Using Microsoft Windows 7 Professional

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1 Unit 2 Using Microsoft Windows 7 Professional Unit Objectives This unit includes the knowledge and skills required to familiarize you with the most frequently used functions of an operating system. Elements include the ability to install and run software, control the workspace (desktop), perform file management and change system settings (display, date and time settings, etc.). Lesson Topic 8 Looking at Operating Systems 9 Looking at the Windows Desktop 10 Starting Windows Applications 11 Looking at Files and Folders 12 Using the Recycle Bin 13 Customizing System Settings 14 Installing and Uninstalling Programs 51

2 Unit 2: 1: Using Recognizing Windows Computers 7 Lesson 8 Lesson 8 Objectives Looking at Operating Systems Looking at Operating Systems In this lesson, you will look at the operating system and how it affects what you can do on the computer. On completion, you should be familiar with: what an operating system is identifying different operating systems how operating systems interact with other computers Skills capabilities and limitations of operating systems common problems related to operating systems Identify the purpose of an operating system Identify different operating systems Identify that a computer user may interact with multiple operating systems while performing everyday tasks Identify the capabilities and limitations imposed by the operating system including levels of user rights (administrative rights, etc.) which determine what a user can and cannot do (install software, download files, change system settings, etc.) Identify and solve common problems related to operating systems Looking at Operating Systems An operating system or environment is a collection of programs designed to control the computer s interaction and communication with the user. It performs two important functions: manages the input devices (keyboard and mouse), output devices (monitor and printer), and storage devices (hard, flash, and optical drives) manages the files stored on the computer and recognizes the file types to complete tasks Every computer requires an operating system to function. A computer must load the operating system into memory before it can load any application program. Examples of operating systems include DOS, Windows, Unix, Linux, and the Mac OS. DOS was the original operating system for the PC; it stands for Disk Operating System. It was text-based software and required single line commands to perform functions for managing files. With the exception of a system using the Unix operating system, all other computers use a graphical operating system like Windows or Mac OS. This is the standard for operating systems and the display capabilities make working with design elements on the screen much easier. The graphical user interface (GUI), also known as gooey, enables you to use a pointing device to point and select functions. Many of these functions or commands appear as buttons or have a picture or symbol, known as an icon, to represent the task. Software vendors design their programs to use the same buttons, symbols, or pictures for commonly used functions (such as copy, paste, bold, save, print, and so on) to reduce time needed to learn new software v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

3 Looking at Operating Systems Lesson 8 The following screens are examples of the first screen you will see when you start the computer and the operating system loads into memory. This screen is commonly known as the Desktop. Microsoft Windows 7 This operating system was released in October 2009 and designed to take advantage of the features of Vista and XP, by simplifying common tasks you perform on a daily basis. Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Microsoft Windows Vista Vista is an operating system for PCs. Windows products include a WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) screen display, which provides an instant preview of what is available v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 53

4 Unit Windows 7 Unit 2: 1: Using Recognizing Computers Lesson 8 Looking at Operating Systems Mac OS This operating system is designed for Apple Macintosh computers. It uses the graphics interface so that working on the computer will be much easier and faster. This was one of the original graphic user interface systems and set the standard for true WYSIWYG programs. Newer versions of the Macintosh operating systems use Unix as its underlying structure, providing a very secure and stable operating environment. Unix This operating system was released in the early 1970s by programmers for programmers. The system was designed with portability in mind for multiple uses and users. The main drawback to this operating system is that it is based on one-line commands controlling the functions. This system is very popular with universities and scientific or research organizations. Linux This operating system is based on Unix with a graphical user interface. This system is readily available and very popular for use with high-end servers, and also with entrepreneurial software developers. Handheld Operating Systems These operating systems work with a PDA device; the options for each system vary depending on the type of handheld device. Embedded Operating Systems These operating systems manage and control operations for the specific types of equipment for which they are designed, such as a vehicle, a machine that controls robotic manufacturing, or a piece of medical equipment. When turned on, the embedded operating system follows a process similar to those used in typical computing devices, but it recognizes the purpose of the specialized equipment. Some manufacturers are embedding a modified version of Windows for their programs so they simulate a PC environment, such as with point of sale systems used in restaurants and retail stores v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

