USING SOCIAL MODELING TO INFORM COMMUNITY COLLEGE STUDENT BEHAVIOR: A CASE STUDY EXAMINING EMBEDDED INTERVENTIONS IN A BASIC SKILLS MATH CLASS

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "USING SOCIAL MODELING TO INFORM COMMUNITY COLLEGE STUDENT BEHAVIOR: A CASE STUDY EXAMINING EMBEDDED INTERVENTIONS IN A BASIC SKILLS MATH CLASS"

Transcription

1 USING SOCIAL MODELING TO INFORM COMMUNITY COLLEGE STUDENT BEHAVIOR: A CASE STUDY EXAMINING EMBEDDED INTERVENTIONS IN A BASIC SKILLS MATH CLASS Dissertation Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctorate in Educational Leadership Mills College Spring 2013 By Celia Esposito-Noy

2 UMI Number: All rights reserved INFORMATION TO ALL USERS The quality of this reproduction is dependent upon the quality of the copy submitted. In the unlikely event that the author did not send a complete manuscript and there are missing pages, these will be noted. Also, if material had to be removed, a note will indicate the deletion. UMI Published by ProQuest LLC (2013). Copyright in the Dissertation held by the Author. Microform Edition ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. This work is protected against unauthorized copying under Title 17, United States Code ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway P.O. Box 1346 Ann Arbor, MI

3 Committee Members: Susan Christopher, Chair Director of Enrollment & Strategic Research, School of Education David Donahue Professor of Education, Associate Provost Regina Stanback Stroud Visiting Assistant Professor Kathy Schultz Professor of Education Dean of School of Education ii

4 identified the significance of setting and maintaining expectations and the emergent theme of faith. The findings from my study have implications for both practitioners and researchers. For practitioners, this study provides a framework for teaching students college know-how in order to advance student success, specifically students enrolled in basic skills courses. The findings from this study also indicate the significance of students feeling cared for and how this contributes to course completion and success. For researchers, data from student interviews indicate that we can learn from students about the factors they believe inform their course success. Including student voices in future research about student success will help the field understand the interventions or treatments that students find most significant. iv

5 Dedication To my mother, Dolores, who inspired in me a love for learning and a respect for the teaching profession And, To my husband, Solomon, for his patience and support v

6 Table of Contents Chapter Page 1 Introduction... 1 Research Question... 1 Background... 1 Rationale for the Study Review of the Literature... 9 Social Stratification and Community College Institutional Attributes and Organizational Leadership Basic Skills in California Community Colleges Student Development Theory Student Retention Learning Communities Collaborative Learning Peer Support Peer Assessment Validation Theory Social-psychological Interventions Social Learning Theory and Social Modeling Concepts Related to Embedded Interventions Summary Conceptual Framework Professional Experience vi

7 Social Modeling Definition and Goals of Embedded Interventions How Embedded Interventions Work Defining Student Success in Relationship to Behaviors Basic Skills and Embedded Interventions Methodology The Pilot Study Institutional Review Board Approval Research Design Scope Setting Procedures Research Participants Data Collection Data Analysis and Validity Limitations Findings and Analysis Findings from the Pilot Study Introduction to Research Participants Classroom Observations SI Observations Themes Conclusion vii

8 6 Implications and Conclusion Implications for Practice Implications for Research Conclusion Appendices A. Student Survey B. Informed Consent C. Interview Protocol and Questions (Students) D. Interview Protocol and Questions (Instructor) E. Interview Protocol and Questions (Peer Model) F. Text from Interviews and Observations References viii

9 Figures Figure Page 1 Conceptual Framework for Study of Embedded Interventions ix

10 Tables Table Page 1 Student Participant Profiles x

11 Acknowledgments Many friends and colleagues assisted me in completing this dissertation. I will be forever grateful to my Committee Chair and Advisor, Dr. Susan Christopher who assisted and supported me throughout my journey. My colleagues at Cosumnes River College were instrumental in helping me throughout this process, specifically Dr. Deborah J. Travis who provided me with the time and encouragement needed to complete this dissertation. Many thanks to the CRC management team, as well as colleagues and friends throughout Los Rios Community College District. I am fortunate to have Drs. Shannon Dickson, Suzanne DuBois, Francisco Rodriguez, and Pam Walker as colleagues and friends who provided guidance and support throughout. I wish to acknowledge my dissertation committee members, Drs. David Donahue, Kathy Schultz, and Regina Stanback Stroud who provided thoughtful feedback and offered unique insight. To my family and friends, Alexis Foster, Kalyn Foster, Sherri Barnes, many thanks for being patient and supportive. I am grateful to the research participants, in particular, the students who trusted me with their stories and generously gave of their time, and to the instructor and peer model both who inspired me through their devotion to the students. xi

12 to a lack of resources. Regardless of who is responsible and why, a significant number of community college students arrive in need of support. Too many high school students are not ready for college success, too many adults lack basic literacy, and enrollment in college too often fails to lead to degree completion (Moore & Shulock, 2009, p. i). According to the report, Investigating the Alignment of High School and Community College Assessments in California, one in four degree-seeking community college students earns a degree, certificate, or transfers within 6 years (Brown & Niemi, 2007, p. 1). The October 2011 draft report Refocusing California Community Colleges Towards Student Success, by the California Community College Task Force on Student Success, estimates that nationally, 60% of all entering college students assess as needing basic skills remediation (p. 39) and that only 12% place in transfer-level math and 14% place in transfer-level English (p. 49). Additionally, the RP Group s 2005 Environmental Scan noted, Empirical evidence suggests that those who begin at the lowest levels of basic skills are unlikely to achieve a degree or transfer to a university (p. 6). For students of color and students of low income attending California s community colleges, completing basic skills courses and progressing to transfer-level courses is particularly challenging. The report, Refocusing California Community Colleges Towards Student Success (California Community College Task Force on Student Success, 2011) indicates that enrollment in all basic skills courses are over represented by students of color. Latinos comprise 40% of the enrollments, African Americans make up 11%, Asians comprise 13% and whites make up 22% (p. 40). The report also notes that a significant number of entering students will place well below college-level courses and will face the daunting task of completing one to four levels of 3

13 course work before enrolling in transfer-level courses. The report further indicates that 16.2% of entering California community college students place four levels below transfer-level math and 18.4% place at one level below transfer-level math and the numbers are equivalent in English, reading, writing, and ESL (p. 40). California s high school graduates and their parents often assume that they are prepared to complete college-level work and enter the community college system with the expectation of completing a degree, certificate, or the transfer curriculum within two years. This expectation is born from the belief that a student who completes the high school curriculum and passes the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) has demonstrated college readiness. Many of these students will face academic and personal obstacles that will make it difficult to complete basic skills courses, let alone college courses, and progress towards a degree, certificate, or transfer to a four-year college. The challenge is to move these students through the basic skills courses so that they can make progress towards a degree or certificate by enrolling in college and transfer-level courses. The 2007 report, Basic Skills as a Foundation for Student Success in California Community Colleges was initiated by the California Community Colleges System Office to identify effective practices in basic skills programs (CSS, p. 3). The CSS and its affiliate, the RP Group for California Community Colleges led the study that resulted in the poppy copy, as it is often referred to because of the color of the report cover. Its extensive literature review, institutional self-assessment tool, and cost/revenue tools served as models for colleges throughout the state. Colleges were introduced to the report by teams of trainers that included faculty, staff, and administrators who met with colleagues up and down the state for months ensuring that all stakeholders were familiar 4

