County of Oxford Asset Management Plan Executive Summary Introduction Purpose and Methodology... 10

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1 Asset Management Plan AUGUST 2014

2 County of Oxford Asset Management Plan 2014 Table of Contents 1.0 Executive Summary Introduction Purpose and Methodology State of Infrastructure Levels of Service Asset Management Strategy Financial Strategy Infrastructure Report Card - Consolidated Additional Information and Assumptions Appendix A Infrastructure Report Card Road Network Appendix B Infrastructure Report Card Bridges and Culverts Appendix C Infrastructure Report Card Water Systems Appendix D Infrastructure Report Card Wastewater Systems Appendix E Infrastructure Report Card Social Housing and Corporate Facilities Appendix F Infrastructure Report Card Fleet and Major Equipment Page 1 of 56

3 1.0 Executive Summary 1.1 Background The state of the County s infrastructure can be an economic development driver and is a determinant in the quality of life of our communities. This Asset Management Plan (AMP) supports the County s strategic plan as well as the Official Plan as it relates to strategically growing our economy and our community. This plan sets out a strategic framework that will guide future investments that support economic growth and respond to changing needs in a fiscally responsible manner. Also complementing the County s Long Term Financial Sustainability Plan the AMP forms a strong foundation for sound asset management financial planning well into the future. This AMP complies with the provincial government directives as set out in the Ministry of Infrastructure s Building Together Guide for Municipal Asset Management Plans. Based on this Guide, qualifying AMPs must include the following information: Table 1 Asset Management Plan Content Section Content Executive Summary Introduction State of Local Infrastructure Levels of Service Asset Management Strategy Financing Strategy Succinct overview of the Asset Management Plan highlighting major points. Overview of asset management within the County and sets out the overall context and expectation for the report. Information on the asset portfolio including inventory, condition, cost, etc. accompanied by information on supporting data. How service is linked to infrastructure investment and defined how service is measured and how performance goals and expectations are identified and set. Sets planned actions that will enable assets to provide the desired levels of service in a sustainable way, while managing risk, at the lowest lifecycle cost (i.e. through preventative action). Identifies lifecycle investment requirements and appropriate funding strategies for completing the work. The County of Oxford owns and operates over $1.5 billion (replacement value) of core County infrastructure that supports the needs of Area Municipalities, residents, and local businesses and industry. These water, wastewater, roads, bridges, social housing/corporate facilities, and fleet/major equipment assets also advance the collective interests of our communities, residents and businesses through customer/client-focused services that improve quality of life. Page 2 of 56

4 Table 2 Replacement Value by Asset Category In addition to meeting the requirements of the Provincial mandated AMP requirements, the County of Oxford s AMP establishes a strategic framework for managing these assets, aligning core infrastructure with service objectives, documenting core practices and procedures, and guiding the action and investment needed to meet key business goals. The AMP clearly aligns with and supports the County s Strategic Plan, Official Plan, By-laws, Policies, Master Plans and Business Plans. This first County of Oxford AMP is based on current information available with a goal to identify plans to address gaps in data and procedures and implement opportunities for improvement. This Plan will be reviewed on a four-year cycle or more frequently if deemed necessary. 1.2 State of Infrastructure The County s asset inventory is made up of six major asset categories: 1. Road network 2. Bridges and culverts 3. Water systems 4. Wastewater systems 5. Social housing and corporate facilities 6. Fleet and major equipment Page 3 of 56

5 Over 90% of the County s asset inventory has conditions ratings of fair or better with approximately 30% in each of the excellent, good and fair condition ratings. Table 3 Consolidated Asset Condition Assessment Page 4 of 56

6 1.3 Financial Strategy The projected capital investment for all asset categories is summarized in Table 4. The values shown represent forecasts for each of the decades to the 2100 s. The capital costs in each 10 year planning period range from $200 million to $375 million over the forecasted horizon. The average annual current investment of $21.9 million is comprised of funding sources including debt, operating levy, user fees, reserves, Federal gas tax and external revenues. Based on replacement values in today s dollars, the average annual investment requirement is $30.3 million, resulting in a funding gap of $8.4 million. The investment requirements for each of the asset categories are set out in detail in the appendices to this Plan. Table 4 Overall Capital Investment Requirements Page 5 of 56

7 In response to the capital investment requirements on an asset category basis, the following provides a summary of some recommendations formulated to ensure sustainable management of the County s core infrastructure. More detailed recommendations are provided within the appendices to this Plan. Table 5 Recommendations Asset Category Road Network Bridge and Culverts Water System Wastewater System Social Housing & Corporate Facilities Fleet and Major Equipment Recommendations Continuation of annual $500,000 increase in budget for roads maintenance to eliminate funding shortfall. Pursue technical solutions to extend the useful lives of bridges and accelerate annual investment to build up bridge reserve to address 2030 infrastructure needs due to large number of anticipated infrastructure replacements. Current capital investment levels need to be sustained to maintain this level of service to replace aging infrastructure and take measures to fill infrastructure gaps in GIS data. Current capital investment levels need to be sustained to maintain this level of service to replace aging infrastructure and take measures to fill infrastructure gaps in GIS data. The condition assessment program needs to be completed to gain a better understanding of current conditions and performance. Increase funding level to sufficiently meet the needs required. Continually evaluate the fleet for overall efficiency and effectiveness in accordance with the Energy Management Plan. The County s first AMP will serve as a benchmark for service delivery and is a key component of the framework from which future asset management decisions will be made. It will be used to communicate progress in asset management effectiveness and the County s performance in meeting its service objectives and goals. This AMP is designed to be a living document that will be reviewed on a four-year cycle and revised in response to changing environmental, and social and economic needs within our communities. Page 6 of 56