5 Looking at Operating Systems Lesson 8 Using Different Operating Systems As noted, a computer may have an OS other than Windows installed. Many organizations recognize that not all users at one site will use the same operating system or computer type. Consequently, operating systems are designed to interact with each other to share data or communicate. An organization will have a network system to manage and control the resources and data for that network that may be a combination of one or more servers with varying operating systems, as well as devices to secure these servers and the data stored there. One of the network operating systems will be set to identify the hardware that a person is using as well as this person s rights to network access. This can be internal during business hours, or external if the person has remote access to the network. For example, John Smith uses a PC notebook at work to log on to the network and the Internet to view his messages. At home, John uses a Mac notebook to access the Internet and then the company s network via remote access. The company s network recognizes the user as John Smith and enables him to access his messages at home, even though he uses a different operating system there. He will also be able to work on documents on the home notebook, even though they were created or modified on the PC notebook at work. Unit 2: Using Windows 7 John may also be a sales person who travels a lot and uses a PDA to send and receive messages. All messages are processed through the network, even when he is working on the PDA in a remote location. John needs to identify himself to the network and, once logged on, can interact with the network as if he were in the office. Equipment with embedded operating systems interact with larger systems that may also have network operating systems installed. Take the example of someone who takes their vehicle to the dealership for maintenance. The mechanic will connect the vehicle s operating system to a computer that is connected to a server at the vehicle vendor s head office. Updates can then occur between the server and the vehicle s operating system. Identifying Capabilities and Limitations Operating systems have advantages and disadvantages; how applicable these are depend on the type of system you have and what your requirements are. Following are some examples of capabilities and limitations with operating systems: You can save files using names that are up to 255 characters long, enabling a detailed description of a file s contents. If you are using a PC, you cannot include certain characters (\ / : * < >? ), whereas with a Mac only the colon cannot be used in file names. You can open two or more programs at the same time; the only restriction is the amount of RAM available to process changes to files in each program. You can customize an operating system to your preference by changing the desktop background, the color, or the screensaver. On a network environment, your customization options may be restricted; for example, you may not be allowed to change system settings as this could lead to hardware problems, or you may have to adhere to company standards for colors, background picture, and so on. In some school environments, the network is set to provide a standard format for the operating system so that any custom changes revert to default when the computer is shut down. On a stand-alone computer, you may be able to install programs or download items from the Internet. In an organization, you may not have access to perform such tasks. (You may also be restricted from activities on a stand-alone computer if you do not have administrative rights for that computer.) Your access to files that could modify part or all of a network could be restricted. For example, you may be able to view the contents of folders for other departments but you cannot move or delete any of these files. You can make a copy of the file to your own folder but you cannot do anything to the original. Common Issues with Operating Systems Some aspects of every operating system can give rise to problems. These may include: Incompatibility between a software application and the operating system may prevent software programs from working. For example, you may be able to install and use older software on newer operating systems, but you cannot run a software program designed for a newer operating system on a system with an older operating system v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 55

6 Unit 2: 1: Using Recognizing Windows Computers 7 Lesson 8 Looking at Operating Systems An error message may appear indicating that a device does not work, usually because the operating system cannot identify the hardware. Many hardware vendors provide newer versions of drivers, or the installation files, so the new operating system can recognize your device. Problems with operating system files can arise from power failures, shutting down the computer incorrectly, installing too much software on your system or installing it incorrectly, a virus infecting your system, or a conflict between the software and the operating system. Operating system files have specific tasks built into the setup for each device or software program. Never delete any program files from the folders where they reside. If you see an error message indicating that a file is missing or corrupted, you may need to reinstall the software in order to recover that file. If your system displays many error messages or requires you to restart the computer several times, you should check with someone who is experienced with computers to reinstall or upgrade the operating system. This is also true if the computer asks you to start the operating system in safe mode; this is an indicator that there is something wrong with the operating system and it may need to be installed again. The operating system or an application program may fail after an update. In the case of the operating system, you may need to uninstall the update to the operating system to see if the problem still exists. You may need an IT specialist to assist with the latter. If you see an error message indicating you do not have access to a particular PC, drive, software program, file, or folder, it generally means that the login ID you have used is incorrect, or that network restrictions have been placed on your ID. For example, you may only have three attempts to enter the password correctly; after that, you will need to contact the network administrator to reset the password or unlock your account. Summary In this lesson, you looked at the operating system and how it affects what you can do on the computer. You should now be familiar with: what an operating system is capabilities and limitations of operating systems identifying different operating systems common problems related to operating systems how operating systems interact with other computers Review Questions 1. An operating system is a collection of programs designed to control the computer s interaction and communication with the user. a. True b. False 2. An example of interaction between operating systems is the transfer of data between a notebook and a PDA. a. True b. False 3. If you changed the desktop background color yesterday and it is the original color again today, why did the color not remain with the preference you chose? a. You do not have rights to change the background color. b. The computer was set to revert to the original color when it was shut down. c. You cannot change anything in the operating system. d. Any of the above e. a or c 4. It is crucial that you do not change any of the operating system files without working with an IT specialist. a. True b. False 5. What should you try if you cannot open an application program after updating Windows? a. Uninstall the Windows update b. Uninstall the application program c. Make sure the file is valid d. Any of the above e. a or c v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

7 Looking at the Windows Desktop Lesson 9 Lesson 9 Objectives Looking at the Windows Desktop In this lesson, you will be introduced to the Windows desktop and how to navigate around in Windows. On successful completion, you will be familiar with: how to start and exit Windows what the Windows desktop is how to use the Start button how to use the taskbar how to manipulate windows Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Skills Shut down, restart, log on and log off the computer Identify elements of the operating system desktop Manipulate windows Start and run programs Looking at the Windows Desktop Once Windows loads, the desktop will look similar to the following screen. You will notice several objects or icons on the desktop that will vary from one system to another depending on how the system was set up Desktop Icons 3 Desktop 5 Taskbar 2 Mouse Pointer 4 Start Button 6 Notification Area v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 57

