Towards a Theory of Economic Recovery from Disasters

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Towards a Theory of Economic Recovery from Disasters"

Transcription

1 CREATE Research Archive Published Articles & Papers Towards a Theory of Economic Recovery from Disasters Stephanie E. Chang University of British Columbia, Adam Z. Rose University of Southern California, Follow this and additional works at: Part of the Other Economics Commons Recommended Citation Chang, Stephanie E. and Rose, Adam Z., "Towards a Theory of Economic Recovery from Disasters" (2012). Published Articles & Papers. Paper This Article is brought to you for free and open access by CREATE Research Archive. It has been accepted for inclusion in Published Articles & Papers by an authorized administrator of CREATE Research Archive. For more information, please contact

2 International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters August 2012, Vol. 32, No. 2, pp Towards a Theory of Economic Recovery from Disasters Stephanie E. Chang School of Community and Regional Planning and Institute for Resources, Environment, and Sustainability University of British Columbia Adam Z. Rose Sol Price School of Public Policy and Energy Institute University of Southern California Economic recovery refers to the process by which businesses and local economies return to conditions of stability following a disaster. Its importance and complexity are being increasingly recognized in disaster risk reduction research and practice. This paper provides an overview of current research on economic recovery and suggests a research agenda to address key gaps in knowledge. Empirical studies have provided a number of robust findings on the disaster recovery of businesses and local economies, with particular insights into short- and long-term recovery patterns, influential factors in recovery, and disparities in recovery across types of businesses and economies. Modeling studies have undertaken formal analyses of economic impacts of disasters in which recovery is usually addressed through the incorporation of resilience actions and investments in repair and reconstruction. Core variables for assessing and understanding economic recovery are identified from the literature, and approaches for measuring or estimating them are discussed. The paper concludes with important gaps in the development of a robust theory of economic recovery. Systematic data collection is needed to establish patterns and variations on how well and how quickly local economies recover from disasters. Research is urgently needed on the effectiveness of resilience approaches, decisions, and policies for recovery at both the business and local economy levels. Detailed, testable theoretical frameworks will be important for advancing understanding and developing sound recovery plans and policies. It will be especially important to consider the relationship between economic recovery and recovery of the built environment and sociopolitical fabric of communities in developing a comprehensive theory of disaster recovery. Keywords: Disaster recovery, economics, resilience, business, modeling 171

3 Overview Economic recovery, as considered in this paper, refers to the process by which businesses and local economies return to conditions of stability following a disaster. Economic recovery differs in two main ways from the term economic impact, which is more commonly associated with disasters: (1) impact refers to the consequences of a disaster, while recovery refers to the process of overcoming them; and (2) economic impact is typically measured in dollars, while economic recovery is also often measured in time (as in years to recover ). Recovery has traditionally been taken to mean a return to pre-disaster conditions; however, there is growing recognition by researchers and practitioners that economies often do not return to pre-disaster states, but may stabilize at a different, new normal state. Recovery and resilience are closely related terms: resilience is demonstrated by actions that facilitate rapid, effective post-disaster recovery. Broadly speaking, it is important for a theory of disaster recovery to encompass several categories of questions regarding economic recovery, including issues of definition, recovery patterns and generalizations, recovery differentials, factors that influence recovery, the relationship between economic and other dimensions of recovery, and, ultimately, factors and decisions that can facilitate economic recovery. These questions have been addressed to differing degrees in the literature to date. This review focuses on two main strands of the literature: empirical studies and modeling approaches. It emphasizes the literature from the U.S. and other advanced economies. At the scale of individual businesses, most insights have derived from surveys and other empirical research, while at the urban and regional economy level, most findings have been gained from modeling studies. This review identifies key research findings, core variables, and important knowledge gaps. It argues that while research has produced numerous insights into economic recovery, there remains a need to synthesize this knowledge into a generalized, multi-scale, integrative, and testable theory of disaster recovery. Findings from Empirical Studies Key Findings The empirical literature to date provides a number of key insights on the economic recovery of businesses and communities. The list of findings below is not intended to be exhaustive; rather, it highlights some of the more robust findings from recent disasters that a theory of disaster recovery should be able to explain. Businesses and local economies are generally resilient to disasters. Most businesses recover (Webb et al. 2000; National Research Council 2006; Lam et al. 2009). 172

4 While the degree of property damage to a business is one factor in explaining recovery, it is often not the most important one (Tierney 1997; Alesch and Holly 1998; Webb et al. 2000; Alesch et al. 2001; Chang and Falit-Baiamonte 2002; Lam et al. 2009). Some types of businesses, sectors, and local economies tend to have greater difficulty recovering from disasters than others. These include: - Small businesses. These often occupy more physically vulnerable structures, have less access to insurance and other means of finance, lack redundancy in facility location, and have limited if any capacity for pre-disaster mitigation and preparedness (Kroll et al. 1991; Dahlhamer and Tierney 1998; Webb et al. 2000, 2002; Chang 2010). - Locally-oriented businesses, especially in retail and some service sectors (Kroll et al. 1991; Dahlhamer 1998; Alesch et al. 2001; Chang and Falit-Baiamonte 2002). Customers of these businesses have themselves suffered losses in the disaster. - Financially marginal businesses (see below) and economies struggling before the disaster (Dahlhamer 1998; Webb et al. 2002; Alesch et al. 2001; Alesch et al. 2009). Restoration of lifeline infrastructure services is important in business recovery; infrastructure concerns can be a significant barrier to businesses re-opening (Webb et al. 2000, 2002; Lam et al. 2009). Neighborhood effects can be important. Businesses in highly damaged neighborhoods often have difficulty in recovery, even if they experienced little direct damage themselves, because of loss of customers (Webb et al. 2000; Chang and Falit- Baiamonte 2002). Locally-oriented retail businesses reliant on foot traffic are especially vulnerable. The business continuity industry is rapidly growing and filling an important niche in terms of services previously not available or only provided by government (Rose and Szelazek 2011). The economic stimulus of reconstruction can be significant, particularly in the short run (Dacy and Kunreuther 1969; Chang 2010). Construction and other sectors involved in rebuilding often experience notable short-term gains. Pre-disaster trends (e.g., of economic growth or decline) are often accelerated, exacerbated, or intensified in recovery (NRC 2006; Chang 2000; Dahlhamer 1998; NRC 2006; Alesch et al. 2009; Chang 2010). Business failures precipitated by a disaster can occur long after the disaster event (Alesch et al. 2001; Webb et al. 2002; Lam et al. 2009). Early work (Wright et al. 1979; Friesema et al. 1979) found little statistical evidence of long-term economic effects of disasters. More recent studies, however, suggest that these findings may have been oversimplified and overly optimistic (see discussion in NRC 2006). Catastrophic events (those in which damage is extraordinarily severe) 173

