CHAPTER 7 DISASTER RECOVERY PLANNING

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1 Source: FACILITY DESIGN AND MANAGEMENT HANDBOOK CHAPTER 7 DISASTER RECOVERY PLANNING L. David McDaniel Chief Scientist BMS Catastrophe Special Technologies Division Fort Worth, Texas INTRODUCTION A disaster is defined as any event that creates an inability on an organization s part to provide critical business functions for some predetermined period of time. After a disaster strikes, the facility manager is central to the recovery process. He or she is expected to stop the damage stabilize the loss. The facility manager will be expected to assess the damage, provide emergency resources and personnel, restore or rebuild the structure, recover the contents, and accomplish all of this within the time parameters defined by the business impact analysis, minimizing loss. In the case of a regional disaster, interaction with emergency personnel from the public sector will be needed. Access to your building can be controlled by public emergency response or law enforcement personnel. The contingency plan (also called business continuity plan, disaster recovery plan, or crisis management plan) is your road map to recovery. It defines the actions, resources, and personnel required for immediate response. Knowledge of your corporate disaster recovery plan is imperative. Many corporations have relegated the responsibility for generating and maintaining the plan to the facility manager. Often the disaster recovery plan is generated by risk management, safety, security, or human resources. It may exist at corporate headquarters. If you are not responsible for development, locate this plan so you can review it and can give your inputs. 7.2 BUSINESS IMPACT ANALYSIS Unfortunately, corporations tend to write plans based on the probability of a specific disaster. What are the chances that a tornado, hurricane, flood, or explosion will hit them? Pretty infinitesimal at best. I would recommend that the mindset be planning not for the probability of a disaster, but planning for the eventuality! Something will occur to interrupt your business. The contingency plan priorities are set by a careful analysis of the cost per day of business interruption. At this juncture, no thought is given to the cause of interruption. This business impact analysis (BIA) is an intensive accounting exercise. Departmental priorities are set based on the cost analysis of the loss of departmental function. Does the loss of accounting cost the firm more than the loss of the call center or does a data processing loss impact more? Manufacturing organizations look at loss of facilities and the overall effect this loss has on the corporation. Single function loss is analyzed, as well as 7.1

2 7.2 PLANNING combinations and permutations. For seasonal businesses, time will be a factor. Accounting firms are very busy when federal income taxes are due, retailers have their biggest season around Christmas, etc. Disasters have an uncanny way of occurring at the worst possible time. With an understanding of the costs involved, the time required to restore the business before it is defunct is determined, as well as restoration priorities for different portions of the organization. This analysis focuses the proactive risk minimization efforts for the organization. 7.3 THE PLAN At this stage, it is time to assess the risks faced by the facility. What natural disasters could occur? Depending on the geographical location there are tornadoes, hurricanes, flooding, lightning, tsunamis, forest fires, volcanoes, earthquakes (see Figure 7.1), and mudslides. What if a fire occurs? Who are your neighbors and what risk does your proximity to them raise? The fire department can provide you with any businesses with hazardous materials that might impact your facility. No business facility is immune from an explosion today (see Figures 7.2 and 7.3). In Oklahoma City, the attack was meant for the federal law enforcement agencies, not the childcare center. Proximity to major highways, railroads, and airports similarly bring risks. Utility failures, limited access for ingress and egress, communication cables, single points of failure, and loss of critical supplier or outside services should also be considered. Winter storms (see Figure 7.4) and civil disorder can close businesses. These risks can be handled proactively or reactively. Window film can reduce flying glass. Separating the UPS from the data center or separating the office battery supply (see Figure 7.5) from the switching equipment can prevent computer contamination if a battery shorts and overheats. Storing vital documents on the second floor can prevent flooding. A contingency plan for each occurrence should be drafted and tabulated. Initially, DR planning began in the financial services sector. The plan was quite simple identify your hot site vendor and sign up. If anything happens, grab the phone, declare, and move operations to the hot site. This plan is hardly sufficient for other business units that may incorporate manufacturing and distribution. In this case, the recovery must be done at the loss site. If a disaster happens in San Francisco, you cannot move San Francisco to San Diego for recovery. The plan FIGURE 7.1 Distress. In an Earthquake, Unattached Files Will Be a Source of Great

