Midori N. Courtice, Sihao Lin, Xiaorong Wang

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Midori N. Courtice, Sihao Lin, Xiaorong Wang"

Transcription

1 Review An updated review on asbestos and related diseases in China Midori N. Courtice, Sihao Lin, Xiaorong Wang School of Public Health and Primary Care at Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China Background: Asbestos is an industrial mineral that can cause diseases such as asbestosis, lung cancer, and mesothelioma. Asbestos consumption in China has increased steadily since the 1960s and is currently at half a million tonnes per year. Work conditions in the asbestos-related industries are poor and exposure levels frequently exceed the occupational exposure limit. Objective: To provide an updated overview on asbestos production and consumption in China and discuss what is known about the resulting burden of asbestos-related diseases. Findings: China is the world s top chrysotile consumer and second largest producer. Over a million people may be occupationally exposed, yet reliable disease statistics are unavailable and the national burden of asbestos-related disease (ARD) is not well known. Nevertheless, ARD prevalence, incidence, and mortality are expected to be high and will increase for many decades due to the volume of asbestos consumed historically, and a long latency period. Conclusions: Government policies to prevent ARD have been implemented but more actions are necessary to ensure compliance and ultimately, the complete elimination of asbestos to prevent a heavy future disease burden. Keywords: Chrysotile, China, Occupational health, Occupational exposure, Asbestos-related diseases Introduction In 2010, the People s Republic of China became the second largest economy in the world. A consequence of the rapid industrialization has been an increase in problems related to occupational health and safety. 1 The consumption of asbestos, as an inexpensive, versatile industrial mineral has often shadowed industrial growth. However, little is known about how the ever increasing use of asbestos has impacted the health of occupationally exposed workers in China. The purpose of this article is to provide an updated overview on asbestos production and consumption in China and discuss what is known about the resulting burden of asbestos-related diseases. Asbestos Production, Consumption and Trade China ranks second after Russia in worldwide asbestos production, but first in resources ( reserves are legally, economically, and technically extractable minerals, while resources are estimated deposits that are potentially valuable and for which reasonable prospects exist for economic extraction). 58 China s asbestos resources are estimated at million Correspondence to: X R Wang, School of Public Health and Primary Care at Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China. tonnes, of which accessible reserves are estimated at million tonnes. Asbestos is ubiquitous across China and two-thirds of the reserves are located in the northwestern provinces of Qinghai, Xinjiang, Gansu, and Sichuan, with the first three accounting for over half. The mountainous terrain, isolation, and severe climate of these northwestern provinces make access a challenge but readily-accessible reserves in the east have mostly been mined. 2 4 Chrysotile accounts for 99% of reserves and is the only form of asbestos currently being mined. Actinolite and tremolite, found mainly in Anhui Province, account for 0.7% and crocidolite, 85% of which is located in Yunnan Province, accounts for 0.1% of China s asbestos reserves. However, tremolite impurities have been detected in chrysotile deposits to varying degrees and the relative purity of Chinese chrysotile appears to vary geographically. Tremolite was found to range from 0.002% to 0.310% by weight across six chrysotile mines in Sichuan, Qinghai, Xinjiang, and Liaoning; 5 less than 0.001% (limit of detection (LOD) with X-ray diffraction) tremolite contamination was reported in bulk chrysotile samples from two Sichuan mines; 6 less than 0.1% (LOD with JIS method A-1481:2008 Determination of asbestos in building material products ) was found in Mangya mine bulk samples from Qinghai Province. 7 ß W. S. Maney & Son Ltd 2012 DOI / Z International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health 2012 VOL. 18 NO

2 Figure 1 Chinese chrysotile domestically mined and total consumed (data sources: British Geological Survey; 10 UN Comtrade; 11 US Geological Survey ) Domestic production of chrysotile started in the 1950s and has increased steadily since then. In the early 2000s, China overtook Canada as the world s second largest producer of chrysotile and may eventually replace Russia as top global producer. 8 In 2009, t were mined, accounting for 20% of world production (Russian chrysotile made up 54%), while total production in 2010 was t, down 15% from the previous year. 9 It was not until the 1960s that chrysotile in China was used in industrial quantities with demand for chrysotile growing steadily from then until the early 1990s at approximately 5000 to t a year, at which point, consumption skyrocketed to current levels (Fig. 1). In 1970, Asia accounted for 19% of worldwide chrysotile consumption and Japan accounted for 50% of that (Fig. 2). By 2010, Asia s share of worldwide chrysotile consumption had risen to 60% with India and China making up 85% of Asian consumption, or 51% of worldwide consumption. China and India are currently two of the fastest growing economies worldwide. Not coincidentally, they are also the two greatest consumers of chrysotile. On a per capita consumption basis in 2010, China consumed 0.45 kg chrysotile. It may appear moderate due to its large population, but this equates to high absolute consumption at t. Domestically mined chrysotile could not keep up with the significant increase in demand of the early 1990s and chrysotile imports have increased steadily since then. Imports, mostly from Russia, rose nearly 150-fold from 1083 t in 1990 to t in 2003, doubling again to t by Imports have averaged t over the last 10 years, with Russia supplying more than 80% and the remainder coming from Kazakhstan, Brazil, Canada, and Zimbabwe. In 2010, t were imported, up 15% compared to the previous year. 9 China is currently the top consumer of chrysotile in the world and its demand shows little signs of slowing down. A report from Natural Resources Canada in 2006 estimated that consumption in China would continue to increase at an average of seven percent annually. 19 China s chrysotile exports consist of a small surplus of shorter and less valuable fibers to Indonesia, Vietnam, Thailand, North Korea, and Myanmar. The annual exports to these countries over the last 10 years averaged t. Although there are approximately 3000 different types of asbestos products, asbestos cement accounts for most of China s chrysotile consumption at 70 80%, followed by asbestos friction products, sealing/ gasket products, heat-insulating products, and textiles or others. 9,20 In 2005, asbestos-cement corrugated sheets and flat sheets accounted for 92% of all fibercement roof and wall material sales. 21 Asbestos product exports consist mainly of cement, averaging t, or USD 12.5 million during 2000 and Figure 2 Comparison of Asian chrysotile consumption in 1970 and 2010 (data sources: Virta, 2006; Virta, 2009a; Virta, 2009b; US Geological Survey 13,15,16,18 ) 248 International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health 2012 VOL. 18 NO. 3

