Using the MMPI-2 to Detect Substance Abuse in an Outpatient Mental Health Setting

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Using the MMPI-2 to Detect Substance Abuse in an Outpatient Mental Health Setting"

Transcription

1 Psychological Assessment 1999, Vol. 11, No. 1,94- Copyright 1999 by the American Psychological Association, Inc /99/S3.00 Using the MMPI-2 to Detect Substance Abuse in an Outpatient tal Health Setting L. A. R. Stein, John R. Graham, Yossef S. Ben-Porath, and John L. McNulty Kent State University This study examined the utility of the MMPI-2 in detecting substance-abuse problems in an outpatient mental health setting. Specifically, the utility of the Addiction Acknowledgment (; N. C. Weed, J. N. Butcher, T. McKenna, & Y. S. Ben-Porath, 1992), the Addiction Potential (; N. C. Weed et al., 1992), and the MacAndrew Alcoholism Revised (; J. N. Butcher, W. G. Dahlstrom, J. R. Graham, A. Tellegan, & B. Kaemmer, 1989) in the prediction of substance abuse was evaluated. In addition, the incremental validity of the and the in comparison to the scale was evaluated. The sample consisted of 500 women and 333 men from a large community mental health center in Northeastern Ohio. Results indicated that the scale, the, and the were related to interviewer ratings of substance abuse in this outpatient treatment setting. Specifically, the results pointed to the superiority of over in substance-abuse identification and the significant contribution of to the information available from the scale alone. Alcohol and drag use and abuse at times are an integral part of problems presented by clients at outpatient mental health clinics. These difficulties may go undetected when they are not the primary reason for referral, as might be the case in primary mental health settings (Weed, Butcher, McKenna, & Ben-Porath, 1992). One of the most widely used instruments for assessing mental health problems in such settings is the MMPI-2 (Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, & Kaemmer, 1989). This study examined the utility of the MMPI-2 in detecting substance-abuse problems in an outpatient setting where substance abuse is not the primary focus of treatment. The MacAndrew Alcoholism (MAC; MacAndrew, 15) of the original MMPI was developed to differentiate alcoholic from nonalcoholic psychiatric patients. The scale was constructed by contrasting the MMPI responses of 200 male alcoholics seeking treatment at an outpatient clinic with 200 male nonalcoholic psychiatric patients from the same facility. MacAndrew (1981) reviewed more than two dozen studies that demonstrated the ability of the MAC scale to differentiate alcoholic from nonalcoholic participants. The scale seems to be effective with men and women, as well as inpatients and outpatients (Graham & Stronger, 1988). Gottesman and Prescott (1989) indicated that the routine use of the MAC scale to identify substance abusers is not as compelling as many users had assumed. They noted poor construct and predictive validity. However, most of the studies reviewed by them used a cutoff score of 24 in discriminating abusers from nonabusers, whereas Graham (1993) recommended a cutoff of 28. In addition, as Graham (1993) pointed out, Gottesman and Prescott (1989) seemed to imply that professionals would decide whether or not a person abuses substances on the basis of MMPI (or L. A. R. Stein, John R. Graham, Yossef S. Ben-Porath, and John L. McNulty, Department of Psychology, Kent State University. Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to L. A. R. Stein, who is now at the Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Box G-BH, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island MMPI-2) data alone. As Graham (1993) recommended, no decisions should be made on the basis of MMPI (or MMPI-2) data alone, and high scores on MAC (or ) should alert clinicians to obtain corroborating data regarding the possibility of substance abuse. With the development of the MMPI-2, four of the original MAC items were among those eliminated from the test because of objectionable content. These items were replaced with four new items selected because they differentiated alcoholic from nonalcoholic men and women. The revised scale is labeled (Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegan, & Kaemmer, 1989). In an effort to expand the assessment of alcohol and drug problems with the broader item pool of the MMPI-2, the Addiction Potential () and the Addiction Acknowledgment () were developed (Weed et al., 1992). The consists of 39 items that were endorsed differently by substance abusers compared with both nonclinical and psychiatric inpatient samples. In an effort to avoid reliance on obvious content in abuse potential determination, items were eliminated from the if they contained obvious reference to substance abuse. The, a 13-item content-based scale, was constructed, using rational item selection augmented by internal consistency procedures (Weed et al.). Items were selected for the because of their obvious content relation to substance abuse and, therefore, it is a more face-valid scale than the. Weed et al. (1992) presented data showing that the and discriminated well between substance-abuse, nonclinical, and psychiatric samples and did so substantially better than the scale. Specifically, the appeared to discriminate between the substance-abuse and nonclinical samples better than the, whereas the appeared to distinguish between substance-abuse and psychiatric samples better than the. Weed et al. noted that their findings were limited because the samples used in development and cross-validation of the and came from the same settings. Greene, Weed, Butcher, Arrendondo, and Davis (1992) found that in a different setting the discriminated between psychiatric inpatients and substance-abuse

2 SUBSTANCE ABUSE AND THE MMPI-2 95 samples more effectively than the and that both scales discriminated better than the scale. However, although Weed et al. found the scale to be quite ineffective at discriminating between psychiatric and substance-abuse samples, results presented by Greene et al. (1992) indicated that the scale discriminated between psychiatric and substanceabuse samples, effectively. In addition, the magnitude of discrimination by the in the study conducted by Greene et al. was less than in the study conducted by Weed et al. No study to date has directly addressed the utility of the and in assessing substance abuse in an outpatient mental health setting where substance abuse, although often of considerable relevance, is not the primary focus of the assessment. It is important to continue efforts to validate the and with a variety of samples, including clients in outpatient settings. In addition, as recommended by Butcher, Graham, and Ben-Porath (1995), new MMPI-2 scales should add significantly to prediction of relevant behaviors and characteristics beyond what is possible using existing scales. The purpose of this study was to explore the effectiveness of the scale, the, and the in the identification of substance abuse, and to examine the incremental validity of the and in comparison to the scale in an outpatient mental health facility where substance abuse is not the primary focus of treatment. On the basis of the body of research available about the MAC/ scale (for a summary of this research, see Graham, 1993), and the research regarding the and reviewed above, we expected that the scale, the, and the would all be effective in identifying substance abuse. This study was conducted in an effort to determine which scale or scales are most effective in an outpatient setting where substance abuse is not the primary focus of treatment, and the extent to which the new MMPI-2 substance abuse scales add incrementally to the in identifying substance abusers in this setting. Participants Methods Data were collected at a large community mental health center (CMHC) in Northeast Ohio. A variety of treatment programs was available for the clients, including partial hospitalization and individual and group outpatient treatment. Clients with substance abuse as a primary problem were referred elsewhere. However, the CMHC served dually diagnosed clients who did not have a substance-abuse disorder as the primary diagnosis. A specialized program was available for these clients involving individual counseling, psychoeducational group intervention, family therapy, support groups, and referral to Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous, and Al-Anon. On the basis of an in-depth interview during intake, and where possible, previous treatment records, the determination was made as to whether substance abuse was a primary or secondary problem. The sample used in this study was a subset of a larger sample collected by Graham, Ben-Porath, and McNulty (in press). The larger sample included all persons seeking services at the mental health center from April 19 through December 1992 and included 1,035 men and 1,447 women. Out of a total of 2,482 clients seeking services at the CMHC, 1,263 participants did not receive services beyond intake and so did not complete the MMPI-2. Valid MMPI-2 profiles were defined as follows: Cannot say raw score <31, Variable Response Inconsistency T score <81, and True Response Inconsistency raw score between 6 and 12, inclusive (Butcher et al., 1989); and F raw score <29 for women, F raw score <27 for men, Back F raw score <24 for women, and Back F raw score <23 for men (Graham, Watts, & Timbrook, 19). Clients who produced a valid MMPI-2 and for whom intake ratings were available concerning relevant substance-abuse data were identified as candidates for this study. Of the 501 men and the 718 women who completed the MMPI-2, 410 men and 610 women produced valid profiles. Of the 1,020 clients who produced valid MMPI-2s, 77 men and 110 women did not have completed intake ratings regarding substance-abuse history and were eliminated. The current study's sample consisted of 500 women and 333 men who produced a valid MMPI-2 profile and for whom substance-abuse data were available. Demographic characteristics and mental health history of the participants are presented in Table 1. These data were collected at the time of the intake interview and were gathered through self-report, and where possible, corroborated by previous treatment records. For participants producing a valid MMPI-2, comparisons were made on the basis of demographic characteristics and mental health history between clients included in the study (those who had a valid MMPI-2 and relevant substance-abuse data) and clients excluded from the study (those who produced a valid MMPI-2 but for whom substance-abuse data were not available). On the demographic and mental health variables as presented in Table 1, we found no significant differences between those clients included in and those excluded from the study. Table 1 Characteristics of Participants Characteristic Age M SD Years of education M SD Ethnicity (%) Caucasian African American/Other Marital status (%) Never married Divorced Married Separated Widowed Employment status (%) Unemployed Full time Part time Disabled Other Demographics tal Health Previous psychiatric hospitalizations (%) Previous outpatient treatment (%) Any Axis I diagnosis (%) Specific Axis I diagnoses (%) Adjustment disorder Depression Anxiety disorders Substance abuse/dependence Any Axis II diagnosis (%) Axis V current level of functioning M SD (n = 500) (n = 333)