8 2.0 Introduction In preparation for Public Sector Accounting Board (PSAB) Standard 3150, which requires entities to record and report their tangible capital assets on the Balance Sheets to their Financial Statement, in 2007, the County prepared an Asset Management Business Plan. That Plan that outlined the following goals and objectives for 2007: Educate staff and Council on asset management planning and Public Sector Accounting Board (PSAB) requirements; Draft an asset capitalization policy to determine thresholds for capitalization; Review asset capitalization requirements for PSAB; and Purchase asset management software. With Council and Senior Management Team approval of the Business Plan, all of the goals and objectives were achieved through the collaborative efforts of various departments, including expertise from engineering, finance, information technology, geographic information and customer service. In addition to being compliant with PSAB 3150 the County followed the Province s advice to develop an Asset Management Plan (AMP). The process involved implementing improvements to our financial software to record and report the tangible capital assets as well as optimizing other financial components such as electronic purchase orders, inventory, assigning labour costs to invoices, and life cycle costing for assets. To round out the Asset Management Plan, a software application was implemented for capital asset long term financial planning and analysis. This AMP is designed to be a living document that will be reviewed on a four-year cycle and revised in response to changing environmental and social and economic needs within our communities. The County s current tangible capital assets are valued at $1.5 billion. The projected annual capital investment for all assets categories range from $200 million to $375 million over the forecasted horizon of 90 years. The average annual current investment of $21.9 million is comprised of funding sources including debt, operating levy, user fees, reserves, Federal gas tax and external revenues. Based on replacement values in today s dollars, the average annual investment requirement is $30.3 million, resulting in a funding gap of $8.4 million. The investment requirements for each of the asset categories are set out in detail in the appendices to this Plan. Alignment to Strategic Plan The County of Oxford Strategic Plan identifies our vision as Vibrant communities, working well and growing stronger together!, and our mission as To serve the needs and advance the collective interests of our communities, residents and businesses through customer/client-focused services that improve quality of life. The initiatives contained within this Asset Management Plan (AMP) support the values and strategic directions as set out in the Strategic Plan as it pertains to the following Strategic Directions: 1.i. A County that Works Together - Enhance the quality of life for all of our citizens by maintaining and strengthening core infrastructure. Page 7 of 56

9 3.iii. A County that Thinks Ahead and Wisely Shapes the Future - Apply social, financial and environmental sustainability lenses to significant decisions by assessing options in regard to life cycle costs and benefit/costs - including debt, tax and reserve levels and implications. As the state of the County s infrastructure can be an economic development driver and is a determinant in the quality of life of our communities, this plan supports the County s strategic plan as well as the Official Plan as it relates to strategically growing our economy and our community. This plan sets out a strategic framework that will guide future investments that support economic growth and respond to changing needs in a fiscally responsible manner. A key element of this plan is to ensure good stewardship through proper asset management well-planned, well-built and well-maintained infrastructure. This Asset Management Plan and its regular review aligns to the County s Strategic Plan as it commits to be A County that Thinks Ahead and Wisely Shapes the Future. In addition, this AMP meets the provincial government directives as set out in the Ministry of Infrastructure s Building Together Guide for Municipal Asset Management Plans. This AMP will ensure infrastructure will be sustained at the required level that enhances the quality of life for all of our citizens by maintaining and strengthening core infrastructure 1. Alignment to Other County Plans and Policies The guiding principles used in the development of this AMP were established consistent with the goals set out in the following County plans and policy. Long Term Financial Sustainability Plan The County s Long Term Financial Sustainability Plan was designed to ensure that sufficient funding and resources are provided over the long term. This will ensure services and infrastructure will be sustained at the required level to maximize value to the citizens of the County. The Asset Management Plan is a key component of the Long Term Financial Sustainability Plan, serving the purpose of the management of infrastructure assets that combines multi-disciplinary management techniques (including technical and financial) over the life cycle of the asset in the most cost effective manner to provide a specific level of service. Other key elements of the Long Term Financial Sustainability Plan that support the AMP relies on include: Business plans and budgeting; Capital Plan; Performance Reporting; Risk Management Plan; Reserve Policy; and Business Continuity Plan. The County has completed various infrastructure master plans and employs an effective enterprise resource management system for asset management, both of which have coalesced into this Asset Management Plan. 1 County of Oxford Strategic Plan, adopted March 27, 2013, strategic directive 1.ii. Page 8 of 56