3 Workforce and Occupational Exposure The total number employed in asbestos-related industries is estimated to be over a million. There are an estimated 598 mining and milling enterprises employing and 169 asbestos product enterprises employing , which equates to workers directly mining or processing asbestos. 3,22 The difference is made up by those employed in smaller mining, milling, or processing enterprises, such as home-based manual spinning, many of which may belong to the vast informal sector of town and village enterprises, and others employed in asbestosassociated industries, such as construction, shipbuilding, automotive repair, plumbing, and other repair or remediation works. Work conditions in the asbestos-related industries are generally poor and the levels of workers exposure to asbestos are high. Currently, the Chinese occupational exposure limit (OEL) for an 8-hour time weighted average of airborne asbestos fibers is 0.8 fibers/ml. Before 2002, it was 2 f/ml or 2 mg/m 3. Pang et al. reported dust concentrations in an asbestos products factory of 415 mg/m 3 in the 1960s, which decreased to 35 mg/m 3 in the 1980s and 17 mg/m 3 in the 1990s. 23 A more recent study has included airborne fiber measurements in an asbestos products factory, and reported geometric mean concentrations from five departments, which ranged from 0.1 to 12.6 fibers/ml. 24 Although airborne asbestos concentrations in workplaces have steadily decreased over time, they often still exceed the OEL. Asbestos-related Diseases In China, one million workers are estimated to be exposed to asbestos, many of them at exposures exceeding the OEL. Annual consumption is at half a million tonnes and nearly 14 million tonnes of chrysotile have been consumed since However, the overall burden of asbestos-related malignancies in the country is unknown, and asbestosis is likely subject to under-reports. Asbestos-related diseases (ARDs) being experienced today are associated with exposures that took place years ago when annual consumption was already at t. Reliable disease statistics, in terms of the incidence, prevalence, or mortality of asbestos-related malignancies are not readily available and there is no centralized national cancer registry or large-scale system of surveillance for ARD. Nevertheless, information about ARD in China can be found in research publications and from some government sources; available information is summarized in the following sections. Asbestosis The first case of asbestosis in China was diagnosed in Asbestosis has been eligible for compensation since 1957 as one of 13 diseases now classified under pneumoconioses according to the Occupational Diseases Prevention and Control Act of the People s Republic of China (ODPC-Act). 26,27 There are cases of pneumoconiosis reported annually 1 and there were cumulative cases by the end of 2007, accounting for 90.8% of all reported occupational disease cases in China. 28 The vast majority of pneumoconiosis cases is coal worker s pneumoconiosis, and expected to remain this way because coal is the country s major source of energy. 29 It is less clear how many pneumoconiosis cases are classified as asbestosis. Data for asbestosis suffer from under-reporting and under-diagnosis. The potential for under-diagnosis of asbestosis may be partially due to the use of a Chinese standard, the 1986 Roentgeno-Diagnostic Criteria of Pneumoconiosis of China, instead of the ILO Classification of Pneumoconiosis. There are several key differences in Chinese standard from ILO Classification: an internal set of standard films is used instead of the ILO set, deciphered by a panel of experts instead of specially trained B-readers, and the disease cut-off point is not as inclusive as the ILO standards, leading to fewer cases being diagnosed as asbestosis. 29,30 Asbestosis prevalence estimates from epidemiological studies of Chinese asbestos workers range from 10 to 30%. 25,30 32 Applying the more conservative estimate of 10% prevalence to the estimate of one million exposed workers would result in current asbestosis cases. This estimate would not include the workers who have already died from this disease with a latency as short as 10 years and may even be an underestimate due to the differences in diagnostic standards discussed above. However, by the end of 2004, only 8237 cumulative cases of asbestosis had ever been reported nationwide. 3,33 Asbestos-related lung cancer Overall, lung cancer rates in China have been increasing from 5.46 (all lung cancer rates per ) in , to in , to in For males, lung cancer rates for the same time periods were 7.13, 24.03, and 41.43, respectively. For females, they were 3.70, 10.66, and 19.84, respectively. Smoking prevalence rates have remained relatively stable since the 1980 s at 4% for females and 60% for males. Only recently have rates among women started to increase. Although overall smoking rates for women are low, the rates in the north to northeast are four times higher than in the south and southeast, i.e. 10.2% versus 2.5%. Among men, smoking rates were the highest in the southwest. More than 70% of male farmers, factory workers, service people, private company employees, those self-employed, and those with no fixed residence were smokers. Female smoking rates by occupation were International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health 2012 VOL. 18 NO

4 Table 1 Cohort studies on occupationally exposed asbestos workers in China Lung cancer Study Follow-up period Industry type Number of subjects Cases RR or SMR 95% CI or P value Wang Chrysotile mines M: Wang * Chrysotile products M: Chen Asbestos products M: 254 M: ,0.001 F: 184 F: (1 Meso) Sun Manual chrysotile spinning F: Wang Asbestos products M: 275 M: 34z(1 Meso) M: 7.7 M: P,0.01 F: 269 F: 4 F: 2.6 F: n/a Pang * Asbestos products Total: 530 Total: 9 Overall: M: 160 M: 3 M: 5.1,0.01 for both F: 370 F: 6 F: 6.8 Zhang Asbestos products M: 160 M: 3 M: 5.09,0.01 for both F: 370 F: 6 F: 6.82 Zhu * Seven factories Total: 5893 Total: 67 Overall: M { : M: 51 M: 5.8,0.01 for both F { : F: 16 F: 11.7 Cheng Chrysotile products Total: 1132 Overall: 21 Overall: 3.15,0.05 for all M: 662 M: 14 M: 2.78 F: 510 F: 7 F: 4.27 Note: *Prospective cohort studies, the others being retrospective. { Person-years. highest among retired persons (11%) and those working at home (8%). 35 As smoking rates have stayed relatively stable, the increase in lung cancer rates has been attributed to an aging population, pollution and westernization. Nevertheless, industrialization and associated increases in occupational exposures to carcinogens, such as asbestos, during the same time period could be another factor. Asbestosrelated lung cancer is detected on average 20 years after initial exposure to asbestos. In 1970, few incident lung cancer cases would have been attributable to asbestos; however, in subsequent years, asbestos exposure would have made an increasingly significant contribution. Incident cases in 2004 with a history of asbestos exposure, though the number is unknown, would have been exposed in the 1980s when consumption was averaging t a year. Epidemiological studies on lung cancer in chrysotile exposed workers were initiated in China as early as the 1950s, an indication that future ARD had been expected, even before chrysotile consumption started to gain momentum. Several of these studies have observed excess lung cancer risks attributable to chrysotile exposure (Table 1). A unique factor in China is a large number of females in the asbestos products workforce; since the majority of females did not smoke, asbestos-related lung cancer may be more clearly attributable to chrysotile exposure in Chinese studies than in the mostly male cohorts from the west. The Chinese OEL of 0.8 fibers/ml is considered a relatively safe level of exposure for workers, yet according to Stayner et al., excess lifetime risk for lung cancer in white men exposed for 45 years at 0.1 fibers/ml is 5/1000 chrysotile exposed workers, meaning that an excess risk of even greater magnitude may be expected for the Chinese workforce since exposures frequently exceed the current OEL. 36 Chinese male asbestos workers also have a high prevalence of smokers. For example, smokers accounted for 78% of a male asbestos cohort, 37 higher than the already high national male smoking prevalence of 60%. 38 A large number of asbestos-related lung cancers would be expected to develop due to the classically described multiplicative interaction between asbestos and smoking exposure. This interaction was demonstrated in the Chongqing study: compared to non-chrysotile exposed non-smokers, the relative risk of lung cancer in non-chrysotile exposed smokers, chrysotile exposed non-smokers, and chrysotile exposed smokers, was 6.03, 7.52, and 17.35, respectively. 37 Mesothelioma and other cancers While statistics on mesothelioma do not exist in China at the national level, some data are available at the municipal level, as well as from individual epidemiological studies. In 2000, the Centre for Disease Control (CDC) in Qingdao, an industrial centre with a history of asbestos products manufacturing and shipbuilding until the late 1990s, initiated a computerized health data system including death certificates for over 7.5 million people. From this database, 94 cases of mesothelioma from 2000 to 2007 or about 1.57 cases/ million/year were documented, of which 65.6% were seen in females, and one case was reportedly seen in a 12-year-old. The authors attributed the higher proportion of female cases to the high proportion of female factory workers and from lung cancer as a competing cause of death in male smokers, since Chinese females tend not to smoke. 30,45 From 2008 until the end of 2010, the Qingdao CDC documented 36 additional 250 International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health 2012 VOL. 18 NO. 3