14 with the best practices identified through the extensive literature review. This publication and the subsequent training sessions served as models for best practices in the community college system. The state s legislature made a significant commitment to funding these efforts and allocated $33 million dollars per year to the community college system to support colleges in implementing best practices. As a senior level administrator overseeing student services at a California community college and a member of one of the basic skills task force training teams, I became increasingly interested in basic skills student success rates, especially as my college examined our practices beginning in While we assessed our teaching methods, our organizational structure, and resource allocation, the faculty teaching basic skills shared their frustration about student behavior in the classroom. Their primary concern was the lack of demonstrated college student behavior, such as being on time to class and remaining throughout, taking notes, not talking on cell phones, and being responsible for assignments. While instructors would prompt students to correct disruptive or ineffective behaviors, many students could not maintain the change nor adopt an internal locus of control and assume responsibility for their own learning. While we were discussing ways to address student behaviors, I found promising practices in positive psychology and became reacquainted with Bandura s seminal work on Social Learning Theory and his more current work using social modeling to affect change around the world. I wondered if social modeling could be used to affect change in students classroom behavior. I introduced the concept of social modeling through what was referred to initially as intrusive interventions in select basic skills math and English courses to provide students specific examples of how to be successful college 5

15 hand, have expectations of what college students should know, and hold students to these sometimes unspoken or unwritten expectations. The disconnect between students understanding and faculty expectations informed my interest in further studying the effect that embedded interventions had on informing student behavior. I was interested in researching the extent to which embedded interventions may bridge the gap between what students arrive knowing and what faculty expect of students. My interest in examining embedded interventions within a basic skills math class was informed by the statewide effort to improve basic skills course success rates known as the Basic Skills Initiative (BSI; California Community Colleges System Office, 2006) and our college s efforts to improve course completion rates for those enrolled in basic skills. The BSI led efforts to improve basic skills course success and shaped how faculty and administrators thought about student success focusing on students, how they learn, and what is missing from the student success data. As a senior level administrator overseeing student services, I also serve as the student discipline officer for my college. In this role, I work with students who have been disruptive, many having arrived unprepared for the rigors of college and unsure how to interpret what the college and faculty expect of them. While some administrators dread serving as the college s student discipline officer, I embrace the role and find it to be an informative way to hear from students about their experiences in the classroom and on campus and to provide them with skills and resources. A significant number of students referred for discipline are those enrolled in basic skills courses and they discuss their frustration with not understanding what the instructor wants. Through this work, I found that students act out in class and on campus when they are not clear about our 7

16 expectations of them, when rules seem hidden or inconsistent, and when they feel uncomfortable about being college students. When I share my findings from discipline meetings with faculty, they are often surprised that students do not understand what is acceptable classroom behavior or the extent to which instructor inconsistencies can be overwhelming for students. My interest in conducting this study was to understand how embedded interventions may inform student behavior and potentially how these interventions may inform the student-instructor dynamic within the basic skills classroom. In the remaining chapters of this study, I will describe the study I conducted to answer these questions. I provide a review of the relevant literature in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 details my conceptual framework, provides definitions for terms used, and explains how embedded interventions work. Chapter 4 focuses on methodology including the scope of my study, my research design, and a pilot study I conducted that informed this study. Chapter 5 provides the findings from my data analysis. Implications for both practitioners and researchers are shared in Chapter 6. 8

17 the social stratification in higher education. As early as 1960, as California formalized the Master Plan for Higher Education, Clark (1960) identified the sequence of procedures that leads to cooling out (p. 574), a condition assumed by students attending junior or community colleges. Community colleges served as a place to let down hopes gently and whereby a student who began with every intention to transfer to a four-year college is brought to realize, finally, that it is best to ease himself out of the competition to transfer (Clark, 1960, p. 574). Brint and Karabel (1989) shared Clark s perspective and wrote about the two-year college serving as a sorting function (p. 213). Wherever they developed, the public junior colleges faced two contradictory tasks: the democratic one of bringing new populations into higher education and the exclusionary one of channeling them away from the four-year institutions they hoped to attend (Brint & Karabel, 1989, p. 208). More recently, Wassmer, Moore, & Shulock (2004) wrote that, social class affects educational attainment through parental education and family expectations, thereby perpetuating educational inequity (p. 653). Some of the more recent literature has challenged Clark s concept of cooling out indicating that students attending community colleges go through a warming up and experience an increase in academic aspirations (Alexander, Bozick, & Entwisle, 2008). The literature on warming up is less prevalent and the data shows that regardless of aspirations, student progress towards a degree, certificate, or transfer is slow and dropout rates are high (Bailey, Leinback, & Jenkins, 2006). After three years just 16% of firsttime community college students who began college in 2003 attained a credential of any kind (certificate, associate s degree, and/or bachelor s degree), and another 40% were still enrolled (Goldrick-Rab, 2010, p. 440). A significant number of these students are 11

18 those who began in basic skills. More than two-fifths of entering community college students enroll in remedial education (Adelman, 2006) and those who require basic skills course work are not likely to complete a degree or certificate at a community college (Bailey, Calcagno, Jenkins, Leinback, & Kienzel, 2005). How and why community college students demonstrate poor completion rates is the focus of much debate in the literature. It is tempting to believe that completion rates are lower in the bottom tiers of four-year institutions and community colleges because the students aren t prepared. But it is more complicated than that (Carnevale & Strohl, 2011, p. B34). Carnevale and Strohl propose that the tracking mechanism used in many high schools closely conformed to hierarchies built along lines of race, class, and gender (p. B34). Nearly 80% of the lowest-income students go to colleges in the bottom half of the postsecondary system, which include less-prestigious four-year colleges and community colleges (Carnevale & Strohl, 2011, p. B32). The authors further note that the polarization of the postsecondary system exacerbates the educational and resource gaps among students from different socioeconomic backgrounds (p. B33), thereby highlighting disparities in allocated resources between those at the highest and lowest levels of the postsecondary educational system. Social stratification impacts students preparation for college, their college choices, and the opportunities available after college. For community college students enrolled in basic skills, the results of social stratification can compound poor academic progress and delay program completion, leaving students uncertain about their ability to complete college. It is important to situate those who place in basic skills within the context of social stratification and acknowledge that our current issues are due to 12