3 DISASTER RECOVERY PLANNING 7.3 FIGURE 7.2 An Explosion is a Fire that Occurs in Milliseconds. Here Soot Was Deposited on the 97th Floor by the Supersonic Forces Generated. FIGURE 7.3 After the World Trade Center Explosion, Electronic Equipment on All Floors Required Restoration. FIGURE 7.4 Heavy Snow Loads Allowed to Build on the Roof Can Lead to a Structural Collapse.

4 7.4 PLANNING FIGURE 7.5 Batteries for UPSs and Office Power Should Be Isolated from the Rest of the Electronic Equipment to Prevent Corrosion from a Faulty Battery s Emissions. should consider the essential functions within the organization and where they could be relocated, perhaps displacing other functions not so critical. In any case, you as the facility manager are charged with the restoration/recovery of the existing facilities. Vital outside suppliers and services should also be identified. Alternate sources must be identified. You should be assured that these organizations are also ready to recover if a business interruption occurs within their organization. For critical equipment, plans should be made to have the ability to replace this equipment within the time parameters defined in the BIA. The plan must prioritize the functions (departments or divisions), equipment (see Figure 7.6), and documents which are critical to the operation of your business. Only you can define which subset of documents are vital and their location should be identified. The documents that are critical for FIGURE 7.6 In a Production Environment, High Priority Critical Equipment Must Be Identified in the Disaster Recovery Plan for Immediate Attention.

5 DISASTER RECOVERY PLANNING 7.5 the survival of the business will normally comprise 5 7% of all documents. They may be in the form of paper, microfilm, microfiche, or magnetic media. The most effective plan is corporate-wide with the support and backing of top administrators. To be useful, the plan must be simple and readable. Major decision tree pages should be marked with tabs, with the first on top. The response requirements should be no longer than one page with a simple bullet format. The plan must be made available to responsible employees and it must be reviewed, updated, and tested on a regular schedule. The top level of the plan deals with life, health, and safety issues, then stabilization and preservation of assets. The plan should provide for business continuity and an orderly return to normal operation. The public response to a regional disaster is the incident command system. The local, regional, or state emergency operations center (EOC) is activated and the incident commander is in charge. Security perimeters are set up and maintained by local, county, state, and federal law enforcement personnel or National Guard troops. Access to the affected area is limited. Whether or not you are allowed entry is defined by your personal relationship with the public authorities and what arrangements you have made to interact with the EOC. To gain entry, you can act either proactively or reactively. Researching the public response disaster plan would expedite reentry. Who will be the incident commander? Where will the EOC be located? Which public officials will man the center? Check with local civil authorities and incorporate the public response with your plan. Local fire departments are a good place to start. You will need to be able to identify your response team, the location/locations where access is required, the functions to be performed, and the time required. 7.4 THE TEAM Equally important is identifying the critical personnel who must be involved in a recovery. Just to assess the seriousness of any situation requires administrative, operations, facility, security, and expert personnel. Administrative personnel should include a person with the authority to declare an emergency and mobilize resources, a person with intimate knowledge of the insurance coverage, a person who knows the operations requirements, and a person who can write checks to provide emergency funds. Accounting should set up special case numbers to capture the cost of materials and services required in recovering the business. Internal labor should also be captured. All contractors must provide detailed invoices. The success in filing an insurance claim is dependent on this documentation. One individual should be named disaster recovery coordinator (quite often the facility manager) who manages the restoration/recovery project and another individual should be responsible for internal communications activating the telephone tree. A single individual should be assigned to handle all questions from the local media and represent the company publicly. All other personnel should refer any queries to that individual. The facilities personnel know the building layout and location of utilities. They are frequently first on the scene, and must decide if escalation is required or if the problem can be handled internally. Security personnel will be needed to establish perimeters and protect assets. Often an outside security firm can be contracted to provide the increased levels of security needed. As soon as practicable, security needs to perform a sweep of the building to take custody of cash, jewelry, and other valuables. Expert personnel will include disaster restoration personnel who can determine what equipment, etc., is restorable, recommend steps to stabilize the loss until restoration can occur, and provide trained personnel dedicated to your recovery (see Figure 7.7). Other experts that might be required are structural engineers to determine the structural integrity of the building. Do not forget to define alternates. What would happen to your plan if one member of your team is on vacation? This composite group constitutes the disaster assessment team who will decide upon the appropriate level of response and will manage the restoration project. The actions will be implemented and the decisions communicated to the employees. Remember that you may have to do all of this notification/mobilization without access to your building. In case of a serious fire, the average length of time before you are allowed to enter the building is 48 h. If hazardous materials are involved or if the building is designated a crime scene, the time involved may be weeks. Notify your insurance broker immediately.

