) 10k rpm SAS drives * 600 GB In this example: 16 physical CPU cores can support 64 virtual machines (16 cores * 4 virtual CPUs per core) 192 GB memory can support 95 virtual machines (2 GB reserve for the hypervisor) 8 * 600 GB SAS drives can support 16 virtual machines by disk capacity and 60 virtual machines by disk performance (see Table 10) Therefore, the total number of virtual machines that this building block node can support is 16. The total number is always the minimum number supported by the individual configuration components, as shown in Figure 19. EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 49

50 Chapter 5: Sizing the Environment Figure 19. Determine the maximum number of virtual machines that a building block can support Planning for high availability In any mission-critical system, EMC recommends planning for system maintenance and hardware failures to minimize disruption. Network availability using multiple links, and power availability using multiple supplies, are well understood and outside the scope of this document. Because of the scale-out, multiple-node architecture of ScaleIO, you should consider the possibility of the loss of a system node. ScaleIO keeps copies of data on multiple nodes to protect against such a loss. Any node loss affects the virtual machines running on that node, but it should not affect the other users of the ScaleIO environment. To test the loss of a system node, we started a set of virtual machines on two of the three nodes in a ScaleIO environment. The virtual machines were running the Private Cloud workload. We intentionally did not include virtual machines on the remaining node. We then turned off the node with no virtual machines running. Predictably, this affected the I/O latency of the system due to the loss of one third of the storage resources. However, the virtual machines running on the other nodes could access all of their data. When we replaced the node, rebalancing occurred automatically in the background without operator intervention and with minimal impact to applications and users. Similar tests with virtual machines running on all nodes showed the expected result. Microsoft Failover Clustering restarted virtual machines on the surviving nodes until the restart criteria were no longer valid. EMC recommends that you include one node more than the workload requires, to ensure that that configuration can support the environment during an outage or during system maintenance. 50 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

51 Determining the number of building block nodes required Component Chapter 5: Sizing the Environment The following examples demonstrate how different building block node configurations can support the same number of virtual machines. The examples represent two customers, each with a requirement for 90 virtual machines, but with different node configurations. The examples illustrate how to size the number of nodes needed to meet the virtual machine requirement with the different node configurations. Example 1 The example in Table 12 is based on a node configuration with six CPUs, 64 GB RAM, and six 900 GB 10K SAS disks per server. Table 12. Example 1 3-node configuration 4-node configuration 5-node configuration 6-node configuration Servers X86 server X86 server X86 server X86 server Processor Memory NIC Disks ScaleIO licensing Virtual machines supported per node Number of reference virtual machines supported across cluster with HA 6 CPU core minimum 64 GB (per server) 2*1 Gb/10 Gb (per server) 6*900 GB 10K SAS (per server) 17 TB license (system) 6 CPU core minimum 64 GB (per server) 2*1 Gb/10 Gb (per server) 6*900 GB 10K SAS (per server) 22 TB license (system) 6 CPU core minimum 64 GB (per server) 2*1 Gb/10 Gb (per server) 6*900 GB 10K SAS (per server) 27 TB license (system) CPU core minimum 64 GB (per server) 2*1 Gb/10 Gb (per server) 6*900 GB 10K SAS (per server) 33 TB license (system) In a high availability scenario, with this configuration, three nodes can support 36 virtual machines, while six nodes can support up to 90 virtual machines. A single node in this example has the following characteristics: 6 physical CPU cores can support 24 virtual machines (6 cores * 4 = 24 processors per node) 64 GB memory can support 31 virtual machines (2 GB reserved for the hypervisor; virtual machines consume (64-2)/2 = 31 virtual machines) 6 * 900 GB SAS drives can support 18 virtual machines by disk capacity (see Table 9) Therefore, in this example, the six-node configuration meets the customer s requirement for 90 virtual machines. EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 51

52 Chapter 5: Sizing the Environment Example 2 The sizing example in Table 13 is based on a configuration with six CPUs, 64 GB RAM, and eight 900 GB 10K SAS disks per server. Table 13. Example 2 Component 3-node configuration 4-node configuration 5-node configuration Servers X86 server X86 server X86 server Processor 6 CPU core minimum 6 CPU core minimum 6 CPU core minimum Memory 64 GB (per server) 64 GB (per server) 64 GB (per server) NIC Disks ScaleIO licensing Virtual machines supported per node Number of reference virtual machines supported across cluster with HA 2*1 Gb/10 Gb (per server) 8*900 GB 10K SAS (per server) 22 TB license (system) 2*1 Gb/10 Gb (per server) 8*900 GB 10K SAS (per server) 29 TB license (system) *1 Gb/10 Gb (per server) 8*900 GB 10K SAS (per server) 36 TB license (system) In a high availability scenario, with this configuration, three nodes can support 48 virtual machines, while five nodes can support up to 96 virtual machines. A single node in this example has the following characteristics: 6 physical CPU cores can support 24 virtual machines (6 cores * 4 = 24 processor per one node) 64 GB memory can support 31 virtual machines (2 GB reserved for the hypervisor; virtual machines consume (64-2)/2 = 31 virtual machines 8 * 900 GB SAS drives can support 24 virtual machines by disk capacity (see Table 9) Therefore, in this example, the five-node configuration meets the customer s requirement for 90 virtual machines. Configuration sizing guidelines Overview To choose an appropriate reference architecture for a customer environment, determine the resource requirements of the environment and then translate these requirements to an equivalent number of reference virtual machines with the characteristics defined in Table 7. This section describes how to use the customer sizing worksheet to simplify the sizing calculations, and additional factors you should take into consideration when deciding which architecture to deploy. 52 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

53 Chapter 5: Sizing the Environment Using the customer sizing worksheet The customer sizing worksheet helps you to assess the customer environment and calculate the sizing requirements of the environment. Table 14 shows a completed worksheet for a sample customer environment. Table 14. Customer sizing worksheet example Application Example 1: Custom-built application Example 2: Point of sale system Example 3: Web server Server resources CPU (vcpus) Memory (GB) Storage resources IOPS Capacity (GB) Reference virtual machines Resource requirements Equivalent reference virtual machines Resource requirements Equivalent reference virtual machines Resource requirements Equivalent reference virtual machines Total equivalent reference virtual machines 14 To complete the customer sizing worksheet, follow these steps: 1. Identify the applications planned for migration into the VSPEX private cloud environment. 2. For each application, determine the compute resource requirements in terms of vcpus, memory (GB), disk performance (IOPS), and disk capacity. 3. For each resource type, determine the equivalent reference virtual machines requirements that is, the number of reference virtual machines required to meet the specified resource requirements. 4. Determine the total number of reference virtual machines needed from the resource pool for the customer environment. Determining the resource requirements CPU The reference virtual machine outlined in Table 7 on page 46 assumes that most virtual machine applications are optimized for a single CPU. If one application requires a virtual machine with multiple virtual CPUs, modify the proposed virtual machine count to account for the additional resources. Memory Memory plays a key role in ensuring application functionality and performance. Each group of virtual machines will have different targets for the available memory that is considered acceptable. Like the CPU calculation, if one application requires additional memory resources, adjust planned virtual machine count to accommodate the additional resource requirements. EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 53