19 students choices upfront (p. 26) and that some colleges may consider a less restrictive approach to assisting students by offering a limited selection of pre-packaged college pathways that students could choose from instead of planning their schedules a la carte (p. 26). An example of successful programs for first-time students are those that leave very little room for students to deviate from an academic plan by providing structure and minimizing student choice (Scott-Clayton, 2011a). The structure hypothesis put forward by Scott-Clayton (2011a) proposes that, community college students will be more likely to persist and succeed in programs that are tightly and consciously structured (p.1) as opposed to those that allow students to determine their own path. Embedded interventions guide students choices by requiring participation in support programs and by providing a peer who can advise students on successful strategies for completing college. Kiessling s 2009 review of After Admission: From College Access to College Success by Rosenbaum, Deil-Amen, & Person (2006) also addresses the importance of institutional structure and its impact on student progress. The authors examine student and college success from an organizational structure perspective and argue that problems students experience during their academic journey can be minimized by using intentionally supportive procedures and processes (p. 261). Research indicates that there are efforts and institutional structures that work most effectively for community college students who place in basic skills. Most community colleges offer a range of support services, most offered outside of the classroom and in silos, separate from instruction and separate from other support services. Sometimes duplication occurs and students may access similar services at multiple locations, such as 14

20 [basic skills] sequence altogether (p. 3). The research indicates that students who make progress quickly towards a degree or certificate are more likely to complete college compared to those who languish in basic skills or those who lose momentum due to personal or academic challenges. Simply put, students who experience success and are able to progress towards their goal are more likely to continue and complete their goal. A significant amount of research on the success and failure rates of basic skills courses and students in those courses focuses on the lack of academic preparation of incoming students (Offenstein & Shulock, 2010). The literature produced by the Institute for Higher Education Leadership & Policy at California State University, Sacramento has created by far the greatest interest among community college educators and policy makers. At the core of this research are three fundamental beliefs: a significant number of students entering the largest open access institution in the world are arriving academically unprepared for the challenges of college; California s community colleges are ill-prepared to address the needs of these students; and, the state and community college system policies are not aligned with identified effective practices. The body of literature focused on the lack of student preparation points to the failure of the K-12 system to educate students for the rigors of college-level work. Students do not necessarily understand that their high school preparation could land them in remedial instead of college-level courses (Perry, Bahr, Rosin & Woodward, 2010, p. 86). Poor reading, writing, and computation skills lead to placement in basic skills math and English, and research has shown that the more remedial courses a student has to complete, the less likely the student is to complete a degree (Adelman, 1999). For high school graduates entering California s community colleges, more than half will 16

21 place one or more levels below college-level math and English and may be surprised to find that in spite of their high school curriculum, they are in need of some remediation (CSS, 2007). Recent efforts to address the issue of poor preparation include assessing all California 11 th grade high school students through the Early Assessment Program (EAP) offered by the California State University (CSU) system. As part of the state s 11 th grade standardized test, the California State University system offers optional questions that measure the readiness for college-level English and mathematics in students junior year of high school in order to facilitate opportunities for them to improve their skills during their senior year (California State University [CSU], 2011). Students may opt out of answering the test questions and high schools may or may not offer the CSU recommended curriculum to seniors in need in order to meet CSU entrance exam requirements. Regardless, EAP is promoted as a means of identifying and addressing college-readiness needs in the last year of high school. Another emphasis found in the literature on basic skills focuses on measuring success by looking at the goals for student outcomes and tracking progress toward those goals (Offenstein & Shulock, 2010, p. 163). Rather than focusing only on course or degree completion, much of this literature defines success based on the completion of milestones or by course-taking patterns that indicate a student is progressing towards a degree (Moore, Offenstein, & Shulock, 2011). Because there is a lack of agreement on what constitutes community college success, completing milestone courses such as college level math and English appear to be the most frequently used measures of a college s ability to demonstrate student progress and success. Since community colleges 17

22 have little control over many student variables and cannot randomly assign students to basic skills courses, colleges cannot accurately evaluate the effect of basic skills courses on overall college success. The ability to research the effectiveness of basic skills on degree completion and college success is limited due to non-random selection of student participants (Levin & Calcagno, 2008). Researchers have written about methodological flaws that inhibit sound evaluative practices for measuring the effectiveness of remedial education or basic skills. The ongoing debate about remediation continues without a useful knowledge base that could inform policy makers, educators, scholars, and students about the effectiveness of different approaches to remediation (Levin & Calcagno, 2008, p. 182). Another focus of the literature is the debate on requiring the completion of basic skills courses before enrolling in college-level courses. In Scott-Clayton s 2011 article on community college student decision-making, she asserts that incoming students lack well-defined, pre-established preferences (2011b, p. 1) that allow students to manage the numerous academic options available and make informed choices regarding unit load, course taking patterns, and educational goals. Incoming students may also be surprised to find that enrolling at a college does not necessarily mean that they can begin by taking college-level courses. (Scott-Clayton, 2011b, p. 1). The belief that students should complete basic skills courses before enrolling in other courses is supported by Shulock, Moore & Offenstein (2011) and a recommendation of the California Community College Task Force on Student Success (2011). While students may be encouraged to complete their math and English course requirements early on, students may find that there are not enough basic skills courses 18

23 available. There may also be a financial consequence for those who enroll in only basic skills courses or for those who declare an educational goal to complete basic skills or remedial courses. Because of the interpretation by some colleges of the federal financial aid regulations pertaining to eligible programs, a student who declares an educational goal of completing basic skills or remediation may be determined ineligible for federal financial aid. For many students, eligibility for federal financial aid informs their choice of academic programs, since on the average basic skills students are twice as likely to receive financial aid compared to all students (Academic Senate for California Community Colleges [ASCCC], 2000, p. 11). Levin & Calcagno (2008) researched remediation and basic skills and noted the importance of basic skills taught in conjunction with content course materials so that students gain experience in transferring these skills to tasks that are perceived to be real. The obvious solution is to tie basic skills development to concrete applications in academic or vocational courses (p. 186). Research indicates that effective approaches to linking basic skills and college-level courses include SI, the development of learning communities, (Smith, 1993), and contextualization. Perin s (2011) work on contextualization, the teaching of basic skills in the context of disciplinary topic areas (p. 1), describes the challenges students have applying skills learned in a writing class to writing assignments in other classes. She writes that, contextualization is implemented in two distinct forms: contextualized and integrated instruction (p. 1) and that from a cognitive perspective, contextualization is thought to promote transfer of learning and improve the retention of information (p. 2). Wiseley, in his 2011 policy brief, writes about both the scarcity and the effectiveness of contextualized developmental math (p. 19

24 community colleges use the decentralized model, allowing discipline-specific departments (math, English, etc.) to determine the basic skills courses offered and teaching methodology. In 1991, the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges (ASCCC) recommended against the centralization of basic skills into a standalone discipline fearing that the establishment of a separate basic skills discipline would lead to a two-tiered system. (ASCCC, 1991, p. 1). This decision by the ASCCC may be why very few California community colleges over the past twenty years have moved to a centralized basic skills organizational structure. Another perspective found in the literature indicates that while remediation is the most common approach to preparing students academically and socially during their early stages of college (Levin & Calcagno, 2008, p. 181), there is no significant research indicating that this approach is effective. Many colleges continue to use skills and drills (Grubb, 1999, p. 5), an approach that is familiar to students who have experienced developmental education in the K-12 system. Students rarely see the usefulness or relevance of the material taught in basic skills courses and are unable to develop valuable skills that are transferable to college-level courses (Levin & Calcagno, 2008). An alternative approach to isolating basic skills courses from other academic courses is put forward by Levin and Koski (1998), who identify successful interventions for underprepared students in higher education (p. 16). Levin and Koski s suggested interventions include developing skills through relevance and real-life context (substance); using teamwork, study groups, and technology (multiple approaches); showing connections between skills learned and application to other courses 21