3 STEIN, GRAHAM, BEN-PORATH, AND McNULTY Instruments MMPl-2. The MMPI-2 (Butcher et al., 1989), a revised and updated version of the original MMPI (Hathaway & McKinley, 1940), is a 567-item personality inventory. The MMPI-2 includes the validity and clinical scales of the original MMPI, as well as new content, supplementary, and validity scales. Adequate internal consistencies and test-retest reliabilities of the MMPI-2 scales are reported in the test manual (Butcher et al., 1989) along with preliminary validity information. Internal-consistency coefficients on are a =.45 for women and a =.56 for men, based on the normative sample (Butcher et al., 1989). Also on the basis of the normative sample, test-retest reliabilities for a 1-week interval are r =.78 for women and r =.62 for men on (Butcher et al., 1989). Although Weed et al. (1992) reported no internalconsistency coefficient for on a combined sample of substance abusers, psychiatric patients, and normative subjects, a =.74 for (Graham, 1993). According to Weed et al., on the basis of the normative sample, test-retest reliabilities for a 1-week interval are r =.77 for women and r =.69 for men on and r =.84 for women and r =.89 for men on. Although they share no items, the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient between and is r =.33 for normative participants, r =.33 for a psychiatric sample, and r =.36 for a substanceabuse sample (Weed et al.). Intake form. An intake form was designed for the larger study (Graham et al., in press) and was completed by a trained intake worker on the basis of a personal interview with each client.' Intake workers consisted of psychologists, nurses, and social workers and were highly experienced in interviewing. Data from the intake form included in this study were the demographic information (e.g., age, education, marital status, employment status, and race), selected information concerning mental health history (e.g., psychiatric hospitalizations and outpatient treatment), diagnosis, and substance-abuse history. Intake workers inquired regarding participants' past and current experience with alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, heroin, and other substances. For each substance, ratings were made on a 4-point Likert scale as follows: 1 (no use), 2 (some use), 3 (possible abuse), and 4 (definite abuse). During several training sessions, intake workers were instructed to limit the definite abuse category to those clients for whom they had great confidence that substance abuse was a problem. The possible abuse category was to be used with clients for whom there was strong indication of substance abuse, but for whom intake workers were unsure as to whether a rating of definite abuse applied. The some-use rating was to be used when some substances had been used but not to levels that had impacted the client's life adversely. The no-use category was reserved for clients who abstained from substances. Before substance-abuse ratings were made on the intake form, specific information regarding past and present use of specific substances was obtained. Information was gained through an in-depth interview, and where possible, previous treatment records. Inquiries regarding substance abuse dealt with frequency, amount, and duration for specific substances, as well as negative effects of use. Procedure Intake forms were completed following an extensive interview conducted at the time clients requested services. Interviewers were instructed to structure the interview around the intake form. Each client completed the MMPI-2 shortly after an intake interview. The median number of days between intake and completion of the MMPI-2 was 7. Ratings of each of the specific substances were combined into a single substance-abuse index by assigning the maximum rating for any substance as the overall indicator of substance abuse. For example, if a client had abuse ratings of 1 for alcohol, 3 for marijuana, 2 for cocaine, 1 for heroin, and 3 for other substances, an overall substance-abuse rating of 3 was recorded for that client. Participants were assigned to one of four substance use groups based on this variable. For women, the average substance-abuse rating was M = 2.3 and SD = 0.93 (with Mdn = 2 and mode = 2), whereas, for men, M = 2.6 and SD = 0.99 (with Mdn = 2 and mode = 2). Results Table 2 presents mean scores and standard deviations on the,, and for participants grouped by substanceabuse rating. T scores were derived based on the normative sample (see Butcher et al., 1989). As reported in Table 2, analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated, for both genders, that the four groups differed significantly for each substance-abuse scale. Table 2 also reports the results of post hoc t tests and their associated effect sizes. For both genders and all three scales, differences between no use and all other substance-abuse groups were statistically significant. Similarly, for both genders and for all three scales, differences between some use and definite abuse were statistically significant. Examining data for women and men, for both the and scale but not for the, differences between possible abuse and definite abuse were statistically significant. For both genders, only for the was the difference between some use and possible abuse statistically significant. In addition, for both genders, effect sizes were generally largest for. Before conducting a series of hierarchical regressions, intercorrelations among,, and scores, and substanceabuse ratings were examined (see Table 3). The positive but modest correlations between scales suggest that they are not completely redundant. For men and women, the highest correlations were between and (r =.49 for women; r =.45 for men) and between and substance-abuse rating (r =.52 for women; r =.50 for men). These data indicate that although and are moderately intercorrelated, the ability of to add to the identification of substance abuse beyond is not attenuated substantially by shared variance among these scales. To test the incremental contribution of the and the to the identification of substance abuse, we conducted a series of hierarchical regression analyses, with substance-abuse rating as the dependent variable. As reported in Table 4, the independent variables were entered in three blocks. The scale was entered in the first block. was entered in the second block to test its incremental contribution in predicting substance abuse beyond. was entered in the third block to test its incremental contribution beyond and. For men and women, added significantly to the variance in substance abuse accounted for by the scale alone, whereas the addition of the produced a significant contribution for women only. In the second set of analyses presented in Table 5, the order of entry for and was reversed. For both genders, the addition of both and contributed significantly to the proportion of variance in rated substance abuse. To evaluate the accuracy with which the substance-abuse scales could classify participants as abusers or nonabusers, we calculated the positive and negative predictive powers, sensitivity, specificity, and overall classification accuracy of the 1 A copy of the intake form is available, on request, from L. A. R. Stein, Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Box G-BH, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 022.

4 Table 2 Substance-Abuse Scores for Four Substance-Abuse Groups SUBSTANCE ABUSE AND THE MMPI-2 97 Substance-abuse group No use Some use Possible abuse Definite abuse " M SD M SD M SD M SD df Significant group differences'" ** 3,4 a (0.39), b (0.68), c (0.22), e (0.63), f (0.40) ** 3,4 a (0.64), b (1.31), c (1.81), d (0.64), e(1.29), f (0.62) ** 3,4 a (0.46), b (0.81), c (0.), e (0.41) ** 3,329 a (0.77), b (1.04), c (1.38), e (0.75), f (0.51) ** 3,329 a (0.71), b (1.51), c (1.56), d(0.74), e (1.08), f (0.40) ** 3,329 a (0.55), b (0.95), c (1), e (0.50) Note. = MacAndrew Alcoholism Revised; = Addiction Acknowledgment ; = Addiction Potential. " is in raw score as is traditionally the case (see Graham, 1993); and are in linear T scores. b Significant group differences are as follows: a = mean MMPI-2 scale scores are significantly different (p.022) between no use and some use groups; b = mean MMPI-2 scale scores are significantly different (p.001) between no use and possible abuse groups; c = mean MMPI-2 scale scores are significantly different (p.001) between no use and definite abuse groups; d = mean MMPI-2 scale scores are significantly different (p.001) between some use and possible abuse groups; e = mean MMPI-2 scale scores are significantly different (p ^.006) between some use and definite abuse groups; f = mean MMPI-2 scale scores are significantly different (p &.042) between possible abuse and definite abuse groups. Numbers within parentheses are effect sizes for the post hoc tests and are expressed as d. **p <.001. scales, using data from those participants about whom we had definitive data. As stated above, all participants were rated on a 4-point scale. Participants rated at the two extremes of this scale (no use and definite abuse) were clearly nonabusers or abusers of substances. Because of ambiguity regarding those rated at the two intermediate levels (some use and possible abuse), they were not included in the classification analyses. Although this procedure reduced the sample size (N = 166 for women; N = 122 for men), it eliminated ambiguity resulting in Table 3 Pearson Product-Moment Correlation Coefficients Between Substance-Abuse s and Substance-Abuse Rating Rating _ 0.45*** 0.36*** 0.39*** 0.49*** 0.37*** 0.50*** 0*** 0.29*** 0.29*** Rating 0.30*** 0.52*** 0.26*** Note. Correlations involving MacAndrew Alcoholism Revised () were computed using raw scores, those for Addiction Acknowledgment () and Addiction Potential () were computed using linear T scores. Correlations above the diagonal refer to women, those below the diagonal refer to men. ***/> < a more precise evaluation of the classification accuracy of the MMPI-2 substance abuse scales. Table 6 shows the classification accuracy analyses using the Table 4 Predicting Substance Abuse From Hierarchical Regression Analyses: Addiction Potential () Entered Last s entered 8 R K 2.29 p2 "adjusted ANOVA F(l,498) = 47.31** F(2, 497) = 90.75** ''change ~~ l.vj F(3, 4) = 63.87** Change = 7-68* f(l, 331) = 58.94** F(2, 330) = 65.31** ^change = 60.94** F(3, 329) = 44.51** Change = 2.37 Note. ANOVA = analysis of variance. a MacAndrew Alcoholism Revised () is in raw score; Addiction Acknowledgment () and are in linear T score. */><.006. **;><.001.