5 cases of mesothelioma. 46 The average age was 69 years for males and 75 years for females. There was no discernible trend over the 10-year span. Shanghai, Harbin, and Wuhan CDC branches have initiated similar computerized data collection systems, 47 although data from these branches have not been made publicly available. From individual epidemiological studies, three cases of mesothelioma were reported in 1227 Laiyuan chrysotile miners, 31 two in 1264 Shenyang chrysotile product factory workers, 30 two out of 515 Chongqing chrysotile product factory workers, and one additional case in a young man exposed as a child while spinning chrysotile at home. 24,48 The case of the home chrysotile spinner highlights a problem unique to China. Most employees remain at their jobs, possibly even performing the same task for their entire working lives, and their whole families live together in dormitories near the asbestos factories or mines. The families could be exposed as workers bring home asbestos on their clothing, or as overtime work to be completed at home. Household exposures of workers families have been described before but typically only as fibers being brought home inadvertently on the clothes of workers. 49 The relatively high levels of asbestos exposure being experienced and the fact that China is the world s greatest user of chrysotile are not reflected in the reported incidences of ARD, in particular, mesothelioma. One possibility is that the labor force experiences a lower life expectancy than higher income nations and workers may die of other illnesses before mesothelioma has a chance to develop. Another factor could be the poor quality of diagnosis as illustrated by the questionable 12-year-old with mesothelioma, 47 a disease which typically takes several decades to develop. As of 2002, mesothelioma diagnosis in China required: 1. cytopathological evidence; 2. cumulative asbestos exposure of at least 1 year; 3. latency of at least 15 years. Many cases may simply be misdiagnosed as lung cancer as there is no mandatory requirement for tissue verification or radiographs and experienced pathologists are still not available in many parts of the country. 30 In 2010, Park et al. estimated the global magnitudes of reported and unreported cases of mesothelioma for the 15-year period between 1994 and China was estimated to have 5107 (95% CI: ) cumulative cases of mesothelioma for that time period. Estimates were based on cumulative asbestos use from 1920 to 1970 when, for the sake of the calculation, asbestos exposure was assumed to have stopped. Asbestos exposures did not stop in 1970; however; worldwide cumulative use has nearly doubled since then and in China, cumulative use has risen to 14.4 million by the end of 2010 from 1.8 million by the end of Some Chinese researchers believe annual incidence of mesothelioma may already be at 1500 cases per year and even greater rates are expected in the future. 51 Other cancers considered causally related to asbestos include laryngeal and ovarian cancers, and possible associations with stomach and colorectal cancers. 52 Gastrointestinal (including stomach and colorectal) and other cancer mortality has been reported in Chinese studies. A standardized mortality ratio (SMR) of 1.66 (95% CI: ) was reported for gastrointestinal cancers in male Qinghai chrysotile miners; 7 an SMR of 7.9 was reported for stomach cancer in male asbestos workers in Qingdao when compared to the general male population (P,0.001); 23 an SMR of 2.4 (P,0.05) for stomach cancer was reported in workers from a study of seven asbestos products factories when compared to controls. 43 Other studies have observed no excess risk. 37,40,41,44 Steps Taken towards the Prevention of ARD The Chinese government has implemented several policies towards ARD prevention. An occupational disease reporting network has been in place since the 1980s and ARD are recognized by the Chinese Ministry of Health as occupational diseases eligible for compensation under the ODPC-Act. Over the last 10 years, legislation has been passed to restrict asbestos use (Table 2), including a revision of the asbestos OEL which was lowered in Health data collection has also been initiated in some regions. 53 China has been slow to embrace asbestos substitutes but research into alternatives including metal fibers, mineral fibers, plant fibers such as cotton and Table 2 Year Timeline of asbestos regulations in China over the recent decade Regulation 2002 Occupational exposure limit revised from 2 to 0.8 f/ml (GBZ2-2002) 2003 The use of asbestos is banned in automotive friction materials 2005 The import and export of amphibole asbestos was completely banned 2007 The Ministry of Health issued a new regulation entitled Criterion for the Control and Prevention of Occupational Hazards in Asbestos Processing (GBZ/T ) Asbestos was forbidden in building projects for the 2008 Beijing Olympics and the 2010 Asian Games 2011 On 1 June 2011, a new industry standard was implemented in China, prohibiting the use of asbestos in siding and wall materials for construction; the prohibition is part of a Chinese national standard (GB ) International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health 2012 VOL. 18 NO

6 flax, and synthetic fibers such as glass, ceramic, and para-aramid (Kevlar) was initiated as early as the 1980s. As restrictions on asbestos have increased in recent years, there has been a slow but steady increase in demand. 20 Over the last 10 years, and t of mineral wool and glass wool products, respectively, have been produced annually, mostly for roofing materials, insulating materials, friction materials, and noise dampeners. 54 China is also the largest producer of chemical fibers in the world, producing 24 t a year, or 60.7% of global production. 55 Despite these positive steps towards occupational health and safety promotion, working conditions in Chinese industries remain characteristic of a quickly growing economy with few regulatory systems in place: heavy exposures, few engineering controls and unenforced use of personal protective equipment. In regard to receiving compensation for ARD, hurdles exist in recognizing disease and making a claim, such as the requirement of several rounds of diagnosis by various authorized provincial and municipal health institutes. The ODPC-Act mandates employers to be responsible for the workers compensation and medical care with insurance companies, and to communicate the compensation program to employees. 1 Employers, particularly those in the informal sector, are less likely to provide information and education about occupational diseases or the system of compensation, and they may even withhold documentation or deny employment when claims are made. 56 Migrant workers would likely receive even less occupational health and safety training, as they frequently move between employment settings and would find the process of making a worker s compensation claim nearly impossible. Finally, even with the best of intentions on the part of the government, a complete ban on chrysotile is unlikely to proceed if commercial asbestos interest groups, such as the Chinese Non-metallic Material Industrial Association, the industry s main lobby group, continue to pressure the government to promote controlled use policies instead. 20 Conclusions As the world s greatest consumer of chrysotile, the incidence of ARD in China is expected to rise over the next few decades. The European Agency for Safety and Health at Work has projected annual Chinese fatalities from ARD at by 2035 while other experts estimate current ARD deaths are at per year already. 57 Increasing awareness of ARD and its prevention among the government, employers, and workers through research, training, and education programs is of utmost importance. While progress has been made with increased legislation to restrict asbestos use and protect workers as well as the public, action from the government is required to monitor for compliance. A nationwide surveillance system for ARD including improved monitoring, reporting, registration, and diagnostic standards must be implemented and data made accessible for researchers. China must choose to eliminate asbestos today in order to reduce an inevitably heavier disease burden in the future. Disclosure: The authors declare no conflicts of interest. References 1 Liang Y, Xiang Q. Occupational health services in PR China. Toxicology. 2004;198(1 3): Tse PK. The mineral industry of China. Reston (VA): US Geological Survey; Fan J. Analysis of status for control of asbestos dust. Labour Prot. 2005;1: China Mining. China mining facts [Internet]. Beijing: CMA [cited 2010 Sep 7]. Available from: Facts/index-99.html 5 Tossavainen A, Kotilainen M, Takahashi K, Pan G, Vanhala E. Amphibole fibres in Chinese chrysotile asbestos. Ann Occup Hyg. 2001;45(2): Kohyama N. Mineral phases determined by XRD and ATEM for commercial chrysotile after chemical digestion. Bulk asbestos analysis report ed.; Wang X, Lin S, Yano E, Qiu H, Yu IT, Tse L, et al. Mortality in a Chinese chrysotile miner cohort. Int Arch Occup Environ Health, to be published. 8 Gurmendi A. USGS Minerals yearbook 2004: the mineral industry of Canada. Reston (VA): US Geological Survey; China Asbestos [Internet]. Anxi: ACA [cited 2011 Jan 26]. Available from: 10 British Geological Survey. Statistical summary of the minerals industry [Internet]. Keyworth: BGS [cited 2011 May 5]. Available from: worldarchive.html 11 United Nations. United Nations Commodity Trade Statistics Database (UN Comtrade) [Internet]. New York: United Nations [cited 2011 Jun 16 17]. Available from: comtrade.un.org/db/ 12 US Geological Survey. Mineral commodity summaries Washington (DC): United States Government Printing Office; US Geological Survey. Mineral commodity summaries Reston (VA): US Geological Survey; US Geological Survey. Bureau of mines minerals yearbook [Internet]. Reston (VA): US Geological Survey [cited 2011 Jul 10]. Available from: pubs/usbmmyb.html 15 Virta RL. USGS minerals yearbook 2009: asbestos. Reston (VA): US Geological Survey; Virta RL. World asbestos consumption from 2003 to Reston (VA): US Geological Survey; Virta RL. USGS minerals yearbook 2008: asbestos. Reston (VA): US Geological Survey; Virta RL. Worldwide asbestos supply and consumption trends from 1900 through Reston (VA): US Geological Survey; Report No.: Circular Natural Resources Canada: Minerals and Metals Sector. Canadian minerals yearbook 2006: chrysotile. Ottawa (Ont.): NRCAN; Tao L, Dehong L. Current status in the use of asbestos and health effects in China. In Proceedings of Global Asbestos Congress 2004; 2004 Nov 19 21; Tokyo, Japan. London: International Ban Asbestos Secretariat; 2004; Kazan-Allen L. Proceedings of Asian Asbestos Conference Apr 26 27; Hong Kong, China. London: International Ban Asbestos Secretariat; National Bureau of Statistics China. China statistic yearbook Beijing: Statistic Press; Pang ZC, Zhang Z, Wang Y, Zhang H. Mortality from a Chinese asbestos plant: overall cancer mortality. Am J Ind Med. 1997;32(5): International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health 2012 VOL. 18 NO. 3