25 (connectivity); and acknowledging that successful learning relies on social engagement and support (supportive context). When the CSS published the 2007 report Basic Skills as a Foundation for Student Success in California Community Colleges, the extensive literature review included research by Hunter Boylan et al., who has contributed to the field of adult education, remediation, and basic skills education in community college. Boylan et al. identify several key principles for successful programs, including collaboration between basic skills and college-level courses, extensive faculty development, strong administrative and faculty leadership, gathering and reflecting on data, a centralized and highly coordinated basic skills program, and a smooth transition for students moving from basic skills to college-level courses (Boylan, Bonham, Clark-Keefe, Drewes, & Saxon, 2004). Based on over 30 years of adult basic education research, Boylan et al. s work contributed significantly to the development of effective practices for the California Community College BSI and much of his referenced work served as the rationale for funding the effective practices. Boylan et al. s best practices informed the definition of effective practices used in the basic skills report (CSS, 2007): Effective practices refer to organizational, administrative, instructional, or support activities engaged in by highly successful programs, as validated by research and literature sources relating to developmental education (p. 13). The literature on how to improve basic skills course success provides multiple perspectives and varying degrees of evidence to support one approach over another. While much of the literature focuses on effective approaches to teaching, organizational culture, funding and policy, less literature is available on how to inform student behaviors 22

SUPPORTING STUDENTS OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM

SUPPORTING STUDENTS OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM Executive Summary Student success matters and many community colleges are innovating and leading the way in finding solutions to some of the biggest challenges facing students. This report provides five

More information

Strategies for Promoting Gatekeeper Course Success Among Students Needing Remediation: Research Report for the Virginia Community College System

Strategies for Promoting Gatekeeper Course Success Among Students Needing Remediation: Research Report for the Virginia Community College System Strategies for Promoting Gatekeeper Course Success Among Students Needing Remediation: Research Report for the Virginia Community College System Josipa Roksa Davis Jenkins Shanna Smith Jaggars Matthew

More information

Basic Skills Initiative http://www.cccbsi.org. Academic Senate http://www.asccc.org. Center for Student Success http://css.rpgroup.

Basic Skills Initiative http://www.cccbsi.org. Academic Senate http://www.asccc.org. Center for Student Success http://css.rpgroup. Basic Skills Initiative http://www.cccbsi.org Academic Senate http://www.asccc.org Center for Student Success http://css.rpgroup.org California Community Colleges Chancellor s Office http://www.cccco.edu

More information

Passing When It Counts Math courses present barriers to student success in California Community Colleges

Passing When It Counts Math courses present barriers to student success in California Community Colleges Engaging Californians on Key Education Challenges I S S U E B R I E F F E B U A R Y 2 0 1 2 Passing When It Counts Math courses present barriers to student success in California Community Colleges Overview

More information

Berkeley City College Student Equity Plan

Berkeley City College Student Equity Plan Berkeley City College Student Equity Plan January 1, 2015 2 Executive Summary Diversity and equity efforts are important because they are fundamental to quality and excellence. Moreover, diversity is more

More information

Assessing the General Education Mathematics Courses at a Liberal Arts College for Women

Assessing the General Education Mathematics Courses at a Liberal Arts College for Women 1 Assessing the General Education Mathematics Courses at a Liberal Arts College for Women AbdelNaser Al-Hasan and Patricia Jaberg Mount Mary College, Milwaukee, WI 53222 alhasana@mtmary.edu jabergp@mtmary.edu

More information

Student Success Courses and Educational Outcomes at Virginia Community Colleges

Student Success Courses and Educational Outcomes at Virginia Community Colleges Student Success Courses and Educational Outcomes at Virginia Community Colleges Sung-Woo Cho and Melinda Mechur Karp February 2012 CCRC Working Paper No. 40 Address correspondence to: Sung-Woo Cho Quantitative

More information

Metro Academies: Increasing College Graduation through a Redesign of the First Two Years

Metro Academies: Increasing College Graduation through a Redesign of the First Two Years Metro Academies: Increasing College Graduation through a Redesign of the First Two Years In the US, the gap in college completion rates between low-income and more affluent students has doubled since 1975.

More information

Transform Your Life! Choose a Berkeley City College Learning Community to help ensure your college success!

Transform Your Life! Choose a Berkeley City College Learning Community to help ensure your college success! Transform Your Life! Choose a Berkeley City College Learning Community to help ensure your college success! What is a learning community and how can it help me? A learning community is a cohort-based educational

More information

Conley, D. T. (2010). College and Career Ready: Helping all Students Succeed Beyond High School. San Francisco: Jossey Bass.

Conley, D. T. (2010). College and Career Ready: Helping all Students Succeed Beyond High School. San Francisco: Jossey Bass. 1 Conley, D. T. (2010). College and Career Ready: Helping all Students Succeed Beyond High School. San Francisco: Jossey Bass. (Abstract prepared for AVID Postsecondary by Harriet Howell Custer, Ph.D.)

More information

The Historic Opportunity to Get College Readiness Right: The Race to the Top Fund and Postsecondary Education

The Historic Opportunity to Get College Readiness Right: The Race to the Top Fund and Postsecondary Education The Historic Opportunity to Get College Readiness Right: The Race to the Top Fund and Postsecondary Education Passage of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) and the creation of the Race to

More information

Ready. Eligible. for College. The Four Dimensions Readiness includes four major components: development of key cognitive strategies, mastery of key

Ready. Eligible. for College. The Four Dimensions Readiness includes four major components: development of key cognitive strategies, mastery of key David T. Conley & Eligible Ready for College M any students who are eligible for college are not ready for college. Readiness is much more complex and multidimensional than eligibility. Students become

More information

Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board

Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board Master s Universities Success Accountability Measures Introduction The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board has organized the Master s Level Universities

More information

Math Placement Acceleration Initiative at the City College of San Francisco Developed with San Francisco Unified School District

Math Placement Acceleration Initiative at the City College of San Francisco Developed with San Francisco Unified School District Youth Data Archive Issue Brief October 2012 Math Placement Acceleration Initiative at the City College of San Francisco Developed with San Francisco Unified School District Betsy Williams Background This

More information

issue brief September 2013

issue brief September 2013 issue brief September 2013 DEVELOPING ALTERNATIVE PLACEMENT CRITERIA FOR ENGLISH COURSES AT CITY COLLEGE OF SAN FRANCISCO Sebastian Castrechini Recognizing the need to improve postsecondary access and

More information

memorandum Background Date: January 15, 2012 California Community Colleges Chancellor s Office From: WestEd and the RP Group

memorandum Background Date: January 15, 2012 California Community Colleges Chancellor s Office From: WestEd and the RP Group memorandum Date: January 15, 2012 To: California Community Colleges Chancellor s Office From: WestEd and the RP Group Question 3: Student Success Courses Background What research is there on the effectiveness