54 Chapter 5: Sizing the Environment For example, if there are 30 virtual machines, but each needs 4 GB of memory instead of the 2 GB that the reference virtual machine provides, plan for 60 reference virtual machines. IOPS The storage performance requirements for virtual machines are usually the least understood aspect of performance. The reference virtual machine uses a workload generated by an industry-recognized tool to run a wide variety of office productivity applications that should be representative of the majority of virtual machine implementations. Storage capacity The storage capacity requirement for a virtual machine can vary widely depending on the type of provisioning, the types of applications in use, and specific customer policies. Determining the equivalent reference virtual machines With all of the resources defined, determine the number of equivalent reference virtual machines by using the relationships listed in Table 15. Round all values to the closest whole number. Table 15. Reference virtual machine resources Resource Value for reference virtual machine Relationship between requirements and equivalent reference virtual machines CPU 1 Equivalent reference virtual machines = Resource requirements Memory 2 Equivalent reference virtual machines = Resource requirements/2 IOPS 25 Equivalent reference virtual machines = Resource requirements/25 Capacity 100 Equivalent reference virtual machines = Resource requirements/100 For example, the Example 2 application in Table 14 requires four CPUs, 16 GB of memory, 200 IOPS, and 200 GB of storage. This translates to four reference virtual machines for CPU, eight reference virtual machines for memory, eight reference virtual machines for IOPS, and two reference virtual machines for capacity, as shown in Table 16. Table 16. Example worksheet row Application CPU (vcpus) Memory (GB) IOPS Capacity (GB) Equivalent reference virtual machines Example 2: Point of sale system Resource requirements Equivalent reference virtual machines EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

55 Chapter 5: Sizing the Environment The number of equivalent reference virtual machines for an application equals the maximum required for an individual resource. For example, the number of equivalent reference virtual machines for the example in Table 16 is eight, because that number will meet all the resource requirements vcpu, memory, IOPS, and capacity, as shown in Figure 20. Figure 20. Required resource from the reference virtual machine pool Determining the total reference virtual machines After completing the worksheet for each application that the customer wants to migrate into the virtual infrastructure, compute the total number of reference virtual machines required in the resource pool by calculating the sum of the total reference virtual machines for all applications. In the example in Table 14, the total is 14 virtual machines. Calculating the building block requirement Fine-tuning hardware resources A building block defines a discrete server node size. For example, the validated reference building block node in Table 8 supports 12 reference virtual machines. The total reference virtual machine requirement calculated using the customer sizing worksheet indicates which reference architecture would be adequate for a customer s requirements. For example, if a customer requires 30 reference virtual machines of capability, four of the validated building block nodes provide sufficient resources for current needs and room for growth; this calculation includes one node reserved for high availability. In most cases, the customer sizing worksheet suggests a reference architecture adequate for the customer s needs. In other cases, you might want to customize the hardware resources further. A complete description of the system architecture is beyond the scope of this document. Storage resources In some applications, there is a need to separate some storage workloads from others. The configuration for the reference architectures puts all of the virtual machines in a single ScaleIO volume. With ScaleIO s scale-out storage architecture, all disks contribute to this volume and data is distributed across all disks in the volume. The ScaleIO software tunes the storage resource automatically. EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 55

56 Chapter 5: Sizing the Environment Server resources For the server resources in the solution, it is possible to customize the hardware resources more effectively. To do this, first summarize the resource requirements for the server components, as shown in Table 17. In the Server resource component totals line at the bottom of the worksheet, total the server resource requirements for the applications. Note: Calculate the sum of the Resource requirements row for each application, and not the Equivalent reference virtual machines row. Table 17. Server resource component totals Server resources Storage resources Application CPU (vcpus) Memory (GB) IOPS Capacity (GB) Reference virtual machines Example 1: Custom built application Example 2: Point of Sale System Example 3: Web Server Example 4: Decision support database Resource requirements Equivalent reference virtual machines Resource requirements Equivalent reference virtual machines Resource requirements Equivalent reference virtual machines Resource requirements Equivalent reference virtual machines Total equivalent reference virtual machines 66 Server resource component totals In the example, the target architecture requires 17 virtual CPUs and 155 GB of memory. Assuming four virtual machines per physical processor core and no requirement for memory over-provisioning, the architecture requires five physical processor cores and 155 GB of memory. With these numbers, the solution can be implemented effectively with fewer server and storage resources. Notes: When customizing resources in this way, confirm that storage sizing is still appropriate. Consider high-availability requirements when customizing the resource pool hardware. Summary The requirements stated in the solution are what EMC considers the minimum set of resources to handle the workloads based on the stated definition of a reference virtual server. In any customer implementation, the load of a system varies over time as users interact with the system. If the customer virtual servers differ significantly from the reference definition and vary in the same resource group, you might need to add more of that resource to the system. 56 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

57 Chapter 6: VSPEX Solution Implementation Chapter 6 VSPEX Solution Implementation This chapter presents the following topics: Overview Pre-deployment tasks Network implementation Installing and configuring the Microsoft Hyper-V hosts Installing and configuring Microsoft SQL Server databases Deploying the System Center Virtual Machine Manager server Preparing and configuring the storage Provisioning a virtual machine Summary EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 57