8 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 9 Desktop Icons Mouse Pointer Desktop Start Button Taskbar Taskbar Notification Area Looking at the Windows Desktop These are shortcuts you can select to open frequently used programs, folders, or files. The arrow that follows the same movement when you move the mouse. Use this arrow to identify which option you want to select or activate. This is the work area or screen on which windows, icons, menus, dialog boxes, and the Sidebar appear. You can customize the appearance of the desktop using features such as wallpaper, themes, pictures, or solid colors, and you can create shortcuts that will take you directly to frequently used folders, files, programs, or Web pages. This is used to start programs, open documents, find items on your computer, and get help, as well as log off and shut down your computer. The taskbar is where the Start button, taskbar notification area, and additional buttons for software programs may appear, depending on what has been set up. As you open a program or file, a button will appear here for each open item. The taskbar is an integral part of Windows multitasking features. Small icons in this area, sometimes called the System Tray, indicate program status, or provide another shortcut to open programs. Using the Start Button The Start button is the primary means of starting programs, finding files, accessing online help, logging off the network, switching between users, or shutting down the computer. You can use the mouse or the keyboard to navigate through the Start menu. To activate the Start button, you can: Click the Start button, or press, or press Pinned Program Area (shown in a boldface) Recently Used Programs (dynamic items that change automatically based on programs used most frequently) Useful System Folders Recently Installed Program Search Box 4 5 A (triangle) with a command indicates that a submenu will display when you select this item. For example, when you point at the All Programs command, Windows displays a list of all programs available on your system. To return to the main Start menu, click the Back command. Items with a (folder) icon indicate there is another submenu with options for selection. These are listed alphabetically; you can use the vertical scroll bar to move up or down the list v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

9 Looking at the Windows Desktop Lesson 9 Items can be selected from the Start menu using the mouse or keyboard. If using the mouse, click the Start button once. Then click the appropriate command to display another menu or activate that command. If using the keyboard, press the key to display the Start menu. Then press the key to move to the first command in the list, use the arrow directional keys to navigate to the required command, and when it is highlighted, press to activate it. Exiting the Computer Properly From a security perspective, it is extremely important to save your files, close the programs, and log off the computer when you finish working to prevent unauthorized access to your files and, more importantly, to your company s network. Alternatively, you can shut down the computer completely using the Shut down button to prevent others from using it. Never turn off your computer without closing your files and open software programs in the correct manner; this will protect the software and data files from being corrupted or lost. 1 2 Shut down Shut down options Click the to display several options including: Unit 2: Using Windows Switch user Log off Lock Restart Sleep Hibernate Switches to another user account without logging out of the current account. Closes all open items, logs out of the current user account, and returns to the log on screen. Hides the desktop behind a log on screen. Closes all open items and restarts the computer; also called a reboot or warm boot. Puts the computer in a state where it consumes less power without losing your place on the screen; the computer does not shut down in this mode. If you are using a desktop computer, the Sleep command appears as Standby. Available only on notebooks, this saves what is on the desktop and then shuts down the computer completely so it consumes no power. When you restart the computer and log on, the desktop returns to where you left it. Always allow Windows to complete the Shut down or Restart process properly. Reactivating the computer before Windows has completed these processes may cause files to be corrupted and result in a message, the next time you turn on the computer, indicating the machine was not shut down properly. Depending on the Power Options scheme and configuration, your computer may be able to go into Sleep or Standby mode, where the monitor or hard disk turns off after a set interval of time. If a power failure occurs while the computer is in this state, you will lose any unsaved information, so be sure to save your work every time you leave the computer, even if you will not be gone for long. To turn off Standby and return to normal mode, simply move the mouse or press a key on the keyboard. Standby is generally used when you want to leave your computer on but will not be using it for a length of time; for example, you are working on some letters and need to attend a staff meeting but don t want to lose your place in your work. Hibernation is generally only used on notebooks because the need to close the notebook and take it somewhere else is not compatible with Standby mode. Restarting the Computer You may sometimes find that the computer does not respond to a request. When this happens, you need to reboot or restart using the Task Manager v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 59

10 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 9 To display the Task Manager, use one of the following methods: Press the + + key combination to display a screen with options to lock the computer, switch user, log off, change the password, or start the Task Manager. Click Start Task Manager. Right-click the taskbar and then click Start Task Manager. Note: Do not end any processes unless you are very familiar with the service, subsystem or executable program that you want to terminate. If you end a system service, it may cause some part of the operating system to malfunction. Looking at the Windows Desktop You can use the Task Manager to switch programs, start a program, check which programs are running and their status, or safely close a program when problems are occurring, such as it is no longer responding. The Task Manager is an advanced application; the other tabs in this feature should only be used by an experienced user or network administrator. If the Task Manager does not respond or close down the applications appropriately, you will need to press the + + key combination again to restart the computer. If you can activate the Start menu, you can also use the Restart option from the Shut down command. Exercise 1 Click the Start button, and then click the Shut down options button. 2 Click Switch user. Windows now displays a screen with an icon with your login name and another one called Other User. Depending on how the users are set up by the administrator, you may also need to press + + before you can view this screen. 3 Click your account, and then log on with your password. 4 Click the Start button, and then click Shut down. 5 Allow the computer to shut down completely, pause a few seconds and then turn it back on. Log on with your user account and password. You will now start a program and then, for demonstration purposes, use the Task Manager to end it. 6 Click Start, All Programs, Accessories, and then WordPad. 7 Right-click a blank area of the taskbar and select Start Task Manager. 8 Ensure the Applications tab is active. 9 In Windows Task Manager, click Document - WordPad and then End Task. This closes the WordPad program. 10 Close the Task Manager v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