7 24 Yano E, Wang Z, Wang X, Wang M, Lan Y. Cancer mortality among workers exposed to amphibole-free chrysotile asbestos. Am J Epidemiol. 2001;154(6): Cai SX, Zhang CH, Zhang X, Morinaga K. Epidemiology of occupational asbestos-related diseases in China. Ind Health. 2001;39(2): He F. Occupational medicine in China. Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1998;71: Su Z. Occupational health and safety legislation and implementation in China. Int J Occup Environ Health. 2003;9(4): Jian FX. Basic occupational health services in China [Internet]. Geneva: WHO [cited 2011 Sep 15]. Available from: letter_15_regions/en/index8.html 29 Wang XR, Christiani DC. Occupational lung disease in China. Int J Occup Environ Health. 2003;9(4): Frank A, Li L, Cao W, Pang ZC, Zhang Z, Zhang H. Radiographic evidence of asbestos disease in Chinese factory workers. Ann Occup Hyg. 2002;46(1): Zou S, Wu Y, Ma F, Ma H, Seung W, Jiang Z. Retrospective mortality study of asbestos workers in Laiyuan. In: Proceedings of the VIIth International Pneumoconioses Conference; 1988 Aug 23 26; Pittsburgh, PA, USA. Washington (DC): National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health; Part II, p Wang X, Wang M, Qiu H, Yu I, Yano E. Longitudinal changes in pulmonary function of asbestos workers. J Occup Health. 2010;52(5): Yin Y. A trend analysis on the national pneumoconiosis epidemics in Chin Occup Med. 2005;32(5): The Ministry of Health of the People s Republic of China. Third national retrospective survey of death-causation. Beijing: People s Health Press; Yang G, Fan L, Tan J, Qi G, Zhang Y, Samet JM, et al. Smoking in China. JAMA. 1999;282(13): Stayner L, Smith R, Bailer J, Gilbert S, Steenland K, Dement J, et al. Exposure-response analysis of risk of respiratory disease associated with occupational exposure to chrysotile asbestos. Occup Environ Med. 1997;54(9): Wang X, Yano E, Qiu H, Yu I, Courtice MN, Tse LA, et al. A 37-year observation of mortality in Chinese chrysotile asbestos workers. Thorax. 2012;67: Xu T, Li W, Hu P. Survey of smoking and passive smoking status among Chinese adults in 11 provinces. Chin J Prev Contr Chron Dis. 2010;18(3): Chen BC, Wu ZY, Wang GL, Bian XA. Retrospective survey on occupational tumors for 40 consecutive years in a factory of asbestos products. Anhui J Prev Med. 2004;2(2): Sun TD, Li L, Shi NF, Zhang X. A 40-year cohort study on cancer mortality among female workers with manual spinning of chrysotile asbestos. J Hyg Res. 2003;32(6): Wang ZH, Hu YB, Guo JS. Study on incidence of malignant tumor in workers of Shanghai asbestos products factory in 40 years. J Labor Med. 2000;17(2): Zhang ZQ, Zhang HQ, Wang WL. A prospective cohort study on malignant tumors mortality among workers exposed to asbestos. Chinese J Ind Med. 1997;10: Zhu H, Wang Z. Study of occupational lung cancer in asbestos factories in China. Br J Ind Med. 1993;50(11): Cheng W, Kong J. A retrospective mortality cohort study of chrysotile asbestos products workers in Tianjin Environ Res. 1992;59(1): Zhang X, Sun TD, Shi NF, Zhu LQ, Morinaga K. Survey on the mortality of malignant tumors in female workers exposed to chrysotile asbestos. Int J Epidemiol Infect Dis. 2006;33(1): Zhang HQ. Qingdao centre for disease control: mesothelioma cases in Qingdao ( ). Personal communication; Frank A, Pang ZC, Zhang HQ, Zhang Y. Mesothelioma in Qingdao, PRC ( ). J Phys: Conf Ser. 2009;151(1): Yano E, Wang ZM, Wang XR, Wang MZ, Takata A, Kohyama N, et al. Mesothelioma in a worker who spun chrysotile asbestos at home during childhood. Am J Ind Med. 2009;52(4): Miller A. Mesothelioma in household members of asbestosexposed workers: 32 United States cases since Am J Ind Med. 2005;47(5): Park EK, Takahashi K, Hoshuyama T, Cheng TJ, Delgermaa V, Le GV, et al. Global magnitude of reported and unreported mesothelioma. Environ Health Perspect. 2011;119(4): Feng Y, Liu J, Zhang T, Pon G. Asbestos in China: country report. In: Proceedings of the Asbestos Symposium for Asian Countries; 2002 Sep 26 27; Kitakyushu, Japan. Helsinki: Finnish Institute of Occupational Health; 2002; Straif K, Benbrahim-Tallaa L, Baan R, Grosse Y, Secretan B, El Ghissassi F, et al. Special report: policy. A review of human carcinogens Part C: Metals, arsenic, dusts, and fibres. Lancet Oncol. 2009;10(5): Liu T, Wang Y. Present status of manufacture, application, hazardous effects and preventive measures of asbestos substitutes in china. China Saf Sci J. 2002;12(2): Yang C. International Fiber Journal: China s chemical fiber producers. Charlotte (NC): International Media Group Inc; Zhang X, Wang Z, Li T. The current status of occupational health in China. Environ Health Prev Med. 2010;15(5): Leping H. Beijing Yilian Legal Aid and Study Center of Labor [Internet] [cited 2011 Mar 15]. Available from: yilianlabor.cn/ 57 Mooney P. Mainland faces explosive rise in asbestos-related lung disease. South China Morning Post, 14 November US Geological Survey. Principles of a resource/reserve classification for minerals. Arlington (VA): US Geological Survey; Report No.: Circular 831. International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health 2012 VOL. 18 NO

Survey on the Mortality from Malignant Tumors of Female Asbestos Spinning Workers

Survey on the Mortality from Malignant Tumors of Female Asbestos Spinning Workers Table of Contents WS-E-12 Xing Zhang Survey on the Mortality from Malignant Tumors of Female Asbestos Spinning Workers Xing Zhang 1, Tong-da Sun 2, Nan-feng Shi 2, Li-qiu Zhu 1, Kenji Morinaga 3 1 Institute

More information

A 37-year observation of mortality in Chinese chrysotile asbestos workers

A 37-year observation of mortality in Chinese chrysotile asbestos workers ORIGINAL ARTICLE A 37-year observation of mortality in Chinese chrysotile asbestos workers Xiaorong Wang, 1 Eiji Yano, 2 Hong Qiu, 1 Ignatius Yu, 1 Midori N Courtice, 1 L A Tse, 1 Sihao Lin, 1 Mianzhen

More information

Asbestos Trends Worldwide, with Richard Lemen

Asbestos Trends Worldwide, with Richard Lemen Asbestos Trends Worldwide, with Richard Lemen Ashley Ahearn Views and opinions expressed in these podcasts are those of the interview subjects and do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions, or policies

More information

Update of the scientific evidence on asbestos and cancer. Kurt Straif, MD MPH PhD. The IARC Monographs

Update of the scientific evidence on asbestos and cancer. Kurt Straif, MD MPH PhD. The IARC Monographs Update of the scientific evidence on asbestos and cancer Kurt Straif, MD MPH PhD International Agency for Research on Cancer Lyon, France World Health Organisation Asturias, 17 March 2011 The IARC Monographs

More information

Mesothelioma Trends as Predictors of the Asbestos- Related Lung Cancer Burden

Mesothelioma Trends as Predictors of the Asbestos- Related Lung Cancer Burden Mesothelioma Trends as Predictors of the Asbestos- Related Lung Cancer Burden Valerie McCormack UICC World Cancer Congress Montreal August 2012 Outline Background Estimating the lung cancer mortality burden

More information

Chrysotile and Lung Cancer Yano et al. Cancer Mortality among Workers Exposed to Amphibole-free Chrysotile Asbestos

Chrysotile and Lung Cancer Yano et al. Cancer Mortality among Workers Exposed to Amphibole-free Chrysotile Asbestos American Journal of Epidemiology Copyright 2001 by the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health All rights reserved Vol. 154, No. 6 Printed in U.S.A. Chrysotile and Lung Cancer Yano et

More information

The Trend in Airborne Asbestos Concentrations at Plants Manufacturing Asbestos-Containing Products in Japan

The Trend in Airborne Asbestos Concentrations at Plants Manufacturing Asbestos-Containing Products in Japan Industrial Health 2001, 39, 127 131 Original Article The Trend in Airborne Asbestos Concentrations at Plants Manufacturing Asbestos-Containing Products in Japan Koji YOSHIZUMI 1 *, Hajime HORI 2, Toshihiko

More information

Epidemiology of Occupational Asbestos-Related Diseases in China

Epidemiology of Occupational Asbestos-Related Diseases in China Industrial Health 2001, 39, 75 83 Review Article Epidemiology of Occupational Asbestos-Related Diseases in China Shi Xiong CAI 1, Chao He ZHANG 2, Xing ZHANG 2 and Kenji MORINAGA 3 * 1 Institute of Occupational