6 7.6 PLANNING FIGURE 7.7 Precontracting with a National Restoration Company Can Bring Dedicated Personnel and Equipment in the Case of an Emergency. In the case of a regional disaster, the normal communications infrastructure may be damaged or non-existent and key employees may be tied up at home making sure their family is cared for first. One solution to this problem is to contract with a national restoration firm so that their response is assured. This way, trained restoration technicians and equipment will be dedicated to stabilizing your building. The same is true of the other critical outside services you may require. Since the priority of any plan is life, health, and safety (see Figure 7.8), this area should be placed foremost in the plan. Evacuation plans, safety shelters, meeting points, and medical aid should all be provided. Special attention is given to the means of communicating with employees through alarms and voice annunciation systems. These systems should be on emergency power systems. As gruesome as the details may be, the plan should include response to fatalities and serious injury. Do not forget to include plans for disabled employees. FIGURE 7.8 If Lower Boxes in a Distribution Warehouse Are Exposed to Water, the Stacks Become Unstable.

7 DISASTER RECOVERY PLANNING 7.7 FIGURE 7.9 If Untreated, Electronics Exposed to Heavy Concentrations of Acidic Soot Will Be Ruined within Hours. 7.5 WHAT TO DO? Businesses today rely upon a complex combination of paper documents, microfilm, scanners, terabyte data storage systems, readers, printers, computer systems, and communication equipment. The critical computer hardware and the media containing vital documents must be stabilized to prevent loss. A fire often generates aggressive acidic corrosive gases which will be an integral part of the smoke. The smoke is analogous to fog and will condense on surfaces below dew point temperature in the building and contents. In this condition, bare metals will corrode. If electronic hardware is allowed to corrode, restoration may be impossible. Quick response is of the essence for stabilization (see Figure 7.9). Insurance companies pay more money each year for smoke damage than for thermal losses. Hurricanes often deposit salt water on equipment when the roof is damaged. The salts cause similar corrosion (see Figure 7.10). Floodwater may contain chemicals that generate the same damage. FIGURE 7.10 Corrosion of Equipment Occurs Rapidly after Exposure to Sea Water Carried Inland by a Hurricane.