11 Looking at the Windows Desktop Lesson 9 Using the Taskbar By default, the taskbar is at the bottom of the Windows desktop. It includes the Start button, a notification area, the clock, and a taskbar button for each open program. By default, Windows automatically installs some commonly-used programs in the taskbar for easy access, e.g. Windows Explorer. 1 Start Button 2 Taskbar Buttons 3 Notification Area 4 Show desktop The notification area displays the time and provides quick access to items such as the volume control or an antivirus program. It can also show shortcuts with information about the status of activities. You can choose which icons to show or hide. You can move the taskbar or change the way it displays as follows: Point the mouse pointer over a blank area of the taskbar and drag it to any side of the screen. To prevent changes to the taskbar, right-click any blank area of the taskbar and ensure Lock the taskbar is active. To customize the properties for the taskbar, right-click the area you want to customize or right-click the Start button, and then click Properties. Unit 2: Using Windows 7 To quickly show the desktop, click the Show Desktop button at the far right of the Task Notification area. You can also quickly redisplay the program you were using last by clicking Show Desktop once more. To see other programs that may be running automatically in the Task Notification area, click the at the front of this area. As you start programs, a button appears in the taskbar as a visual clue that this program is running. As you open files within that program, a preview window appears for each file when you point at the program button on the taskbar. Exercise 1 Right-click the time in the notification area. Select Properties from the shortcut menu. 2 Scroll through the list of items to see what you can adjust, and then click Cancel. 3 Right-click the time in the notification area and review the items on the shortcut menu. 4 Click Start Task Manager. You should have no programs running at the moment. 5 Click the Close button to close the Task Manager. 6 Click the in the notification area to view what other programs may be active. Now try using the taskbar. 7 Click the Internet Explorer button v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 61

12 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 9 8 Point at this button in the taskbar to see what appears. Looking at the Windows Desktop Windows displays a small window of the web page you currently have displayed on the screen. Notice also that the button now has a border around it to indicate this program is active. 9 Click the folder button to the right of Internet Explorer. This button represents Windows Explorer, the file management tool for Windows (covered later in this Unit). 10 Point at the Internet Explorer button. Notice how the Web browser is still active even though you started another program from the taskbar. 11 With the Web page window displayed, click the Close button in the window to close this page without having to view the full page in Internet Explorer. 12 Click the Close button for Windows Explorer to close this program. Looking at a Typical Window When programs or folders are opened, they appear on the desktop in individual windows. You can have multiple windows displayed on the screen, but each window will share similar features. 1 2 Back/Forward Navigation Buttons Title Bar 3 4 Address Bar Command Bar 5 Search Box 7 6 Control Buttons 8 Favorite Links Contents Pane 9 10 Navigation Pane Details Pane Back and Forward Buttons Allow you to navigate back or forward to display different views of files and folders v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

13 Looking at the Windows Desktop Lesson 9 Title Bar Command Bar Address Bar Search Box Control Buttons Displays the name of the currently active feature or application program. (In this example, the name for this window appears in the Address Bar, showing you the contents of the computer at this location). Provides commands you can use to organize, view, or protect your data. Facilitates quick and easy navigation. Also known as the eyebrow menu or breadcrumb trail, this feature allows you to click the name of any folder visible in the trail so that you can go to that folder, or click the arrow that appears next to any item and see other items at the same level in the folder hierarchy. Provides an area into which you can enter criteria to search for a file or folder. Change the way currently open windows are displayed, as follows: (Minimize) (Maximize) (Restore Down) (Close) Temporarily closes the window, replacing it as a button on the taskbar. Click the button on the taskbar to open or restore the window. Displays the window full screen. Restores the window to the size it was before it was maximized. Closes the window. (If you see a box that only displays a (Close) or (Help) button, you are seeing a feature window, with a message about what you must do before the computer will allow you to do anything else.) Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Favorite Links Navigation Pane Contents Pane Details Pane Displays folders or locations you use often as links that will take you directly to them. Displays folders and drives that you can double-click in order to see their contents. Displays the contents of the folder or drive selected in the Navigation Pane. Displays properties or details about the selected file or folder in the Contents pane. Exercise 1 Click Start, and then click Computer. 2 Click the (Maximize) button at the top right corner of the window. 3 Click the (Minimize) button. Notice that the window seems to have disappeared but it actually was moved to the taskbar. 4 Click the Computer button on the taskbar to redisplay the window. The window is now maximized, occupying the entire screen, and the appears. 5 Click the (Restore Down) button. 6 Click the (Close) button. The Computer window is now closed from the screen. (Restore Down) button v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 63

14 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 9 Moving a Window Looking at the Windows Desktop You can move a window anywhere on the desktop using the mouse or keyboard. Point the mouse pointer anywhere on the title bar and then drag the window to a new location. With the keyboard, press + to activate the control icon; it is not visible on the screen but the menu appears once it s activated. Press the key to select the Move command and press. Using the arrow direction keys, move the window to the new location and then press to exit the action. You can only move a window that is not full screen. Maximized windows cannot be moved as they occupy the entire screen. Sizing a Window On occasion you may want to change the size of the window so that you can see more or less of multiple windows. You can use the mouse or the keyboard to size a window. Position the mouse pointer anywhere on the border (side) to be sized. When you see the mouse cursor change to a (vertical double-headed arrow) for the top or bottom border, or (horizontal double-headed arrow) for the left or right border, drag the mouse to the desired size. To size the vertical and horizontal sides at the same time, position the mouse cursor on any corner of the window, and then drag to the desired size for the window when you see or (diagonal double-headed arrow). Some windows are set to a specific size and cannot be altered. With the keyboard, press + to activate the control icon; it is not visible on the screen but the menu appears once it s activated. Press the key to select the Size command and press. Using the appropriate arrow direction key for the side you want to size, press that direction key until the window is the size you want, and then press to exit the action. You will need to repeat this action for every side to be sized. Using Scroll Bars If a window is too small to display all the contents, scroll bars will automatically appear vertically on the right side of a window, or horizontally at the bottom. Scroll Box A scroll bar consists of three parts: an arrow button at each end of the scroll bar, a scroll box, and the scroll area. The scroll box is also called a thumb or an elevator. The position of the scroll box within the scroll area provides an approximate gauge of where the information currently displayed in the window is in relation to the entire window s contents. Use one of the following methods to move around with the scroll bars: Click in the lighter shaded area above or below the scroll box to display the previous or subsequent screen of information. Click the arrow at either end of the vertical scroll bar once to display a line of information in that direction. Click the arrow at either end of the horizontal scroll bar once to display a column of information in that direction. Click and hold down the mouse button on the arrow at either end of the scroll bar to have the screen scroll in that direction. Drag the scroll box to a specific area in the scroll area to move directly to that location. Depending on the program, you may also see a tip showing where the cursor will be placed when you release the mouse button v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