More information

First-Generation College Students: How Co-Curricular Involvement Can Assist with Success. Valerie Garcia

First-Generation College Students: How Co-Curricular Involvement Can Assist with Success. Valerie Garcia 46 The Vermont Connection 2010 Volume 31 First-Generation College Students: How Co-Curricular Involvement Can Assist with Success Valerie Garcia First-generation college students are students whose parents

More information

EDUCATING SCHOOL LEADERS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

EDUCATING SCHOOL LEADERS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY EDUCATING SCHOOL LEADERS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY EDUCATING SCHOOL LEADERS At a time when America s schools face a critical demand for effective principals and superintendents, the majority

More information

An Evaluation of Developmental Education in Texas Public Colleges and Universities. Table of Contents

An Evaluation of Developmental Education in Texas Public Colleges and Universities. Table of Contents An Evaluation of Developmental Education in Texas Public Colleges and Universities Prepared by Hunter R. Boylan, Ph.D. and D. Patrick Saxon, M.B.A. National Center for Developmental Education Developmental

More information

Illinois Professional Teaching Standards

Illinois Professional Teaching Standards Illinois Professional Teaching Standards Preamble: We believe that all students have the potential to learn rigorous content and achieve high standards. A well-educated citizenry is essential for maintaining

More information

Destination BSN: How California Community College Transfer Students Work toward a Bachelor s Degree in Nursing

Destination BSN: How California Community College Transfer Students Work toward a Bachelor s Degree in Nursing Destination BSN: How California Community College Transfer Students Work toward a Bachelor s Degree in Nursing the Research & Planning Group for California Community Colleges Introduction The RP Group

More information

Mathematics Placement And Student Success: The Transition From High School To College Mathematics

Mathematics Placement And Student Success: The Transition From High School To College Mathematics Mathematics Placement And Student Success: The Transition From High School To College Mathematics David Boyles, Chris Frayer, Leonida Ljumanovic, and James Swenson University of Wisconsin-Platteville Abstract

More information

State College Readiness Initiatives and Community Colleges

State College Readiness Initiatives and Community Colleges 8 This chapter traces the author s work in developing California State University s Early Assessment Program, an initiative that aligned eleventh-grade performance standards, new English and mathematics

More information

Evaluating the Impact of Remedial Education in Florida Community Colleges: A Quasi-Experimental Regression Discontinuity Design

Evaluating the Impact of Remedial Education in Florida Community Colleges: A Quasi-Experimental Regression Discontinuity Design NATIONAL CENTER FOR POSTSECONDARY RESEARCH NCPR BRIEF BRIEF AUGUST 2009 Evaluating the Impact of Remedial Education in Florida Community Colleges: A Quasi-Experimental Regression Discontinuity Design Juan

More information

Creating Quality Developmental Education

Creating Quality Developmental Education ***Draft*** Creating Quality Developmental Education A Guide to the Top Ten Actions Community College Administrators Can Take to Improve Developmental Education Submitted to House Appropriations Subcommittee

More information

2013 Political Science Department PAPR

2013 Political Science Department PAPR 2013 Political Science Department PAPR The Political Science Department offers a variety of courses designed to prepare students for transfer to four-year colleges and universities and provide training

More information

Career and Technical Education Policy Proposal David W. Gordon, Superintendent Sacramento County Office of Education.

Career and Technical Education Policy Proposal David W. Gordon, Superintendent Sacramento County Office of Education. Career and Technical Education Policy Proposal David W. Gordon, Superintendent Sacramento County Office of Education Framing The Issue It is imperative that every high school student be prepared with the

More information

The School Counselor s Role in College and Career Readiness

The School Counselor s Role in College and Career Readiness College and Career Readiness Counseling for All Students 1 The School Counselor s Role in College and Career Readiness Judy Petersen, M. Ed. Director, College and Career Readiness Granite School District

More information

Implementing Guided Pathways at Miami Dade College: A Case Study

Implementing Guided Pathways at Miami Dade College: A Case Study CASE STUDY / MARCH 2015 Implementing Guided Pathways at Miami Dade College: A Case Study Systemic Change at Miami Dade In 2011, working groups from across the eight campuses of Miami Dade College (MDC)

More information

Clark College. Strategic Plan {2015-2020}

Clark College. Strategic Plan {2015-2020} Clark College Strategic Plan {2015-2020} 2 3 Purpose A strategic plan is a story one told by many authors, and for many audiences. Taken as a whole, the Clark College 2015-2020 Strategic Plan tells the

More information

31816 RECEIVED AND PLACED ON FILE - BOARD OF TRUSTEES COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT NO. 508 APRIL 4, 2013

31816 RECEIVED AND PLACED ON FILE - BOARD OF TRUSTEES COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT NO. 508 APRIL 4, 2013 31816 RECEIVED AND PLACED ON FILE - BOARD OF TRUSTEES COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT NO. 508 APRIL 4, 2013 Holistic Placement Enhancing present course placement mechanisms to drastically improve outcomes for

More information

Crosswalk of the New Colorado Principal Standards (proposed by State Council on Educator Effectiveness) with the

Crosswalk of the New Colorado Principal Standards (proposed by State Council on Educator Effectiveness) with the Crosswalk of the New Colorado Principal Standards (proposed by State Council on Educator Effectiveness) with the Equivalent in the Performance Based Principal Licensure Standards (current principal standards)

More information

Abstract Title Page. Title: Researcher-Practitioner Collaboration Supporting the Florida College and Career Readiness Initiative

Abstract Title Page. Title: Researcher-Practitioner Collaboration Supporting the Florida College and Career Readiness Initiative Abstract Title Page Title: Researcher-Practitioner Collaboration Supporting the Florida College and Career Readiness Initiative Authors and Affiliations: Christine Mokher, Ph.D. - CNA Louis Jacobson, Ph.D.

More information

July 2009 Research Brief: Factors that support academic success

July 2009 Research Brief: Factors that support academic success July 2009 Research Brief: Factors that support academic success The single most important factor determining a student s academic success is the academic preparation a student receives and the rigor of

More information

College and Career Readiness in New York State 1

College and Career Readiness in New York State 1 College and Career Readiness in New York State 1 New York's Regents Reform Agenda is grounded in the belief that all students should graduate from high school ready for success in postsecondary education

More information

memorandum Background Date: January 15, 2012 California Community Colleges Chancellor s Office From: WestEd and the RP Group

memorandum Background Date: January 15, 2012 California Community Colleges Chancellor s Office From: WestEd and the RP Group memorandum Date: January 15, 2012 To: California Community Colleges Chancellor s Office From: WestEd and the RP Group Question 1: Mandatory Orientation, Assessment, and Counseling Background Is there research

More information

SREB State College and Career Readiness Initiative

SREB State College and Career Readiness Initiative SREB State College and Career Readiness Initiative Teacher Development to Increase College and Career Readiness Guidelines and Promising Practices for States College and career readiness is an increasingly

More information

Master of Arts in Higher Education (both concentrations)