10 Infrastructure Master Plans Much of the content of this Plan is based on goals and projections from the following master plans: 2010 Roads Needs Study, authored by AECOM, April 2011; Performance Modeling and Deterioration Curve Development, authored by Stantec Consulting Ltd., October 2011; 2012 Municipal Bridge Inspections, R.J. Burnside & Associates Limited, March 2013; and County of Oxford Water System Financial Plan , approved by Council September Components of Enterprise Resource Management System Comprehensive asset inventory including condition ratings; Replacement costs for the asset inventory items; Asset maintenance management system developed in order to assess maintenance versus replacement requirements; Asset accounting and asset management practices strategically aligned refer to Accounting Treatment for Capital Assets Policy No of the County s General Policy Manual; and Asset service levels and expected useful lives have been developed and regularly monitored for updating as new information becomes available. Capital Plan As previously identified as a key element of the Long Term Financial Sustainability Plan, the Capital Plan consists of a capital budget and capital program over a 10 year horizon. The plan identifies capital projects and equipment purchases, provides a planning schedule and identifies financing sources for the plan under the principles of the County s Risk Management Plan, Debt Management Policy and Reserve Policy. To complement the Capital Plan, the AMP considers a more comprehensive conditions analysis of the County s asset inventory based on the following key components: Recording procedures to account for tangible capital asset inventory in the financial repository following appropriate work processes to ensure the inventory list is all inclusive; Desired level of service is defined for each asset class and tracked through performance indicators which supply targets and timeframes that trigger improvements or replacements; Levels of service will be based on a combination of the following influencing factors: Public expectations; Strategic and corporate goals; Legislative requirements; and Design standards and codes of practice. Comprehensive risk matrix for each asset category in accordance with the County s Risk Management Plan General Policy No. 6.16, unless assets are the subject of a legislated risk management plan i.e. Safe Drinking Water Act; Financial planning for budgeting based on sensitivity analysis; and Consideration of Area Municipalities asset management plans for linear assets. Page 9 of 56

11 3.0 Purpose and Methodology The purpose of the County s AMP is to set out how the County s infrastructure will be managed in accordance with the County s Strategic Plan; various plans and policies; and legislation, to ensure that the County is capable of providing the levels of service required to support the public s needs. The methodology employed to develop and review the AMP is based on the following key components. Strategic Plan Strategic Plan goals, public expectations, legislated requirements State of Infrastructure Asset inventory, valuation, current condition/performance, sustainable funding Levels of Service Key performance indicators, performance measures Asset Management Strategy Life cycle analysis, growth requirements, risk management, project priorities Financing Strategy Capital budget including revenue source analysis Performance Reporting Key performance measures, progress reported in Annual Report As illustrated above, the County s infrastructure planning process begins with the County s Strategic Plan, aligned with the public s expectations and government regulations. The process evaluates the state of infrastructure which is determined by a current conditions and performance assessment for each asset class. This assists in forecasting a sustainable funding level and identifies if a funding surplus or deficit exists. Report cards are used to assess and report the state of infrastructure. A life cycle analysis provides an understanding of the current levels of service and the projected levels of service for the future. This framework guides the development for desired levels of service and relative performance measures that are used to evaluate progress annually in achieving the desired levels of service. The asset management strategy component of the planning process provides a detailed analysis for each infrastructure class. This analysis is based on best practices and industry standards employed to manage the assets with the goal to meet the desired level of service. This component includes a comprehensive conditions assessment Page 10 of 56

12 based on clearly identified rehabilitation strategies that trigger specific life cycle events. The specified life cycle event is dependent upon return on investment, risk assessment and prioritization of projects. The next step in the planning cycle is developing the financing strategy. This is an integral component of the 10 year capital plan (budget). All possible revenue sources are considered for each capital project such as, grants, reserves, gas tax, development charges, debt, user fees (rates), and tax levy. This component of the process is reviewed and developed concurrently with the County s annual operating budget to ensure the overall budget is achievable and manageable, both technically and financially. The final component of the infrastructure planning process is performance reporting and evaluating against key performance measures established to assess progress towards achieving the desired levels of service. This exercise will also identify weaknesses in performance that will trigger re-assessment of the desired service levels or rehabilitation strategies. The County s Plan includes the following infrastructure assets: Roads; Bridges and culverts; Water; Wastewater; Social housing and corporate facilities; and Fleet and major equipment. At the organizational level, the County s enterprise asset management process involves collaboration among various departments and programs roads, water, wastewater, waste management, fleet, facilities, information systems, customer service and finance. 1. Asset maintenance management system records information related to maintenance, operation and repair activities of existing asset infrastructure. 2. Modeling and master planning based on condition assessment data of existing and planned future replacements and growth related asset infrastructure. The output from the AMP serves as a framework for the County s Long Term Capital Plan, including reconstruction and rehabilitation strategies, maintenance, operations and repair activities and financial planning. 4.0 State of Infrastructure Each asset category will be rated on three independent assessments: 1. Condition and Performance - Present condition of the asset and an assessment as to how well it currently performs. 2. Funding versus Need Current spending levels for each asset group versus investment requirements for replacement of the asset when needed. 3. Trend Indicators Trend is increasing, decreasing or stable Page 11 of 56