58 Chapter 6: VSPEX Solution Implementation Overview Table 18 lists the main stages in the solution deployment process. The table also includes references to the sections that describe the related procedures. After deployment, integrate the VSPEX infrastructure with the existing customer network and server infrastructure. Table 18. Deployment process overview Stage Description reference 1 Verify the deployment prerequisites. Pre-deployment tasks 2 Obtain the deployment tools. Deployment prerequisites 3 Gather customer configuration data. Customer configuration data 4 Rack and cable the components. Refer to the vendor documentation 5 Configure the solution networks and connect to the customer network. Network implementation 6 Configure virtual machine storage. How to Deploy a Virtual Machine 7 Install and configure the servers. Installing and configuring the Microsoft Hyper-V hosts 8 Set up Microsoft SQL Server (used by SCVMM). Installing and configuring Microsoft SQL Server databases 9 Install and configure SCVMM. Deploying the System Center Virtual Machine Manager server 10 Configure the ScaleIO environment. Preparing and configuring the storage Pre-deployment tasks The pre-deployment tasks, shown in Table 19 include procedures that do not directly relate to environment installation and configuration, but you will need the results from these tasks at the time of installation. Examples of pre-deployment tasks are collection of host names, IP addresses, VLAN IDs, license keys, installation media, and so on. Perform these tasks before the customer visit to reduce the amount of time required on site. 58 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

59 Chapter 6: VSPEX Solution Implementation Table 19. Pre-deployment tasks Task Description Reference Gather documents Gather tools Gather data Gather the related documents listed in Appendix A: Reference Documentation. These documents provide setup procedures and deployment best practices for the various components of the solution. Gather the required and optional tools for the deployment. Use Table 20 to confirm that all equipment, software, and appropriate licenses are available before starting the deployment process. Collect the customer-specific configuration data for networking, naming, accounts, and so on. Enter this information into the Customer configuration worksheet for reference during the deployment process. Appendix A: Reference Documentation Table 20: Deployment prerequisites checklist Appendix B: Customer Configuration Worksheet Deployment prerequisites Table 20 lists the hardware, software, and licenses required to configure the solution. For more information, refer to Table 3 and Table 4. Table 20. Deployment prerequisites checklist Requirement Hardware Description Physical servers to host the virtual servers: Sufficient physical server capacity to host the virtual machines Windows Server 2012 servers to host the virtual infrastructure servers Note: The existing infrastructure might already meet this requirement. Switch port capacity and capabilities as required by the virtual server infrastructure Software Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2 (or later) Standard Edition installation media Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2012 SP1 installation media Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 or later installation media Note: The existing infrastructure might already meet this requirement. Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter Edition installation media (suggested OS for virtual machine guest OS) EMC ScaleIO 1.3 software bundle EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 59

60 Chapter 6: VSPEX Solution Implementation Requirement Licenses Description Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2012 SP1 license keys Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard Edition (or later) license keys Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter Edition license keys Note: An existing Microsoft Key Management Server (KMS) might cover this requirement. Microsoft SQL Server license key Note: The existing infrastructure might already meet this requirement. EMC ScaleIO license key Customer configuration data Assemble customer information such as IP addresses and hostnames as part of the planning process to reduce time onsite. The Customer configuration worksheet provides a set of tables that you can use as a worksheet to record the information. Add, record, and modify information as needed during the deployment process. Network implementation This section describes the requirements for preparing the network infrastructure needed to support this solution. Table 21 summarizes the tasks to be completed and provides references for further information. Table 21. Tasks for switch and network configuration Task Description Reference Prepare network switches Configure the infrastructure network Configure the VLANs Complete the network cabling Prepare the network switching. Configure the infrastructure networking. Configure private and public VLANs as required. Connect the network interconnect ports; connect the Hyper-V server ports. Preparing the network switches Installing and configuring the Microsoft Hyper-V hosts Switch configuration guide for your vendor Configuring the VLANs Completing the network cabling Preparing the network switches For validated levels of performance and high availability, this solution requires the switching capacity listed in Table 3. There is no need for new hardware if existing infrastructure meets the requirements. 60 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

61 Chapter 6: VSPEX Solution Implementation Configuring the infrastructure network The infrastructure network requires redundant network links for each Windows host, for the network switch interconnect ports, and for the network switch uplink ports. This configuration provides both redundancy and additional network bandwidth. This configuration is required regardless of whether the network infrastructure already exists or is being deployed with other components of the solution. Figure 21 shows a sample redundant Ethernet infrastructure for this solution. It illustrates the use of redundant switches and links to ensure that no single point of failure exists in network connectivity. Figure 21. Sample Ethernet network architecture Configuring the VLANs Completing the network cabling Ensure that there are adequate network switch ports for Windows hosts. EMC recommends that you configure the Windows hosts with three VLANs: Client access network Virtual machine networking (these are customer-facing networks, which can be separated if needed) Storage network ScaleIO data networking (private network) Management network Live migration networking (private network) Ensure that all solution servers, switch interconnects, and switch uplinks have redundant connections and are plugged into separate switching infrastructures. Ensure that there is a complete connection to the existing customer network. Note: At this point, the new equipment is connected to the existing customer network. Ensure that unexpected interactions do not cause service issues on the customer network. EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 61

62 Chapter 6: VSPEX Solution Implementation Installing and configuring the Microsoft Hyper-V hosts This section provides information about installing and configuring the Windows hosts and infrastructure servers required to support the architecture. Table 22 outlines the tasks to be completed. Table 22. Tasks for server installation Task Description Reference Install the Windows hosts Install Hyper-V and configure Failover Clustering Configure Windows Hyper- V networking Plan the virtual machine memory allocations Install Windows Server 2012 R2 on the physical servers for the solution. 1. Add the Hyper-V Server role. 2. Add the Failover Clustering feature. 3. Create and configure the Hyper-V cluster. Configure Windows hosts networking, including network interface card (NIC) teaming and the virtual switch network. Ensure that Windows Hyper-V guest memory-management features are configured properly for the environment. technet.microsoft.com Installing the Windows hosts technet.microsoft.com Installing Hyper-V and configuring failover clustering technet.microsoft.com Configuring Windows host networking technet.microsoft.com Planning virtual machine memory allocations Installing the Windows hosts Installing Hyper-V and configuring failover clustering Follow Microsoft best practices to install Windows Server 2012 R2 on the physical servers for the solution. Windows requires hostnames, IP addresses, and a root password for installation. The Customer configuration worksheet provides appropriate values. To install Hyper-V and configure Failover Clustering, complete the following steps: 1. Install and patch Windows Server 2012 R2 on each Windows host. 2. Configure the Hyper-V role, and the Failover Clustering feature. Table 22 provides the steps and references for the configuration tasks. Configuring Windows host networking To ensure performance and availability, the following NICs are required: At least one NIC for virtual machine networking and management (can be separated by network or VLAN if necessary) At least two 10 GbE NICs for the data network 62 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