More information

ASBESTOS. Know what it is and how you can protect yourself. environmental affairs Department: Environmental Affairs REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

ASBESTOS. Know what it is and how you can protect yourself. environmental affairs Department: Environmental Affairs REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA ASBESTOS Know what it is and how you can protect yourself environmental affairs Department: Environmental Affairs REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA 1 What is asbestos? The term asbestos designates a group of naturally

More information

Grassroots Asbestos Campaign in Asia. Sanjiv Pandita Asian Ban Asbestos Network Geneva, 2015 1

Grassroots Asbestos Campaign in Asia. Sanjiv Pandita Asian Ban Asbestos Network Geneva, 2015 1 Grassroots Asbestos Campaign in Asia Sanjiv Pandita Asian Ban Asbestos Network Geneva, 2015 1 Asbestos- A global Concern Workers and communities in west continue to suffer due to past exposure. In developing

More information

Emerging evidence that the ban on asbestos use is reducing the occurrence of pleural mesothelioma in Sweden

Emerging evidence that the ban on asbestos use is reducing the occurrence of pleural mesothelioma in Sweden 596500SJP0010.1177/1403494815596500B. Järvholm and A. BurdorfAsbestos ban reduces mesothelioma incidence research-article2015 Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 1 7 Original Article Emerging evidence

More information

Scientific Update on Safe Use of Asbestos. Robert P. Nolan, PhD International Environmental Research Foundation New York, New York www.ierfinc.

Scientific Update on Safe Use of Asbestos. Robert P. Nolan, PhD International Environmental Research Foundation New York, New York www.ierfinc. Scientific Update on Safe Use of Asbestos Robert P. Nolan, PhD International Environmental Research Foundation New York, New York www.ierfinc.org When We Talk about Asbestos What Do We Mean? Anthophyllite

More information

Asbestos and Mesothelioma in Ontario

Asbestos and Mesothelioma in Ontario Asbestos and Mesothelioma in Ontario May 29, 2010 CARWH Conference: Worker Health in a Changing world of work Loraine Marrett, PhD Outline Part I: Asbestos & its uses Part II: Asbestos & cancer Part III:

More information

ASBESTOS DISEASES. Dr Alastair Robertson

ASBESTOS DISEASES. Dr Alastair Robertson ASBESTOS DISEASES Dr Alastair Robertson Occupational Health Department University Hospital Birmingham Birmingham B29 6JF 01216278285 Alastair.robertson@uhb.nhs.uk Occupational Lung Disease Unit Birmingham

More information

Review of Eliminating occupational cancer in Europe and globally by J. Takala

Review of Eliminating occupational cancer in Europe and globally by J. Takala Review of Eliminating occupational cancer in Europe and globally by J. Takala There primary concerns of this manuscript are outlined below. More detail discussion of these points is presented on the following

More information

PATTERNS OF MORTALITY IN ASBESTOS FACTORY WORKERS IN LONDON*

PATTERNS OF MORTALITY IN ASBESTOS FACTORY WORKERS IN LONDON* PATTERNS OF MORTALITY IN ASBESTOS FACTORY WORKERS IN LONDON* M. L. Newhouse TUC Centenary Institute of Occupational Health London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine London WCIE 7HT. England G. Berry

More information

HEALTH CARE FOR EXPOSURE TO ASBESTOS. 2010 The SafetyNet Centre for Occupational Health and Safety Research Memorial University www.safetynet.mun.

HEALTH CARE FOR EXPOSURE TO ASBESTOS. 2010 The SafetyNet Centre for Occupational Health and Safety Research Memorial University www.safetynet.mun. HEALTH CARE FOR PATIENTS WITH EXPOSURE TO ASBESTOS 2010 The SafetyNet Centre for Occupational Health and Safety Research Memorial University www.safetynet.mun.ca HEALTH CARE FOR PATIENTS WITH EXPOSURE

More information

Questions and Answers about the prevention of occupational diseases

Questions and Answers about the prevention of occupational diseases World Day for Safety and Health at Work 28 April 2013 Questions and Answers about the prevention of occupational diseases Occupational diseases cause huge suffering and loss in the world of work. Yet,

More information

Worldwide mesothelioma mortality trends

Worldwide mesothelioma mortality trends Worldwide mesothelioma mortality trends Harvard Symposium 24 th July 2009 Julian Peto London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and Institute of Cancer Research Asbestos-related diseases Asbestosis

More information

Epidemiology of Mesothelioma & Asbestos Diseases,

Epidemiology of Mesothelioma & Asbestos Diseases, DOSH, Malaysia July 2, 2010 Epidemiology of Mesothelioma & Asbestos Diseases, A Global Perspective Ken Takahashi Professor of Environmental Epidemiology Acting Director of WHO-CC for Occup Health University

More information

Asbestos Exposure and the Continuing Burden of Asbestos Related Disease. Paul A. Demers Partners in Prevention April, 2014

Asbestos Exposure and the Continuing Burden of Asbestos Related Disease. Paul A. Demers Partners in Prevention April, 2014 Asbestos Exposure and the Continuing Burden of Asbestos Related Disease Paul A. Demers Partners in Prevention April, 2014 Town of Asbestos, Quebec Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/asbestos,_quebec

More information

Asbestos Health Risks. Dr Andrew Pengilley Acting Chief Health Officer

Asbestos Health Risks. Dr Andrew Pengilley Acting Chief Health Officer Asbestos Health Risks Dr Andrew Pengilley Acting Chief Health Officer Asbestos Asbestos is a name given to several different fibrous minerals Three main commercial types are Chrysotile (white asbestos)

More information

Asbestos Presence in a Factory that Produced Asbestos-Containing Products

Asbestos Presence in a Factory that Produced Asbestos-Containing Products Asbestos Presence in a Factory that Produced Asbestos-Containing Products Hana Fajkovi Department of Geology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Horvatovac 95, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia, e-mail: (hanaf@geol.pmf.hr)

More information

Occupational Heath and Safety Section American Public Health Association

Occupational Heath and Safety Section American Public Health Association Occupational Heath and Safety Section American Public Health Association THE ELIMINATION OF ASBESTOS (Resolution No. 20096, Adopted 11/10/2009) As early as 1898, British government factory inspectors recognized

More information

Mesothelioma in Australia: Incidence (1982 to 2013) and Mortality (1997 to 2012)

Mesothelioma in Australia: Incidence (1982 to 2013) and Mortality (1997 to 2012) Mesothelioma in Australia: Incidence (1982 to 213) and Mortality (1997 to 212) 215 Disclaimer The information provided in this document can only assist you in the most general way. This document does not

More information

Call for an International Ban on Asbestos

Call for an International Ban on Asbestos Call for an International Ban on Asbestos To eliminate the burden of disease and death that is caused worldwide by exposure to asbestos, The Collegium Ramazzini calls for an immediate ban on all mining

More information

Current Usage and Health Significance of the Modern Use of Chrysotile Products: Review of Recently Published Evidence

Current Usage and Health Significance of the Modern Use of Chrysotile Products: Review of Recently Published Evidence Current Usage and Health Significance of the Modern Use of Chrysotile Products: Review of Recently Published Evidence John Hoskins Health & Safety Consultant, Haslemere, Surrey, UK ASBESTOS SERPENTINE

More information

Asbestos Diseases. What Is Asbestos?