13 Grading Scale: Condition and Performance Grade Description Trend A B C D F Excellent no noticeable defects Good minor deterioration Fair deterioration evident, function is affected Poor Serious deterioration, function is inadequate Fail no longer functional, general or complete failure Letter Grade A B C D F Grading Scale: Funding vs. Need Description Excellent >90% of need Good >75% to 90% of need Fair >60% to 75% of need Poor >45% to 60% of need Fail <45% of need Trend 5.0 Levels of Service Level of service is a methodology used to consider affordability of assets against customer needs and expectations. Identifying levels of service ensures that asset management decisions are: Based on impact on customers, the community and the environment; and Aligned with the strategic goals of the County. It is important to define and quantify the levels of service within each service area as key indicators of asset needs and the basis for investment decisions. Levels of service take into consideration: 1. Legislative requirements; 2. Corporate objectives; 3. Customer needs; and 4. Design standards and codes of practice technical requirements to achieve the service objective. Page 12 of 56

14 6.0 Asset Management Strategy In accordance with the County s mission statement, customer/client-focused services that improve quality of life, the County is transitioning into a more customer centric asset management strategy that includes: improved asset management maintenance programs; customer service outreach initiatives; performance tracking systems; and a dynamic financial planning model. It is intended that this enhanced enterprise asset management model will develop customer performance indicators that link technical indicators with service delivery goals. The performance indicators will be formed and refined as part of the continuous improvement service review process that began in This asset management strategy will result in a set of planned actions to enable a sustainable level of service, while managing risk at the lowest life cycle costs. The set of planned actions are referred to as Triggers the timing of which are identified in Tables 4 of each of the appendicies to this report, where Q1 is the first quarter of the assets useful life, etc. 7.0 Financial Strategy The Asset Management Plan is a key component of the County s Long Term Financial Sustainability Plan (Policy No. 6.16), designed to combine multi-disciplinary management techniques (including technical and financial) over the life cycle of the asset in the most cost-effective manner to maintain specific levels of service. A key component of the Asset Management Strategy is a financial planning tool that will assist in achieving the guidelines as set out in the County s Long Term Financial Sustainability Plan, Risk Management Plan (Policy No. 6.17), Reserve Policy (Policy No. 6.20) and Debt Management Policy (Policy No. 6.19). The financial planning tool will provide a comprehensive asset registry for all asset types and will enable dynamic lifecycle planning, condition assessment, risk analysis, levels of service and project prioritization. In the event that this AMP identifies funding shortfalls in any of the asset categories, the Province requires an action plan for managing the shortfall. The action plan may include any of the following approaches: 1. Reduce levels of service which will effectively reduce the funding requirement; and 2. Employ asset management and financial strategies, such as: a. Use of debt; b. Establish reserves with appropriate target balances; and c. Increase or introduce user fees. The recommendations contained in this AMP have considered these strategic approaches for funding shortfalls. Page 13 of 56

15 8.0 Infrastructure Report Card - Consolidated Asset Category Overall Conditions Rating Trend Road Network B Bridge and Culverts C Water System B Comments/Recommendations The overall condition of the County s road network is rated B. Based on current management practices it is anticipated that the condition rating will decline due to calculated investment requirements and the inability to fund those requirements in the short-term (next five years). Recommend continuation of annual $500,000 increase in budget for roads maintenance to eliminate funding shortfall. The overall condition of the County s bridges and culverts are rated C. Based on current management practices it is anticipated that the condition rating will decline due to calculated investment requirements and the inability to fund those requirements in the short-term (next five to twenty years). Technical solutions are required to extend the useful lives of these structures. Recommend pursuing technical solutions to extend the useful lives of bridges and increase investment to build up bridge reserve. The overall condition of the County s water systems are rated B. Based on current management practices it is anticipated that the condition rating will be stable. Recent upgrades to Water Treatment Facilities and implementation of the Water Efficiency Plan have had positive impacts on overall rating of the County water systems. Recommend current capital investment levels need to be sustained to maintain this level of service to replace aging infrastructure and take measures to fill infrastructure gaps in GIS data. Page 14 of 56