15 Looking at the Windows Desktop Lesson 9 Exercise 1 Click Start, and then Computer. 2 If necessary, restore the Computer window. 3 Point the mouse pointer on the title bar of the Computer window. 4 Click and drag the window to a new position on the desktop. 5 Practice moving the window around to several different locations. 6 Move the mouse pointer to the right edge of the window and hold the mouse over the border until the pointer changes to a (horizontal double-headed arrow). Unit 2: Using Windows 7 7 Drag the border to approximately one inch (2.5 cm) from the right side of the screen. 8 Move the mouse pointer to the lower right corner of the window and drag the corner of the window until the window is approximately half the current size. 9 Resize the window to half its original size. Notice that the window was resized vertically and horizontally at the same time. 10 Click the arrow button at the bottom of the vertical scroll bar in the Folders list. 11 Click the arrow button at the top of the scroll bar. 12 Drag the scroll box up and down to view the information in the window. 13 Resize the window so that all of the contents are visible and the scroll bars disappear. It is not necessary to perform step 13 before closing the window; the step is provided here for you to practice sizing windows as well as to prepare for forthcoming exercises. 14 Click (Close) to close the Computer window v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 65

16 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 9 Summary Looking at the Windows Desktop In this lesson you learned about the common elements shared by all windows, regardless of whether they are application windows or windows that open after activating a command. You should now be familiar with: how to start and exit Windows what the Windows desktop is how to use the Start button Review Questions how to use the taskbar how to manipulate windows 1. The best way to shut down the computer is simply to press the power switch on the computer case to turn it off. a. True b. False 2. Use the Task Manager to: a. End a program that has stopped responding b. Check the power usage on your computer c. Check which programs are running and their status d. Any of the above e. a or c 3. To see the programs installed on your system, which option from the Start button would you use? a. Documents b. All Programs c. Search d. List of Quick Start items 4. If you wanted to make the window smaller than the full screen, which button would you use? a. b. c. d. 5. What would you do to move the window? a. Click and drag the Control Icon to move to the new location b. Click and drag the Title bar to move to the new location c. Click anywhere in the window to move to the new location d. Click on the button v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

17 Starting Windows Applications Lesson 10 Lesson 10 Objectives Starting Windows Applications In this lesson, you will look at how to start application programs and how to access help in Windows. On completion, you will be able to: start an application program move between open application programs start an application using the Run command access online help understand the Help screens determine the version of Windows Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Skills Identify elements of the operating system desktop Start and run programs Starting Application Programs The most common way to start a program is from the All Programs menu. Another way is to select the shortcut for the application program on the desktop or the taskbar. Programs installed on the computer usually appear in the All Programs menu, unless otherwise specified. Not all applications will create a shortcut on the desktop or the taskbar. An application program might also create an option in the Startup folder during the time of installation, which means it will automatically run each time you start Windows; this is the case, for example, with Windows Live Messenger, QuickTime, and most antivirus programs. These items appear in the taskbar notification area as seen here: Each application program contains its own set of control icons that allow you to manage the application window. Depending on the program, there may also be a set of control icons for the window that contains the document, as seen in the following: In this type of program, you can manipulate the document without changing how the application window looks. For example, you can minimize an Excel file you are working on to create a new file or to open an existing file, as seen here: Only one set of controls appears and it is with the active file, as shown with the new file in this screen; the minimized workbook shows the name of the file but it will not display its control buttons until you make that file active. You can close each file without affecting the Excel application, which continues to display its own set of controls v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 67

18 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 10 Working with Multiple Windows Starting Windows Applications Working with multiple windows and multiple programs at the same time is called multitasking. Windows provides you with several ways of switching between the programs and organizing the open windows. Each program you have open appears in its own window. As you open files within each program, Windows displays these in a new window when you point at the program button on the taskbar. You can move or switch from one program to another by clicking the appropriate window for the file to use. You can also close a file by clicking the Close button in that window. Using the keyboard, press + or + to switch between the active programs on the taskbar. You can also press + to display a small window with icons representing each open program. The icon with the box around it is the current selection. Press and hold as you press to toggle from one program icon to another. Release both keys when you select the appropriate program icon. Using the Run Command Occasionally you may need to start a program that was not or does not need to be installed on your system and is not in the Start menu; for example, a network administrator helping you with some troubleshooting on your machine might instruct you to open a program to help diagnose the problem. In this case, you can access the program using the Run command; you will need to know what the command is before it can be used. Whenever possible, use the Start menu to start a command; alternatively, you can activate a program from its desktop icon. The Run command should be used only when you need to run a specific program from another drive or start some troubleshooting commands (which is beyond the scope of this course). To activate the Run command, use one of the following methods: Click Start, type: run in the search field, and then press. Click Start, All Programs, Accessories, Run. Press +. Exercise 1 Click Start and then point at All Programs. 2 Click Accessories and then click WordPad. 3 Click Start and then point at All Programs v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