5 can cause long-term, structural change in local economies. The new normal may differ from the pre-disaster economy in such ways as types of businesses, sectoral composition, spatial distribution, and economic strength and competitiveness (Alesch et al. 2009; Lam et al. 2009; Chang 2010). Findings from Models Most of the formal analyses of disaster recovery have been undertaken with models developed to estimate economy-wide losses, or consequences. These are typically multisector models emphasizing the interdependency of the entire economy and the role of indirect effects input-output (I-O) and computable general equilibrium (CGE) analysis (Rose 2004). Recently, efforts have been made to incorporate resilience into these models to show how an efficient allocation of resources can mute business interruption (BI) and hasten recovery (Rose and Liao 2005; Rose et al. 2010). Recovery is usually addressed with these models in two ways: 1) resilience actions and 2) investment in repair and reconstruction. Findings include: Multiplier or general equilibrium effects can be even larger than the direct business interruption effects for metropolitan areas or entire states because interdependencies increase with the size of the economy (Rose et al. 1997; Cochrane 2004). Key sectors, such as lifelines and petroleum refining, have been identified that can bottleneck an economy and whose resumption to normal levels is a key first step to recovery (West and Lenze 1994; Rose et al. 1997; Barker and Santos 2001). Some model analyses and real world examples, such as Los Angeles after the Northridge Earthquake, have yielded some ironic outcomes that recovery leads to the economy being better off than before. This is misleading in two ways. First, it can only happen if there is an outside infusion of capital from insurance payments or government and philanthropic assistance. Second, the recovery effort is most assuredly a drain on the national economy. In fact, Cochrane (2004) has pointed out it is a mirage even for the region because any stimulus from people dipping into their savings will necessitate replenishment of bank accounts for several years, thereby stunting the consumption spending stream in years to come. Resilience has been found to have a profound effect on recovery. Rose et al. (2009) found that business interruption was lowered by more than 70% for firms that were able to relocate quickly after 9/11. Rose et al. (2007, 2011) have shown that several low-cost resilience tactics could reduce the losses from short-term water and power service disruptions by as much as 90% (e.g., conservation, input substitution, storage, and production recapture). Not all price increases represent gouging, as some increases are a signal of increased scarcity of remaining resources. Rationing requires an administrative bureaucracy, and while likely to maintain political stability and promote equity, incurs the extra 174

6 administrative cost and also leads to lower efficiency in terms of general resource allocation (Rose and Benavides 1999; Rose and Liao 2005). Summary: Core Variables (or Parameters) of a Theory of Recovery Table 1 summarizes some of the core variables that have been suggested in the literature. (For conceptual frameworks that relate some of these variables in an explanatory model of business and/or regional economic recovery, see Alesch et al. 2001; Chang and Falit-Baiamonte 2002; Cochrane 2004; Rose 2009). Table 1. Core Variables Variable Category For Businesses For Economies Dependent (i.e., recovery) Independent (1) Correlate (3) Business survival/recovery Business interruption Direct damage to business Infrastructure disruption Speed of business reopening (2) Disaster impact on customers Disaster impact on competitors Industry competition Market access Product necessity Pre-disaster financial condition Entrepreneurial actions Mitigation/preparedness Access to recovery resources Type of recovery resources Resilience (inventories, unused capacity, system redundancy) Business size Sector Tenure (rent/own) Employment Unemployment Output Income Income distribution Number of businesses Direct damage to infrastructure Core economic sectors Economic diversity Pre-disaster growth/decline Inflow of insurance payments Inflow of disaster assistance Distribution of disaster assistance Market signals Excess capacity Population dislocation Size of the economy Resource base Social structure Location Climate/Weather (1) May be impediments or facilitators to recovery. (2) Classified as an independent variable, rather than a measure of recovery, because reopening does not ensure long-term business survival and recovery. (3) Variables that are empirically correlated with independent variables but that are not themselves explanatory factors. 175

7 Measurement or Estimation of Core Variables Of the core variables suggested in Table 1, many can be readily measured quantitatively. Statistical time series data are generally available for localities in the U.S. for such variables as number of businesses, employment, wages, etc. Few studies have used such data for assessing economic recovery from disasters (e.g., Ewing et al. 2003), and they have arguably been underexploited as a data source for comparative analysis. Chang (2010) identifies issues and suggests guidelines for using statistical data to analyze disaster recovery, particularly from the standpoint of systematically developing datasets of multiple disasters to derive generalized patterns and insights. For example, recovery can and has been variously defined with reference to pre-disaster, without -disaster, or restabilized reference levels of economic activity. For discussions of conceptual and methodological issues related to measuring economic losses or damages, see Cochrane (2004) and Rose (2004). Other variables in Table 1 can be readily measured in tailored data collection instruments such as surveys. Financial marginality, for example, can be inferred from questions that ask about the financial health of a business prior to the disaster, even if these are Yes/No, scale, or Likert type questions. Such variables have typically been operationalized in binary or categorical form in statistical models (e.g., Alesch et al. 2001; Webb et al. 2002) and recovery simulation models (Miles and Chang 2006, 2008). Survey data have also been used to infer parameters of regional economic models, such as resilience responses to water outages (Rose and Liao 2005). Key Unanswered Questions and Further Research Needs As suggested in Table 1 above, empirical studies on business recovery have provided a stronger basis for a theory of economic recovery than the literature on recovery of local economies. While many questions remain to be addressed, in our opinion, several represent important gaps in developing a robust theory of economic recovery: 1. To what degree, and how well, do local economies recover? There is a need for systematic gathering of data on economic recovery of disaster-affected communities. Getting beyond case studies is essential in order to establish patterns and identify disparities. Similarly, modeling studies that explore a range of disaster scenarios can be used to inform policy-makers about how economic recovery might transpire under various conditions. 2. Why is economic recovery faster in some disasters than others? Some potential factors to be investigated include the magnitude of the hazard impact relative to the economy, characteristics of the physical damage, attributes of the local economy (e.g., size, diversity, growth trend), and recovery policies implemented. 176

8 3. What is the role of resilience in disaster recovery? How important are inherent and adaptive capacities? There is a need to measure the effectiveness and the costeffectiveness of best practice resilience tactics (Sheffi 2005; Rose 2007). Better understanding is needed on how resilience of businesses and economies can be enhanced prior to a disaster. 4. How is economic recovery linked with the recovery of households, institutions, and other aspects of holistic community recovery? Current knowledge is patchy, and permits only rudimentary development of simulation models of community recovery (e.g., Miles and Chang 2006, 2008). The roles of agents other than local businesses notably, governments, non-governmental organizations, the informal sector of the economy, and agents outside the disaster area should also be considered. 5. What types of decisions and policies are most effective in facilitating business and local economic recovery? For example, empirical evidence on the use of insurance, loans, and other financial sources has been surprisingly mixed (Alesch et al. 2001; Webb et al. 2002). Another key policy issue concerns the timing of recovery resources; in particular, the tension between delaying activities to enable post-disaster planning (including incorporation of mitigation in recovery activities) and accelerating reconstruction to allow businesses to reopen quickly. Insights are also needed on what types of recovery strategies are effective for economies that were already declining prior to the disaster. 6. What is the best relative mix of private, government and non-profit sector roles? Studies of this issue would examine how the various major sector groups can work effectively with a minimum of overlap and conflict. It would also identify complementary polices and partnerships (Wein and Rose 2011). For example, the influence of the increasing privatization of disaster recovery activities should be considered. In our opinion, these knowledge gaps suggest the following broad research priorities for developing a theory of economic recovery from disasters: Developing systematic databases of economic recovery in actual disasters, using comparable data collection and measurement protocols (see Peacock et al. 2008). Similarly, it is important to develop systematic databases of key variables that may explain recovery patterns and differences. Developing detailed theoretical frameworks of the processes of business and local economic recovery. It is important that these frameworks be capable of being operationalized into measurable variables, so that they can be empirically tested. It is further important that these frameworks address the multi-scale relationships between recovery of individual businesses, the local economy, and the broader economic environments in which they are located. Moreover, these frameworks must include 177