5 98 STEIN, GRAHAM, BEN-PORATH, AND McNULTY Table 5 Predicting Substance Abuse From Hierarchical Regression Analyses: Addiction Acknowledgment () Entered Last entered" R R "adjusted ANOVA F(l, 498) = 47.31** F(2, 497) = 33.95** Change = 18.90** F(3,4) = 63.87** Change = 108.** F(l, 331) = 58.99** F(2, 330) = 35.65** F =10 S9** r change 1U.J7 F(3, 329) = 44.51** F change = 51.36** Note. ANOVA = analysis of variance. " MacAndrew Alcoholism Revised () is in raw score; and Addiction Potential () are in linear T score. ** p <.001. resulting base rate of 49% for women and base rate = 74% for men. These percentages reflect the base rate of substance abuse found in the smaller sample of participants for whom substanceabuse ratings were unambiguous (i.e., ratings of 1 or 4). Generally, overall hit rates for women and men were rather poor for the and (ranging from 47% to 69%). For women, T score on yielded the best overall hit rate (%) with a sensitivity of %, a specificity of 87%, and positive and negative predictive powers of % each. For men, T score a60 on yielded the best overall hit rate (76%) with a sensitivity of 71%, a specificity of %, and positive and negative predictive powers of % and 53%, respectively. Because the actual base rates obtained in the narrower sample were unrealistically high, analyses were again conducted on the participants for whom substance-abuse ratings were unambiguous; however, base rates were adjusted (Meehl & Rosen, 1955) to reflect the base rate of substance abuse found in the larger sample of participants (N = 500 for women; N 333 for men). These results are reported in Table 7. Generally, overall hit rates were acceptable for both women and men on and (ranging from 76% to %). For women, T score on yielded the best overall hit rate (92%) with a sensitivity of 69%, a specificity of %, and positive and negative predictive powers of % and 94%, respectively. For men, T score 5:60 on yielded the best overall hit rate (%) with a sensitivity of 71%, a specificity of %, and positive and negative predictive powers of 74% and 89%, respectively. Table 6 Sensitivity, Specificity, Positive Predictive Power (PPP), Negative Predictive Power (NPP), and Overall Hit Rate in Percentages cutoff 3 Sensitivity Specificity PPP NPP Overall hit rate Note. For women, base rate = 49%, and for men, base rate = 74%. " MacAndrew Alcoholism Revised () raw score is based on Gottesman and Prescott (1989); raw score is based on Graham (1993). Addiction Acknowledgment () and Addiction Potential () linear T score is based on Graham (1993); and linear T score a65 is based Butcher et al. (1989) Table 7 Sensitivity, Specificity, Positive Predictive Power (PPP), Negative Predictive Power (NPP), and Overall Hit Rate in Percentages cutoff" Sensitivity Specificity PPP NPP Overall hit rate Note. For women, base rate = 16%, and for men, base rate = 27%. "MacAndrew Alcoholism Revised () raw score is based on Gottesman and Prescott (1989); raw score is based on Graham (1993). Addiction Acknowledgment () and Addiction Potential () linear T score 60 is based on Graham (1993); and linear T score is based Butcher et al. (1989)

6 SUBSTANCE ABUSE AND THE MMPI-2 99 Discussion Scores on the three MMPI-2 substance abuse scales,,, and, were related to interviewer ratings of substance abuse in.this outpatient mental health sample. The three scales differentiated significantly between individuals identified by experienced interviewers as evidencing varied levels of substance abusive behavior. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that added significantly and substantially to and in predicting variance in substance abuse and that added only modestly to on this task in this sample. Although classification accuracy analyses indicated that and yielded acceptable overall hit rates, produced the best classification rates in this sample. explained a modest, but significant amount of variance in substance use and abuse (about 10% and 15% for women and men, respectively). For women and men, added substantially to the amount of variance explained by alone (variance increased by 18% and 13% for women and men, respectively). The addition of to and did not add as much information to the amount of variance in substance abuse explained. Similarly, whereas the addition of to was statistically significant, variance increased by only 3% for women and 2% for men. Finally, predicted a statistically significant and substantial proportion of additional variance beyond and (variance increased by 15% and 11% for women and men, respectively). The amount of variance in substance use and abuse explained by all three scales in the regression equation was a little less than 30%, which suggests that these scales have practical utility in screening for substance abusive behavior in outpatient mental health settings. The overall hit rates obtained in the classification accuracy analyses were higher when base rates were adjusted to reflect the base rate of substance abuse in the total sample (N = 500 for women; N = 333 for men). As compared with base rate = 49% for women and base rate = 74% for men, adjusted base rates of 16% and 27% for women and men, respectively, may be more realistic estimates of the base rates of substance abuse found in outpatient settings. For both genders, a cutoff of 28 provided the highest overall accurate classification rate on. The positive and negative predictive powers were high; however, sensitivity was poor for both genders. For women, optimal classification accuracy was found on at a T-score cutoff of 65, whereas for men, the optimal r-score cutoff was 60 on. For both genders, all four accuracy indicators were acceptably high. Overall classification accuracy was equal at T-score cutoffs of 60 and 65 for both women and men on. However, positive predictive power was poor for women at both cutoffs and acceptable for men only at a cutoff of 65. These classification accuracy analyses indicate that an elevated score on any of these scales in outpatient mental health settings should alert clinicians to obtain more data regarding the possibility of substance abuse. The higher the score, the greater the possibility of substance-abuse problems. The hierarchical regression results indicate that scores on these scales are not completely redundant, and therefore, each of the scales warrants examination when screening for a possible substance-abuse problem in outpatient mental health clients. The finding that demonstrated the greatest effect size in this sample warrants further consideration. This brief, face valid content-based scale consists primarily of items related overtly to substance abusive behavior. As its label implies, individuals with elevated scores on this scale are acknowledging problems in the area of substance abuse. The current results are consistent with previous research, indicating that content-based scales can provide incrementally valid information when compared with empirically keyed scales. Archer, Elkins, Aiduk, and Griffin (1997); Ben-Porath, Butcher, and Graham (19); and Ben-Porath, Mc- Cully, and Almagor (1993) have reported similar findings for the MMPI-2 Content s compared with the empirically keyed clinical scales. The finding that adds incrementally to the empirically keyed and scales provides further evidence of the importance of considering item content themes in MMPI-2 interpretation. As is the case with the MMPI-2 Content s, the transparent nature of the items imposes limitations on its interpretability. Although this study did not address the susceptibility of the substance abuse scales to distortion, for obvious reasons, content scales may be more susceptible to intentional distortion than empirically keyed ones. Therefore, it is of particular importance to examine scores on the validity scales of the MMPI-2 before interpreting. A defensive test-taking approach is likely to result in artificially low scores on and other content scales. Moreover, even if a general defensive approach to the test is not indicated, it remains possible that some test-takers would be reluctant to acknowledge problems specifically in the area of substance abuse. Therefore, the absence of elevation on this scale cannot be taken as a negative indicator of substance abuse. Thus, higher scores on can be used to suggest the possibility of substance-abuse difficulties in outpatient mental health settings; however, low scores on this scale cannot be used to rule this problem out. Future studies may address the effects of defensive test-taking style on the substance abuse scales. Findings regarding indicate a significant, but perhaps, more limited role for this scale in detecting substance-abuse problems in outpatient settings. Results for this scale were generally comparable to those of the scale. Unlike the findings reported by Weed et al. (1992), the present results do not point to a substantial contribution of beyond in identifying substance abuse in this setting. Population differences may account for the discrepant findings. Participants in the Weed et al. study came from two different types of settings: an inpatient facility devoted exclusively to substance-abuse treatment and a number of inpatient psychiatric units. It is possible that is better able to differentiate between individuals more clearly identified as having either substance-abuse or significant psychiatric difficulties than it can distinguish among outpatients, all receiving mental health services and some of whom have secondary substance-abuse problems. A limitation of our study concerns the broad definition used for rating substance abuse. Our substance-abuse variable did not measure a specific class of substances. Significant levels of comorbidity precluded breaking our sample down into mutually exclusive alcohol- or drug-abuse subsamples. Consequently, the ability of the MMPI-2 substance abuse scales to identify alcohol-only or drug-only abuse could not be examined here and remains to be studied in future investigations. Another limitation of this study is