Master of Arts in Higher Education (both concentrations) Higher Education Dickinson Hall, Room 419 (501) 569-3267 Master of Arts and Doctor of Education The Master of Arts in Higher Education is designed for those individuals who are interested in entering or

More information

Principal Practice Observation Tool

Principal Practice Observation Tool Principal Performance Review Office of School Quality Division of Teaching and Learning Principal Practice Observation Tool 2014-15 The was created as an evidence gathering tool to be used by evaluators

More information

Mentoring University Students

Mentoring University Students Mentoring University Students Mellon Academic Mentoring Support Project Cusanovich and Gilliland state that a mentoring relationship involves professors acting as close, trusted, and experienced colleagues

More information

Revisioning Graduate Teacher Education in North Carolina Master of Arts in Elementary Education Appalachian State University

Revisioning Graduate Teacher Education in North Carolina Master of Arts in Elementary Education Appalachian State University Revisioning Graduate Teacher Education in North Carolina Master of Arts in Elementary Education Appalachian State University A. A description of how the proposed program has been revisioned to reflect

More information

Changing a Culture. Toward a 30% Increase in Degree Attainment in Stark County, Ohio

Changing a Culture. Toward a 30% Increase in Degree Attainment in Stark County, Ohio Changing a Culture November 2005 Toward a 30% Increase in Degree Attainment in Stark County, Ohio Stark County is the 7th largest county in Ohio. In 2001 we formed a P-16 Compact and began looking at the

More information

Student Preferences for Learning College Algebra in a Web Enhanced Environment

Student Preferences for Learning College Algebra in a Web Enhanced Environment Abstract Student Preferences for Learning College Algebra in a Web Enhanced Environment Laura Pyzdrowski West Virginia University Anthony Pyzdrowski California University of Pennsylvania It is important

More information

Program Assessment Report. Unit Psychology Program name: Clinical Psychology MA Completed by David Grilly May 2007

Program Assessment Report. Unit Psychology Program name: Clinical Psychology MA Completed by David Grilly May 2007 Program Assessment Report Unit Psychology Program name: Clinical Psychology MA Completed by David Grilly May 2007 This is a two year M.A. professional program in clinical psychology, which consists of

More information

Agenda Items I.1.a.(1) and I.1.a.(2)

Agenda Items I.1.a.(1) and I.1.a.(2) June, 2015 Agenda Items I.1.a.(1) and I.1.a.(2) REQUEST FOR AUTHORIZATION TO IMPLEMENT A DOCTORATE OF EDUCATION DEGREE IN STUDENT AFFAIRS ADMINISTRATION AND LEADERSHIP AT UW-LA CROSSE PREAPARED BY UW-LA

More information

The Bronx Achievement Pact

The Bronx Achievement Pact The Bronx Achievement Pact Every Student Counts Overview The Bronx Achievement Pact works to improve educational outcomes in the Bronx by closing the gaps in the high school-college pipeline. This comprehensive

More information

Higher Performing High Schools

Higher Performing High Schools COLLEGE READINESS A First Look at Higher Performing High Schools School Qualities that Educators Believe Contribute Most to College and Career Readiness 2012 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved. A First Look

More information

Ohio Standards for School Counselors

Ohio Standards for School Counselors Adopted by state board of education of ohio October, Ohio Standards for School Counselors Ohio Standards for School Counselors ii Contents Section I: Overview of the Ohio Standards for School Counselors...

More information

National Standards. Council for Standards in Human Service Education. http://www.cshse.org 2013 (2010, 1980, 2005, 2009)

National Standards. Council for Standards in Human Service Education. http://www.cshse.org 2013 (2010, 1980, 2005, 2009) Council for Standards in Human Service Education National Standards ASSOCIATE DEGREE IN HUMAN SERVICES http://www.cshse.org 2013 (2010, 1980, 2005, 2009) I. GENERAL PROGRAM CHARACTERISTICS A. Institutional

More information

Professor Susan Hendricks, Associate Professor of Learning Support, Gordon State College shendricks@gordonstate.edu

Professor Susan Hendricks, Associate Professor of Learning Support, Gordon State College shendricks@gordonstate.edu Building a Bridge to College English Project Lead: Dr. Stephen Raynie Professor of English, Gordon State College sraynie@gordonstate.edu Other Team Members: Dr. Wesley Venus Assistant Professor of English,

More information

CPE College Readiness Initiatives Unified Strategy: Increase accelerated learning opportunities for all Kentucky students.

CPE College Readiness Initiatives Unified Strategy: Increase accelerated learning opportunities for all Kentucky students. CPE College Readiness Initiatives Unified Strategy: Increase accelerated learning opportunities for all Kentucky students. INTRODUCTION 1 P age 1. Objectives and Activities Bluegrass Community and Technical

More information

The New Student Experience

The New Student Experience Valencia College Quality Enhancement Plan: The New Student Experience Fall 2014 Report Prepared by Dr. Christina Hardin Director, New Student Experience Initial Goals and Intended Outcomes Valencia s New

More information

TEACHING THE LAW AND JUSTICE CURRICULUM. lawandjustice.edc.org

TEACHING THE LAW AND JUSTICE CURRICULUM. lawandjustice.edc.org lawandjustice.edc.org Introduction Welcome to the Law and Justice curriculum! Developed by Education Development Center, Inc. (EDC), with support from The James Irvine Foundation, the Law and Justice curriculum

More information

Transform Remediation: The Co-Requisite Course Model

Transform Remediation: The Co-Requisite Course Model Transform Remediation: The Co-Requisite Course Model For far too many students, postsecondary remedial education is a dead end. About 40 percent of all students entering postsecondary education in recent

More information

Division of Undergraduate Education 2009-2014 Strategic Plan Mission

Division of Undergraduate Education 2009-2014 Strategic Plan Mission Mission The mission of the Division of Undergraduate Education is to promote academic excellence through collaboration with colleges and support units across the University. The mission is realized through

More information

Northeastern Illinois University Chicago, Illinois

Northeastern Illinois University Chicago, Illinois Chicago, Illinois 2010 UNDERGRADUATE SPECIAL EDUCATION Teacher Preparation Program Design D While general professional coursework enhances the design of this program, there are other critical elements

More information

ACT National Curriculum Survey 2012. Policy Implications on Preparing for Higher Standards. improve yourself

ACT National Curriculum Survey 2012. Policy Implications on Preparing for Higher Standards. improve yourself ACT National Curriculum Survey 2012 Policy Implications on Preparing for Higher Standards improve yourself ACT is an independent, not-for-profit organization that provides assessment, research, information,

More information

What We Know About Accelerated Developmental Education

What We Know About Accelerated Developmental Education ACCELERATED DEVELOPMENTAL EDUCATION / MARCH 214 What We Know About Accelerated Developmental Education Why Accelerate Developmental Education? Most community colleges require new students to take placement

More information

recommendation #4: give college and work readiness assessments in high school

recommendation #4: give college and work readiness assessments in high school recommendation #4: give college and work readiness assessments in high school College entrance examinations often present a barrier to higher education for high school students. Low-income and minority

More information

Participation and pass rates for college preparatory transition courses in Kentucky