9 essential aspects of recovery in other domains, such as the built environment, social, and institutional recovery. For example, there is a need to evaluate the extent to which government involvement represents an unnecessary duplication of effort or detracts from the efficient workings of markets, and to identify conditions under which markets fail to perform well (e.g., externalities, public goods, attainment of equitable outcomes). Developing an understanding of how economic recovery is influenced by the magnitude of the disaster. This includes examination of special features of catastrophes, including the potential of major disasters to erode or overwhelm economic resilience, and the need for extreme measures at high levels, such as actions by the Federal Reserve as in the aftermath of 9/11 (Rose et al. 2009). Developing sound assessments of actions, decisions, and policies that can foster recovery in a range of disaster contexts. For example, resilience tactics by businesses should be studied for their effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. Remedies for market failure, both government involvement and market strengthening, should be systematically analyzed. Public-private partnerships should be studied. Policy analysis should include examination of equitable approaches to addressing situations in which full recovery is impossible or imprudent, or where massive relocations are warranted. Relationship with Other Dimensions of Recovery Economic recovery is only part of the broader community recovery effort, though a crucial aspect. Economic recovery provides basic necessities of life, jobs to sustain the economy in terms of income and tax revenues, and reinstatement of wealth through the return of property values. At the same time, economic recovery is not likely to be forthcoming as effectively, or at all, unless the physical and sociopolitical fabric is repaired: Civil order must be restored. Infrastructure must be repaired. Capital markets must be accessible. Workers must be available and labor markets functioning. Government services need to be available. Spiritual/ethical values, either religious or secular, must be intact. Recovery also presents great opportunities for mitigation and resilience capacitybuilding for future events: Lessons must be learned to avoid repeating mistakes. 178

10 Where appropriate, short-run adaptive behavior should be sustained for the long-run. Mitigation should be built into reconstruction since it is less expensive than retrofitting. These and other issues related to the relationship between economic recovery and overall, holistic recovery of a community after disaster are the subject of other papers in this workshop. Acknowledgement The authors wish to thank James K. Mitchell, who served as the formal discussant for this paper, and other participants of the Workshop for their helpful comments. References Alesch, D.J. and J.N. Holly Small Business Failure, Survival, and Recovery: Lessons from the January 1994 Northridge Earthquake. NEHRP Conference and Workshop on Research on the Northridge, California Earthquake of January 17, Richmond CA: Consortium of Universities for Research in Earthquake Engineering. Alesch, D.J., J.N. Holly, E. Mittler, and R. Nagy Organizations at Risk: What Happens When Small Businesses and Not-for-Profits Encounter Natural Disasters. Fairfax, VA: Public Entity Risk Institute. Alesch, D.J., L.A. Arendt, and J.N. Holly Managing for Long-Term Community Recovery in the Aftermath of Disaster. Fairfax VA: Public Entity Risk Institute. Barker, K. and J. Santos A Risk-based Approach for Identifying Key Economic and Infrastructure Systems. Risk Analysis 30(6): Brookshire, D. S., S. E. Chang, H. Cochrane, R. A. Olson, A. Rose, and J. Steenson Direct and Indirect Economic Losses from Earthquake Damage. Earthquake Spectra 13(4): Chang, S.E Disasters and Transport Systems: Loss, Recovery, and Competition at the Port of Kobe after the 1995 Earthquake. Journal of Transport Geography 8(1): Chang, S.E Urban Disaster Recovery: A Mmeasurement Framework with Application to the 1995 Kobe Earthquake. Disasters 34(2): Chang, S.E. and A. Falit-Baiamonte Disaster Vulnerability of Businesses in the 2001 Nisqually Earthquake. Environmental Hazards 4(2/3): Cochrane, H Economic Loss: Myth and Measurement. Disaster Prevention and Management 13(4):

11 Dacy, D.C. and H. Kunreuther The Economics of Natural Disasters. New York: Free Press. Dalhamer, J. M. and K. J. Tierney Rebounding from Disruptive Events: Business Recovery Following the Northridge Earthquake. Sociological Spectrum 18: Ewing, B.T., J.B. Kruse, and M.A. Thompson A Comparison of Employment Growth and Stability before and after the Fort Worth Tornado. Environmental Hazards 5: FEMA Declared Disasters by Year or State. Retrieved February 10, 2009, from Friesema, H. P., J. Caparano, G. Goldstein, R. Lineberry, and R. McCleary Aftermath: Communities after Natural Disasters. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Kroll, C.A., J.D. Landis, Q. Shen, and S. Stryker Economic Impacts of the Loma Prieta Earthquake: A Focus on Small Businesses. Berkeley, CA: University of California at Berkeley Transportation Center and Center for Real Estate and Urban Economics. Working Paper # Lam, N.S.N., K. Pace, R. Campanella, J. LeSage, and H. Arenas Business Return in New Orleans: Decision Making Amid Post-Katrina Uncertainty. PLoS ONE 4(8): e6765. Miles, S. B. and S. E. Chang Modeling Community Recovery from Earthquakes. Earthquake Spectra 22(2): Miles, S. B. and S. E. Chang ResilUS -- Modeling Community Capital Loss and Recovery. Paper presented at the 14th Annual World Conference on Earthquake Engineering, Beijing, China. Peacock, W.G., H. Kunreuther, W.H. Hooke, S.L. Cutter, S.E. Chang, and P.R. Berke Toward a Resiliency and Vulnerability Observatory Network: RAVON. College Station TX: Texas A&M University Hazard Reduction & Recovery Center, HRRC Report 08-02R. Rose, A Economic Principles, Issues, and Research Priorities of Natural Hazard Loss Estimation. In Modeling of Spatial Economic Impacts of Natural Hazards, edited by Y. Okuyama and S. Chang. Heidelberg: Springer. Rose, A Economic Resilience to Natural and Man-made Disasters: Multidisciplinary Origins and Contextual Dimensions. Environmental Hazards 7(4): Rose, A Economic Resilience to Disasters. CARRI Research Report #8. Oak Ridge TN: Oak Ridge Natonal Laboratory. Rose, A. and J. Benavides Optimal Allocation of Electricity after Major Earthquakes: Market Mechanisms vs. Rationing. Pp in Advances in Mathematical Programming and Financial Planning, edited by K. Lawrence et al. Greenwich, CT: JAI Press. 180