7 STEIN, GRAHAM, BEN-PORATH, AND McNULTY that both interrater reliability and temporal stability data were unavailable regarding substance-abuse ratings by intake workers. It was simply unrealistic for intake workers at this large community mental health center to conduct two interviews per client on a subsample of participants for this field study. In addition, future studies may measure substance use and abuse using methods other than intensive interview data. For example, standardized instruments may be used as may reports from significant others. In summary, the current findings indicate that scores on the MMPI-2 substance abuse scales are related to rated substance abuse in an outpatient mental health setting. These results illustrate that the utility of the recently developed and scales generalizes beyond inpatient settings where they were initially constructed and studied. Identifying potential substance-abuse problems in individuals referred primarily for outpatient mental health services is important to the development of a successful treatment plan. The MMPI-2 substance abuse scales can play a significant role in this process. There may be times when a client is not honest in an interview but is honest on a test that does not involve face to face contact, and this argues for the usefulness of testing. This study depended in part on the truthfulness of the client and the skill of the interviewer in determining substance abuse, even when perhaps the client was reluctant to divulge information. However, there may be times when a more skillful and experienced interviewer is unavailable to conduct a thorough interview, and testing can alert professionals to areas needing more attention. The MMPI-2 can also assist in streamlining following interviews. This study indicates that the MMPI-2 is useful in screening for substance abuse in outpatient mental health settings where substance abuse is not the primary reason for referral. References Archer, R. P., Elkins, D. E., Aiduk, R., & Griffin, R. (1997). The incremental validity of MMPI-2 Supplementary scales. Assessment, I, Ben-Porath, Y. S., Butcher, J. N., & Graham, J. R. (19). Contribution of the MMPI-2 Content scales to the differential diagnosis of schizophrenia and major depression. Psychological Assessment, 3, Ben-Porath, Y. S., McCully, E., & Almagor, M. (1993). Incremental validity of the MMPI-2 Content scales in the assessment of personality and psychopathology by self-report. Journal of Personality Assessment, 61, Butcher, J. N., Dahlstrom, W. G., Graham, J. R., Tellegen, A., & Kaemmer, B. (1989). MMPI-2: Manual for administration and scoring. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Butcher, J. N., Graham, J. R., & Ben-Porath, Y. S. (1995). Methodological problems and issues in MMPI, MMPI-2, and MMPI-A research. Psychological Assessment, 7, Gottesman, I. I., & Prescott, C. A. (1989). Abuses of the MacAndrew MMPI Alcoholism scale: A critical review. Clinical Psychology Review, 9, Graham, J. R. (1993). MMPI-2: Assessing personality and psychopathology (2nd ed.). New York: Oxford University Press. Graham, J. R., Ben-Porath, Y. S., & McNulty, J. L. (in press). Using the MMPI-2 in outpatient mental health settings. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Graham, J. R., & Stronger, V. E. (1988). MMPI characteristics of alcoholics: A review. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 56, Graham, J. R., Watts, D., & Timbrook, R. E. (19). Detecting fake-good and fake-bad MMPI-2 profiles. Journal of Personality Assessment, 57, Greene, R. L., Weed, N. C., Butcher, J. N., Arrendondo, R., & Davis, H. G. (1992). A cross-validation of MMPI-2 Substance Abuse scales. Journal of Personality Assessment, 58, Hathaway, S. R., & McKinley, J. C. (1940). A multiphasic personality schedule (Minnesota): I. Construction of the schedule. Journal of Psychology, 10, MacAndrew, C. (15). The differentiation of male alcoholic outpatients from nonalcoholic psychiatric outpatients by means of the MMPI. Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 26, MacAndrew, C. (1981). What the MAC scale tells us about alcoholics: An interpretive review. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 42, Meehl, P. E., & Rosen, A. (1955). Antecedent probability and the efficiency of psychometric signs, patters, or cutting scores. Psychological Bulletin, 52, Weed, N. C., Butcher, J. N., McKenna, T., & Ben-Porath, Y. S. (1992). New measures for assessing alcohol and drug abuse with the MMPI-2: The and. Journal of Personality Assessment, 58, Received April 7, 1998 Revision received October 22, 1998 Accepted October 26, 1998

Comparison of External Correlates of MMPI Substance Abuse Scales Across Sex and Race

Comparison of External Correlates of MMPI Substance Abuse Scales Across Sex and Race Journal of Consulting and Qinical Psychology 985, Vol. 53, No. 4, 5-55 Copyright 985 by the American Psychological Association, Inc. -6X/85/S.75 Comparison of External Correlates of MMPI Substance Abuse

More information

SUBSTANCE ABUSE QUESTIONNAIRE SHORT FORM (SAQ-Short Form)

SUBSTANCE ABUSE QUESTIONNAIRE SHORT FORM (SAQ-Short Form) SUBSTANCE ABUSE QUESTIONNAIRE SHORT FORM (SAQ-Short Form) www.online-testing.com Scale Description Scale Interpretation Test Features SAQ-Short Form The Substance Abuse Questionnaire (SAQ-Short Form) Short

More information

DUI Arrests, BAC at the Time of Arrest and Offender Assessment Test Results for Alcohol Problems

DUI Arrests, BAC at the Time of Arrest and Offender Assessment Test Results for Alcohol Problems DUI Arrests, BAC at the Time of Arrest and Offender Assessment Test Results for Alcohol Problems 2001 Donald D. Davignon, Ph.D. Abstract Many DUI/DWI offenders have drinking problems. To further reduce

More information

Gambler Addiction Index: Gambler Assessment

Gambler Addiction Index: Gambler Assessment * * * Gambler Addiction Index: Gambler Assessment Abstract The Gambler Addiction Index (GAI) is an adult gambler assessment test that accurately measures gambler risk of gambling addiction, suicide, substance

More information

Associations between MMPI-2-RF PSY-5 Scale Scores and Therapist-rated Success in Treatment

Associations between MMPI-2-RF PSY-5 Scale Scores and Therapist-rated Success in Treatment Associations between MMPI-2-RF PSY-5 Scale Scores and Therapist-rated Success in Treatment William E. Ajayi and John R. Graham Kent State University The MMPI-2-RF PSY-5 scales provide conceptual linkages

More information

Residential SOAP and Inpatient Dual Diagnosis Comparisons Consumer Satisfaction Report, 2003-2005 Addendum to 2003-2005 Inpatient Aggregate Report

Residential SOAP and Inpatient Dual Diagnosis Comparisons Consumer Satisfaction Report, 2003-2005 Addendum to 2003-2005 Inpatient Aggregate Report Residential SOAP and Inpatient Dual Diagnosis Comparisons Consumer Satisfaction Report, 2003-2005 Addendum to 2003-2005 Inpatient Aggregate Report, Inc. 1 , Inc. CQI s mission is to give consumers a greater

More information

YOUNG ADULTS IN DUAL DIAGNOSIS TREATMENT: COMPARISON TO OLDER ADULTS AT INTAKE AND POST-TREATMENT

YOUNG ADULTS IN DUAL DIAGNOSIS TREATMENT: COMPARISON TO OLDER ADULTS AT INTAKE AND POST-TREATMENT YOUNG ADULTS IN DUAL DIAGNOSIS TREATMENT: COMPARISON TO OLDER ADULTS AT INTAKE AND POST-TREATMENT Siobhan A. Morse, MHSA, CRC, CAI, MAC Director of Fidelity and Research Foundations Recovery Network YOUNG

More information

http://www.elsevier.com/locate/permissionusematerial

http://www.elsevier.com/locate/permissionusematerial This article was originally published in a journal published by Elsevier, and the attached copy is provided by Elsevier for the author s benefit and for the benefit of the author s institution, for non-commercial

More information

The relationship among alcohol use, related problems, and symptoms of psychological distress: Gender as a moderator in a college sample

The relationship among alcohol use, related problems, and symptoms of psychological distress: Gender as a moderator in a college sample Addictive Behaviors 29 (2004) 843 848 The relationship among alcohol use, related problems, and symptoms of psychological distress: Gender as a moderator in a college sample Irene Markman Geisner*, Mary

More information

[Appellant] Psychology Technician, GS-181-7. Department of Veterans Affairs Veterans Health Administration [Installation] [City, State]

[Appellant] Psychology Technician, GS-181-7. Department of Veterans Affairs Veterans Health Administration [Installation] [City, State] LASSIFIATION APPEAL DEISION U.S. OFFIE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT HIAGO OVERSIGHT DIVISION INUMBENT: [Appellant] POSITION NUMBER: 1792 AGENY LASSIFIATION: POSITION LOATION: Psychology Technician, GS-181-7

More information

Executive Summary. 1. What is the temporal relationship between problem gambling and other co-occurring disorders?