63 Chapter 6: VSPEX Solution Implementation Planning virtual machine memory allocations Server capacity Server capacity in the solution is required for two purposes: To support the new virtualized server infrastructure To support required infrastructure services such as authentication and authorization, DNS, and databases For information on the minimum infrastructure requirements, refer to Table 3. There is no need for new hardware if existing infrastructure meets the requirements. Memory configuration Take care to properly size and configure the server memory for this solution. Memory virtualization techniques, such as Dynamic Memory, enable the hypervisor to abstract physical host resources to provide resource isolation across multiple virtual machines and avoid resource exhaustion. With advanced processors, such as Intel processors with Extended Page Table (EPT) support, abstraction takes place within the CPU. Otherwise, abstraction takes place within the hypervisor itself. Microsoft Hyper-V includes multiple techniques for maximizing the use of system resources such as memory. Do not substantially overcommit resources as this can lead to poor system performance. The exact implications of memory over commitment in a realworld environment are difficult to predict. Performance degradation due to resource exhaustion increases with the amount of memory overcommitted. Installing and configuring Microsoft SQL Server databases Overview Most customers use a management tool to provision and manage their server virtualization solution even though this is not required. The management tool requires a database back end. SCVMM uses SQL Server 2012 as the database platform. Note: Do not use Microsoft SQL Server Express edition for this solution. Table 23 lists the tasks for installing and configuring a SQL Server database for the solution. The subsequent sections describe these tasks. Table 23. Tasks for SQL Server database setup Task Description Reference Create a virtual machine for SQL Server Install Microsoft Windows on the virtual machine Create a virtual machine to host SQL Server. Verify that the virtual server meets the hardware and software requirements. Install Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2 on the virtual machine created to host SQL Server. msdn.microsoft.com Creating a virtual machine for SQL Server technet.microsoft.com Installing Microsoft Windows on the virtual machine EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 63

64 Chapter 6: VSPEX Solution Implementation Task Description Reference Install Microsoft SQL Server Configure SQL Server for SCVMM Install Microsoft SQL Server on the designated virtual machine. Configure a remote SQL Server instance for SCVMM. technet.microsoft.com Installing SQL Server technet.microsoft.com Configuring SQL Server for SCVMM Creating a virtual machine for SQL Server On one of the Windows servers designated for infrastructure virtual machines, create a virtual machine with sufficient computing resources for SQL Server. Use the datastore designated for the shared infrastructure. Note: EMC recommends CPU and memory values of 2 GB and 6 GB respectively for the SQL virtual machine. If the customer environment already contains a SQL Server instance, refer to Configuring SQL Server for SCVMM. Installing Microsoft Windows on the virtual machine Installing SQL Server The SQL Server service must run on Microsoft Windows. Install the required Windows version on the virtual machine, and select the appropriate network, time, and authentication settings. Install SQL Server on the virtual machine from the SQL Server installation media. Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) is one of the components in the SQL Server installer. Install this component on the SQL Server instance directly, and on an administrator console. In many implementations, you may want to store data files in locations other than the default path. To change the default path for storing data files, follow these steps: 1. Right-click the server object in SSMS and select Database Properties. 2. In the Properties window, change the default data and log directories for new databases created on the server. Note: For high availability, install SQL Server on a Microsoft failover cluster. Configuring SQL Server for SCVMM To use SCVMM in this solution, configure the SQL Server instance for remote connections. Create individual login accounts for each service that accesses a database on the SQL Server instance. For detailed requirements and instructions, refer to Configuring a Remote Instance of SQL Server for VMM. For further information, refer to the list of documents in Appendix A: Reference Documentation. 64 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

65 Chapter 6: VSPEX Solution Implementation Deploying the System Center Virtual Machine Manager server Overview This section provides information about configuring SCVMM for the solution. Table 24 outlines the tasks to be completed. Table 24. Tasks for SCVMM configuration Task Description Reference Create the SCVMM host virtual machine Install the SCVMM guest OS Create a virtual machine for the SCVMM server. Install Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter Edition on the SCVMM host virtual machine. Create a virtual machine Install the guest operating system Install the SCVMM server Install an SCVMM server. How to Install a VMM Management Server Installing the VMM Server Install the SCVMM Admin Console Install the SCVMM agent locally on the hosts Add the Hyper-V cluster to SCVMM Create a virtual machine in SCVMM Perform partition alignment Create a template virtual machine Deploy virtual machines from the template virtual machine Install an SCVMM Admin Console. Install an SCVMM agent locally on the hosts that SCVMM manages. Add the Hyper-V cluster to SCVMM. Create a virtual machine in SCVMM. Use diskpart.exe to perform partition alignment, assign drive letters, and assign the file allocation unit size of the virtual machine s disk drive. Create a template virtual machine from the existing virtual machine. Create the hardware profile and Guest OS profile at this time. Deploy the virtual machines from the template virtual machine. How to Install the VMM Console Installing the VMM Administrator Console Installing a VMM Agent Locally on a Host How to Add a Host Cluster to VMM Creating and Deploying Virtual Machines in VMM How to Create a Virtual Machine with a Blank Virtual Hard Disk Disk Partition Alignment Best Practices for SQL Server How to Create a Virtual Machine Template How to Create a Template from a Virtual Machine How to Create and Deploy a Virtual Machine from a Template How to Deploy a Virtual Machine EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 65

66 Chapter 6: VSPEX Solution Implementation Creating a SCVMM host virtual machine Installing the SCVMM guest OS Installing the SCVMM server To deploy a SCVMM server as a virtual machine on a Hyper-V server that is installed as part of this solution, connect directly to an infrastructure Hyper-V server by using the Hyper-V manager. Create a virtual machine on the Hyper-V server with the customer guest OS configuration by using infrastructure server storage presented from the storage array. The memory and processor requirements for the SCVMM server depend on the number of Hyper-V hosts and virtual machines that SCVMM must manage. Install the guest OS on the SCVMM host virtual machine. Install the required Windows Server version on the virtual machine and select appropriate network, time, and authentication settings. Set up the SCVMM database and the default library server; then install the SCVMM server. Refer to the Microsoft TechNet Library topic Installing the VMM Server to install the SCVMM server. Installing the SCVMM Admin Console Installing the SCVMM agent locally on a host The SCVMM Admin Console is a client tool to manage the SCVMM server. Install the SCVMM Admin Console on the same computer as the VMM server. Refer to the Microsoft TechNet Library topic Installing the VMM Administrator Console to install the SCVMM Admin console. If the hosts must be managed on a perimeter network, install an SCVMM agent locally on the host before adding the host to SCVMM. Optionally, install an SCVMM agent locally on a host in a domain before adding the host to SCVMM. Refer to the Microsoft TechNet Library topic Installing a VMM Agent Locally on a Host to install a VMM agent locally on a host. Adding the Hyper-V cluster to SCVMM Creating a virtual machine in SCVMM Add the deployed Hyper-V cluster to SCVMM. SCVMM manages the Hyper-V cluster. Refer to the Microsoft TechNet Library topic How to Add a Host Cluster to VMM to add the Hyper-V cluster. Create a virtual machine in SCVMM to use as a virtual machine template. Install the virtual machine, install the software, and then change the Windows and application settings. Refer to the Microsoft TechNet Library topic How to Create and Deploy a Virtual Machine from a Blank Virtual Hard Disk to create a virtual machine. Performing partition alignment Perform disk partition alignment on virtual machines with an OS earlier than Windows Server EMC recommends implementing disk partition alignment with an offset of 1,024 KB, and formatting the disk drive with a file allocation unit (cluster) size of 8 KB. 66 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