19 Starting Windows Applications Lesson 10 4 Click Microsoft Office and then click Microsoft Excel Notice that Excel displays on the screen and there is a button for both programs on the taskbar. 5 Click the button for WordPad on the taskbar. Look at the top right corner of WordPad. You should see only one set of controls (as compared with what you would see in Excel). 6 Click (Close) to close the WordPad application. The program no longer appears on the screen or the taskbar. 7 In Excel, click the Minimize button in the second row (the one next to the Help button). Excel has now minimized this file to a small tab at the lower left corner of the screen. Unit 2: Using Windows 7 8 Click the (Restore Up) button on this tab. Notice that the file displays on the screen but does not take up the full screen as it did when you started the program. 9 Click the (Maximize) button on the file. Try using the Run command to start a program. The command used here is for demonstration purposes only. 10 Click Start, type: run in the search field, and then press. 11 Type: command in the Open field and press. Note: If command does not work on your computer, use cmd instead. If you were going to enter a command, you would do so now at the location of the flashing cursor. 12 Click the Microsoft Excel button on the Taskbar. Then click (Close) at the top right corner to close the Excel application. Only the Command window appears on the screen. 13 Type: exit at the command line and press. You should now be back at the desktop. Hint: You could also have clicked the Close button for this window. Using Windows Help and Support Windows provides an extensive online Help system that displays step-by-step procedures, definitions for terms, and hypertext links to other related topics. Web Help is available for additional online support via the Internet. To activate Help, use one of the following methods: select Help and Support from the Start menu, or press, or click the (Help) button in any dialog box, if available v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 69

20 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 10 Starting Windows Applications The Windows Help and Support window contains navigation and search tools, as well as links to a variety of resources, such as assistance in Finding an Answer, Asking Someone, or Obtaining Information from Microsoft Toolbar Links for navigating Help to locate the 2 answer for yourself 3 Links for accessing additional information from Microsoft 4 Additional Help resources 5 Settings for searching Offline or Online 4 5 The toolbar at the top of each Help window includes buttons that assist when working with Help Arrows 4 Enable you to retrace steps through the Help system. 2 Help and Support home 5 Returns you to the Help and Support home page. 3 Print 6 Prints the currently displayed topic. Browse Help Displays the current location in the table of contents, from which you can navigate up or down the hierarchy of a topic of interest. Learn about other support options Takes you to a page with links to other resources, such as someone who can help you via Remote Desktop (they can see or control what is happening on your computer), or go to a specific Microsoft Web site for more assistance. Options Provides additional commands such as adjusting the size of help text or finding a word or phrase in the currently displayed Help page. The first time you use Windows Help and Support, you may be asked if you wish to obtain the latest online content. Unless you are using a dial-up connection, you should accept this option. Remember that online help content is not stored on your computer; it is only available when you are connected to the Internet. Using the Table of Contents Windows provides an option to use a table of contents to find help on specific topics. Here, the topics are grouped into types of task or activity. To activate the Help Contents, do one of the following: In the Windows Help and Support window, click the Browse Help topics link, or on the Help toolbar, click (Browse Help) v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

21 Starting Windows Applications Lesson 10 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 These categories will link you to information about specific features or options available in Windows. As you move from one page to another, you will see symbols similar to the following: a link that opens an article with further information for this topic a link that displays a list of articles for this topic. Getting Additional Technical Support If you cannot find help on a specific topic online, a number of other options for technical support are available: Contact Microsoft. A list of numbers and ways to contact them are available in the Help menu from any Microsoft application program; you can also use the online help option to find technical support information. Go to a computer store that provides technical support. This does not have to be the store where you purchased the computer. Technicians charge an hourly fee for repairs or training. Hire a consultant who can come to your site to fix the computer or provide you with training or assistance on the problem. Consultants also charge an hourly fee, which may include travel time. Take additional courses on Windows to study advanced skills and troubleshooting techniques. Check your Yellow Pages or go online to locate courses offered in your area. Pricing for courses will vary depending on the training facility. Search the Internet for any groups that specialize in Windows Vista or have a community area such as a blog where they share information with each other. When you require further technical support, you may be asked which version of Windows you are using. It is important to tell technical support the version you are using so they can provide you with the correct support. Windows 7 is pretty easy to identify as the taskbar is large and the Start button is an icon only and does not contain the word Start as with earlier versions. To display the version of Windows for technical support: click the Start button and click Control Panel. In the Control Panel window, click System and Security, and then click System, or click the Start button, right-click Computer and then click Properties v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 71

22 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 10 Starting Windows Applications Exercise 1 Click Start and then click Help and Support. The Windows Help and Support window displays. 2 Type: Windows 7 in the Search Help field and click the button, or press. The search results will find the top 30 results on the term Windows 7. Notice that Windows breaks it down by category to help you identify the area about which you may want more assistance. 3 In the list of topics, click What s new in Windows 7. The information appears in the window with a variety of links for more help on specific topics. Displayed at the right side is a list that is much like a table of contents. 4 Click Easier ways to work with windows in the In this article list to display the help topic. 5 In the first paragraph, click the windows link. Text links in blue will move quickly to another page with more information on the clicked item. Text links in green will display a definition of the text for easy reference. Up to this point, you have been moving forward to find and read more information on specific topics. As you move from page to page, the Back and Forward buttons appear. 6 Click (Back) to go back one page. 7 Click the Find which edition of Windows 7 you are using link in the Top 30 results list. Notice that Windows displays this article 8 In the Windows Help and Support toolbar, click (Browse Help). 9 Click Windows Basics in the Categories list. 10 Click the Pictures and games link. 11 Click the Learn about Windows games link. You are now reading an article explaining the games available with Windows, and how they can be accessed. 12 Click (Back) to return to the previous help page. 13 Click (Forward) to return to the games information page. 14 Click (Home) to return to the Windows Help and Support page. 15 Close the Windows Help and Support window v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