Executive Summary. 1. What is the temporal relationship between problem gambling and other co-occurring disorders? Executive Summary The issue of ascertaining the temporal relationship between problem gambling and cooccurring disorders is an important one. By understanding the connection between problem gambling and

More information

RECENT epidemiological studies suggest that rates and

RECENT epidemiological studies suggest that rates and 0145-6008/03/2708-1368$03.00/0 ALCOHOLISM: CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH Vol. 27, No. 8 August 2003 Ethnicity and Psychiatric Comorbidity Among Alcohol- Dependent Persons Who Receive Inpatient Treatment:

More information

Glossary of Terms Ability Accommodation Adjusted validity/reliability coefficient Alternate forms Analysis of work Assessment Battery Bias

Glossary of Terms Ability Accommodation Adjusted validity/reliability coefficient Alternate forms Analysis of work Assessment Battery Bias Glossary of Terms Ability A defined domain of cognitive, perceptual, psychomotor, or physical functioning. Accommodation A change in the content, format, and/or administration of a selection procedure

More information

Determinants of Alcohol Abuse in a Psychiatric Population: A Two-Dimensionl Model

Determinants of Alcohol Abuse in a Psychiatric Population: A Two-Dimensionl Model Determinants of Alcohol Abuse in a Psychiatric Population: A Two-Dimensionl Model John E. Overall The University of Texas Medical School at Houston A method for multidimensional scaling of group differences

More information

PII S0306-4603(97)00072-5 BRIEF REPORT

PII S0306-4603(97)00072-5 BRIEF REPORT Pergamon Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 23, No. 4, pp. 537 541, 1998 Copyright 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd Printed in the USA. All rights reserved 0306-4603/98 $19.00.00 PII S0306-4603(97)00072-5 BRIEF REPORT

More information

Colorado Substance Abuse Treatment Clients with Co-Occurring Disorders, FY05

Colorado Substance Abuse Treatment Clients with Co-Occurring Disorders, FY05 Colorado Substance Abuse Treatment Clients with Co-Occurring Disorders, FY05 Introduction Many clients who have chronic substance use disorders often simultaneously suffer from a serious mental disorder.

More information

General Symptom Measures

General Symptom Measures General Symptom Measures SCL-90-R, BSI, MMSE, CBCL, & BASC-2 Symptom Checklist 90 - Revised SCL-90-R 90 item, single page, self-administered questionnaire. Can usually be completed in 10-15 minutes Intended

More information

Clinical Treatment Protocol For The Integrated Treatment of Pathological Gamblers. Presented by: Harlan H. Vogel, MS, NCGC,CCGC, LPC

Clinical Treatment Protocol For The Integrated Treatment of Pathological Gamblers. Presented by: Harlan H. Vogel, MS, NCGC,CCGC, LPC Clinical Treatment Protocol For The Integrated Treatment of Pathological Gamblers Presented by: Harlan H. Vogel, MS, NCGC,CCGC, LPC Purpose of Presentation To provide guidelines for the effective identification,

More information

SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH ON INTERVENTIONS FOR ADOLESCENT SUBSTANCE MISUSE: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH ON INTERVENTIONS FOR ADOLESCENT SUBSTANCE MISUSE: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH ON INTERVENTIONS FOR ADOLESCENT SUBSTANCE MISUSE: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE By: Christine Kim Cal State University, Long Beach May 2014 INTRODUCTION Substance use among

More information

African American Women and Substance Abuse: Current Findings

African American Women and Substance Abuse: Current Findings African American Women and Substance Abuse: Current Findings Based on the work of Amelia Roberts, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, UNC School of Social Work and Iris Carleton-LeNay, Ph.D. Professor, UNC School

More information

Classification Appeal Decision Under section 5112 of title 5, United States Code

Classification Appeal Decision Under section 5112 of title 5, United States Code U.S. Office of Personnel Management Division for Human Capital Leadership & Merit System Accountability Classification Appeals Program Chicago Field Services Group 230 South Dearborn Street, Room 3060

More information

Running Head: INTERNET USE IN A COLLEGE SAMPLE. TITLE: Internet Use and Associated Risks in a College Sample

Running Head: INTERNET USE IN A COLLEGE SAMPLE. TITLE: Internet Use and Associated Risks in a College Sample Running Head: INTERNET USE IN A COLLEGE SAMPLE TITLE: Internet Use and Associated Risks in a College Sample AUTHORS: Katherine Derbyshire, B.S. Jon Grant, J.D., M.D., M.P.H. Katherine Lust, Ph.D., M.P.H.

More information

UNDERSTANDING CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS. Frances A. Campbell MSN, PMH CNS-BC, CARN Michael Beatty, LCSW, NCGC-1 Bridge To Hope November 18, 2015

UNDERSTANDING CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS. Frances A. Campbell MSN, PMH CNS-BC, CARN Michael Beatty, LCSW, NCGC-1 Bridge To Hope November 18, 2015 UNDERSTANDING CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS Frances A. Campbell MSN, PMH CNS-BC, CARN Michael Beatty, LCSW, NCGC-1 Bridge To Hope November 18, 2015 CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS What does it really mean CO-OCCURRING

More information

Special Populations in Alcoholics Anonymous. J. Scott Tonigan, Ph.D., Gerard J. Connors, Ph.D., and William R. Miller, Ph.D.

Special Populations in Alcoholics Anonymous. J. Scott Tonigan, Ph.D., Gerard J. Connors, Ph.D., and William R. Miller, Ph.D. Special Populations in Alcoholics Anonymous J. Scott Tonigan, Ph.D., Gerard J. Connors, Ph.D., and William R. Miller, Ph.D. The vast majority of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) members in the United States are

More information

Client Population Statistics

Client Population Statistics Client Population Statistics Fiscal Year 6-7 Introduction On the following pages, the reader will find information about the client population that Daytop served during the fiscal year 6-7 in its diverse

More information

SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT PROGRAMS AT THE CORRECTIONS CENTER OF NORTHWEST OHIO

SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT PROGRAMS AT THE CORRECTIONS CENTER OF NORTHWEST OHIO SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT PROGRAMS AT THE CORRECTIONS CENTER OF NORTHWEST OHIO Appropriate treatment helps to prevent recidivism among offenders. This holds true at the Corrections Center of Northwest

More information

CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES Treatment of Schizophrenia

CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES Treatment of Schizophrenia CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES Treatment of Schizophrenia V. Service Delivery Service Delivery and the Treatment System General Principles 1. All patients should have access to a comprehensive continuum

More information

Department of Community and Human Services Mental Health, Chemical Abuse and Dependency Services Division

Department of Community and Human Services Mental Health, Chemical Abuse and Dependency Services Division Criminal Justice Initiative Community Center for Alternative Programs Intensive Outpatient Chemical Dependency Treatment Program Two Year Outcomes Subsequent to Program Changes Department of Community

More information

Root Cause Analysis of Addiction: An Ongoing Study ERIC J. KOCIAN, PH.D. SAINT VINCENT COLLEGE JULY 21, 2015

Root Cause Analysis of Addiction: An Ongoing Study ERIC J. KOCIAN, PH.D. SAINT VINCENT COLLEGE JULY 21, 2015 Root Cause Analysis of Addiction: An Ongoing Study ERIC J. KOCIAN, PH.D. SAINT VINCENT COLLEGE JULY 21, 2015 Genesis: How This Study Began Heroin: Pure Evil and the toll it takes on the individual, the

More information

Treatment for Adolescent Substance Use Disorders: What Works?