Asbestos Diseases. What Is Asbestos? 1 Asbestos Diseases What Is Asbestos? Asbestos is a term applied to a group of minerals formed into rock and mined in a similar way to coal. In this form, asbestos is made up of strong, fine and flexible

More information

NHS Barking and Dagenham Briefing on disease linked to Asbestos in Barking & Dagenham

NHS Barking and Dagenham Briefing on disease linked to Asbestos in Barking & Dagenham APPENDIX 1 NHS Barking and Dagenham Briefing on disease linked to Asbestos in Barking & Dagenham 1. Background 1.1. Asbestos Asbestos is a general name given to several naturally occurring fibrous minerals

More information

Testimony of. Laura Welch, M.D. Medical Director Center to Protect Workers Rights November 17, 2005

Testimony of. Laura Welch, M.D. Medical Director Center to Protect Workers Rights November 17, 2005 Testimony of Laura Welch, M.D. Medical Director Center to Protect Workers Rights November 17, 2005 Testimony of Laura Welch, MD Medical Director, Center to Protect Workers Rights On Asbestos Related Diseases

More information

Changing Trends in Mesothelioma Incidence. Hans Weill, M.D. Professor of Medicine Emeritus Tulane University Medical Center

Changing Trends in Mesothelioma Incidence. Hans Weill, M.D. Professor of Medicine Emeritus Tulane University Medical Center Changing Trends in Mesothelioma Incidence Hans Weill, M.D. Professor of Medicine Emeritus Tulane University Medical Center International Conference on Chrysotile Montreal, May 23, 2006 Global Mesothelioma

More information

Occupational Disease Fatalities Accepted by the Workers Compensation Board

Occupational Disease Fatalities Accepted by the Workers Compensation Board Occupational Disease Fatalities Accepted by the Workers Compensation Board Year to date, numbers as of 30, Occupational disease fatalities are usually gradual in onset and result from exposure to work-related

More information

The Carcinogenicity of Chrysotile Asbestos A Review

The Carcinogenicity of Chrysotile Asbestos A Review Industrial Health 2001, 39, 57 64 Review Article The Carcinogenicity of Chrysotile Asbestos A Review William J. NICHOLSON Mount Sinai School of Medicine, NY, NY, USA Received December 23, 2000 and accepted

More information

The Management of Asbestos at the University of Manitoba

The Management of Asbestos at the University of Manitoba The Management of Asbestos at the University of Manitoba WHAT IS ASBESTOS? Asbestos is a name given to a group of minerals which occur naturally as masses of long silky fibres. Asbestos is known for its

More information

Mortality Experience in an Historical Cohort of Chrysotile Asbestos Textile Workers

Mortality Experience in an Historical Cohort of Chrysotile Asbestos Textile Workers Table of Contents WS-E-03 Carlo Mamo Mortality Experience in an Historical Cohort of Chrysotile Asbestos Textile Workers Carlo Mamo 1, Giuseppe Costa 2 1 Epidemiology Unit, Piedmont Region, Grugliasco,

More information

Asbestos was mined in Korea, mainly under the

Asbestos was mined in Korea, mainly under the Asbestos Problems Yet to Explode in Korea DOMYUNG PAEK, MD, MSC, SCD Although asbestos mining and manufacture has occurred in Korea since the 1920s, it was not until the 1980s that the broader social democratic

More information

Elimination of Asbestos- Related Diseases WHO action. Dr Ivan D. Ivanov Public Health and Environment WHO Headquarters

Elimination of Asbestos- Related Diseases WHO action. Dr Ivan D. Ivanov Public Health and Environment WHO Headquarters Elimination of Asbestos- Related Diseases WHO action Dr Ivan D. Ivanov Public Health and Environment WHO Headquarters Worldwide 125 million people are exposed to asbestos (mostly chrysotile) 75 million

More information

Mesothelioma among brake mechanics: an expanded analysis of a casecontrol

Mesothelioma among brake mechanics: an expanded analysis of a casecontrol 1 Risk Anal. 2004 Jun;24(3):547-52. Related Articles, Links Mesothelioma among brake mechanics: an expanded analysis of a casecontrol study. Hessel PA, Teta MJ, Goodman M, Lau E. Exponent, Wood Dale, IL

More information

Asbestos Disease: An Overview for Clinicians Asbestos Exposure

Asbestos Disease: An Overview for Clinicians Asbestos Exposure Asbestos Asbestos Disease: An Overview for Clinicians Asbestos Exposure Asbestos: A health hazard Exposure to asbestos was a major occupational health hazard in the United States. The first large-scale

More information

Estimation of the Number of Lung Cancer Cases Attributable to Asbestos Exposure

Estimation of the Number of Lung Cancer Cases Attributable to Asbestos Exposure Estimation of the Number of Lung Cancer Cases Attributable to Asbestos Exposure BC Asbestos Statistics Approximately 55,000 BC men and women exposed in 1971 in high exposed industries Significant exposure

More information

Report of Working Groups

Report of Working Groups BD5.3 Report of Working Groups Elimination of Asbestos-related Diseases ICOH 2012 March 18, 2012 Cancun Report of WG Elimination of Asbestos-related Diseases Dr. Sherson mail to ICOH President of 7 December

More information

GLOBAL PANORAMA ON MESOTHELIOMA 2008

GLOBAL PANORAMA ON MESOTHELIOMA 2008 GLOBAL PANORAMA ON MESOTHELIOMA 2008 Laurie Kazan-Allen Presented at conference: Malignant Mesothelioma in the 21st Century Cairo, Egypt, February 20-21, 2008 1. Introduction Malignant mesothelioma is

More information

June 20, 2002. 2002.06.20: Wagner Testimony on Workplace Exposure to Asbestos. This is an archive page. The links are no longer being updated.

June 20, 2002. 2002.06.20: Wagner Testimony on Workplace Exposure to Asbestos. This is an archive page. The links are no longer being updated. Page 1 of 6 skip navigational links This is an archive page. The links are no longer being updated. Statement by Gregory R. Wagner, M.D. Director, Division of Respiratory Disease Studies National Institute

More information

Table 2.4. Summary of design and findings from mesothelioma case-control studies

Table 2.4. Summary of design and findings from mesothelioma case-control studies categories Agudo et al. (2000) Barcelona and Cadiz, Spain 32 cases (77% males) of histologically con rmed malignant pleural mesothelioma identified from hospital in the region between //993 and 2/3/996.

More information

Health effects of occupational exposure to asbestos dust

Health effects of occupational exposure to asbestos dust Health effects of occupational exposure to asbestos dust Authors: N.Szeszenia-Dąbrowska, U.Wilczyńska The major health effects of workers' exposure to asbestos dust include asbestosis, lung cancer and

More information

Asbestos : the legacy remains and will still go on. Rob Armstrong Hawkes Bay District Health Board

Asbestos : the legacy remains and will still go on. Rob Armstrong Hawkes Bay District Health Board Asbestos : the legacy remains and will still go on Rob Armstrong Hawkes Bay District Health Board Early uses of asbestos Asbestiform minerals richterite winchite erionite : limited industrial use Samuel

More information

Global Action on Prevention of Asbestos Diseases. Building and Woodworkers International - BWI

Global Action on Prevention of Asbestos Diseases. Building and Woodworkers International - BWI Global Action on Prevention of Asbestos Diseases Building and Woodworkers International - BWI Problems 100,000 deaths a year from diseases caused by asbestos: lung cancer, asbestosis, mesothelioma 95%

More information

Malignant Mesothelioma Among Employees of a Connecticut Factory that Manufactured Friction Materials Using Chrysotile Asbestos

Malignant Mesothelioma Among Employees of a Connecticut Factory that Manufactured Friction Materials Using Chrysotile Asbestos Ann. Occup. Hyg., Vol. 54, No. 6, pp. 692 696, 2010 Ó The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society doi:10.1093/annhyg/meq046 Malignant Mesothelioma

More information

Cohort Studies on Cancer Mortality Among Workers Exposed Only to Chrysotile Asbestos: a Meta-analysis 1

Cohort Studies on Cancer Mortality Among Workers Exposed Only to Chrysotile Asbestos: a Meta-analysis 1 BIOMEDICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 17, 459-468 (2004) Cohort Studies on Cancer Mortality Among Workers Exposed Only to Chrysotile Asbestos: a Meta-analysis 1 LU LI *,#, TONG-DA SUN #, XING ZHANG, RUI-NAN

More information

Defending the Rest Basics on Lung Cancer, Other Cancers and Asbestosis: Review of the B-Read and Pulmonary Function Testing

Defending the Rest Basics on Lung Cancer, Other Cancers and Asbestosis: Review of the B-Read and Pulmonary Function Testing Defending the Rest Basics on Lung Cancer, Other Cancers and Asbestosis: Review of the B-Read and Pulmonary Function Testing OTHER CANCERS November 2013 Bruce T. Bishop Nancy E. Leary Willcox & Savage 440

More information

ASBESTOS. By Robert L. Virta

ASBESTOS. By Robert L. Virta ASBESTOS By Robert L. Virta Domestic survey data and tables were prepared by Subina W. Pandey, statistical assistant, and the world production table was prepared by Regina R. Coleman, international data

More information

By Robert L. Virta. Prices. 1.) Domestic production data for asbestos were collected by largest importer of unmanufactured fibers and manufactured