12 Rose, A. and S. Liao Modeling Regional Economic Resilience to Disasters: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis of Water Service Disruptions. Journal of Regional Science 45(1): Rose, A. and S. Liao The Economics of Demand Surge. Los Angeles, CA: University of Southern California Center for Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events. Rose, A. and T. Szelazek An Analysis of the Business Continuity Industry. Los Angeles, CA: University of Southern California Center for Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events. Rose, A., S. Liao and A. Bonneau Regional Economic Impacts of a Verdugo Earthquake Disruption of Los Angeles Water Supplies: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis. Earthquake Spectra 27(3): Rose, A., G. Oladosu, and S. Liao Business Interruption Impacts of a Terrorist Attack on the Electric Power System of Los Angeles: Customer Resilience to a Total Blackout. Risk Analysis 27(3): Rose, A., G. Oladosu, B. Lee, and G. Beeler-Asay The Economic Impacts of the 2001 Terrorist Attacks on the World Trade Center: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis. Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy 15(2): Article 4. Rose, A., J. Benavides, S. Chang, D. Lim, and P. Sczesniak The Regional Economic Impact of an Earthquake: Direct and Indirect Effects of Electricity Lifeline Disruptions. Journal of Regional Science 37(4): Sheffi, Y The Resilient Enterprise: Overcoming Vulnerability for Competitive Advantage. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Tierney, K.J Business Impacts of the Northridge Earthquake. Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management 5(2): Webb, G.R., K.J. Tierney, and J.M. Dahlhamer Businesses and Disasters: Empirical Patterns and Unanswered Questions. Natural Hazards Review 1(2): Webb, G.R., K.J. Tierney, and J.M. Dahlhamer Predicting Long-term Business Recovery from Disaster: A Comparison of the Loma Prieta Earthquake and Hurricane Andrew. Environmental Hazards 4: Wein, A. and Rose, A Resilience Lessons from the Shakeout. Earthquake Spectra 27(2): West, C. and D. Lenze Modeling the Regional Impact of Natural Disaster and Recovery: A General Framework and an Application to Hurricane Andrew. International Regional Science Review 17(2): Wright, J.D., P.H. Rossi, S.R. Wright, and E. Weber-Burdin After the Clean-Up: Long-Range Effects of Natural Disasters. Beverly Hills CA: Sage. Zhang, I. and W. Peacock Planning for Housing Recovery? Lessons Learned from Hurricane Andrew. Journal of the American Planning Association 76(1):

Modeling earthquake impact on urban lifeline systems: advances and integration in loss estimation

Modeling earthquake impact on urban lifeline systems: advances and integration in loss estimation Modeling earthquake impact on urban lifeline systems: advances and integration in loss estimation S. E. Chang University of Washington A. Z. Rose Pennsylvania State University M. Shinozuka University of

More information

FOUNDATIONS FOR MODELING COMMUNITY RECOVERY FROM EARTHQUAKE DISASTERS

FOUNDATIONS FOR MODELING COMMUNITY RECOVERY FROM EARTHQUAKE DISASTERS 13 th World Conference on Earthquake Engineering Vancouver, B.C., Canada August 1-6, 2004 Paper No. 567 FOUNDATIONS FOR MODELING COMMUNITY RECOVERY FROM EARTHQUAKE DISASTERS Scott B. MILES 1 and Stephanie

More information

Economics of Business Interruption Insurance Against Terrorism

Economics of Business Interruption Insurance Against Terrorism Economics of Business Interruption Insurance Against Terrorism Adam Rose Center for Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events (CREATE) University of Southern California Prominence of Business Interruption

More information

SELECT RESOURCES FOR DISASTER RECOVERY & CRISIS MANAGEMENT

SELECT RESOURCES FOR DISASTER RECOVERY & CRISIS MANAGEMENT SELECT RESOURCES FOR DISASTER RECOVERY & CRISIS MANAGEMENT Alesch, D. J., Arendt, L. A., & Holly, J. N. (2009). Managing for Long-Term Community Recovery in the Aftermath of Disaster. Fairfax, VA: Public

More information

Constructing Urban Vulnerability Index for Major U.S. Cities

Constructing Urban Vulnerability Index for Major U.S. Cities CREATE Research Archive Research Project Summaries 2009 Constructing Urban Vulnerability Index for Major U.S. Cities Haydar Kurban Howard University, HKURBAN@HOWARD.EDU Mika Kato Howard University, mkato@howard.edu

More information

DISASTER RECOVERY PLANNING FOR CITY COMPUTER FACILITIES

DISASTER RECOVERY PLANNING FOR CITY COMPUTER FACILITIES APPENDIX 1 DISASTER RECOVERY PLANNING FOR CITY COMPUTER FACILITIES March 2008 Auditor General s Office Jeffrey Griffiths, C.A., C.F.E. Auditor General City of Toronto TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...1

More information

DISASTER RECOVERY FOR PUBLIC HEALTH. August 2007

DISASTER RECOVERY FOR PUBLIC HEALTH. August 2007 DISASTER RECOVERY FOR PUBLIC HEALTH August 2007 National events like the terrorist attacks of 2001 and Hurricanes Katrina and Rita have focused attention on the need for recovery planning. Citizens who

More information

Modeling Business Interruption Losses for Insurance Portfolios

Modeling Business Interruption Losses for Insurance Portfolios Modeling Business Interruption Losses for Insurance Portfolios Vineet Kumar Jain 1 and Jayanta Guin 2 1 Principal Engineer, PhD, AIR Worldwide Corporation, Boston, USA, vjain@air-worldwide.com 2 Senior

More information

Analytically comparing disaster recovery following the 2012 derecho

Analytically comparing disaster recovery following the 2012 derecho Analytically comparing disaster recovery following the 2012 derecho Christopher W. Zobel Virginia Tech czobel@vt.edu ABSTRACT This work in progress paper discusses analytically characterizing nonlinear

More information

The Effectiveness of Post-Katrina Disaster Aid: The Influence of SBA Loans on Small Businesses in Mississippi

The Effectiveness of Post-Katrina Disaster Aid: The Influence of SBA Loans on Small Businesses in Mississippi 141 10 th International Conference of the International Institute for Infrastructure Resilience and Reconstruction (I3R2) 20 22 May 2014 Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA The Effectiveness

More information

Dimensions and Domains of Disaster Recovery

Dimensions and Domains of Disaster Recovery University of Colorado Boulder Dimensions and Domains of Disaster Recovery Kathleen Tierney, Director Liesel A. Ritchie, Assistant Director for Research February 2012 Disaster recovery remains the least

More information

Urban infrastructure systems such as water and electric power networks

Urban infrastructure systems such as water and electric power networks Assessing the Role of Lifeline Systems in Community Disaster Resilience by Stephanie E. Chang and Christopher Chamberlin Research Objectives The objective of this research is to advance the state-of-the-art

More information

Chatham County Disaster Recovery Plan Recovery Planning Update. Mark Misczak, Brock Long, & Corey Reynolds Hagerty Consulting April 7, 2015

Chatham County Disaster Recovery Plan Recovery Planning Update. Mark Misczak, Brock Long, & Corey Reynolds Hagerty Consulting April 7, 2015 Chatham County Disaster Recovery Plan Recovery Planning Update Mark Misczak, Brock Long, & Corey Reynolds Hagerty Consulting April 7, 2015 Welcome Introduction to Recovery Planning Recovery Planning Process

More information

Assessing the Disaster Recovery Planning Capacity of the State of North Carolina

Assessing the Disaster Recovery Planning Capacity of the State of North Carolina January 2011 Assessing the Disaster Recovery Planning Capacity of the State of North Carolina Project Leads Gavin Smith, PhD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Victor B. Flatt, JD, University

More information

Perspectives on Disaster Recovery

Perspectives on Disaster Recovery Perspectives on Disaster Recovery Arnold M. Howitt, Ph.D. Executive Director, The Roy and Lila Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation and Faculty Co-Director, Program on Crisis Leadership

More information

Vulnerability of Community Businesses to Environmental Disasters

Vulnerability of Community Businesses to Environmental Disasters Vulnerability of Community Businesses to Environmental Disasters Yang Zhang Department of Environmental Studies University of Illinois at Springfield Springfield, IL Michael K. Lindell Carla S. Prater

More information

Business, Resiliency and Effective Disaster Recovery. Anne Kleffner, PhD Haskayne School of Business, University of Calgary

Business, Resiliency and Effective Disaster Recovery. Anne Kleffner, PhD Haskayne School of Business, University of Calgary Business, Resiliency and Effective Disaster Recovery Anne Kleffner, PhD Haskayne School of Business, University of Calgary CRHNet October 2012 Agenda Business resilience and community resilience in disaster