Treatment for Adolescent Substance Use Disorders: What Works? Treatment for Adolescent Substance Use Disorders: What Works? Mark W. Lipsey Emily E. Tanner-Smith Sandra J. Wilson Peabody Research Institute, Vanderbilt University Addiction Health Services Research

More information

FRN Research Report March 2011: Correlation between Patient Relapse and Mental Illness Post-Treatment

FRN Research Report March 2011: Correlation between Patient Relapse and Mental Illness Post-Treatment FRN Research Report March 2011: Correlation between Patient Relapse and Mental Illness Post-Treatment Background Studies show that more than 50% of patients who have been diagnosed with substance abuse

More information

Metropolitan Detention Center (MDC) DWI Addiction Treatment Programs (ATP) Outcome Study for DWI Offenders

Metropolitan Detention Center (MDC) DWI Addiction Treatment Programs (ATP) Outcome Study for DWI Offenders Metropolitan Detention Center (MDC) DWI Addiction Treatment Programs (ATP) Outcome Study for DWI Offenders Prepared for: The DWI Addiction Treatment Programs (ATP) Metropolitan Detention Center Prepared

More information

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHIATRY. 1153 Centre Street Boston, MA 02130

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHIATRY. 1153 Centre Street Boston, MA 02130 DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHIATRY 1153 Centre Street Boston, MA 02130 Who We Are Brigham and Women s Faulkner Hospital (BWFH) Department of Psychiatry is the largest clinical psychiatry site in the Brigham / Faulkner

More information

Measurement & Data Analysis. On the importance of math & measurement. Steps Involved in Doing Scientific Research. Measurement

Measurement & Data Analysis. On the importance of math & measurement. Steps Involved in Doing Scientific Research. Measurement Measurement & Data Analysis Overview of Measurement. Variability & Measurement Error.. Descriptive vs. Inferential Statistics. Descriptive Statistics. Distributions. Standardized Scores. Graphing Data.

More information

American Society of Addiction Medicine

American Society of Addiction Medicine American Society of Addiction Medicine Public Policy Statement on Treatment for Alcohol and Other Drug Addiction 1 I. General Definitions of Addiction Treatment Addiction Treatment is the use of any planned,

More information

EFFECTIVENESS OF INPA TIENT TREATMENT PROGRAMS F OR DUALLY DIAGNOSED PAT IENTS.

EFFECTIVENESS OF INPA TIENT TREATMENT PROGRAMS F OR DUALLY DIAGNOSED PAT IENTS. FEDERAL SCIENCE POLICY. EFFECTIVENESS OF INPA TIENT TREATMENT PROGRAMS F OR DUALLY DIAGNOSED PAT IENTS. Promoter: Professor B. Sabbe (Universiteit Antwerpen). Researcher: B. De Wilde (Universiteit Antwerpen).

More information

With Depression Without Depression 8.0% 1.8% Alcohol Disorder Drug Disorder Alcohol or Drug Disorder

With Depression Without Depression 8.0% 1.8% Alcohol Disorder Drug Disorder Alcohol or Drug Disorder Minnesota Adults with Co-Occurring Substance Use and Mental Health Disorders By Eunkyung Park, Ph.D. Performance Measurement and Quality Improvement May 2006 In Brief Approximately 16% of Minnesota adults

More information

Suicide Assessment in the Elderly Geriatric Psychiatric for the Primary Care Provider 2008

Suicide Assessment in the Elderly Geriatric Psychiatric for the Primary Care Provider 2008 Suicide Assessment in the Elderly Geriatric Psychiatric for the Primary Care Provider 2008 Lisa M. Brown, Ph.D. Aging and Mental Health Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute University of South

More information

Dual Diagnosis Capability

Dual Diagnosis Capability Checklist: Dual Diagnosis Capability Agency / Service Level A tool for any Mental Health or Substance Treatment service to self-assess, reflect on and plan around their service s level of dual diagnosis

More information

DRAFT Metropolitan Detention Center (MDC) DWI Addiction Treatment Programs (ATP) Outcome Study Final Report UPDATED

DRAFT Metropolitan Detention Center (MDC) DWI Addiction Treatment Programs (ATP) Outcome Study Final Report UPDATED DRAFT Metropolitan Detention Center (MDC) DWI Addiction Treatment Programs (ATP) Outcome Study Final Report UPDATED Prepared for: The DWI Addiction Treatment Programs (ATP) Metropolitan Detention Center

More information

Factors Related To Psychiatric Hospitalization and Repeated Crisis Service Use By Dually- Diagnosed Persons

Factors Related To Psychiatric Hospitalization and Repeated Crisis Service Use By Dually- Diagnosed Persons Factors Related To Psychiatric Hospitalization and Repeated Crisis Service Use By Dually- Diagnosed Persons Meeyoung Oh Min, Ph.D. Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, Ohio Statement of the Research

More information

Continuous Performance Test 3 rd Edition. C. Keith Conners, Ph.D.

Continuous Performance Test 3 rd Edition. C. Keith Conners, Ph.D. Continuous Performance Test 3 rd Edition C. Keith Conners, Ph.D. Assessment Report Name/ID: Alexandra Sample Age: 16 Gender: Female Birth Date: February 16, 1998 Grade: 11 Administration Date: February

More information

JUVENILE AUTOMATED SUBSTANCE ABUSE EVALUATION REFERENCE GUIDE

JUVENILE AUTOMATED SUBSTANCE ABUSE EVALUATION REFERENCE GUIDE JUVENILE AUTOMATED SUBSTANCE ABUSE EVALUATION REFERENCE GUIDE DEVELOPED AND OWNED BY ADE INCORPORATED Copyright (c) ADE Incorporated 2007 Ver. 3.25 Rev.4/07 The JUVENILE AUTOMATED SUBSTANCE ABUSE EVALUATION

More information

Partial Hospitalization - MH - Adult (Managed Medicaid only Service)

Partial Hospitalization - MH - Adult (Managed Medicaid only Service) Partial Hospitalization - MH - Adult (Managed Medicaid only Service) Definition Partial hospitalization is a nonresidential treatment program that is hospital-based. The program provides diagnostic and

More information

Abstract. Introduction

Abstract. Introduction Predicting Talent Management Indices Using the 16 Primary Personality Factors John W. Jones, Ph.D.; Catherine C. Maraist, Ph.D.; Noelle K. Newhouse, M.S. Abstract This study investigates whether or not

More information

Treatment of Alcoholism

Treatment of Alcoholism Treatment of Alcoholism Why is it important Prevents further to body by getting people off alcohol. Can prevent death. Helps keep health insurance down. Provides assistance so alcoholics don t t have to

More information

DIFFERENTIATING DSM-IV ALCOHOL DEPENDENCE AND ABUSE BY COURSE: Community Heavy Drinkers

DIFFERENTIATING DSM-IV ALCOHOL DEPENDENCE AND ABUSE BY COURSE: Community Heavy Drinkers DIFFERENTIATING DSM-IV ALCOHOL DEPENDENCE AND ABUSE BY COURSE: Community Heavy Drinkers DEBORAH S. HASIN* RONAN VAN ROSSEM STEVEN MCCLOUD JEAN ENDICOTT Columbia University/NYS Psychiatric Institute ABSTRACT:

More information

Treatment Research Institute 600 Public Ledger Building, 150 S. Independence Mall West Philadelphia, PA 19106-3475 (800 )238-2433

Treatment Research Institute 600 Public Ledger Building, 150 S. Independence Mall West Philadelphia, PA 19106-3475 (800 )238-2433 From The University of Pennsylvania/Veterans Administration Center for Studies of Addiction Supported by Grants from the National Institute of Drug Abuse(project DA 02254) and the Veterans Administration

More information

Outline. Drug and Alcohol Counseling 1 Module 1 Basics of Abuse & Addiction

Outline. Drug and Alcohol Counseling 1 Module 1 Basics of Abuse & Addiction Outline Drug and Alcohol Counseling 1 Module 1 Basics of Abuse & Addiction About Substance Abuse The Cost of Chemical Abuse/Addiction Society's Response The Continuum of Chemical Use Definitions of Terms

More information

Client Intake Information. Client Name: Home Phone: OK to leave message? Yes No. Office Phone: OK to leave message? Yes No

Client Intake Information. Client Name: Home Phone: OK to leave message? Yes No. Office Phone: OK to leave message? Yes No : Chris Groff, JD, MA, Licensed Pastor Certified Sex Addiction Therapist Candidate 550 Bailey, Suite 235 Fort Worth, Texas 76107 Client Intake Information Client Name: Street Address: City: State: ZIP:

More information

Copyright 2006: www.valueoptions.com Page 1 of 5

Copyright 2006: www.valueoptions.com Page 1 of 5 V-CODES RELATIONAL PROBLEMS DSM-IV-TR Diagnostic Codes: V61.9 Relational Problem Related to a Mental Disorder or General Medical Condition V61.20 Parent-Child Relational Problem V61.10 Partner Relational

More information

A Descriptive Study of Depression, Substance Abuse, and Intimate Partner Violence Among Pregnant Women

A Descriptive Study of Depression, Substance Abuse, and Intimate Partner Violence Among Pregnant Women A Descriptive Study of Depression, Substance Abuse, and Intimate Partner Violence Among Pregnant Women 1 OVERVIEW This presentation is based on the study of pregnant women enrolled in the Augusta Partnership

More information

OXFORD HOUSE: DEAF-AFFIRMATIVE SUPPORT

OXFORD HOUSE: DEAF-AFFIRMATIVE SUPPORT OXFORD HOUSE: DEAF-AFFIRMATIVE SUPPORT FOR SUBSTANCE ABUSE RECOVERY DEAF JOSEFINA ALVAREZ, ADERONKE M. ADEBANJO, MICHELLE K. DAVIDSON, LEONARD A. JASON, AND MARGARET I. DAVIS ALVAREZ IS A RESEARCH ASSOCIATE,