Participation and pass rates for college preparatory transition courses in Kentucky U.S. Department of Education March 2014 Participation and pass rates for college preparatory transition courses in Kentucky Christine Mokher CNA Key findings This study of Kentucky students who take college

More information

RUNNING HEAD: TUTORING TO INCREASE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT USING TUTORING TO INCREASE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT ON END OF COURSE ASSESSMENTS. By KATHYRENE HAYES

RUNNING HEAD: TUTORING TO INCREASE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT USING TUTORING TO INCREASE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT ON END OF COURSE ASSESSMENTS. By KATHYRENE HAYES RUNNING HEAD: TUTORING TO INCREASE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT Tutoring To Increase Student Achievement 1 USING TUTORING TO INCREASE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT ON END OF COURSE ASSESSMENTS By KATHYRENE HAYES Submitted

More information

Effective Programming for Adult Learners: Pre-College Programs at LaGuardia Community College

Effective Programming for Adult Learners: Pre-College Programs at LaGuardia Community College Effective Programming for Adult Learners: Pre-College Programs at LaGuardia Community College Amy Dalsimer, Director Pre College Academic Programming October 18, 2013 LaGuardia Community College Division

More information

Section Two: Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession

Section Two: Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession 12 Section Two: Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession 1 Teachers understand student learning and development and respect the diversity of the students they teach. Teachers display knowledge of how

More information

Program Personnel Standards Approval Form. Disciplrne: Nursing. ','J1* )lplll. RTP Committeehair Date i

Program Personnel Standards Approval Form. Disciplrne: Nursing. ','J1* )lplll. RTP Committeehair Date i Program Personnel Standards Approval Form Disciplrne: Nursing ','J1* )lplll RTP Committeehair Date i Introduction Relationship of Discipline Standards to CSU Channel Islands Program Standards To understand

More information

Trinity Christian College Palos Heights, Illinois

Trinity Christian College Palos Heights, Illinois Palos Heights, Illinois 2010 UNDERGRADUATE ELEMENTARY Teacher Preparation Program Design D+ While its overall design has numerous weaknesses, including the fact that the institution does not play the pivotal

More information

National-Louis University Wheeling, Illinois

National-Louis University Wheeling, Illinois Wheeling, Illinois 2010 GRADUATE SPECIAL EDUCATION Teacher Preparation Program Design C- The design of this program is enhanced by its selectivity, but there are critical elements in need of improvement.

More information

Promising Practices & Organizational Structures: Promoting Community College Student Success

Promising Practices & Organizational Structures: Promoting Community College Student Success Promising Practices & Organizational Structures: Promoting Community College Student Success Stephen Handel Bradley Quin The College Board Mary Ziskin Indiana University Emily Chung University of Southern

More information

Student Success Challenges in Three Areas: Developmental Education, Online Learning, and the Structure of the Student Experience

Student Success Challenges in Three Areas: Developmental Education, Online Learning, and the Structure of the Student Experience Student Success Challenges in Three Areas: Developmental Education, Online Learning, and the Structure of the Student Experience Shanna Smith Jaggars Community College Research Center Teachers College/Columbia

More information

Pittsburgh Public Schools. We Dream Big. We Work Hard. We Promise. Promise-Readiness Corps

Pittsburgh Public Schools. We Dream Big. We Work Hard. We Promise. Promise-Readiness Corps Pittsburgh Public Schools We Dream Big. We Work Hard. We Promise. Promise-Readiness Corps 1 Promise-Readiness Corps (PRC) Salary Plan: Additional Compensation: Residency: FLSA Status: Work Day: Work Year:

More information

Standard 2: The program shall have an explicit philosophical statement and clearly defined knowledge base.

Standard 2: The program shall have an explicit philosophical statement and clearly defined knowledge base. Council for Standards in Human Service Education National Standards MASTER S DEGREE IN HUMAN SERVICES http://www.cshse.org 2013 (2010, 2009) I. GENERALPROGRAM CHARACTERISTICS A. Institutional Requirements

More information

Hispanic and First-Generation Student Retention Strategies

Hispanic and First-Generation Student Retention Strategies ACADEMIC AFFAIRS FORUM Hispanic and First-Generation Student Retention Strategies Custom Research Brief Research Associate Amanda Michael Research Manager Nalika Vasudevan November 2012 2 of 10 3 of 10

More information

The Undergraduate Education Office and First-Year Offerings

The Undergraduate Education Office and First-Year Offerings UNIVERSITY LEADERSHIP COUNCIL The Undergraduate Education Office and First-Year Offerings Custom Research Brief TABLE OF CONTENTS RESEARCH ASSOCIATE Joe LeMaster RESEARCH MANAGER Sarah Moore I. Research

More information

Careers, Academic Support, Service-Learning, Community Service and related

Careers, Academic Support, Service-Learning, Community Service and related Award Title SmartStart: A Successful Transition Program for Underprepared Community College Students Awards Categories Careers, Academic Support, Service-Learning, Community Service and related Executive

More information

2012-2013 ANNUAL PROGRAM REVIEW MS IN COUNSELING SCHOOL COUNSELING CONCENTRATION

2012-2013 ANNUAL PROGRAM REVIEW MS IN COUNSELING SCHOOL COUNSELING CONCENTRATION 2012-2013 ANNUAL PROGRAM REVIEW MS IN COUNSELING SCHOOL COUNSELING CONCENTRATION I. School Counseling Graduate Program II. Annual Program Reviewers Program Reviewers consist of the Department of Psychology

More information

NCNSP Design Principle 1: Ready for College

NCNSP Design Principle 1: Ready for College College Credit College Ready Skills (High School) Course of Study NCNSP Design Principle 1: Ready for College Students are tracked according to past performance into regular and honors level courses. All

More information

A Study of Family Engagement in Redwood City Community Schools

A Study of Family Engagement in Redwood City Community Schools February 2013 A Study of Family Engagement in Redwood City Community Schools Lisa Westrich and Karen Strobel Since 2007, the Redwood City School District (RCSD) and Redwood City 2020 (RWC 2020) have partnered

More information

INNOVATIONS IN DEVELOPMENTAL EDUCATION REDESIGN ST. JOHNS RIVER STATE COLLEGE. Jobs for the Future November 2015

INNOVATIONS IN DEVELOPMENTAL EDUCATION REDESIGN ST. JOHNS RIVER STATE COLLEGE. Jobs for the Future November 2015 INNOVATIONS IN DEVELOPMENTAL EDUCATION REDESIGN ST. JOHNS RIVER STATE COLLEGE Jobs for the Future November 2015 In 2013, the Florida Legislature passed Senate Bill (SB) 1720, which called for all developmental

More information

Quality Assurance Initiatives in Literacy and Essential Skills: A Pan-Canadian Perspective

Quality Assurance Initiatives in Literacy and Essential Skills: A Pan-Canadian Perspective Quality Assurance Initiatives in Literacy and Essential Skills: A Pan-Canadian Perspective Summary of Key Informant Interviews Final Report November 2014 Acknowledgments Thank you to the following organizations

More information

Category Preparation How prepared are students for college-level work? Participation How many students are going to college?