23 Starting Windows Applications Lesson 10 Summary In this lesson, you learned how to start application programs as well as how to access help in Windows. You should now be able to: start an application program move between open application programs start an application using the Run command Review Questions access online help understand the Help screens determine the version of Windows 1. The most common way to start an application program is to use the Start button on the desktop. a. True b. False 2. Multitasking is a process whereby Windows allows you to work on multiple programs or documents at the same time. a. True b. False 3. How can you activate the Help feature? a. Select Help and Support from the Start menu b. Click a Help icon or button if it is displayed on the screen c. Press d. Any of the above 4. What is the difference between a text link that is shown in blue as opposed to one that is shown in green? a. Text links in blue jump to a new page with more help links whereas green text links jump to a new page with definitions. b. Blue text links jump to a new page with more help details whereas green text links display the definition in the same window. c. Blue text links jump to a new page with more help details whereas green text links display a glossary of terms. d. There is no difference between blue and green text links. 5. If you cannot find online help on a Windows topic, what options are available to you for further help? a. Check with a technical person, either at your site or a computer dealer. b. Contact Microsoft. c. Search the Internet for groups of people who may have experienced the same problem or issue. d. Hire a consultant to help you or take training courses that target the features you want to learn. e. Any of the above Unit 2: Using Windows v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 73

24 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 11 Lesson 11 Objectives Looking at Files and Folders Looking at Files and Folders In this lesson, you will look at the different ways files or folders display and how to manipulate them. On successful completion, you will be familiar with: what a file or folder is how to recognize a file or folder on the desktop how to recognize the drives available selecting files or folders moving files or folders copying files or folders changing the view for drives, files or folders how to create, customize, or change a folder s properties renaming files or folders viewing file or folder properties finding files Skills Manipulate desktop folders and icons/shortcuts Manage files Identify precautions one should take when manipulating files Understanding Files and Folders A file is created using a specific program; the type of program determines what type of file it is. Application File Data File System File This type of file includes very detailed instructions for the microprocessor on what tasks to perform (such as read, write, calculate) and is usually stored in a folder named for that program, which in turn resides in the Program Files folder on your hard drive. This type of file contains information you have entered and saved in one of the applications you have on your computer. For example, you might have a budget file in Excel, a letter file in Word, a database in Access, and so on. These files can be stored anywhere. This type of file also contains detailed instructions for the microprocessor on what tasks to perform, except that they are part of the operating system. Many of these files are hidden to protect them from being changed or deleted. Regardless of the file type, all files appear with an icon that includes a symbol of the associated program. Shown are examples of icons that appear beside an application file (Outlook), a data file (Excel), and a system file (Windows): A folder is a container for programs and files and a method of organizing information; it s something like a hanging folder in a file cabinet within which you can organize other folders and files. A folder that you create is represented by a yellow icon that looks like a file folder. You can create folders using Windows or an application program v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

25 Looking at Files and Folders Lesson 11 Another way to think of files and folders is as an inverted hierarchy or tree structure, much like a family tree. At the top level is the Libraries folder. Each level below that may contain more folders and files. Consider the example shown at the right: This structure shows Libraries at the top level with a folder underneath called Documents, and another folder below that called My Documents. This folder is created automatically for every valid user account that can log onto this computer. Within this My Documents folder is a subfolder called Annual Reports, which contains two folders for previous years. Also stored in the Annual Reports are three reports: a Word file called Annual Report 2010 (audited) and two Excel files called FY Budget (Actual) and FY Sales Figures. To tell someone where the August 28 Proposal file is located, you would write it as follows: C:\Documents\My Documents\Annual Reports\Annual Report 2010 (audited).docx This is known as the path because you are stating the exact route to follow to get to the location of this file. The C: indicates the drive where the file is located and the backslash (\) indicates go to this level ; this is followed by each folder name and finally the file name. You can also use the forward slash (/) symbol; Windows will recognize it as performing the same action as the backslash symbol. Notice we did not show Libraries in the path as this is the standard location for the Documents folder. Libraries are actually categories that help gather information about your files and displays them in one location. For instance, the Pictures folder is automatically created by Windows to hold all your pictures in one location; however, as you copy pictures from your digital camera or download them from a friend s Web site, these may be saved with individual folder names. The library groups all these folders containing picture files so you can view them by clicking the Pictures folder. Windows provides you with four libraries as a start: There are no limitations on where you can store a file, or to the number of folders you can create. The only consideration is how many subfolders you require for all the types of files you use. Think again about a filing cabinet where you keep hard copies of your documentation. Keeping all your documents in one folder called Documents could seem simple, but without some kind of organization or hierarchy it could take a lot of time to find any particular file within that folder. On the other hand, you have to be careful not to set up too many different levels as then you will spend all your time drilling down through the levels to find the file you require. There is no one correct method for setting up a filing system on your computer; just be sure to follow the company s standards or create a structure that is logical to you and to others who are sharing the computer. One option is to ensure each person who will be using the system save files in his/her own folder as set up when the person logs on to the computer with his/her own account. If saving files to a network drive where others may share this file, you may need to create your own folder on that drive for you and others to use. The more important your data is, the more crucial it will be for you to have backups or copies. This will protect against potential loss due to theft, fire, or hardware failure. Windows provides a Backup tool, or you can purchase a third-party product to handle this task. If your data is on a network drive, the network administrator will likely have this process set up to occur on a regular basis. However, if you save files to the hard drive on your computer, the network backup does not backup your hard drive and you will need to ensure you put a copy of these working files on the network, or create your own backup. To begin working with files and folders, use one of the following methods: Click Start and then click Computer, or click Start, All Programs, Accessories, and then click Windows Explorer, or click Start, type: expl in the Search box, and click Windows Explorer, or right-click the Start button and click Open Windows Explorer, or press +. Both Computer and Windows Explorer allow you to perform the same functions when managing your files and folders. The only difference is what appears when you start Computer versus Windows Explorer: Computer displays the storage devices in the right pane, whereas Windows Explorer displays the contents of the Library folder or area where you may be storing your work. Unit 2: Using Windows v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 75