More information

PCO 6317: Psychological Assessment 2 (Personality) Spring 2013 * Wednesdays 10:40 am - 1:40 pm * CWC 231

PCO 6317: Psychological Assessment 2 (Personality) Spring 2013 * Wednesdays 10:40 am - 1:40 pm * CWC 231 PCO 6317: Psychological Assessment 2 (Personality) Spring 2013 * Wednesdays 10: am - 1: pm * CWC 231 Professor: Jennifer Alonso, Ph.D. Email: jalonso2@ufl.edu Phone: (352) 392-1575 Office Hours: Tue and

More information

DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT IN BARBADOS. By: Laura Lee Foster National Council on Substance Abuse

DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT IN BARBADOS. By: Laura Lee Foster National Council on Substance Abuse DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT IN BARBADOS By: Laura Lee Foster National Council on Substance Abuse STANDARDS & POLICIES DRUG & ALCOHOL TREATMENT: POLICIES & STANDARDS - THE CURRENT SITUATION At present, there

More information

1.0 Abstract. Title: Real Life Evaluation of Rheumatoid Arthritis in Canadians taking HUMIRA. Keywords. Rationale and Background:

1.0 Abstract. Title: Real Life Evaluation of Rheumatoid Arthritis in Canadians taking HUMIRA. Keywords. Rationale and Background: 1.0 Abstract Title: Real Life Evaluation of Rheumatoid Arthritis in Canadians taking HUMIRA Keywords Rationale and Background: This abbreviated clinical study report is based on a clinical surveillance

More information

Key Questions to Consider when Seeking Substance Abuse Treatment

Key Questions to Consider when Seeking Substance Abuse Treatment www.ccsa.ca www.cclt.ca Frequently Asked Questions Key Questions to Consider when Seeking Substance Abuse Treatment The Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse (CCSA) has developed this document to address

More information

PREDICTORS OF NON-EPILEPTIC SEIZURES IN AN INPATIENT EPILEPSY PROGRAM

PREDICTORS OF NON-EPILEPTIC SEIZURES IN AN INPATIENT EPILEPSY PROGRAM PREDICTORS OF NON-EPILEPTIC SEIZURES IN AN INPATIENT EPILEPSY PROGRAM Robert C. Doss, PsyD John R. Gates, M.D This paper has been prepared specifically for: American Epilepsy Society Annual Meeting Philadelphia,

More information

The Begun Center is currently serving as the evaluator for five drug courts in Ohio receiving SAMHSA grant funding. http://begun.case.

The Begun Center is currently serving as the evaluator for five drug courts in Ohio receiving SAMHSA grant funding. http://begun.case. The Begun Center for Violence and Prevention Research & Education at Case Western Reserve University has been awarded the contract to evaluate the effectiveness of Ohio s Addiction Treatment Pilot Program

More information

THE ECONOMIC EFFECTS OF STATE-MANDATED HEALTH INSURANCE BENEFITS

THE ECONOMIC EFFECTS OF STATE-MANDATED HEALTH INSURANCE BENEFITS THE ECONOMIC EFFECTS OF STATE-MANDATED HEALTH INSURANCE BENEFITS Robert Sobers The College of New Jersey April 2003 I. INTRODUCTION There are currently 41.2 million Americans without health insurance,

More information

Documentation Guidelines for ADD/ADHD

Documentation Guidelines for ADD/ADHD Documentation Guidelines for ADD/ADHD Hope College Academic Success Center This document was developed following the best practice recommendations for disability documentation as outlined by the Association

More information

Family Law Toolkit for Survivors The Domestic Violence & Mental Health Collaboration Project

Family Law Toolkit for Survivors The Domestic Violence & Mental Health Collaboration Project Family Law Toolkit for Survivors The Domestic Violence & Mental Health Collaboration Project Family Law Evaluations If you will be seeking custody of your child or children, or are already involved in

More information

A PROSPECTIVE EVALUATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN REASONS FOR DRINKING AND DSM-IV ALCOHOL-USE DISORDERS

A PROSPECTIVE EVALUATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN REASONS FOR DRINKING AND DSM-IV ALCOHOL-USE DISORDERS Pergamon Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 23, No. 1, pp. 41 46, 1998 Copyright 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd Printed in the USA. All rights reserved 0306-4603/98 $19.00.00 PII S0306-4603(97)00015-4 A PROSPECTIVE

More information

Courses Descriptions. Courses Generally Taken in Program Year One

Courses Descriptions. Courses Generally Taken in Program Year One Courses Descriptions Courses Generally Taken in Program Year One PSY 602 (3 credits): Native Ways of Knowing Covers the appropriate and valid ways of describing and explaining human behavior by using the

More information

COMPARISONS OF CUSTOMER LOYALTY: PUBLIC & PRIVATE INSURANCE COMPANIES.

COMPARISONS OF CUSTOMER LOYALTY: PUBLIC & PRIVATE INSURANCE COMPANIES. 277 CHAPTER VI COMPARISONS OF CUSTOMER LOYALTY: PUBLIC & PRIVATE INSURANCE COMPANIES. This chapter contains a full discussion of customer loyalty comparisons between private and public insurance companies

More information

Couple Therapy ROLE OF BEHAVIORAL COUPLE THERAPY IN TREATMENT OF SUBSTANCE USE DISORDERS MYRTO MIA MCNEIL, RN, BSN,DNP (C)

Couple Therapy ROLE OF BEHAVIORAL COUPLE THERAPY IN TREATMENT OF SUBSTANCE USE DISORDERS MYRTO MIA MCNEIL, RN, BSN,DNP (C) Couple Therapy ROLE OF BEHAVIORAL COUPLE THERAPY IN TREATMENT OF SUBSTANCE USE DISORDERS MYRTO MIA MCNEIL, RN, BSN,DNP (C) Learning Objectives At the end of this presentation the participant will be able

More information

Case Description: Mr. F Personnel Screening, Law Enforcement Score Report

Case Description: Mr. F Personnel Screening, Law Enforcement Score Report REPORT Case Description: Mr. F Personnel Screening, Law Enforcement Score Report Mr. F is a -year-old single male who was evaluated as a candidate for an entry-level law enforcement officer position with

More information

The Roles of School Psychologists Working Within a Pediatric Setting

The Roles of School Psychologists Working Within a Pediatric Setting APA 06 1 The Roles of School Psychologists Working Within a Pediatric Setting Emily D. Warnes, Ph.D. University of Nebraska-Medical Center Stephanie C. Olson, M.A., Susan M. Sheridan, Ph.D., Ashley M.

More information

As the proportion of racial/

As the proportion of racial/ Treatment Episode Data Set The TEDS Report May 5, 1 Differences in Substance Abuse Treatment Admissions between Mexican-American s and s As the proportion of racial/ ethnic minority groups within the United

More information

Revised April 1, 2015 Page 1 of 5

Revised April 1, 2015 Page 1 of 5 Interview Date: Community Treatment Center 1215 Lake Drive Cocoa, Florida 32922 Phone: 321-632-5958 Fax: 321-632-2533 Do you have a substance abuse problem? Yes No Do you have a mental health diagnosis?

More information

Using a Mental Measurements Yearbook Review to Evaluate a Test

Using a Mental Measurements Yearbook Review to Evaluate a Test Using a Mental Measurements Yearbook Review to Evaluate a Test Anthony J. Nitko Professor Emeritus of Psychology in Education, University of Pittsburgh Adjunct Professor of Educational Psychology, University

More information

Results from the 2009 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Mental Health Findings

Results from the 2009 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Mental Health Findings Results from the 2009 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Mental Health Findings DISCLAIMER SAMHSA provides links to other Internet sites as a service to its users and is not responsible for the availability

More information

CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS. Michaelene Spence MA LADC 8/8/12

CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS. Michaelene Spence MA LADC 8/8/12 CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS Michaelene Spence MA LADC 8/8/12 Activity Chemical Health? Mental Health? Video- What is Addiction HBO Terminology MI/CD: Mental Illness/Chemical Dependency IDDT: Integrated Dual

More information

Running head: ASPERGER S AND SCHIZOID 1. A New Measure to Differentiate the Autism Spectrum from Schizoid Personality Disorder

Running head: ASPERGER S AND SCHIZOID 1. A New Measure to Differentiate the Autism Spectrum from Schizoid Personality Disorder Running head: ASPERGER S AND SCHIZOID 1 A New Measure to Differentiate the Autism Spectrum from Schizoid Personality Disorder Peter D. Marle, Camille S. Rhoades, and Frederick L. Coolidge University of

More information

Treatment. Race. Adults. Ethnicity. Services. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Mental Health Service Use among Adults. Inpatient Services.