By Robert L. Virta. Prices. 1.) Domestic production data for asbestos were collected by largest importer of unmanufactured fibers and manufactured ASBESTOS By Robert L. Virta Asbestos is a generic name given to six fibrous minerals that markets were friction products, packings, and roofing products have been used widely in commercial products. The

More information

Occupational respiratory diseases due to Asbestos. Dirk Dahmann, IGF, Bochum

Occupational respiratory diseases due to Asbestos. Dirk Dahmann, IGF, Bochum Occupational respiratory diseases due to Asbestos Dirk Dahmann, IGF, Bochum Contents Introduction Diseases Further Effects Preventive Strategies Conclusion Asbestos minerals Woitowitz, 2003 Imports (+

More information

Asbestos at the Work Site

Asbestos at the Work Site Asbestos at the Work Site Asbestos is a naturally occurring mineral. The most commonly used types of asbestos are named chrysotile, amosite and crocidolite. Asbestos has been and continues to be used in

More information

Findings from Situational Analyses of Asbestos-Related Diseases in the World

Findings from Situational Analyses of Asbestos-Related Diseases in the World ANZSOM2011 Wellington, NZ Findings from Situational Analyses of Asbestos-Related Diseases in the World University of Occupational & Environmental Health, Japan Acting Director of the WHOCC for Occupational

More information

(1) Comparison of studies with different follow-up periods

(1) Comparison of studies with different follow-up periods (1) Comparison of studies with different follow-up periods Is the absolute potency of amphiboles and relative potency of chrysotile underestimated because of studies with substantially incomplete follow-up?

More information

Science-Based Facts Relevant Health Issues 2015. For environmental occupational health safe and responsible use

Science-Based Facts Relevant Health Issues 2015. For environmental occupational health safe and responsible use Science-Based Facts Relevant Health Issues 2015 For environmental occupational health safe and responsible use SCIENCE-BASED FACTS AND RELEVANT HEALTH ISSUES 2015 ON THE DIFFERENT ASBESTOS FIBER TYPES:

More information

Environmental Asbestos Exposure in Poland

Environmental Asbestos Exposure in Poland Reference Centre for Asbestos Exposure &Health Risk Assessment Material partly was presented on: European Asbestos Conference: Policy, Status & Human Rights European Parliament, Brussels, 22-23 September

More information

Asbestos related cancers

Asbestos related cancers New cancer cases 1954-215 in Finland, Men Pukkala et al. 26 Asbestos related cancers Panu Oksa, MD, docent Course on asbestos-related diseases Tartu 4-5.12.26 Asbestos related cancer / FIOH / PO / 1.1.27

More information

Asbestos Campaign: Update on the Recent Developments for ANROAV 7 Meeting FURUYA Sugio Secretary General JOSHRC: Occupational Safety and Health Resource Center BANJAN: Ban Asbestos Network Silent Time

More information

Transcript for Asbestos Information for the Community

Transcript for Asbestos Information for the Community Welcome to the lecture on asbestos and its health effects for the community. My name is Dr. Vik Kapil and I come to you from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Agency for Toxic Substances

More information

Asbestos: health effects and risk. Peter Franklin Senior Scientific Officer, EHD Senior Research Fellow, UWA

Asbestos: health effects and risk. Peter Franklin Senior Scientific Officer, EHD Senior Research Fellow, UWA Asbestos: health effects and risk Peter Franklin Senior Scientific Officer, EHD Senior Research Fellow, UWA What is asbestos Naturally occurring mineral that has crystallised to form long thin fibres and

More information

#UDGUVQU4GNCVGF *GCNVJ 4KUMU KP 'UVQPKC

#UDGUVQU4GNCVGF *GCNVJ 4KUMU KP 'UVQPKC +06'40#6+10#.,1740#. 1( 1%%72#6+10#. 5#('6; #0& '4)101/+%5,15' 81. 01 t NOTES #UDGUVQU4GNCVGF *GCNVJ 4KUMU KP 'UVQPKC /CKG -CPIWT 'UVQPKCP +PUVKVWVG QH 'ZRGTKOGPVCN CPF %NKPKECN /GFKEKPG 6CNNKPP 'UVQPKC

More information

Asbestos Clauses Workgroup

Asbestos Clauses Workgroup Asbestos Clauses Workgroup Report to LUG conference Cambridge September 5 2006 Background market situation in 2002/2003 growing application of asbestos clauses concern at variety of clauses and the need

More information

Influence of Fiber Type, Size, and Number in Human Disease: Conclusions from Fiber Burden Analysis

Influence of Fiber Type, Size, and Number in Human Disease: Conclusions from Fiber Burden Analysis Influence of Fiber Type, Size, and Number in Human Disease: Conclusions from Fiber Burden Analysis Andrew Churg, MD Department of Pathology University of British Columbia Vancouver, BC, Canada Techniques,

More information

Executive Summary All invited experts at the meeting agreed that:

Executive Summary All invited experts at the meeting agreed that: Meeting Notes - GCSA meeting on the Classification and Regulation of Chrysotile Asbestos 10:30-12:30, Monday 7 th March 2011 Government Office for Science, 1 Victoria Street, London SW1H 0ET Attendees

More information

Workers compensation for asbestos related disease in Canada

Workers compensation for asbestos related disease in Canada Workers compensation for asbestos related disease in Canada Katherine Lippel Canada Research Chair in Occupational Health and Safety Law University of Ottawa With the assistance of Valerie Kleinman, Friha

More information

ASBESTOS AWARENESS. For workers and building occupants

ASBESTOS AWARENESS. For workers and building occupants ASBESTOS AWARENESS For workers and building occupants Asbestos Awareness Asbestos is a serious health hazard commonly found in our environment today. This module is designed to provide an overview of asbestos

More information

Banning Asbestos in Asia, Campaigns and Strategies by the Asian Network for the Rights of Occupational Accident Victims (ANROAV)

Banning Asbestos in Asia, Campaigns and Strategies by the Asian Network for the Rights of Occupational Accident Victims (ANROAV) Table of Contents PL-7-06 Sanjiv Pandita Banning Asbestos in Asia, Campaigns and Strategies by the Asian Network for the Rights of Occupational Accident Victims (ANROAV) Sanjiv Pandita Occupational Safety

More information

Asbestos Lessons learned from the EU. Alexandra Caterbow, Coordinator Chemicals and Health Women in Europe for a Common Future

Asbestos Lessons learned from the EU. Alexandra Caterbow, Coordinator Chemicals and Health Women in Europe for a Common Future Asbestos Lessons learned from the EU Alexandra Caterbow, Coordinator Chemicals and Health Women in Europe for a Common Future Ukrainian citizens believe their asbestos is safe WECF discovered with shock

More information

The Burden of Occupational Lung Cancer Paul A. Demers, PhD

The Burden of Occupational Lung Cancer Paul A. Demers, PhD The Burden of Occupational Lung Cancer Paul A. Demers, PhD February 24 th, 2014 Measuring the Impact (burden) of Occupational Cancer Number or proportion of cancer deaths Number or proportion of new cancers

More information

MESOTHELIOMA IN AUSTRALIA INCIDENCE 1982 TO 2009 MORTALITY 1997 TO 2011

MESOTHELIOMA IN AUSTRALIA INCIDENCE 1982 TO 2009 MORTALITY 1997 TO 2011 MESOTHELIOMA IN AUSTRALIA INCIDENCE 1982 TO 29 MORTALITY 1997 TO 211 OCTOBER 213 Safe Work Australia Mesothelioma in Australia Incidence 1982 to 29 Mortality 1997 to 211 OCTOBER 213 Acknowledgement Disclaimer

More information

NIOSH Publishes Study of Cancer Among Firefighters Claire Reiss National League of Cities Risk Information Sharing Consortium.