8 7.8 PLANNING You, as the insured, are legally responsible for loss mitigation (stabilization) and you must take all reasonable and prudent precautions to minimize the cost of the loss. This must be done immediately. Service contracts and warranties are voided by the exposure of equipment to a hostile environment. The process of recovery has three phases. The first is stabilization stopping the damage. The second step is restoration returning the equipment to pre-loss condition using appropriate cleaning protocols. The final phase is recertification. In the case of equipment this means tests, diagnostics, and service as required to reestablish the warranties or service contract. In the case of the building, the recertification is done by employing a certified industrial hygienist (CIH) to run the appropriate tests to recertify the building for re-occupancy. The building recertification is especially important in office buildings. The CIH should be made available to the office personnel to answer any particular questions that arise during re-occupancy. The disaster recovery plan should define the steps for stabilization, and the equipment and materials required must be acquired and stored. The basic steps of mitigation are covered in the following subsections Electronic Hardware The first warning signs will be the corrosion of mild steel hardware components. Objective chemical tests can be run to determine corrosion potential. The most effective means of corrosion control is to lower the humidity to reduce the reaction rate. Remove water. The steps are as follows: WARNING: DO NOT ENERGIZE ANY WET EQUIPMENT REMOVE POWER Open cabinet doors, remove side panels and covers, and pull out chassis drawers to allow water to run out of the equipment. Remove standing water with wet vacuum cleaners. Use low-pressure air (50 psi) to blow trapped water out of the equipment. Absorbent cotton pads (diapers?) can be used to blot up water. Use appropriate caution around header pins and back-plane wire wrap connectors to avoid bending. Vacuum and mop up water under any raised computer room floor. Equipment that contains open relays and transformers will require a special bake out before application of power Industrial Equipment Includes lathes, mills, other machine shop equipment, plastic injection molding machines, and other production equipment with precision ways and close tolerance metal surfaces. The corrosion process requires moisture, so the bare metal surfaces should be lightly coated with a petroleum-based lubricant. This process will have to be repeated as the lubricant evaporates. Tenting with desiccant dehumidification inside will also help protect the equipment from further damage. Complete restoration removing the contaminants should begin immediately Magnetic Media One important asset that must be preserved after a disaster is the critical data on magnetic media. Media that has been exposed to contaminants should be examined by a professional before any attempt is made to use them. If an attempt is made to use a floppy disk with hard particulate matter on the surface, damage to the oxide layer may destroy data as the floppy spins. Tapes must be dry

9 DISASTER RECOVERY PLANNING 7.9 and clean before any attempt is made to copy the data. Hard disk data can be partially saved even after a head crash. This process is very labor intensive and requires special equipment in a clean room. Contaminated media is replaced with clean media. Restoration of data is a process involving the emergency cleaning of the media so that data may be copied onto other media. The original media will be discarded (or archived). If exposed to flood waters, keep tapes wet until they can be restored. Use Ziploc bags, pack in a plastic lined box, etc. Keep in a cool area ( 65 F). Tapes must be cleaned within two weeks to avoid fungus growth. Do not attempt to dry with heat!! A % success ratio is possible. Predicated on h response Microfilm, Unmounted Microfiche, X-ray Film The most important thing to know about microfilm is that once the film is wet do not let it dry!! The film must be processed while still wet or the gelatin coating will stick to the next layer and the document information will be torn from the film. Here again, speed is of the essence. For short time storage, five gallon buckets can be used to store film with enough (preferably distilled) water to cover the film. Ziploc bags or Saran Wrap can also be used to package the film and prevent drying. Use gloves when handling wet materials and wash hands thoroughly to prevent infection from flood bio-contaminants. For longer storage than a few days, a conservator must add special gelatin hardening chemicals to the water. To minimize damage, store wet film in a refrigerated area with a temperature of F. For long periods of time, film may be frozen to preserve it. It should never be freeze-dried, but thawed and wet processed. SPECIAL NOTE (According to Kodak) Because the original quality level of film cannot be restored, the word restored is used to mean the microfilm is returned to a usable state so that it may fulfill the purpose for which it was primarily intended: the storage and retrieval of information. Its quality and appearance, however, will never equal that of the damaged film. In all restoration projects, it is important that you are aware that complete restoration cannot be guaranteed and that restored film will not be of archival quality. When archival quality is required, a silver duplicate film print must be made Optical Media, Magneto-Optical Media If optical media is wet, keep wet until it can be cleaned (similar to microfilm). Take care not to scratch the surface of the media Prints and Negatives Again, treated similar to microfilm.