67 Chapter 6: VSPEX Solution Implementation Refer to the Microsoft TechNet Library topic Disk Partition Alignment Best Practices for SQL Server to perform partition alignment, assign drive letters, and assign file allocation unit size using diskpart.exe. Creating a template virtual machine Create a template virtual machine from the existing virtual machine in SCVMM. Create a hardware profile and a guest OS profile when creating the template. Use the profiler to deploy the virtual machines. Converting a virtual machine into a template destroys the source virtual machine. Consequently, you should back up the virtual machine before converting it. Refer to the Microsoft TechNet Library topic How to Create a Template from a Virtual Machine to create a template from a virtual machine. Deploying virtual machines from the template The virtual machine deployment wizard in the SCVMM Admin Console enables you to save the PowerShell scripts that perform the conversion and reuse them to deploy other virtual machines with the same configuration. Refer to the Microsoft TechNet Library topic How to Deploy a Virtual Machine to deploy a virtual machine from a template. Preparing and configuring the storage This section describes how to install and configure ScaleIO on physical nodes in a Windows Hyper-V environment. Table 25 outlines the tasks to be completed. Table 25. Set up and configure a ScaleIO environment Task Description Reference Prepare the installation spreadsheet Install the ScaleIO components Create and map volumes Create the CSV disk Install the GUI Populate the ScaleIO installation spreadsheet with the configuration and topology information for the ScaleIO environment and save it as a commaseparated value (CSV) file. Setup the Installation Manager server; install and configure the ScaleIO components. Create volumes with the required capacity via the CLI. Map the volumes to the specific SDCs for the application. Scan the ScaleIO LUN from the Windows hosts and transmit the disks to the CSV file system. Install the ScaleIO GUI to manage the system. EMC ScaleIO User Guide Use Cluster Shared Volumes in a Failover Cluster EMC ScaleIO User Guide EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 67

68 Chapter 6: VSPEX Solution Implementation Preparing the installation worksheet ScaleIO Installation Manager uses a comma-separate values (CSV) file to install and configure ScaleIO components. The CSV file contains configuration and topology information that Installation Manager uses to set up and configure all ScaleIO nodes. Notes: Use a combination of a CSV file and Installation Manager to add servers after the initial installation. Use the CSV file to remove installed components. To create the installation CSV file, populate a spreadsheet with all the required configuration information and save the spreadsheet in CSV format. Installation Manager prompts you to upload the installation CSV file during installation. If you have not pre-created the CSV file, you can download one of the following spreadsheet templates during installation and create the CSV at that time: Complete Contains all available fields, both required and optional. Minimal Contains only the mandatory fields. Installation Manager assigns default values to the optional fields when you use this spreadsheet. Table 26 describes both the mandatory and optional fields. Table 26. CSV installation spreadsheet Field Value Required Domain Username If using a domain user, the name of the domain. The name of the domain user. IP IP address of the physical node. Yes Password Root password. Yes Operating System The server s OS: Windows. Yes Is MDM/TB Primary, Secondary, TB, or blank Yes MDM Mgmt IP Is SDS SDS Name SDS All IPs SDS-SDS Only IPs SDS-SDC Only IPs The IP for the management-only network. Yes or No, depending on whether SDS should be installed on the node. The name for the SDS node. The SDS IP addresses to be used for communication among all ScaleIO nodes. Comma-separated, no spaces. The SDS IP addresses to be used for communication among ScaleIO SDS nodes only. Comma-separated, no spaces. The SDS IP addresses to be used for communication among ScaleIO SDS and SDC nodes only. Commaseparated, no spaces. Yes 68 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

69 Chapter 6: VSPEX Solution Implementation Field Value Required Protection Domain Fault Set SDS Device List SDS Pool List Optimize IOPS Is SDC The Protection Domain to which to assign this SDS. The Fault Set to which to assign this SDS. The devices to add to the SDS. Comma-separated, no spaces. The Storage Pool to which to assign this SDS. Optimize SDS parameters when using fast devices, such as SSD. Yes or No. Yes or No, depending on whether SDC should be installed on the node. Yes Yes Installing the ScaleIO components You can use the ScaleIO CLI or ScaleIO Installation Manager to install and configure ScaleIO components. This section describes the installation procedure using Installation Manager via the web client. For information on using the CLI to install ScaleIO components, refer to EMC ScaleIO User Guide. To install and configure ScaleIO components using Installation Manager, follow these steps: 1. Prepare the Installation Manager server. 2. Log in to the Installation Manager server. 3. Upload the installation packages. 4. Upload the installation CSV file. 5. Configure credentials, syslog, and Call Home. 6. Complete the install and configuration phases. Preparing the Installation Manager server To prepare the Installation Manager server, follow these steps: 1. Copy the appropriate gateway MSI file to the Installation Manager server: 32-bit-EMC-ScaleIO-gateway xxx-x86.msi 64-bit-EMC-ScaleIO-gateway xxx-x64.msi 2. Run the MSI file. 3. Enter a new IM_PASSWORD for accessing Installation Manager. Logging in to the Installation Manager server To log in to Installation Manager, follow these steps: 1. Log in to: https://<im_server_url> where <IM_Server_URL> is the URL of the server you installed the Installation Manager package. 2. Accept the certificate warning. EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 69

70 Chapter 6: VSPEX Solution Implementation 3. Type the default username (admin) and the password, and click Login. The Home page appears. Figure 22. Installation Manager Home page Uploading the installation packages 1. Click Packages. You might need to re-authenticate with the login credentials. The Manage Installation Packages page appears, as shown in Figure 23. Figure 23. Manage installation packages 2. Browse to the location of the ScaleIO packages, select the files, and click Open. 3. Click Upload. The uploaded installation packages appear in the file table, as shown in Figure EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