16 Asset Category Wastewater System Social Housing & Corporate Facilities Fleet and Major Equipment Overall Conditions Rating B B B Trend Comments/Recommendations The overall condition of the County s wastewater systems are rated B. Based on current management practices it is anticipated that the condition rating will be stable. Recent upgrades to Wastewater Treatment Plants and additions of new wastewater systems have had positive impacts on overall rating of the County wastewater system. Recommend current capital investment levels need to be sustained to maintain this level of service to replace aging infrastructure and take measures to fill infrastructure gaps in GIS data. The overall condition of the County s social housing and corporate facilities are rated B. Based on current management practices it is anticipated that the condition rating will decline due to calculated investment requirements and the inability to fund those requirements in the mid-term (next ten to fifteen years). Recommend the condition assessment program be completed to gain a better understanding of current conditions and performance. Increase funding level to sufficiently meet the needs required. The overall condition of the County s fleet and major equipment is rated B. Based on current management practices it is anticipated that the condition rating will be stable Aging of the County fleet is reviewed on an annual basis due to the short replacement timeframe. Actions are taken to extend the asset life, where possible, through cost effective maintenance and where asset use has been lower than expected. The recently adopted Energy Management Plan will influence the asset replacement schedule. Recommend re-evaluating departmental requirements for fleet vehicles. Page 15 of 56

17 9.0 Additional Information and Assumptions Road Network Asset Type Useful Life Cost per Sq M Base Surface Base ($) Surface ($) Rural Surface Treatment 50 7 $20 $4 Bonded Wear Course $20 $7 Rural Asphalt $20 $18 Semi-Urban $28 $33 Urban $28 $49 Useful lives were derived from the 2010 Road Needs Study Base: assume 600 mm thick Rural surface treatment: assume 50mm thick Semi-urban asphalt: assume 100mm thick Urban asphalt: assume 150mm thick Average cost per traffic signal: $250,000 Asset Type Type Diameter (mm) Length (m) Cost ($) Culverts Plastic $5,550 Plastic $6,380 Plastic $6,580 Concrete $16,750 Average $8,815 Actual culvert length is approx 4m greater than road width. Bridges and Culverts Asset Type Culvert Bridge Asset Component Useful Life (years) CPS - corrugated plate steel 50 CPR - cast in place 50 HYB - hybrid composite culvert 75 CST - corrugated steel 40 C - cast in place 75 P - precast concrete 75 S - steel 100 Page 16 of 56

18 Water System Asset Type Linear Facilities Asset Component Useful Life (years) Transmission main (> 400mm) Local main (< 400mm) Services 90 Meters 20 Water treatment facilities 75 Pumping stations 75 Storage (reservoirs and towers) Wells 50 Other 75 Wastewater System Linear Asset Type Facilities Asset Component Useful Life (years) Forcemains Trunk sewers (>or= 450mm) Local sewers (< 450mm) STEP/STEG units & grinder pumps Sewer laterals 90 Wastewater treatment plants 75 Pumping stations 60 Odour control facilities 60 Biosolids centralized storage facility 60 Social Housing and Corporate Facilities The following classifications and estimated useful lives are based on industry standards which have been applied to all social housing and corporate facility assets in the corporate asset inventory. Each property has been broken into these components by address rather than by unit in order to simplify data management and reflect the general practice of coordinating the replacement of all unit components at one property at the same time to be more efficient and economical. Page 17 of 56

19 Asset Type Structure Exterior Interior Site Elements Asset Component Useful Life (years) Structural frame, foundations, balconies 50 Water systems, drainage systems, fire sprinkler systems 30 Electrical systems 25 Mechanical & HVAC systems, elevators 20 Security, smoke, fire alarm systems 15 Brick mortar 40 Roofing pitched metal Roofing flat SBS membrane & tar gravel 30 Roofing pitched shingle 20 Windows, exterior doors, siding 20 Millwork/shelving/interior doors/kitchen cabinetry - residential 25 Drywall/flooring 20 Interior fixtures lighting, bathroom 15 Sidewalks, curbing, driveways, parking lots, concrete patios/porches, carport 20 posts, walkways Retaining walls, pavilions, gazebos, ramps 15 Fencing, playground structures, exterior lighting 10 Page 18 of 56

20 Appendix A Infrastructure Report Card Road Network Table A.1 Road Network Inventory Asset Type Asset Component 2013 Inventory Road Network 1 Rural surface treatment Bonded wear course Rural asphalt Semi-urban Urban 154 km 7 km 385 km 27 km 68 km 641 km Notes: Roads Needs Study, authored by AECOM, April Performance Modeling and Deterioration Curve Development, authored by Stantec Consulting Ltd., October The source information for the road network is the County s GIS and capital asset inventory. Table A.2 Road Network Replacement Value Asset Type Asset Component 2014 Replacement Value ($ per km) 2014 Replacement Value ($ million) % of Total Value Rural surface treatment $213,413 $ % Road Network Bonded wear course $267,720 $2 0.8% Rural asphalt $349,323 $ % Semi-urban $572,998 $16 6.1% Urban $1,112,511 $ % Replacement Value Total $ % Road Network Replacement cost per household $5,760 Page 19 of 56

21 Table A.3 Road Network Condition Assessment Asset Type Asset Component Condition Rating Trend Rural surface treatment C Bonded wear course B Road Network Rural asphalt B Semi-urban C Urban B Overall Rating B Page 20 of 56