More information

Methods for Assessing Vulnerability of Critical Infrastructure

Methods for Assessing Vulnerability of Critical Infrastructure March 2010 Methods for Assessing Vulnerability of Critical Infrastructure Project Leads Eric Solano, PhD, PE, RTI International Statement of Problem Several events in the recent past, including the attacks

More information

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 25 26 May 2010. Report

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 25 26 May 2010. Report Cooperative Arrangement for the Prevention of Spread of Communicable Disease through Air travel (CAPSCA) Workshop / Seminar on Aviation Business Continuity Planning Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 25 26 May 2010

More information

Urban Disaster Recovery: A Framework and Simulation Model

Urban Disaster Recovery: A Framework and Simulation Model ISSN 1520-295X Urban Disaster Recovery: A Framework and Simulation Model by Scott B. Miles and Stephanie E. Chang University of Washington Department of Geography Seattle, WA 98195-3550 Technical Report

More information

Introduction and Disaster Impact Discussion

Introduction and Disaster Impact Discussion Statewide Economic Impacts of Disaster -Related Payments to Support Household and Private and Public Sector Recovery in Iowa Dave Swenson Department of Economics Iowa State University January, 2010 Introduction

More information

Emergency Preparedness at Nuclear Power Plants

Emergency Preparedness at Nuclear Power Plants A White Paper Addressing Compliance with NRC Proposed Rule making Emergency Preparedness at Nuclear Power Plants Ensuring Readiness and Compliance with New NRC Regulation of Emergency Preparedness Programs

More information

BOARD OF GOVERNORS FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM

BOARD OF GOVERNORS FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM WASHINGTON, D.C. 20551 DIVISION OF BANKING SUPERVISION AND REGULATION DIVISION OF CONSUMER AND COMMUNITY AFFAIRS SR 12-17 CA 12-14 December 17, 2012 TO

More information

DISASTER PLANNING AND RECOVERY

DISASTER PLANNING AND RECOVERY PLANNING IS THE KEY TO SUCCESSFUL DISASTER RECOVERY Source: US State Government Disaster Recovery Markets by Frost & Sullivan, A Global Growth Consulting Company DISASTER PLANNING AND RECOVERY In the aftermath

More information

Developing Post Disaster Recovery Frameworks

Developing Post Disaster Recovery Frameworks Developing Post Disaster Recovery Frameworks Raja Rehan Arshad Team Leader Sustainable Recovery, GFDRR Disaster and Crisis Recovery Operations for Increased Resilience JVI, September 10-14, 2012 Why The

More information

Department of Homeland Security Office of Inspector General

Department of Homeland Security Office of Inspector General Department of Homeland Security Office of Inspector General Management Advisory Report: FEMA's Housing Strategy for Future Disasters OIG-09-111 September 2009 Office of Inspector General U.S. Department

More information

Walter Gillis Peacock Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center Texas A&M University

Walter Gillis Peacock Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center Texas A&M University Walter Gillis Peacock Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center Texas A&M University September 23, 2009 Presentation to the National Academies Second Sustainability R&D Forum. Research discussed herein was

More information

Is Your Port Prepared to Recover from a Disaster? Can you keep the cash register ringing when bad things happen?

Is Your Port Prepared to Recover from a Disaster? Can you keep the cash register ringing when bad things happen? Is Your Port Prepared to Recover from a Disaster? Can you keep the cash register ringing when bad things happen? J E A N N I E B E C K E T T T H E B E C K E T T G R O U P A P P W I N T E R C O N F E R

More information

FORMULATING YOUR BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLAN

FORMULATING YOUR BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLAN WHITE PAPER Page 0 Planning for the Worst Case Scenario: FORMULATING YOUR BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLAN 9 Wing Drive Cedar Knolls, NJ 07927 www.nac.net Page 1 Table of Contents Overview... 2 What is Disaster

More information

A New Paradigm in Urban Road Network Seismic Vulnerability: From a Link-by-link Structural Approach to an Integrated Functional Assessment

A New Paradigm in Urban Road Network Seismic Vulnerability: From a Link-by-link Structural Approach to an Integrated Functional Assessment A New Paradigm in Urban Road Network Seismic Vulnerability: From a Link-by-link Structural Approach to an Integrated Functional Assessment Gonçalo Caiado goncalo.caiado@ist.utl.pt Rosário Macário rosariomacario@civil.ist.utl.pt

More information

TOTAL REGIONAL ECONOMIC LOSSES FROM WATER SUPPLY DISRUPTIONS TO THE LOS ANGELES COUNTY ECONOMY. Adam Rose, Ian Sue Wing, Dan Wei, and Misak Avetisyan

TOTAL REGIONAL ECONOMIC LOSSES FROM WATER SUPPLY DISRUPTIONS TO THE LOS ANGELES COUNTY ECONOMY. Adam Rose, Ian Sue Wing, Dan Wei, and Misak Avetisyan TOTAL REGIONAL ECONOMIC LOSSES FROM WATER SUPPLY DISRUPTIONS TO THE LOS ANGELES COUNTY ECONOMY by Adam Rose, Ian Sue Wing, Dan Wei, and Misak Avetisyan Price School of Public Policy and Center for Risk

More information

Why Should Companies Take a Closer Look at Business Continuity Planning?

Why Should Companies Take a Closer Look at Business Continuity Planning? whitepaper Why Should Companies Take a Closer Look at Business Continuity Planning? How Datalink s business continuity and disaster recovery solutions can help organizations lessen the impact of disasters

More information

Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Planning

Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Planning Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Planning Jennifer Brandt, CISA A p r i l 16, 2015 HISTORY OF STINNETT & ASSOCIATES Stinnett & Associates (Stinnett) is a professional advisory firm offering services

More information

85-01-55 Overview of Business Continuity Planning Sally Meglathery Payoff

85-01-55 Overview of Business Continuity Planning Sally Meglathery Payoff 85-01-55 Overview of Business Continuity Planning Sally Meglathery Payoff Because a business continuity plan affects all functional units within the organization, each functional unit must participate

More information

Hurricane Sandy: The Challenges and Opportunities to Link Disaster Management and Climate Change Adaptation*

Hurricane Sandy: The Challenges and Opportunities to Link Disaster Management and Climate Change Adaptation* Hurricane Sandy: The Challenges and Opportunities to Link Disaster Management and Climate Change Adaptation* Gavin Smith, Ph.D. Associate Research Professor Department of City and Regional Planning University

More information

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020: PRIORITY ACTIONS

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020: PRIORITY ACTIONS TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020: PRIORITY ACTIONS INTRODUCTION The purpose of this document is to list the aligned with each in the Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan 2015-2020 (THSSP).

More information

MODELING DYNAMICS OF POST DISASTER RECOVERY. A Dissertation ALI NEJAT

MODELING DYNAMICS OF POST DISASTER RECOVERY. A Dissertation ALI NEJAT MODELING DYNAMICS OF POST DISASTER RECOVERY A Dissertation by ALI NEJAT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of

More information

American Planning Association

American Planning Association American Planning Association Planning for Post-Disaster Recovery Session 2 Moderator: James Schwab, AICP, APA Speakers: Laurie A. Johnson, AICP, Laurie Johnson Consulting Lincoln Walther, FAICP, CSA Ocean

More information

Moving forward in a difficult time

Moving forward in a difficult time Moving forward in a difficult time Purpose The purpose of recovery planning is to anticipate, to the maximum extent possible, what will be needed to restore the community to full functioning as rapidly

More information

/ business. Small steps toward preparing your business for emergencies

/ business. Small steps toward preparing your business for emergencies / business Small steps toward preparing your business for emergencies Step 4: Insurance THE GOAL: Make sure you have insurance that will enable you to get back into business after a disaster. Finding the

More information

Chapter 1: An Overview of Emergency Preparedness and Business Continuity

Chapter 1: An Overview of Emergency Preparedness and Business Continuity Chapter 1: An Overview of Emergency Preparedness and Business Continuity After completing this chapter, students will be able to: Describe organization and facility stakeholder needs during and after emergencies.