10 7.10 PLANNING Flooded Books Must Be Washed and Frozen to Prevent Fur- FIGURE 7.11 ther Damage Paper If paper is wet (see Figure 7.11), the following steps are recommended: Keep air moving, lower humidity, lower temperature to avoid fungal growth. An industry expert, Dr. Peter Waters, states To leave such materials more than 48 h in temperatures above 70 F and a relative humidity above 60% without good air circulation will almost certainly result in heavy mold growth and lead to high recovery and restoration costs. Freeze wet documents as quickly as practicable. Separate blocks of documents before freezing as required with plastic for possible later removal and segregation. If exposed to flood waters containing mud and silt, the document should be washed and sanitized before freezing. NOTE: The most effective means of restoration for paper records is freeze drying in a vacuum chamber. Sublimation dries the documents without having liquid water attacking the inks, surface finishes, and binding glues. This is the only method for glossy finish stock Microfiche (Aperture Card Mounted) Similar to paper. First freeze dried, and when dry, the film is cleaned and remounted if required Building Structure Wet buildings (see Figure 7.12) must be properly dried to avoid damage and microbial growth. Ever-present mold spores will bloom and grow in two days with the right conditions (see Figure 7.13). See Appendix A for more information. To discourage growth, decrease humidity, circulate air, lower the temperature, leave lights on.

11 DISASTER RECOVERY PLANNING 7.11 FIGURE ,000 Gallons. Two Inches of Water in a 20,000 Square Foot Facility is With the exceptions of musical instruments or museum-archived collections, the building cannot be dried too quickly. The faster the water removal, the less the damage. All water-soaked ruined contents should be removed and discarded before effective dehumidification is possible. In general, the most effective way to dehumidify is with large desiccant units sized to provide at least one air interchange per hour. Air movement is provided with turbo-fans. Proper instrumentation should be used to determine water content of walls, ceiling, and sub flooring. Progress of dehumidification is measured by monitoring humidity ratio, not relative humidity. Before return to the building, re-occupancy certification by a certified industrial hygienist will curtail many potential health concerns that tenants or employees may have. FIGURE 7.13 Fungus Growing on Water Saturated Ceiling Tile after Two Weeks Would Have Been Much Easier to Prevent Than to Clean.

12 7.12 PLANNING 7.6 CONCLUSION At this point in the disaster recovery, the loss site is stabilized and the critical portions of the company are operating according to plan. As required, the employees are working at a hot site, alternate facility, or alternate building space. Communications have been rerouted, all critical information systems are operational, and we are ready for the next step: demolition, cleaning, restoration, replacement, and reconstruction as needed. This portion of the plan is too often only skeletal. The planning effort is focused on business continuity and the restoration and return to the original facility is not planned in detail. The business priorities defined should be followed and the recovery plan should provide for an orderly return to the original facility with no business interruption. This part of the project provides closure for the loss. The final result is that the company has returned to predisaster operation. APPENDIX A A FRIGHTENING FUNGUS Used by Permission of Fort Worth Star Telegram, May 23, 1997 by Karen Brooks Health officials were puzzled by the illness of a suburban Dallas woman. For about two weeks after moving into a condominium, she had suffered flu-like symptoms. The neighbors found her crawling around on her hands and knees complaining of earthquakes, said Ken McBride, a regional industrial hygienist with the Fort Worth-Tarrant County Public Health Departments. Health officials investigating the case six years ago found the cause of her illness: fungus. Airconditioning ducts at her condo were layered with mold. She was totaled. Her system was overwhelmed, McBride said. She was in the hospital for 60 days before they got her cleaned out. Public knowledge of fungi is replete with images of mushrooms, athlete s foot, and yeast infections. But researchers say that fungi carry a deadly potential, as well as the promise of health benefits. That s why the scientific community is reaching for information about one of the world s most ancient and mystifying life forms. In the last 10 years, mycology, the study of fungus, has become one of the most critical in all of medicine, said Michael Rinaldi, a mycologist at Audie Murphy Veterans Affairs Hospital in San Antonio. In recent weeks, the fungus stachybotrys was found at some Birdville district schools after parents reported mold and mildew odors and allergic symptoms in their children. Health officials said the children were not in direct contact with the fungus and that there was no health threat. The same type of fungus has been linked to illnesses among infants in Cleveland in 1992 and Twenty-one infants from extremely damp homes were hospitalized with bleeding lungs. Three died. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which usually doesn t track fungal infections, is considering studying the fungus, officials said. How much of a threat are fungi? The subjective nature of immune systems makes it difficult to nail down exposure limits, researchers say. Everybody has their own unique susceptibility in response to fungal spores that s one of the reasons nobody has said, This is the dose of spores that will cause reaction, said Robert Garrison, a mycologist with IAQ Consultants, an industrial hygiene company in Southlake that helped investigate the Birdville incident. Infants are more susceptible to infection because their immune systems haven t fully developed, immunologists said. The elderly tend to have weaker immune systems, too. People are more susceptible to a fungus when it is in a building. Asthma patients who are being treated with steroids are