22 Table A.4 Road Network Lifecycle Activities There are four maintenance categories considered in the overall sustainable management of road assets, described as follows: Strategy Lifecycle Activity Trigger Minor maintenance Major maintenance Rehabilitation Replacement Regularly scheduled maintenance and inspection programs including conditions assessments, pothole repairs, cleaning catch basins Planned activities such as a crack sealing, patching sections of road and repairing major damage/defects caused by traffic mishaps or environmental impacts One time events that extend the life of the asset to its established life expectancy surface grinding and repaving program Occurs at the end of the useful service life complete replacement of road base, curbs, gutters and surface treatment Q1, Q2, Q3 Q2 Q3 Q4 Table A.5 Road Network Useful Life Asset Type Asset Component Remaining Useful Life Base 1 Remaining Useful Life Surface 1 Rural surface treatment -3 1 Bonded wear course 14 9 Road Network Rural asphalt 6 9 Semi-urban -3-1 Urban 9 1 Notes: 1. Useful lives are based on average expected life based on the type of material used and the estimated traffic flow. Weather factors and actual traffic flow will have an effect on the actual life achieved for each road segment. When resurfacing a road segment, the base is evaluated to determine if it requires replacement. As many factors contribute to the actual useful life of a road segment it is possible to have segments exceed the Page 21 of 56

23 average life, as well as segments that require replacement prior to the average useful life. Those that exceed the expected life are represented in the chart as negative years. The projected capital investment for the road network is summarized in Table A.6. The values shown represent forecasts for each of the decades to the 2100s. The capital costs in each 10 year planning period range from $65 million to $120 million over the forecasted horizon. The average annual current investment of $7.59 million is comprised of funding sources including debt, operating levy, reserves, Federal gas tax and external revenues. Based on replacement values in today s dollars, the average annual investment requirement is $10.35 million, resulting in a funding gap of $2.76 million. Table A.6 Road Network Capital Investment Requirements Page 22 of 56

24 Table A.7 Road Network Investment Profile The investment profile considers lifecycle costs comprised of capital requirements for the renewal of the County s existing infrastructure and the operations and maintenance estimates included in annual operating budgets. Investment Measure Description Investment ($ millions) % of Current Replacement Value Capital investment requirements Average annual capital renewal over 95 years $ % Average Annual Current Investment Level Total road network capital investment over 10 years $ % Average Annual Operating Budget Total operations and maintenance costs over 8 years $ % Average annual lifecycle investment requirements Average annual capital and operating costs $ % Overview and Recommendations The overall condition of the County s road network is rated B. Based on current management practices it is anticipated that the condition rating will decline due to calculated investment requirements and the inability to fund those requirements in the short-term (next five years). Overview - Positive Impacts on Rating 1. Roads Needs Study, dated April This plan presents recommended improvement programs for the next 20 years and future funding requirements to sustain the infrastructure. 2. Update the 2009 Transportation Master Plan in the next 5 years to identify the transportation needs of the community as it continues to grow and evolve. 3. Additional funding received from Council annually in the amount of $500,000 has assisted in replacing the aging road network. (CS ) Page 23 of 56

25 Overview - Negative Impacts on Rating 1. Reliance on Federal government gas tax funding to support the capital program. 2. Absence of Provincial government funding to support the capital program. 3. Demand for corridor space to accommodate active transportation and utilities. 4. Underground infrastructure needs impact on road network. 5. Increased public expectations for higher levels of service. 6. Increasing environmental impacts on conditions assessment and seasonal maintenance. The following recommendations are based on the review of current management practices and inventory, valuation and conditions analysis. Recommendations 1. Integrate financial reporting processes with an asset management condition/valuation reporting tool that provides for annual update of replacement values. 2. Establish and monitor appropriate and measurable levels of service and performance measures. 3. Continue annual $500,000 budget increase for road upgrades. 4. Collaborate with Area Municipalities to align Asset Management Plans to gain efficiencies by optimizing investment priorities of linear assets. 5. Review and update the Infrastructure Report Card on a four-year cycle. 6. Embrace emerging technologies and techniques to extend pavement structure life. Page 24 of 56

26 Appendix B Infrastructure Report Card Bridges and Culverts Table B.1 Bridges and Culverts Inventory Asset Type Asset Component Length (m = metre) 2013 Inventory Bridges and Culverts Bridges 26,725 m 2 94 Culverts 1,678 m 61 Notes: Municipal Bridge Inspections, R.J. Burnside & Associates Limited, March The source information for bridges and culverts is the 2012 Bridge Needs Study Report. Only culverts with a span of 3 metres and greater are included in this value. Culverts with spans less than 3 metres are inspected during regular Road Maintenance Activities and are included in the cost of the road. Table B.2 Bridges and Culverts Replacement Value Asset Type Asset Component 2014 Replacement Value ($ per m 2 /m) 2014 Replacement Value ($ million) % of Total Value Bridges and Culverts Bridges $7,901 $ % Culverts $26,784 $ % Replacement Value Total $ % Bridges and Culverts Replacement cost per household $5,658 Table B.3 Bridges and Culverts Condition Assessment Asset Type Asset Component Condition Rating Trend Bridges and Culverts Overall Rating Bridges C Culverts C C Page 25 of 56