Treatment. Race. Adults. Ethnicity. Services. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Mental Health Service Use among Adults. Inpatient Services. CHAPTER 1 Introduction Racial/Ethnic Differences in Mental Health Service Use among Adults Treatment Ethnicity Outpatient Services Mental Health Adults Mental Health Care Prevalence Inpatient Services

More information

Comorbidity among Oxford House residents: A preliminary outcome study

Comorbidity among Oxford House residents: A preliminary outcome study Addictive Behaviors 27 (2002) 837 845 Comorbidity among Oxford House residents: A preliminary outcome study John M. Majer a, *, Leonard A. Jason a, Joseph R. Ferrari a, Carol S. North b a Department of

More information

Chapter 7. Screening and Assessment

Chapter 7. Screening and Assessment Chapter 7 Screening and Assessment Screening And Assessment Starting the dialogue and begin relationship Each are sizing each other up Information gathering Listening to their story Asking the questions

More information

Suicide, PTSD, and Substance Use Among OEF/OIF Veterans Using VA Health Care: Facts and Figures

Suicide, PTSD, and Substance Use Among OEF/OIF Veterans Using VA Health Care: Facts and Figures Suicide, PTSD, and Substance Use Among OEF/OIF Veterans Using VA Health Care: Facts and Figures Erin Bagalman Analyst in Health Policy July 18, 2011 Congressional Research Service CRS Report for Congress

More information

Perception of drug addiction among Turkish university students: Causes, cures, and attitudes

Perception of drug addiction among Turkish university students: Causes, cures, and attitudes Addictive Behaviors 30 (2005) 1 8 Perception of drug addiction among Turkish university students: Causes, cures, and attitudes Okan Cem Çırakoğlu*, Güler Içnsın Faculty of Economic and Administrative Sciences,

More information

Day Treatment Mental Health Adult

Day Treatment Mental Health Adult Day Treatment Mental Health Adult Definition Day Treatment provides a community based, coordinated set of individualized treatment services to individuals with psychiatric disorders who are not able to

More information

Substance Abuse Treatment Admissions for Abuse of Benzodiazepines

Substance Abuse Treatment Admissions for Abuse of Benzodiazepines Treatment Episode Data Set The TEDS Report June 2, 2011 Substance Abuse Treatment Admissions for Abuse of Benzodiazepines Benzodiazepines are a class of central nervous system depressant drugs that are

More information

Phoenix House. Outpatient Treatment Services for Adults in Los Angeles and Orange Counties

Phoenix House. Outpatient Treatment Services for Adults in Los Angeles and Orange Counties Phoenix House Outpatient Treatment Services for Adults in Los Angeles and Orange Counties Phoenix House s outpatient programs offer comprehensive and professional clinical services that include intervention,

More information

Applied Psychology. Course Descriptions

Applied Psychology. Course Descriptions Applied Psychology s AP 6001 PRACTICUM SEMINAR I 1 CREDIT AP 6002 PRACTICUM SEMINAR II 3 CREDITS Prerequisites: AP 6001: Successful completion of core courses. Approval of practicum site by program coordinator.

More information

Dodge-Fillmore- Olmsted Methamphetamine Treatment Project. July 2006-December 2007 evaluation report

Dodge-Fillmore- Olmsted Methamphetamine Treatment Project. July 2006-December 2007 evaluation report Dodge-Fillmore- Olmsted Methamphetamine Treatment Project July 2006-December 2007 evaluation report M A Y 2 0 0 8 Dodge-Fillmore-Olmsted Methamphetamine Treatment Project July 2006-December 2007 evaluation

More information

Results from the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Mental Health Findings

Results from the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Mental Health Findings Results from the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Mental Health Findings DISCLAIMER SAMHSA provides links to other Internet sites as a service to its users and is not responsible for the availability

More information

What is Addiction? DSM-IV-TR Substance Abuse Criteria

What is Addiction? DSM-IV-TR Substance Abuse Criteria Module 2: Understanding Addiction, Recovery, and Recovery Oriented Systems of Care This module reviews the processes involved in addiction and what is involved in recovering an addiction free lifestyle.

More information

Alcohol addiction treatment

Alcohol addiction treatment Alcohol addiction treatment VERESIES CLINIC offers treatment of alcohol dependence. The program is offered both as an inpatient and outpatient program. It offers an intensive program of personal Psychological

More information

Psychology Externship Program

Psychology Externship Program Psychology Externship Program The Washington VA Medical Center (VAMC) is a state-of-the-art facility located in Washington, D.C., N.W., and is accredited by the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of

More information

Behavioral Health Services 14.0

Behavioral Health Services 14.0 Behavioral Health Services 14.0 Kaiser Permanente s Behavioral Health Services operates within the multi-specialty Mid- Atlantic Permanente Medical Group (MAPMG). It is a regional service committed to

More information

Perceptions and Use of Medical Marijuana in an Urban Substance Treatment Program

Perceptions and Use of Medical Marijuana in an Urban Substance Treatment Program Perceptions and Use of Medical Marijuana in an Urban Substance Treatment Program Corresponding Author: Charles Shuman M.D. Denver Health and Hospital Authority and the University of Colorado Denver, 667

More information

Behavioral Health Rehabilitation Services: Brief Treatment Model

Behavioral Health Rehabilitation Services: Brief Treatment Model Behavioral Health Rehabilitation Services: Brief Treatment Model Presented by Allegheny HealthChoices, Inc. 444 Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15222 Phone: 412/325-1100 Fax 412/325-1111 April 2006 AHCI

More information

In 2010, approximately 8 million Americans 18 years and older were dependent on alcohol.

In 2010, approximately 8 million Americans 18 years and older were dependent on alcohol. Vivitrol Pilot Study: SEMCA/Treatment Providers Collaborative Efforts with the treatment of Opioid Dependent Clients Hakeem Lumumba, PhD, CAADC SEMCA Scott Schadel, MSW, LMSW, CAADC HEGIRA PROGRAMS, INC.

More information

Substance Abuse Treatment Record Review Presentation

Substance Abuse Treatment Record Review Presentation Substance Abuse Treatment Record Review Presentation January 15, 2015 Presented by Melissa Reagan, M.S.W., L.S.W., Quality Management Specialist & Rebecca Rager, M.S.W., Quality Management Specialist Please

More information

Assessment of depression in adults in primary care

Assessment of depression in adults in primary care Assessment of depression in adults in primary care Adapted from: Identification of Common Mental Disorders and Management of Depression in Primary care. New Zealand Guidelines Group 1 The questions and

More information

THE OFFICE OF SUBSTANCE ABUSE SERVICES REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROVISION OF RESIDENTIAL DETOXIFICATION SERVICES BY PROVIDERS FUNDED WITH DBHDS RESOURCES

THE OFFICE OF SUBSTANCE ABUSE SERVICES REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROVISION OF RESIDENTIAL DETOXIFICATION SERVICES BY PROVIDERS FUNDED WITH DBHDS RESOURCES THE OFFICE OF SUBSTANCE ABUSE SERVICES REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROVISION OF RESIDENTIAL DETOXIFICATION SERVICES BY PROVIDERS FUNDED WITH DBHDS RESOURCES PURPOSE: The goal of this document is to describe the

More information

Fax # s for CAMH programs and services

Fax # s for CAMH programs and services INFORMATION AND INSTRUCTIONS STEP 1 BEFORE COMPLETING THE REFERRAL FORM CATS Program / General Psychiatry Memory Clinic, Geriatric Mental Health Program Go to www.camh.net for detailed information on each

More information

STATISTICS FOR PSYCHOLOGISTS

STATISTICS FOR PSYCHOLOGISTS STATISTICS FOR PSYCHOLOGISTS SECTION: STATISTICAL METHODS CHAPTER: REPORTING STATISTICS Abstract: This chapter describes basic rules for presenting statistical results in APA style. All rules come from

More information

Concurrent Disorder Comprehensive Assessment: Every Interaction is an Intervention

Concurrent Disorder Comprehensive Assessment: Every Interaction is an Intervention Concurrent Disorder Comprehensive Assessment: Every Interaction is an Intervention Presented by: Kristin Falconer, Gillian Hutton & Stacey Whitman November 12, 2015 Disclosure Statement We have not received

More information

Addiction Psychiatry Fellowship Rotation Goals & Objectives

Addiction Psychiatry Fellowship Rotation Goals & Objectives Addiction Psychiatry Fellowship Rotation Goals & Objectives Table of Contents University Neuropsychiatric Institute (UNI) Training Site 2 Inpatient addiction psychiatry rotation.....2 Outpatient addiction

More information