13 DISASTER RECOVERY PLANNING 7.13 also susceptible, said Dr. Justin Radolf, associate professor of internal medicine and microbiology at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. Ironically, medical advances in treating diseases such as polio, cancer, and AIDS have created a population suddenly susceptible to unusual fungal infections. Anybody who is immune-suppressed, has cancer or is undergoing therapy for cancer, has had transplant surgery, HIV/AIDS, leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin s disease, hemotologic malignancies, people born with defects in their immune system, diabetics... those are the people that are at risk for fungal infections, Rinaldi said. That s why the study of fungi has come to the forefront of medical science, he said. Fungi that were never connected with human medicine before these are normal environmental creatures we are now seeing that these fungi are killing these immune-suppressed people, he said. Some fungi can cause asthma and bad breath. Some make fingernails fall off. Some can eat away a backbone or destroy brain capacity. Other times, fungi can save lives. Penicillin and other major antibiotics are produced by fungi, Rinaldi said. Yet for the most part, fungi exist undetected after they make contact with the body. More than 200,000 species of fungus have been identified only a tiny percentage of the variety and the typical healthy individual is usually not at risk. The constant exposure to small doses of fungi is beneficial to healthy people because, much like a vaccine, they build up the immune system. Every day of your life, you re walking around literally in a sea of microbes you breathe them, they re on your hands, on your clothes, in the food that you eat, Rinaldi said. And yet very few people die of infectious diseases, comparatively. Most fungal infections can be treated with antibiotics, he said. But that doesn t mean they ll be eradicated soon. One reason they re such hardy survivors is that fungi rarely go hungry. There is very little on Earth that a fungus can t or won t eat, Rinaldi said. If you happen to wear eyeglasses and you set them on the ground and come back a year later, not only will the fungus have eaten the rims, it will have eaten the glass lenses, too. Compared to that, human tissue becomes...almost like dessert. APPENDIX B PRE-LOSS RISK ASSESSMENT CHECK LIST FOR ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT FACILITY 1.0 Fire Suppression And Detection Systems 1.1 Sprinkler Systems Water flow sensors to detect flow and cut off power to EDP equipment to prevent electrical damage precharged sprinklers. Controlled power-down sequence Under computer room floor water detectors to warn of impending water threat from flood, plumbing leaks, etc Sprinkler heads in HVAC ducts to prevent spread of fire Sprinkler system reservoir charged with compressed air with flow value to limit accidental discharge of water Routine use of EDP equipment and media storage covers during periods of nonuse to protect from accidental water exposure Routine electrical shutdown of equipment during periods of non-use electrically active equipment exposed to water may require extensive repair and retesting. 1.2 Halon Systems Back-up with sprinkler systems Needs to be checked routinely for facility containment duration. ASTM Door Testing.