NIOSH Publishes Study of Cancer Among Firefighters Claire Reiss National League of Cities Risk Information Sharing Consortium. NIOSH Publishes Study of Cancer Among Firefighters Claire Reiss National League of Cities Risk Information Sharing Consortium The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has released the

More information

MESOTHELIOMA IN AUSTRALIA INCIDENCE 1982 TO 2008 MORTALITY 1997 TO 2007

MESOTHELIOMA IN AUSTRALIA INCIDENCE 1982 TO 2008 MORTALITY 1997 TO 2007 MESOTHELIOMA IN AUSTRALIA INCIDENCE 1982 TO 28 MORTALITY 1997 TO 27 August 212 Safe Work Australia Mesothelioma in Australia Incidence 1982 to 28 Deaths 1997 to 27 August 212 Acknowledgement Data on the

More information

PREVENTION OF OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES

PREVENTION OF OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES THE PREVENTION OF OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES World Day for safety and health at work 28 April 2013 Outline The hidden epidemic: a global picture Assessing the need for better data Steps for the prevention of

More information

Asbestos in the Home MISAWA AB, JAPAN

Asbestos in the Home MISAWA AB, JAPAN Asbestos in the Home MISAWA AB, JAPAN Asbestos Awareness OCCUPANT ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF INFORMATION SIGNATURE UNIT NUMBER DATE Prepared by: 35 CES/CEV If you have further question about location of asbestos

More information

Testimony of. Dr. James Crapo. April 26, 2005

Testimony of. Dr. James Crapo. April 26, 2005 Testimony of Dr. James Crapo April 26, 2005 Written Statement of Dr. James D. Crapo, Professor of Medicine, National Jewish Medical and Research Center and University of Colorado Health Sciences Center

More information

A Cross-Sectional Study of Asbestos- Related Morbidity and Mortality in Vermonters Residing Near an Asbestos Mine November 3, 2008

A Cross-Sectional Study of Asbestos- Related Morbidity and Mortality in Vermonters Residing Near an Asbestos Mine November 3, 2008 A Cross-Sectional Study of Asbestos- Related Morbidity and Mortality in Vermonters Residing Near an Asbestos Mine 108 Cherry Street, PO Box 70 Burlington, VT 05402 802.863.7200 healthvermont.gov A Cross-Sectional

More information

Asbestos and Health WHO recommendations on elimination of asbestos-related diseases

Asbestos and Health WHO recommendations on elimination of asbestos-related diseases Asbestos and Health WHO recommendations on elimination of asbestos-related diseases Background World Health Assembly Resolution 58.22 from 2005 on Cancer Prevention and Control Countries should pay special

More information

ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT IN THE MIDDLE EAST. Charles Faulkner Asbestos Risk Management Consultant TEP Environmental Consultants

ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT IN THE MIDDLE EAST. Charles Faulkner Asbestos Risk Management Consultant TEP Environmental Consultants ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT IN THE MIDDLE EAST Charles Faulkner Asbestos Risk Management Consultant TEP Environmental Consultants SALACIOUS HEADLINES ALARMING IMAGES DUBAI AIRPORT FORMER ASBESTOS CEMENT PIPE FACTORY

More information

All About Asbestos. Read this booklet to learn more about:

All About Asbestos. Read this booklet to learn more about: All About Asbestos Read this booklet to learn more about: identifying asbestos-containing material in you home the health risks of asbestos what you can do about asbestos. What Is Asbestos? Asbestos is

More information

COLLEGIUM RAMAZZINI THE GLOBAL HEALTH DIMENSIONS OF ASBESTOS AND ASBESTOS-RELATED DISEASES

COLLEGIUM RAMAZZINI THE GLOBAL HEALTH DIMENSIONS OF ASBESTOS AND ASBESTOS-RELATED DISEASES COLLEGIUM RAMAZZINI THE GLOBAL HEALTH DIMENSIONS OF ASBESTOS AND ASBESTOS-RELATED DISEASES The Collegium Ramazzini is an international scientific society that examines critical issues in occupational and

More information

Malignant Mesothelioma Mortality --- United States, 1999--2005

Malignant Mesothelioma Mortality --- United States, 1999--2005 Weekly April 24, 2009 / 58(15);393-396 Malignant Mesothelioma Mortality --- United States, 1999--2005 Malignant mesothelioma is a fatal cancer primarily associated with exposure to asbestos. The latency

More information

The asbestos crisis Why Britain needs an eradication law

The asbestos crisis Why Britain needs an eradication law Why Britain needs an eradication law All-Party Parliamentary Group on Occupational Safety and Health The All-Party Parliamentary Group on Occupational Safety and Health believes that the time has come

More information

ASBESTOS AWARENESS. Environmental Health And Safety. www.uoguelph.ca/ehs MAINTENANCE CONTRACTORS

ASBESTOS AWARENESS. Environmental Health And Safety. www.uoguelph.ca/ehs MAINTENANCE CONTRACTORS ASBESTOS AWARENESS MAINTENANCE CONTRACTORS Environmental Health And Safety www.uoguelph.ca/ehs March 2007 ASBESTOS AWARENESS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH What is Asbestos? The term asbestos refers to a

More information

The asbestos crisis. Why Britain needs an eradication Law. Background. Levels of mortality

The asbestos crisis. Why Britain needs an eradication Law. Background. Levels of mortality The asbestos crisis. Why Britain needs an eradication Law. The All-Party Parliamentary Group on Occupational Safety and Health believes that the time has come to put in place regulations requiring the

More information

Asbestos Control Programs

Asbestos Control Programs Asbestos Control Programs Effective: September 2000 Vice-President, Finance and Administration Applicable Legislation: Occupational Health and Safety (OHSA), R.S.O. 1990 O.Reg 837, R.R.O. 1990, Designated

More information

NISG Asbestos. Caroline Kirton

NISG Asbestos. Caroline Kirton NISG Asbestos Caroline Kirton 1 The Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012, Regulation 10 requires every employer to ensure that adequate information, instruction and training is given to their employees

More information

National Asbestos Profile Germany 2014

National Asbestos Profile Germany 2014 Germany 2014 National Asbestos Profil Germany 2014 National Asbestos Profile Germany, 2014 Packroff, BAuA 1 20 April 2016 Declaration of Parma/Italy, 2010 to develop national programmes for the elimination

More information

Estimating the Global Burden of Asbestos-related Diseases Using YPLL

Estimating the Global Burden of Asbestos-related Diseases Using YPLL Ramazzini Days Carpi, Italy October, 2012 Estimating the Global Burden of Asbestos-related Diseases Using YPLL Ken Takahashi 1, Ying Jiang 1, Mehrnoosh Movahed 1, Giang Vinh Le 2,1, Eun-Kee Park 3,1, Rokho

More information

Toxicity of Amphibole Asbestos

Toxicity of Amphibole Asbestos Toxicity of Amphibole Asbestos Disclaimer: The material presented in these slides has been reviewed by the U.S. EPA and approved for presentation. Approval does not signify that the contents necessarily

More information

Primary reason asbestos is used, is its special resistance to heat. Asbestos fibers are also virtually indestructible.

Primary reason asbestos is used, is its special resistance to heat. Asbestos fibers are also virtually indestructible. ASBESTOS AWARENESS Asbestos Awareness Asbestos is a serious health hazard commonly found in our environment today. This module is designed to provide initial education of asbestos and its associated hazards.

More information

Asbestos and Cancer in Ontario and The Occupational Cancer Research Centre

Asbestos and Cancer in Ontario and The Occupational Cancer Research Centre Asbestos and Cancer in Ontario and The Occupational Cancer Research Centre March 3 2010 A Presentation to the Asbestos Surveillance & Disease Compensation Think Tank, Toronto Dr. Loraine Marrett Associate

More information

Health Effects of Asbestos Exposure

Health Effects of Asbestos Exposure Health Effects of Asbestos Exposure Jill Dyken, PhD, PE John Wheeler, PhD, DABT Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Asbestos Science Seminar Folsom, California August 18-19, 2004 Agency for

More information

Occupational Disease Fatalities Accepted by the Workers Compensation Board

Occupational Disease Fatalities Accepted by the Workers Compensation Board Occupational Disease Fatalities Accepted by the Workers Compensation Board Year to date, numbers as of January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2008 Occupational disease fatalities are usually gradual in onset

More information

D.M. Bernstein * WHO review Page 1 of 8

D.M. Bernstein * WHO review Page 1 of 8 A review of the WHO s document on the adverse health effects of exposure to asbestos and WHO's recommendations on the prevention of asbestos-related diseases D.M. Bernstein * The WHO s Programme on Occupational

More information

Nebraska Occupational Health Indicator Report, 2013

Nebraska Occupational Health Indicator Report, 2013 Occupational Health Indicator Report, 213 Occupational Safety and Health Surveillance Program Department of Health and Human Services Web: www.dhhs.ne.gov/publichealth/occhealth/ Phone: 42-471-2822 Introduction

More information

Asbestos and the diseases it causes

Asbestos and the diseases it causes Asbestos and the diseases it causes October 2013 Liz Darlison Mesothelioma UK University Hospitals of Leicester Contents What is asbestos Why is it such an issue in the UK Disease Statistics Asbestos Related

More information