Category Preparation How prepared are students for college-level work? Participation How many students are going to college? JUNE 014 The State of Higher Education in Average Won t Do Regional Profile San Francisco Bay Area Counties of Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, Sonoma

More information

MIRACOSTA COLLEGE TRANSFER CENTER: MASTER PLAN

MIRACOSTA COLLEGE TRANSFER CENTER: MASTER PLAN MIRACOSTA COLLEGE TRANSFER CENTER: MASTER PLAN Fall 2015 TRANSFER CENTERS: THE HUB OF TRANSFER ACTIVITY This section presents a description of the strategies that support the transfer function at MiraCosta

More information

Community College of Philadelphia Administrative Function and Support Service Audit Learning Lab Executive Summary

Community College of Philadelphia Administrative Function and Support Service Audit Learning Lab Executive Summary Community College of Philadelphia Administrative Function and Support Service Audit Learning Lab Executive Summary Introduction to Function /Service Description and History The Learning Lab was founded

More information

Bachelor of Social Work

Bachelor of Social Work Indiana University School of Social Work PRAC Annual Report 2005-2006 Academic Introduction The Indiana University School of Social Work was founded in 1911. It currently offers social work education at

More information

Ramp-Up to Readiness is a school-wide guidance program designed to increase the number and diversity of students who graduate from high school with

Ramp-Up to Readiness is a school-wide guidance program designed to increase the number and diversity of students who graduate from high school with Ramp-Up to Readiness is a school-wide guidance program designed to increase the number and diversity of students who graduate from high school with the knowledge, skills, and habits necessary for success

More information

BRIEF NUMBER 45 SEPTEMBER 2010

BRIEF NUMBER 45 SEPTEMBER 2010 ISSN 1526-2049 C O M M U N I T Y C O L L E G E R E S E A R C H C E N T E R BRIEF NUMBER 45 SEPTEMBER 2010 Student Progression Through Sequences in Community Colleges Thomas Bailey, Dong Wook Jeong, and

More information

THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE AT MARTIN DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL STUDIES

THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE AT MARTIN DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL STUDIES THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE AT MARTIN DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL STUDIES Instructor: David Dietrich, Ph.D. Office: 219 McWherter, Jackson State Community College, Jackson, TN 38301 Phone: 731.267.2949 or

More information

Elmhurst College Elmhurst, Illinois

Elmhurst College Elmhurst, Illinois Elmhurst, Illinois 2010 UNDERGRADUATE SPECIAL EDUCATION Teacher Preparation Program Design C+ While its university's selectivity in admissions and fairly strong reading preparation enhance the design of

More information

Taking Student Retention Seriously: Rethinking the First Year of College

Taking Student Retention Seriously: Rethinking the First Year of College Taking Student Retention Seriously: Rethinking the First Year of College Vincent Tinto Syracuse University Pell Institute for the Study of Opportunity in Higher Education Introduction Many colleges speak

More information

051 School Counselor. Effective after October 1, 2013 MI-SG-FLD051-01

051 School Counselor. Effective after October 1, 2013 MI-SG-FLD051-01 051 School Counselor Effective after October 1, 2013 MI-SG-FLD051-01 TABLE OF CONTENTS PART 1: General Information About the MTTC Program and Test Preparation OVERVIEW OF THE TESTING PROGRAM... 1-1 Contact

More information

Promoting Gatekeeper Course Success Among Community College Students Needing Remediation

Promoting Gatekeeper Course Success Among Community College Students Needing Remediation Promoting Gatekeeper Course Success Among Community College Students Needing Remediation Findings and Recommendations from a Virginia Study (Summary Report) Davis Jenkins Shanna Smith Jaggars Josipa Roksa

More information

Guide to Using Results

Guide to Using Results Guide to Using Results Contact Information For assistance, call ACT Engage Customer Service at 319.337.1893, 8:30 a.m. 5:00 p.m., central time, Monday through Friday, or email engage@act.org. Resources

More information

National Standards. Council for Standards in Human Service Education. http://www.cshse.org 2013 (2010, 1980, 2005, 2009)

National Standards. Council for Standards in Human Service Education. http://www.cshse.org 2013 (2010, 1980, 2005, 2009) Council for Standards in Human Service Education National Standards BACCALAUREATE DEGREE IN HUMAN SERVICES http://www.cshse.org 2013 (2010, 1980, 2005, 2009) I. GENERAL PROGRAM CHARACTERISTICS A. Institutional

More information

IMPACT OF LEARNING COMMUNITIES IN DEVELOPMENTAL ENGLISH ON COMMUNITY COLLEGE STUDENT RETENTION AND PERSISTENCE

IMPACT OF LEARNING COMMUNITIES IN DEVELOPMENTAL ENGLISH ON COMMUNITY COLLEGE STUDENT RETENTION AND PERSISTENCE J. COLLEGE STUDENT RETENTION, Vol. 12(1) 7-24, 2010-2011 IMPACT OF LEARNING COMMUNITIES IN DEVELOPMENTAL ENGLISH ON COMMUNITY COLLEGE STUDENT RETENTION AND PERSISTENCE RANDALL A. BARNES San Diego City

More information

Public Four-Year Colleges and Universities Report*

Public Four-Year Colleges and Universities Report* What Works in Student Retention? Fourth National Survey Public Four-Year Colleges and Universities Report* ACT 2010 *Minor revisions were made to selected data in Sections I and II as of July 1, 2010.

More information

Delaware Performance Appraisal System

Delaware Performance Appraisal System Delaware Performance Appraisal System Building greater skills and knowledge for educators DPAS-II Guide for Administrators (Principals) Principal Practice Rubric Updated July 2015 1 INEFFECTIVE A. DEVELOPS

More information

REMOVING OUR BA BLINDERS: RECONCEIVING COMMUNITY COLLEGE PROCEDURES TO IMPROVE STUDENT SUCCESS

REMOVING OUR BA BLINDERS: RECONCEIVING COMMUNITY COLLEGE PROCEDURES TO IMPROVE STUDENT SUCCESS THE CHANGING ECOLOGY OF HIGHER EDUCATION REMOVING OUR BA BLINDERS: RECONCEIVING COMMUNITY COLLEGE PROCEDURES TO IMPROVE STUDENT SUCCESS James E. Rosenbaum, Ph.D. Northwestern University Janet Rosenbaum,

More information

Associated Colleges of Illinois: Peer Mentoring Initiative A collaboration between Augustana College, Dominican University and North Park University

Associated Colleges of Illinois: Peer Mentoring Initiative A collaboration between Augustana College, Dominican University and North Park University Associated Colleges of Illinois: Peer Mentoring Initiative A collaboration between Augustana College, Dominican University and North Park University What brings you to this session today? + Your most hoped-for

More information

CTL 2009 ADVANCED PROGRAM REPORT

CTL 2009 ADVANCED PROGRAM REPORT CTL 2009 ADVANCED PROGRAM REPORT 1 Because the Office of Undergraduate Studies is now requiring program assessment reports that are similar to CTL program assessment reports; The Office of Research, Evaluation,

More information