27 Table B.4 Bridges and Culverts Lifecycle Activities There are four maintenance categories considered in the overall sustainable management of bridge and culvert assets, described as follows: Strategy Lifecycle Activity Trigger Minor maintenance Major maintenance Rehabilitation Activities such as inspections, monitoring, sweeping, winter control, etc. Activities such as repairs to cracked or spalled concrete, damaged expansion joints, bent or damaged railings, etc. Events such as structural reinforcement of structural elements, deck replacement, etc. Q1 Q2 Q3 Replacement Full structure reconstruction Q4 Page 26 of 56

28 Table B.5 Bridges and Culverts Useful Life Asset Type Asset Component Remaining Useful Life Years Bridges and Culverts Bridges 34 Culverts 5 The projected capital investment for bridges and culverts is summarized in Table B.6. The values shown represent forecasts for each of the decades to the 2100s. The capital costs in each 10 year planning period range from less than $5 million to $85 million over the forecasted horizon. The average annual current investment of $2.03 million is comprised of funding sources including debt, operating levy, reserves, Federal gas tax and external revenues. Based on replacement values in today s dollars, the average annual investment requirement is $3.24 million, resulting in a funding gap of $1.21 million. Table B.6 Bridges and Culverts Capital Investment Requirements Page 27 of 56

29 Table B.7 Bridges and Culverts Investment Profile The investment profile considers lifecycle costs comprised of capital requirements for the renewal of the County s existing infrastructure and the operations and maintenance estimates included in annual operating budgets. Investment Measure Description Investment ($ millions) % of Current Replacement Value Capital investment requirements Average annual capital renewal over 95 years $ % Average Annual Current Investment Level Total bridges and culverts capital investment over 10 years $ % Average Annual Operating Budget Total operations and maintenance costs over 8 years $ % Average annual lifecycle investment requirements Average annual capital and operating costs $ % Overview and Recommendations The overall condition of the County s bridges and culverts are rated C. Based on current management practices it is anticipated that the condition rating will decline due to calculated investment requirements and the inability to fund those requirements in the short-term (next five to 20 years). Technical solutions are required to extend the useful lives of these structures. The Bridge Needs Study is required to be carried out every two years to comply with the Public Transportation and Improvement Act, Ontario Regulation 104/97, amended to Ontario Regulation 160/02. The Study evaluates the structural and serviceability of the bridge/culvert components, and recommends required improvements. Overview - Positive Impacts on Rating Municipal Bridge Inspections, R.J. Burnside & Associates Limited, March This plan presents recommended improvement programs for the next 10 years and future funding requirements to sustain the infrastructure. The report includes recommendations for $10.1 million in bridges maintenance, $13.7 million for bridge replacements and $3.3 million for culverts maintenance over the next 10 years. 2. Update the 2009 Transportation Master Plan in the next five years to identify the transportation needs of the community as it continues to grow and evolve. Page 28 of 56

30 Overview - Negative Impacts on Rating 1. Reliance on Federal government gas tax funding to support the capital program. 2. Absence of Provincial government funding to support the capital program. 3. Increased public expectations for higher levels of service. 4. Increasing environmental impacts on conditions assessment and seasonal maintenance. The following recommendations are based on the review of current management practices; and, inventory, valuation and conditions analysis. Recommendations 1. Integrate financial reporting processes with an asset management condition/valuation reporting tool that provides for annual update of replacement values. 2. Establish and monitor appropriate and measurable levels of service and performance measures. 3. Pursue technical solutions to extend the useful lives of bridges and accelerate annual investment to build up bridge reserve to address 2030 infrastructure needs due to large number of anticipated infrastructure replacements. 4. Collaborate with Area Municipalities to align Asset Management Plans to gain efficiencies by optimizing investment priorities of linear assets. 5. Every two years following the Bridge Needs Study, review and update the Infrastructure Report Card. Page 29 of 56

31 Appendix C Infrastructure Report Card Water Systems Table C.1 Water Systems Inventory Asset Type Linear Facilities Asset Component 2013 Inventory 1 Transmission main (> 400mm) 48,625 m Local main (< 400mm) 635,088 m Services 31,650 Meters 26,370 Water treatment facilities 32 Pumping stations 24 Storage (reservoirs and towers) 21 Wells 62 Other (works yards, storage, etc.) 10 Notes: 1 The source information for the water system infrastructure is the County s GIS and capital asset inventory. Some assumptions were made in respect to information gaps, particularly in the linear infrastructure data. Table C.2 Water Systems Replacement Value Asset Type Asset Component 2014 Replacement Value ($ million) Linear Facilities % of Total Value Transmission main (> 400mm) $15 4.4% Local main (< 400mm) $ % Services $ % Meters $6 1.8% Replacement Value Sub-Totals $ % Water treatment facilities $ % Pumping stations $11 3.2% Storage (reservoirs and towers) $ % Wells $4 1.2% Other (works yards, storage, etc.) $3 0.9% Replacement Value Sub-Totals $ % Replacement Value Total $ % Water Systems Replacement cost per water household $10,742 Page 30 of 56