71 Chapter 6: VSPEX Solution Implementation Figure 24. Upload installation packages 4. Click Proceed to Install to proceed to the Install page. Uploading the installation CSV file If you have not pre-created the CSV file, use the Minimal or Complete option to download a template and create the CSV file at this time. To upload the installation CSV file, follow these steps: 1. Under Upload Installation CSV, shown in Figure 25, browse to the location of the installation CSV file, select the file, and click Open. 2. Click Upload Installation CSV. Figure 25. Upload CSV file When the CSV file is uploaded successfully, Installation Manager displays the installation configuration for review, as shown in Figure 26. EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 71

72 Chapter 6: VSPEX Solution Implementation Figure 26. Installation configuration Configuring credentials, syslog, and Call Home To complete the installation configuration, follow these steps: Note: If you do not configure syslog reporting and the Call Home feature during installation, you can configure them later using the CLI. 1. Type the MDM password and confirm it. The MDM password is used to log in to the MDM server. The password must meet the following criteria: Between six and 31 characters Include at least three of the following groups: [a-z], [A-Z], [0-9], special characters No white spaces 2. Type the Lightweight Installation Agent (LIA) password and confirm it. The LIA password is the password used to authenticate communication between Implementation Manager and the LIA. The password must meet the same criteria as the MDM password. 3. To configure syslog reporting, select Configure MDM the sending of syslog events, and specify the following parameters: Syslog Server Host name of the syslog server to which the messages are to be sent. Port Port of the syslog server (default 1468) Syslog Facility Facility level (default: Local0)) 72 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

73 Chapter 6: VSPEX Solution Implementation 4. To configure Call Home, select Configure call home, and specify the following parameters: SMTP Server SMTP server that will send the Call Home messages. SMTP Credentials SMTP credentials, if required. MDM Credentials MDM credentials for a new user, with a monitor role, that will be created for the purpose of Call Home functions. from Sender address. to Destination address. Customer name Name of the customer. Severity Minimum event severity for Call Home messages. 5. Review the configuration information. Completing the install and configuration phases Installation Manager s install process performs the following phases: upload, install, and configure. Start each phase by clicking the start phase option on the Monitor page. 1. Click Start Installation. 2. Click Monitor to follow the progress of the current phase. Figure 27 shows the status of the upload phase during the installation process for this solution. Figure 27. Monitor page 3. When the upload phase is complete, click Start install phase to continue to the install phase. EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 73

74 Chapter 6: VSPEX Solution Implementation 4. When all install commands are completed, click Start configure phase to continue to the configure phase. Note: If you get an error message during the install process, you can abort or retry the install. 5. When all processes are finished, the message shown in Figure 28 appears. Figure 28. Completed Install Operation Click Mark operation completed. At this stage, the ScaleIO components are installed and running. Creating and mapping volumes SDCs expose volumes as local storage devices to the applications servers. This section describes how to create volumes and map them to SDCs via the CLI. Use the add_volume command to create the volumes. Use the map_volume_to_sdc command to map the volumes to specific SDCs. Use the drv_cfg rescan command to scan for the most up-to-data status on a particular SDC node. CLI basics The CLI is the main management tool of the ScaleIO system. You use CLI commands to configure, maintain, and monitor the system. The CLI is part of the MDM component and is located in the following path in a Windows environment: C:\Program Files\emc\scaleio\MDM\bin All CLI commands use the following format in a Windows environment:./scli [--mdm_ip <IP>] <command> The mdm_ip parameter indicates the MDM that receives and executes the command. In a non-clustered environment, use the MDM IP. In a clustered environment, use the IP addresses of the primary and secondary MDM, as follows: scli mdm_ip query If the command is run from the primary MDM, you can omit the mdm_ip switch. Notes: The order of the parameters and command is not significant CLI commands are lowercase and case-sensitive All parameters are proceed with -- For a list of all ScaleIO CLI commands, refer to EMC ScaleIO User Guide. 74 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

75 Chapter 6: VSPEX Solution Implementation Creating volumes Command add_volume Syntax scli --add_volume(--protection_domain_id <ID> -- protection_domain_name <NAME>) [--storage_pool_id <ID> -- storage_pool_name <NAME>] --size_gb <SIZE> [--volume_name <NAME>] [Options] [Obfuscation Options] Description Use this command to create a volume when the requested capacity is available. To start allocating volumes, the system requires that there be at least three SDS nodes, and that the combined system capacity exceeds 200 GB. The created volume cannot be used until it is mapped to at least one SDC. Parameters Table 27 describes the parameters of the add_volume command. Table 27. add_volume command parameters Parameter --protection_domain_id <ID> --protection_domain_name <NAME> --storage_pool_id <ID> --storage_pool_name <NAME> --size_gb <SIZE> --volume_name <NAME> Description Protection Domain ID Protection Domain name Storage Pool ID Storage Pool name Volume size, in GB basic allocation granularity is 8 GB Name to be associated with the added volume Options: CHOOSE ONE --thin_provisioned --thick_provisioned The specified volume will be thin provisioned The specified volume will be thick provisioned (default) Obfuscation Options: CHOOSE ONE --use_obfuscation --dont_use_obfuscation Enable data obfuscation for this volume (default) Disable data obfuscation for this volume. This overrides the global obfuscation default. Example scli --mdm_ip add_volume --size_gb volume_name vol_1 --protection_domain_name rack_1.1 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 75

76 Chapter 6: VSPEX Solution Implementation Mapping a volume to an SDC Command map_volume_to_sdc Syntax scli --map_volume_to_sdc (--volume_id <ID> --volume_name <NAME>) (--sdc_id <ID> --sdc_name <NAME> --sdc_ip <IP>) Description This command exposes the volume to the specified SDC, effectively creating a block device on the SDC. Parameters Table 28 describes the parameters of the add_volume command. Table 28. map_volume_to_sdc command parameters Parameter --volume_id <ID> --volume_name <NAME> --sdc_id <ID> --sdc_name <Name> --sdc_ip <IP> Description Volume ID Volume name SDC ID SDC name SDC IP address Example scli --mdm_ip map_volume_to_sdc--volume_name vol_1 --sdc_ip Detecting new volumes Command drv_cfg rescan Syntax /opt/emc/scaleio/sdc/bin/drv_cfg --rescan Description Volumes are always exposed to the OS as devices. ScaleIO periodically scans the system to detect new volumes. You can initiate a scan for the most up-to-date status on a particular SDC node. This command is not a CLI command, but rather an executable that is run on the specific SDC. 76 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