More information

Summer Disaster Institute. PLAN 740 Disaster Recovery: Concepts, Policies and Approaches. Overview

Summer Disaster Institute. PLAN 740 Disaster Recovery: Concepts, Policies and Approaches. Overview Summer Disaster Institute PLAN 740 Disaster Recovery: Concepts, Policies and Approaches Karl Kim, Andrew Rumbach, Dolores Foley Ken Tingman, Gavin Smith, Carolyn Harshman University of Hawaii Wednesday,

More information

Identifying Dimensions of Business Continuity Plan from Common Expressions among Business Continuity Professionals

Identifying Dimensions of Business Continuity Plan from Common Expressions among Business Continuity Professionals www.sciedu.ca/ijba International Journal of Business Administration Vol. 5, No. 3; 2014 Identifying Dimensions of Business Continuity Plan from Common Expressions among Business Continuity Professionals

More information

ECONOMIC CONSIDERATIONS FOR COMMUNITY RESILIENCE

ECONOMIC CONSIDERATIONS FOR COMMUNITY RESILIENCE ECONOMIC CONSIDERATIONS FOR COMMUNITY RESILIENCE 1. Introduction a. Purpose To identify and briefly describe the ways in which disasters affect the local economy and the way the economy influences the

More information

www.pwc.com Business Resiliency Business Continuity Management - January 14, 2014

www.pwc.com Business Resiliency Business Continuity Management - January 14, 2014 www.pwc.com Business Resiliency Business Continuity Management - January 14, 2014 Agenda Key Definitions Risks Business Continuity Management Program BCM Capability Assessment Process BCM Value Proposition

More information

Disaster Recovery. 1.1 Introduction. 1.2 Reasons for Disaster Recovery. EKAM Solutions Ltd Disaster Recovery

Disaster Recovery. 1.1 Introduction. 1.2 Reasons for Disaster Recovery. EKAM Solutions Ltd Disaster Recovery Disaster Recovery 1.1 Introduction Every day, there is the chance that some sort of business interruption, crisis, disaster, or emergency will occur. Anything that prevents access to key processes and

More information

Session 12. Holistic Disaster Recovery: Creating a More Sustainable Future. Facilitators of a Sustainable Recovery (Part I)

Session 12. Holistic Disaster Recovery: Creating a More Sustainable Future. Facilitators of a Sustainable Recovery (Part I) Session 12 Holistic Disaster Recovery: Creating a More Sustainable Future Facilitators of a Sustainable Recovery (Part I) Time: 3 hours (Slide 12-1) Objectives: 12.1 Discuss Exam 12.2 Discuss leveraging

More information

STRUCTURE AND PROCESS IN THE STUDY OF DISASTER RESILIENCE

STRUCTURE AND PROCESS IN THE STUDY OF DISASTER RESILIENCE STRUCTURE AND PROCESS IN THE STUDY OF DISASTER RESILIENCE K. J. Tierney 1 1 Professor, Dept. of Sociology and Institute of Behavioral Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO USA E-mail: tierneyk@colorado.edu

More information

The Need for Long-Term Disaster Recovery Systems

The Need for Long-Term Disaster Recovery Systems Ninth LACCEI Latin American and Caribbean Conference (LACCEI 2011), Engineering for a Smart Planet, Innovation, Information Technology and Computational Tools for Sustainable Development, August 3-5, 2011,

More information

Supplemental Tool: Executing A Critical Infrastructure Risk Management Approach

Supplemental Tool: Executing A Critical Infrastructure Risk Management Approach Supplemental Tool: Executing A Critical Infrastructure Risk Management Approach Executing a Critical Infrastructure Risk Management Approach Risk is defined as the potential for an unwanted outcome resulting

More information

Disaster Recovery 101 the basics.

Disaster Recovery 101 the basics. Disaster Recovery 101 the basics. Scott MacLeod, MA Emergency Management Agency Hazard Mitigation & Disaster Recovery Division Manager December 19, 2012 1 Today s discussion Define disaster recovery Provide

More information

A Framework for Management of Supply Chain Disruption Gary Stading, Assistant Professor University of Houston-Downtown 713-221- 2775; stadingg@uhd.

A Framework for Management of Supply Chain Disruption Gary Stading, Assistant Professor University of Houston-Downtown 713-221- 2775; stadingg@uhd. A Framework for Management of Supply Chain Disruption Gary Stading, Assistant Professor University of Houston-Downtown 713-221- 2775; stadingg@uhd.edu Ralph G. Kauffman, Associate Professor Emeritus University

More information

ready? are you [ ] An Elected Official s Guide to Emergency Management

ready? are you [ ] An Elected Official s Guide to Emergency Management ready? are you An Elected Official s Guide to Emergency Management [ ] The emergency management system was created in the 1950s and evolved over decades through the periods of détente in the 70s to the

More information

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST LOCAL CHURCH DISASTER PREPAREDNESS AND RESPONSE PLANNING GUIDELINES

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST LOCAL CHURCH DISASTER PREPAREDNESS AND RESPONSE PLANNING GUIDELINES UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST LOCAL CHURCH DISASTER PREPAREDNESS AND RESPONSE PLANNING GUIDELINES The United Church of Christ local churches may use this plan as a guide when preparing their own disaster plans

More information

BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLAN

BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLAN How to Develop a BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLAN To print to A4, print at 75%. TABLE OF CONTENTS SUMMARY SUMMARY WHAT IS A BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLAN? CHAPTER PREPARING TO WRITE YOUR BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLAN CHAPTER

More information

Emergency Support Function #14 RECOVERY & MITIGATION

Emergency Support Function #14 RECOVERY & MITIGATION Emergency Support Function #14 RECOVERY & MITIGATION Lead Agencies Virginia Department of Emergency Management (VDEM) Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) Support Agencies and Organizations

More information

Some companies never recover from a disaster related loss. A business that cannot operate will lose money, customers, credibility, and good will.