32 Table C.3 Water Systems Condition Assessment Asset Type Asset Component Condition Rating Trend Transmission main (> 400mm) B Linear Local main (< 400mm) B Services B Meters B Water treatment facilities B Pumping stations B Facilities Storage (reservoirs and towers) B Wells B Other (works yards, storage, etc.) B Overall Rating B Page 31 of 56

33 Table C.4 Water Systems Lifecycle Activities There are four maintenance categories considered in the overall sustainable management of water assets, described as follows: Strategy Lifecycle Activity Trigger Minor maintenance Major maintenance Rehabilitation Replacement Regularly scheduled maintenance and inspection programs including cleaning and flushing, hydrant flushing, pressure testing, visual inspections, lubricating and minor repairs Planned activities such as repairing or replacing broken mains, replacing components such as motors or pumps, and similar unscheduled or unplanned emergency activities One time events that extend the life of the asset to its established life expectancy watermain lining Occurs at the end of the useful service life can vary among systems due to construction material and environmental factors that impact the degree of deterioration and performance resulting in an extended asset life Semi-annually, annually Q2, Q3 Q3 Q4 Table C.5 Water Systems Useful Life Asset Type Linear Facilities Useful Life Asset Component Remaining (years) Transmission main (> 400mm) 50 Local main (< 400mm) 48 Services 48 Meters 10 Water treatment facilities 56 Pumping stations 38 Storage (reservoirs and towers) 59 Wells 27 Other (works yards, storage, etc.) 48 Page 32 of 56

34 The projected capital investment for water systems is summarized in Table C.6. The values shown represent forecasts for each of the decades to the 2100 s. The capital costs in each 10 year planning period range from $5 million to $60 million over the forecasted horizon. The average annual current investment of $3.68 million is comprised of funding sources including debt, user fees, reserves, and external revenues. Based on replacement values in today s dollars, the average annual investment requirement is $3.95 million, resulting in a funding gap of $0.27 million. Table C.6 Water Systems Capital Investment Requirements Page 33 of 56

35 Table C.7 Water Systems Investment Profile The investment profile considers lifecycle costs comprised of capital requirements for the renewal of the County s existing infrastructure and the operations and maintenance estimates included in annual operating budgets. Investment Measure Description Investment ($ millions) % of Current Replacement Value Capital investment requirements Current average annual capital budget Current average annual operating budget Average annual lifecycle investment requirements Average annual capital renewal - over 95 years Total waterworks systems capital budget 10 year average Total operations and maintenance budget Average annual capital and operating costs $ % $ % $ % $ % Notes: Investment profile above does not include growth-related capital projects. Capital budget attributed to growth was eliminated based on the estimates from the 2014 Hemson Development Charge Background Study. Page 34 of 56

36 Overview and Recommendations The overall condition of the County s water systems are rated B. Based on current management practices it is anticipated that the condition rating will be stable. Overview - Positive Impacts on Rating 1. The water and wastewater rate setting for 2014 to 2016, was completed in 2013 with a primary goal of fully funding projected lifecycle costs through user rates. The study projected the financial position of the water systems over a six year period ( ) and resulted in setting rates for the initial three year period ( ). 2. Significant investment in treatment upgrades and local watermain renewals has occurred over the past 10 years. Significant federal and provincial funding under the OSTAR program was received for the treatment upgrades. 3. Installation of residential water metering is planned for the Township systems in 2015/16. This should assist with water conservation and water efficiency plans, but could impact system revenues. 4. New or expanded water systems were constructed in the communities of Princeton, Sweaburg and Innerkip. 5. Implementation in 2013 of a Water Efficiency Plan to promote conservation and reduce water loss. A robust program will improve efficiency and delay the need for capacity expansion. 6. Implementation of Source Water Protection Plans is anticipated to begin in The Plans will help protect drinking water quality and quantity. Overview - Negative Impacts on Rating 1. Revenues from water rates have reduced due to economic conditions and water conservation efforts resulting in pressure on lifecycle funding. 2. Aging cast iron watermains in several systems will require significant investments in the future. 3. Challenges with aesthetic water quality parameters such as iron and hydrogen sulphide in some systems may require treatment facility upgrades to improve quality. 4. Water capacity constraints in the Mount Elgin and Bright Water system may require costly system expansions. Exploration efforts continue attempts to find solutions. Page 35 of 56

37 The following recommendations are based on the review of current management practices and inventory, valuation and conditions analysis. Recommendations 1. Integrate financial reporting processes with an asset management condition/valuation reporting tool that provides for annual update of replacement values. 2. Establish and monitor appropriate and measurable levels of service and performance measures. 3. Collaborate with Area Municipalities to align Asset Management Plans to gain efficiencies by optimizing investment priorities of linear assets. Also the use of technologies for in-situ replacement/rehabilitation so that road work and watermain work do not necessarily need to coincide. 4. Review and update the Infrastructure Report Card on a four-year cycle. 5. Take measures to fill infrastructure gaps in GIS data. Page 36 of 56

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