77 Chapter 6: VSPEX Solution Implementation Installing the GUI You can install the ScaleIO GUI on a Windows or Linux workstation. To install the GUI, type the command for the operating system that you use: Windows: EMC-ScaleIO-gui xxx.msi RHEL: rpm -U scaleio-gui xxx.noarch.rpm Debian: sudo dpkg -i scaleio-gui xxx.deb Provisioning a virtual machine Summary To provision virtual machines in SCVMM, follow these steps: 1. Create a virtual machine in SCVMM to use as a virtual machine template: a. Install the virtual machine. b. Install the software. c. Change the Windows and application settings. Refer to the Microsoft TechNet Library topic How to deploy a virtual machine to create a virtual machine. 2. Perform disk partition alignment on virtual machines for operating systems earlier than Windows Server Align the disk drive with an offset of 1,024 KB, and format the disk drive with a file allocation unit (cluster) size of 8 KB. Use diskpart.exe to perform the partition alignment, assign drive letters, and assign the file allocation unit size. Refer to the Microsoft TechNet Library topic Disk Partition Alignment Best Practices for SQL Server for details. 3. Convert the virtual machine into a template. Create a customization specification when creating the template. Refer to the Microsoft TechNet Library topic How to Create a Template from a Virtual Machine to create the template and specification. 4. Deploy virtual machines from the template virtual machine and the customization specification. Refer to the Microsoft TechNet Library topic How to Deploy a Virtual Machine for details. This chapter presents the required steps to deploy and configure the various aspects of the VSPEX solution using the ScaleIO software bundle, which includes both the physical and logical components. After performing these steps, the VSPEX solution is fully functional. EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 77

78 Chapter 6: VSPEX Solution Implementation 78 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

79 Chapter 7: Verifying the Solution Chapter 7 Verifying the Solution This chapter presents the following topics: Overview Post-install checklist Deploying and testing a single virtual server Verifying the redundancy of the solution components EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 79

80 Chapter 7: Verifying the Solution Overview After you configure the solution, complete the tasks in Table 29 to verify the configuration and functionality of specific aspects of the solution and ensure that the configuration supports the core availability requirements. Table 29. Tasks for testing the installation Task Description Reference Post-install checks Deploy and test a single virtual server Verify the redundancy of the solution components Verify that sufficient virtual ports exist on each Hyper-V host virtual switch. Verify that the VLAN for virtual machine networking is configured correctly on each Hyper-V host. Verify that each Hyper-V host has access to the required Cluster Shared Volumes. Verify that ScaleIO networking is configured correctly Verify that the live migration interfaces are configured correctly on all Hyper-V hosts. Deploy a single virtual machine to verify that the solution functions as expected. Verify data protection of the ScaleIO system. Verify the redundancy of network switches. On a Hyper-V host that contains at least one virtual machine, verify that the virtual machine can successfully migrate to an alternate host. Hyper-V: How many network cards do I need? Network Recommendations for a Hyper-V Cluster in Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V: Using Hyper-V and Failover Clustering EMC ScaleIO User Guide Virtual Machine Live Migration Overview Deploying Hyper-V Hosts Using Microsoft System Center 2012 Virtual Machine Manager Deploying and testing a single virtual server Verifying the redundancy of the solution components Vendor documentation Verifying the redundancy of the solution components Creating a Hyper-V Host Cluster in VMM Overview Verifying the redundancy of the solution components 80 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

81 Chapter 7: Verifying the Solution Post-install checklist The following configuration items are critical to the functionality of the solution. On each Windows Server, verify the following items before deploying to production: The VLAN for virtual machine networking is configured correctly ScaleIO networking is configured correctly The server can access the required Cluster Shared Volumes A network interface is configured correctly for live migration Deploying and testing a single virtual server To verify that the solution functions as expected, deploy a single virtual machine from the SCVMM interface. Verify that the virtual machine is joined to the applicable domain, has access to the expected networks, and that it is possible to log in. Verifying the redundancy of the solution components To ensure that the various components of the solution maintain availability requirements, test the following maintenance and hardware failure scenarios: Verify the data protection of the ScaleIO system, as follows: a. Power off one ScaleIO node. b. Verify that ScaleIO LUN connectivity is maintained. c. Verify that the data rebuild process is running properly. Disable each of the redundant switches in turn and verify that the Hyper-V host virtual machine remains intact. On a Hyper-V host that contains at least one virtual machine, enable maintenance mode and verify that the virtual machine can successfully migrate to an alternate host. EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 81

82 Chapter 7: Verifying the Solution 82 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

83 Chapter 8: System Monitoring Chapter 8 System Monitoring This chapter presents the following topics: Overview Post-install checklist Deploying and testing a single virtual server Verifying the redundancy of the solution components EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 83

84 Chapter 8: System Monitoring Overview System monitoring of a VSPEX environment is no different from monitoring any core IT system; it is a relevant and essential component of administration. The monitoring levels involved in a highly virtualized infrastructure, such as a VSPEX environment, are more complex than in a purely physical infrastructure, because the interaction and interrelationships between various components can be subtle and nuanced. However, those experienced in administering virtualized environments should be familiar with the key concepts and focus areas. The key differentiators are monitoring at scale and the ability to monitor end-to-end systems and workflows. Several business needs require proactive, consistent monitoring of the environment: Stable, predictable performance Sizing and capacity needs Availability and accessibility Elasticity the dynamic addition, removal, and modification of workloads Data protection If self-service provisioning is enabled in the environment, the ability to monitor the system is more critical because clients can generate virtual machines and workloads dynamically. This can adversely affect the entire system. This chapter provides the basic knowledge necessary to monitor the key components of a VSPEX Proven Infrastructure environment. Key areas to monitor VSPEX Proven Infrastructures provide end-to-end solutions and require system monitoring of three discrete, but highly interrelated areas. The following components comprise the critical areas that affect overall system performance: Servers (both virtual machines and clusters) Networking ScaleIO layer This chapter focuses primarily on monitoring key components of the ScaleIO infrastructure, but briefly describes other components. Performance baseline When a workload is added to a VSPEX deployment, server and networking resources are consumed. As more workloads are added, modified, or removed, resource availability and capabilities change; this impacts all other workloads running on the platform. Customers should fully understand the workload characteristics on all key components prior to deploying them on a VSPEX platform; this is required to correctly size resource utilization against the defined reference virtual machine. Deploy the first workload, and then measure the end-to-end resource consumption and the platform performance. This removes the guesswork from sizing activities and 84 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