14 7.14 PLANNING Consider replacement with sprinkler system as Halons become more expensive and limited in use due to ozone depletion potential and Montreal Protocol. 1.3 Facility Modifications Compare original facility layout with current layout note all changes in wall locations, high shelf storage arrangements, types of material stored, new room areas, etc Re-evaluate fire suppression and detection system for suitability with facility modifications. 1.4 Fire Detection System Location of detectors in high-risk areas check all new areas for adequate coverage Check program for follow-up of manufacturer s instructions for periodic operational test and certification of detector system Upgrade of sensor devices are current sensor devices properly matched with current risk? New technology HCl and fuel leak sensors developed by BellCore Labs. Smart sensors Location of alarm system external sites to alert area supervisor use of phone lines to reach home locations. 2.0 Facility Concerns 2.1 Presence of dedicated HVAC systems for critical areas containment and control of external fire by-products prevention of cross contamination. 2.2 Use of HVAC duct located fire baffles and sprinkler heads to limit spread of fire. 2.3 Use of flame-retardant floor, wall, and ceiling materials in Computer Center construction. 2.4 Separation of Computer Center from high-risk manufacturing areas. 2.5 Location of Computer Center in high-risk flood areas and/or areas accessible to non-company individuals. 3.0 Backup Capability 3.1 Electrical power and services Requirements for diesel generators and/or battery backed power supplies for backup to critical operations EDP centers, communications, HVAC, services, maintain security systems, etc. Planned wiring/switching for external generators Location critical separate UPS from data room, flood threat to generators? Availability of auxiliary HVAC/dehumidification equipment to control post-loss environment Contacts with common carriers and power companies to provide for emergency backup services. Continuation of brokerage services, remote access capabilities, other financial system links. 3.2 Magnetic Media Backup Routine program for daily media backup. Use of cartridges instead of reel to reel. Streaming tape media for PC hard disk back up recommended Remote off-site storage of backup media over 24 hours old. Virtual Private Network wide-band data vaulting to a secure vendor to avoid transporting tapes Availability of formatted blank copy and storage media for all EDP users at worksite. 3.3 Backup EDP equipment In-house availability of similar EDP equipment and software. Specialized MICR equipment Contacts with external hot/cold sites and time share organizations for EDP services. 3.4 Backup Communications Equipment Cellular phones, direct lines (convert FAX/MODEM lines), satellite link Radio 4.0 Pre-Loss Assessment of EDP Assets 4.1 Identification of EDP physical assets Inventory listing by type, manufacturer, model, and serial numbers, date of purchase, replacement costs, unique configurations.

15 DISASTER RECOVERY PLANNING Inventory of software including purchased and custom programs phone numbers, s/n Identify critical data/documents source and archival documents inventory Copies of CSR sorted by DS3 and circuit number. Other outside network routing information. Equipment software configuration. 4.2 Location and preservation of vendor warranties, service maintenance policies, and third party service and repair policies, system configuration documentation. 4.3 Prioritization of hardware and software recovery processes. Specialized processing equipment: MICR, microfilm, microfiche, networks, security, etc. What replacements are available for this equipment should it be destroyed? 5.0 Identification and Review of Outside Loss Recovery Services 5.1 Restoration of media and/or data recovery from damaged magnetic media. 5.2 Hot/cold sites for EDP service backup. 5.3 Corrosion control and clean-up of water exposed equipment. 5.4 Environmental stabilization and moisture control. 5.5 Detection, analysis, and removal of hazardous materials. 5.6 Clean-up of EDP equipment and facilities. 5.7 Recovery of water-damaged source and archival documents. 5.8 Supplementary security personnel. 5.9 Experts structural engineer to determine damage, archivist, CIH, others. 6.0 Formula Disaster Recovery Plan 6.1 Updated plan in place 6.2 Accessibility of plan to key employees. These employees should be identified and notified. Check list quarterly. 6.3 Testing of plan for feasibility and completeness. Fire scenario. Regional disaster scenario. ENDNOTES 1. BMS Catastrophe Disaster restoration guide for disaster recovery planners, 9th Revision. Fort Worth, TX: Special Technologies Division. 2. National Archives and Records Administration Instructional Guide Series Vital records and records disaster mitigation and recovery. College Park, MD: Office of Records Administration. 3. Nyberg, S The invasion of the giant spore. SOLINET Preservation Program. Leaflet Number (November). 4. Van Bogart, J National Media Lab. Recovery of damaged magnetic tape and optical disk media. Presentation at Library of Congress Symposium. (September 21). 5. Waters, P Procedures for salvage of water damaged library materials. Extracts from unpublished revised text. Washington DC: The Library of Congress. (July). 6. Reagor, B. T Smoke corrosivity: Generation, impact, detection and protection. The Journal of Fire Science s Colloquium on Smoke Corrosivity, Baltimore, MD. (November). 7. An extensive library of Disaster Recovery Planning information resides at the Disaster Recovery Journal website and Contingency Planning & Management at 7.15

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