Some companies never recover from a disaster related loss. A business that cannot operate will lose money, customers, credibility, and good will. How Disaster Recovery Planning Can Be Leveraged For Electronic Discovery and Litigation Response Digital Discovery and e-evidence John Connell April 1. 2008 Hurricanes, floods, earthquakes, power outages,

More information

RISK AND RESILIENCE $58,000,000 +$38,000,000 / 190.0%

RISK AND RESILIENCE $58,000,000 +$38,000,000 / 190.0% RISK AND RESILIENCE $58,000,000 +$38,000,000 / 190.0% Overview The economic competiveness and societal well-being of the United States depend on the affordability, availability, quality, and reliability

More information

PPSADOPTED: OCT. 2012 BACKGROUND POLICY STATEMENT PHYSICAL FACILITIES. PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE STATEMENT Developing a Business Continuity Plan

PPSADOPTED: OCT. 2012 BACKGROUND POLICY STATEMENT PHYSICAL FACILITIES. PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE STATEMENT Developing a Business Continuity Plan PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE STATEMENT Developing a Business Continuity Plan OCT. 2012 PPSADOPTED: What is a professional practice statement? Professional Practice developed by the Association Forum of Chicagoland

More information

Initiating the CCSF Lifelines Council. Interdependency Study

Initiating the CCSF Lifelines Council. Interdependency Study LAURIE JOHNSON CONSULTING Initiating the CCSF Lifelines Council Urban Planning Risk Management Disaster Recovery Interdependency Study Lifelines Council Meeting #7 November 17, 2011 (Source: JIIRC-UBC)

More information

Triangle Alliance Conference DISASTERS & HISTORIC PRESERVATION. October 23, 2009

Triangle Alliance Conference DISASTERS & HISTORIC PRESERVATION. October 23, 2009 Triangle Alliance Conference DISASTERS & HISTORIC PRESERVATION October 23, 2009 Topic Outline FEMA s Mission Programs: Individual Assistance, Public Assistance, Mitigation, National Preparedness Environmental

More information

Testimony of Mr. Robert J. Fenton, Jr. Assistant Administrator for Response, Office of Response and Recovery Federal Emergency Management Agency U.S. Department of Homeland Security Before House Committee

More information

Business Resilience: How to Get Business Interruption Right Before and After the Storm

Business Resilience: How to Get Business Interruption Right Before and After the Storm Business Resilience: How to Get Business Interruption Right Before and After the Storm March 1, 2016 Rick Lunt Technical Director, Business Resilience National Tornado Summit Time Element Issues Business

More information

Oil and Gas Industry A Comprehensive Security Risk Management Approach. www.riskwatch.com

Oil and Gas Industry A Comprehensive Security Risk Management Approach. www.riskwatch.com Oil and Gas Industry A Comprehensive Security Risk Management Approach www.riskwatch.com Introduction This white paper explores the key security challenges facing the oil and gas industry and suggests

More information

Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS) Report 2012-2017. Southwest Florida Economic Development District

Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS) Report 2012-2017. Southwest Florida Economic Development District Southwest Florida Economic Development District Southwest Florida Economic Development District TABLE OF CONTENTS Strategy Report Executive Summary... v A. Background... 2 Community and Private Sector

More information

BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLANNING

BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLANNING Policy 8.3.2 Business Responsible Party: President s Office BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLANNING Overview The UT Health Science Center at San Antonio (Health Science Center) is committed to its employees, students,

More information

Business Interruption Impacts of a Terrorist Attack on the Electric Power System of Los Angeles: Customer Resilience to a Total Blackout

Business Interruption Impacts of a Terrorist Attack on the Electric Power System of Los Angeles: Customer Resilience to a Total Blackout Risk Analysis, Vol. 27, No. 3, 2007 DOI: 10.1111/j.1539-6924.2007.00912.x Business Interruption Impacts of a Terrorist Attack on the Electric Power System of Los Angeles: Customer Resilience to a Total

More information

Success or Failure? Your Keys to Business Continuity Planning. An Ingenuity Whitepaper

Success or Failure? Your Keys to Business Continuity Planning. An Ingenuity Whitepaper Success or Failure? Your Keys to Business Continuity Planning An Ingenuity Whitepaper May 2006 Overview With the level of uncertainty in our world regarding events that can disrupt the operation of an

More information

Business Unit CONTINGENCY PLAN

Business Unit CONTINGENCY PLAN Contingency Plan Template Business Unit CONTINGENCY PLAN Version 1.0 (Date submitted) Submitted By: Business Unit Date Version 1.0 Page 1 1 Plan Review and Updates... 3 2 Introduction... 3 2.1 Purpose...

More information

APICS INSIGHTS AND INNOVATIONS SUPPLY CHAIN RISK CHALLENGES AND PRACTICES

APICS INSIGHTS AND INNOVATIONS SUPPLY CHAIN RISK CHALLENGES AND PRACTICES APICS INSIGHTS AND INNOVATIONS SUPPLY CHAIN RISK CHALLENGES AND PRACTICES APICS INSIGHTS AND INNOVATIONS ABOUT THIS REPORT This report examines the role that supply chain risk management plays in organizations

More information

Response, Recovery, and Resilience

Response, Recovery, and Resilience Response, Recovery, and Resilience KATHLEEN TIERNEY ATURAL HAZARDS CENTER NIVERSITY OF COLORADO RESILIENCE THE ABILITYOF PHYSICAL SYSTEMS AND SOCIAL UNITS TO: Mitigate Hazards Contain the Effects of Disasters

More information

Disaster recovery planning as an element of risk management for natural disaster systems

Disaster recovery planning as an element of risk management for natural disaster systems Disaster recovery planning as an element of risk management for natural disaster systems Akram keramat Faculty of science, Islamic azad university, dezfoul branch E-mail address: a.keramat@iaud.ac.ir Abstract

More information

Business Recovery and the Rebuilding of Commercial Property

Business Recovery and the Rebuilding of Commercial Property 5 Business Recovery and the Rebuilding of Commercial Property Dr Felicity Powell PhD (Human Geography) Principal Researcher, Opus Central Laboratories Felicity is an economic geographer specialising in

More information

Star Valley Ranch Disaster Recovery Plan

Star Valley Ranch Disaster Recovery Plan Appendix 6: Star Valley Ranch Disaster Recovery Plan Star Valley Ranch Disaster Recovery Plan Introduction This plan is designed to assist Town officials and staff with recovery efforts following a disaster

More information

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS 2008 to Assistant Professor, Department of Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning, present Texas A&M University

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS 2008 to Assistant Professor, Department of Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning, present Texas A&M University 1 Current as of February, 2013 YU XIAO Assistant Professor, Department of Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning Faculty Fellow, Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center (HRRC) Texas A&M University, 3137

More information

BUSINESS INTERRUPTION IMPACTS OF A TERRORIST ATTACK ON THE ELECTRIC POWER SYSTEM OF LOS ANGELES: CUSTOMER RESILIENCE TO A TOTAL BLACKOUT

BUSINESS INTERRUPTION IMPACTS OF A TERRORIST ATTACK ON THE ELECTRIC POWER SYSTEM OF LOS ANGELES: CUSTOMER RESILIENCE TO A TOTAL BLACKOUT BUSINESS INTERRUPTION IMPACTS OF A TERRORIST ATTACK ON THE ELECTRIC POWER SYSTEM OF LOS ANGELES: CUSTOMER RESILIENCE TO A TOTAL BLACKOUT by Adam Rose The Pennsylvania State University University Park,

More information

better broadband Redundancy White Paper

better broadband Redundancy White Paper Redundancy White Paper May 2009 Table of Contents Executive Overview 3 Towerstream Overview 4 Towerstream Difference 4 Page 5 of 9 Cost of Downtime To Businesses 5 Causes of Unplanned Downtime 6 Cost of

More information

SEISMIC RISK REDUCTION SPARKS COMMUNITY RESILIENCE. A. Chakos

SEISMIC RISK REDUCTION SPARKS COMMUNITY RESILIENCE. A. Chakos SEISMIC RISK REDUCTION SPARKS COMMUNITY RESILIENCE A. Chakos Project Director, Kennedy School of Government, Taubman Center for State and Local Government, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts

More information

Temple university. Auditing a business continuity management BCM. November, 2015

Temple university. Auditing a business continuity management BCM. November, 2015 Temple university Auditing a business continuity management BCM November, 2015 Auditing BCM Agenda 1. Introduction 2. Definitions 3. Standards 4. BCM key elements IT Governance class - IT audit program

More information

GLOBAL RISK IDENTIFICATION PROGRAMME. Better Risk Information for Sound Decision Making DISASTER RISK ASSESSMENT TRAINING PACKAGE INTRODUCTORY COURSES

GLOBAL RISK IDENTIFICATION PROGRAMME. Better Risk Information for Sound Decision Making DISASTER RISK ASSESSMENT TRAINING PACKAGE INTRODUCTORY COURSES GLOBAL RISK IDENTIFICATION PROGRAMME Better Risk Information for Sound Decision Making DISASTER RISK ASSESSMENT TRAINING PACKAGE INTRODUCTORY COURSES GRIP Global Risk Identification Programme 2012 GRIP

More information

Appendix C Emergency Management and Related Terms and Definitions Handout

Appendix C Emergency Management and Related Terms and Definitions Handout Appendix C Emergency Management and Related Terms and Definitions Handout Emergency Management: Emergency management has been defined as the process by which the uncertainties that exist in potentially

More information

Flood Hazard Mitigation

Flood Hazard Mitigation District of Columbia Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency Flood Hazard Mitigation DC Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency 2720 Martin Luther King Jr., Avenue, SE Washington, DC

More information

Table of Contents. A. Aggregate Jobs Effects...3. B. Jobs Effects of the Components of the Recovery Package...5. C. The Timing of Job Creation...

Table of Contents. A. Aggregate Jobs Effects...3. B. Jobs Effects of the Components of the Recovery Package...5. C. The Timing of Job Creation... 1 Table of Contents A. Aggregate Jobs Effects...3 B. Jobs Effects of the Components of the Recovery Package...5 C. The Timing of Job Creation...7 D. Breakdown by Industry...7 E. Effects on Different Demographic

More information

Assessment Profile: Establishing Curricular Categories for Homeland Security Education

Assessment Profile: Establishing Curricular Categories for Homeland Security Education Assessment Profile: Establishing Curricular Categories for Homeland Security Education During any examination or assessment of the subject, homeland security, it becomes quite evident that by the definition(s)

More information

Disaster Risk Reduction and Building Resilience to Climate Change Impacts

Disaster Risk Reduction and Building Resilience to Climate Change Impacts Disaster Risk Reduction and Building Resilience to Climate Change Impacts Luna Abu-Swaireh (abu-swaireh@un.org) May 2015 United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR) Droughts Floods Storms

More information

Business Crisis and Continuity Management and Planning

Business Crisis and Continuity Management and Planning Business Crisis and Continuity Management and Planning Healy P. Palepu Dong Burritt Morhardt J. Freeman Chapter Outline 1. Introduction of topics and concepts to be discussed in this chapter. a. Introduction

More information

Community Disaster Recovery: A Framework Approach

Community Disaster Recovery: A Framework Approach Community Disaster Recovery: A Framework Approach San Diego Chapter American Society of Safety Engineers William F. Norris Disaster Preparedness & Emergency Management Consultant January 11, 2011 1 Let

More information

A Framework for Enhancing Resilience of Community by Expediting Post Disaster Recovery

A Framework for Enhancing Resilience of Community by Expediting Post Disaster Recovery A Framework for Enhancing Resilience of Community by Expediting Post Disaster Recovery Abhijeet DESHMUKH 1 and Makarand HASTAK 2 1 PhD student, school of civil engineering, Purdue University (550 Stadium

More information

An Overview of Professional Directors and Officers Liability in Disaster Preparedness and Recovery Planning

An Overview of Professional Directors and Officers Liability in Disaster Preparedness and Recovery Planning An Overview of Professional Directors and Officers Liability in Disaster Preparedness and Recovery Planning Eric Martin Scott Southern University Law Center Preparation for disasters involves a variety

More information

HOW DO SCHOOL LEADERS RESPOND TO COMPETITION?

HOW DO SCHOOL LEADERS RESPOND TO COMPETITION? Objective, rigorous, and useful research to understand post-katrina school reforms. POLICY BRIEF EducationResearchAllianceNola.com March 26, 2015 HOW DO SCHOOL LEADERS RESPOND TO COMPETITION? Evidence

More information

Business Continuity & Disaster Recovery

Business Continuity & Disaster Recovery Business Continuity & Disaster Recovery Safety First Quality Every Time 1 Business Continuity & Disaster Recovery Planning Who here has a formal Business Continuity & Disaster Recovery plan? The purpose

More information

The Dynamics of Disaster Economics: The Philippines Recovery and Response to Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda)

The Dynamics of Disaster Economics: The Philippines Recovery and Response to Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) The Dynamics of Disaster Economics: The Philippines Recovery and Response to Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) Antonio Louis A. Holmes Industrial Engineering Department, De La Salle University-Manila 2401 Taft

More information

Resolution XII.13. Wetlands and disaster risk reduction

Resolution XII.13. Wetlands and disaster risk reduction 12 th Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) Punta del Este, Uruguay, 1-9 June 2015 Resolution XII.13 Wetlands and disaster risk reduction 1. RECALLING

More information

Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR)

Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) A. Introduction 1. In order to address the impacts of the May 12 Wenchuan Earthquake, the Government of China will implement an effective, comprehensive and sustainable recovery

More information

BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLANNING AT THE NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA. Erica Persak

BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLANNING AT THE NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA. Erica Persak BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLANNING AT THE NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA Erica Persak Thank you for giving me the opportunity to speak on behalf of the National Gallery on the subject of business continuity planning

More information

Grand Challenges Making Drill Down Analysis of the Economy a Reality. John Haltiwanger

Grand Challenges Making Drill Down Analysis of the Economy a Reality. John Haltiwanger Grand Challenges Making Drill Down Analysis of the Economy a Reality By John Haltiwanger The vision Here is the vision. A social scientist or policy analyst (denoted analyst for short hereafter) is investigating

More information

Barre City City-wide Policy and Program Options

Barre City City-wide Policy and Program Options Barre City (VERI Land Use Regulations Update policies allowing fill in flood hazard areas. RPC, DEC River Management, VLCT, Allowing landowners to elevate buildings using fill may help protect an individual

More information

Community Infrastructure (CI) Recovery. Krishna S. Vatsa Regional Disaster Reduction Advisor BCPR, UNDP

Community Infrastructure (CI) Recovery. Krishna S. Vatsa Regional Disaster Reduction Advisor BCPR, UNDP Community Infrastructure (CI) Recovery Krishna S. Vatsa Regional Disaster Reduction Advisor BCPR, UNDP Defining Community Infrastructure (CI) CI primarily refers to small scale basic physical structures,

More information

Interactive-Network Disaster Recovery

Interactive-Network Disaster Recovery Interactive-Network Disaster Recovery BACKGROUND IT systems are vulnerable to a variety of disruptions, ranging from mild (e.g., short-term power outage, disk drive failure) to severe (e.g., terrorism,

More information

QUANTITATIVE MODEL FOR INFORMATION SECURITY RISK MANAGEMENT

QUANTITATIVE MODEL FOR INFORMATION SECURITY RISK MANAGEMENT QUANTITATIVE MODEL FOR INFORMATION SECURITY RISK MANAGEMENT Rok Bojanc ZZI d.o.o. rok.bojanc@zzi.si Abstract: The paper presents a mathematical model to improve our knowledge of information security and

More information