85 Chapter 8: System Monitoring ensures that initial assumptions were valid. As more workloads are deployed, reevaluate resource consumption and performance levels to determine cumulative load and the impact on existing virtual machines and their application workloads. Adjust resource allocation accordingly to ensure that any oversubscription is not negatively affecting overall system performance. Run these assessments consistently to ensure the platform as a whole, and the virtual machines themselves, operate as expected. Servers The key server resources to monitor include: Processors Memory Local disk Networking Monitor these areas both from a physical host level (the hypervisor host level) and from a virtual level (from within the guest virtual machine). For a VSPEX deployment with Microsoft Hyper-V, you can use Windows perfmon to monitor and log the metrics. Follow your vendors guidance to determine performance thresholds for specific deployment scenarios, which can vary greatly depending on the application. For detailed information about perfmon, refer to the Microsoft TechNet Library topic Using Performance Monitor. Keep in mind that each VSPEX Proven Infrastructure provides a guaranteed level of performance based on the number of reference virtual machines deployed and their defined workload. Networking ScaleIO layer Ensure that there is adequate bandwidth for networking communications, and monitor network loads at the server and virtual machine level. Windows perfmon provides sufficient metrics to analyze flows into and out of the servers and guests. Key items to track include aggregate throughput or bandwidth, latencies, and IOPS size. Capture additional data from network card or HBA utilities. Monitoring the ScaleIO layer of a VSPEX implementation is crucial to maintaining the overall health and performance of the system. The ScaleIO GUI enables you to review the overall status of the system, drill down to the component level, and monitor the components. The various screens display different views and data that are beneficial to the storage administrator. The key screens to focus on include: Dashboard screen Protection Domains screen Protection Domain Servers screen Storage Pools screen The ScaleIO GUI provides an easy-to-use yet powerful means to gain insight into how the underlying ScaleIO components are operating. The EMC ScaleIO User Guide on EMC Online Support provides detailed information on using the GUI for monitoring the ScaleIO layer. EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 85

86 Chapter 8: System Monitoring 86 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

87 Appendix A: Reference Documentation Appendix A Reference Documentation This appendix presents the following topics: EMC documentation Other documentation EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 87

88 Appendix A: Reference Documentation EMC documentation Other documentation The following documents, available on EMC Online Support, provide additional and relevant information. If you do not have access to a document, contact your EMC representative. EMC Host Connectivity Guide for Windows EMC ScaleIO User Guide The following documents, located on the Microsoft website, provide additional and relevant information: Adding Hyper-V Hosts and Host Clusters, and Scale-Out File Servers to VMM Configuring a Remote Instance of SQL Server for VMM Deploying Hyper-V Hosts Using Microsoft System Center 2012 Virtual Machine Manager (video) Hardware and Software Requirements for Installing SQL Server 2012 Hyper-V: How many network cards do I need? How to Add a Host Cluster to VMM How to Create a Virtual Machine Template How to Create a Virtual Machine with a Blank Virtual Hard Disk How to Deploy a Virtual Machine How to Install a VMM Management Server Hyper-V: Using Hyper-V and Failover Clustering Install SQL Server 2012 Installing a VMM Agent Locally on a Host Installing the VMM Administrator Console Installing the VMM Server Installing Virtual Machine Manager Install and Deploy Windows Server 2012 R2 and Windows Server 2012 Use Cluster Shared Volumes in a Failover Cluster Virtual Machine Live Migration Overview 88 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

89 Appendix B: Customer Configuration Worksheet Appendix B Customer Configuration Worksheet This appendix presents the following topic: Customer configuration worksheet EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 89

90 Appendix B: Customer Configuration Worksheet Customer configuration worksheet Before configuring a Private Cloud for ScaleIO with Hyper-V deployment, you need to gather some customer-specific network and host configuration information. The following tables provide a worksheet that you can use to record the information. You can also use the worksheet as a customer leave behind document for future reference. To confirm the customer information, cross-reference with the relevant array configuration worksheet: VNX Block Configuration Worksheet or VNX Installation Assistant for File/Unified Worksheet. Table 30. Common server information Server name Purpose Primary IP address Domain Controller DNS Primary DNS Secondary DHCP NTP SMTP SNMP System Center Virtual Machine Manager SQL Server Table 31. Hyper-V server information Server name Purpose Primary IP address Private net (storage) addresses Hyper-V Host 1 Hyper-V Host 2 Table 32. ScaleIO information Field Array name Value Admin account Management IP Storage pool name Datastore name 90 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

91 Appendix B: Customer Configuration Worksheet Table 33. Network infrastructure information Name Purpose IP address Subnet mask Default gateway Ethernet switch 1 Ethernet switch 2 Table 34. VLAN information Name Network purpose VLAN ID Allowed subnets Client access network Storage network Management network Table 35. Service accounts Account Purpose Password (optional; secure appropriately) Windows Server administrator Installation Manager administrator SCVMM administrator SQL Server administrator Printing the worksheet A standalone copy of the customer configuration worksheet is attached to this document in Microsoft Office Word format. To view and print the worksheet: 1. In Adobe Reader, open the Attachments panel, as follows: Select View > Show/Hide > Navigation Panes > Attachments. or Click the Attachments icon, as shown in Figure 29. Figure 29. Opening attachments in a PDF file 2. Under Attachments, double-click the worksheet file. EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 91

92 Appendix B: Customer Configuration Worksheet 92 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

93 Appendix C: Customer Sizing Worksheet Appendix C Customer Sizing Worksheet This appendix presents the following topic: Customer sizing worksheet for Private Cloud EMC VSPEX Private Cloud 93

94 Appendix C: Customer Sizing Worksheet Customer sizing worksheet for Private Cloud Before selecting a reference architecture on which to base a customer solution, use the customer sizing worksheet to gather information about the customer s business requirements and to calculate the required resources. Table 36 shows a blank worksheet. A standalone copy of the worksheet is attached to this document in Microsoft Office Word format. Table 36. Customer sizing worksheet Application CPU (vcpus) Memory (GB) IOPS Capacity (GB) Reference virtual machines Resource requirements Equivalent reference virtual machines Resource requirements Equivalent reference virtual machines Resource requirements Equivalent reference virtual machines Total equivalent reference virtual machines To view and print the worksheet attachment: 1. In Adobe Reader, open the Attachments panel, as follows: Select View > Show/Hide > Navigation Panes > Attachments. or Click the Attachments icon, as shown in Figure 29. Figure 30. Opening attachments in a PDF file 2. Under Attachments, double-click the worksheet file. 94 EMC VSPEX Private Cloud

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