26 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 11 1 Navigation Pane 2 Split Bar 3 Contents Pane Looking at Files and Folders Navigation Pane (Expand) (Collapse) Split Bar Contents Pane Displays the Favorites list containing locations you navigate to frequently, Libraries or Folder List where the majority of the files stored on the local drive, and the Computer or Network areas containing all storage devices available to this computer such as the local hard drive, the optical drive, and any network drive(s). Displays more folders or items at this level; you may see several of these arrows depending on the way the structure is set up. Allows you to hide items or collapse the structure at this level; you may see several of these arrows based on the structure set up. Click on and drag this bar to show more or less of the Folders list. Displays all files and folders stored in the selected folder at the left in the Navigation Pane. Files or folders can be saved and displayed anywhere in Windows, including on the Desktop for quick access. Consider the following when viewing files or folders: An icon similar to one of these indicates that a data file or folder is saved in this location. If a data file, the miniature icon in the upper left corner represents the program needed to view or modify the document. The text below the icon is the file or folder name If you delete this icon, you will delete the actual file or folder. A similar icon with a small arrow at the lower left corner represents a shortcut to the location where this data file or folder is saved. The arrow tells you that this is a shortcut only. If you delete this icon from the desktop, only the shortcut is deleted not the actual file. An icon with a program symbol on it indicates that it is a shortcut to an application program file. If you delete this icon, you are only deleting the shortcut, not the actual file that starts the program. Creating Folders You can create folders at any level, including directly on the Windows Desktop. To create a folder, use one of the following methods: On the Command bar, click, or right-click the location (drive or folder) in the Folders list for the new folder, and then click New, Folder, or right-click a blank area of the Contents pane and then click New, Folder v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

27 Looking at Files and Folders Lesson 11 Navigate to the location for the new folder before activating the New Folder command. This is often referred to as the Address bar and displays the path or location as a reminder. Windows does not restrict where you create folders, or whether another folder shares the same name in another location. Keep the folder name unique to prevent accidental deletion or replacement of files and folders. You can rename or move the folder to another location, as appropriate. To create a shortcut to a folder, use one of the following methods: Right-click the location (drive or folder) in the Folders list for the new shortcut, and then click New, Shortcut, or right-click a blank area of the Contents pane and then click New, Shortcut. Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Exercise The following exercises require that you have downloaded the student data files to be used with this content. If you have not already done so, please follow the data file instructions in the Preface before proceeding. 1 From the desktop, double-click the 7310 Student Data folder. Review the screen so you can identify the structure of the folders on the left side of the window. Notice that there are no Collapse arrows displayed in the Folders list. Try creating some folders in different locations. 2 In the Contents pane, double-click Unit 2 - Windows. 3 On the Command bar, click New folder. You should now have a new item in the Contents pane similar to the following: 4 Type your first and last name for the new folder and press. You have just created a new folder within the Unit 2 - Windows folder. The new folder should look similar to this: 5 Double-click your new folder to view the contents (it should be empty). 6 In the Contents pane, right-click to display the shortcut menu, click New, and then click Folder. 7 Type: Personal and press v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 77

28 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 11 Looking at Files and Folders You have just created a new folder that resides within the folder with your name in the Unit 2 - Windows folder. 8 Move up one level by clicking Unit 2 - Windows in the Address bar, as shown in the following: You should now be looking at the contents of your folder. Use the path in the Address bar to help you navigate quickly to a specific location. Alternatively, click the last item to move up one level at a time. Try creating a shortcut to the Student Data folder as a quick method to navigate to the entire set of data files for this courseware. You will create this shortcut inside your new folder. 9 In the Contents pane, right-click to display the shortcut menu, click New, and then click Shortcut. 10 Click the Browse button. 11 If necessary, scroll until you can see the 7310 Student Data folder, click to select it, and then click OK. 12 Click Next. 13 Click Finish to keep the name for this shortcut the same as recommended by Windows. The contents of your folder should appear similar to: Now create some subfolders in your folder. 14 In the Contents pane, right-click, click New, and then Folder. 15 Type: Worksheets as the name of the new folder and press. 16 Repeat steps 14 and 15 to create the Documents, Misc, and Slide Shows folders, as shown: Hint: When adding new folders, be sure to right-click in a blank area of the Contents pane to select New, Folder. If necessary, make the Computer window larger to show a blank area v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

29 Looking at Files and Folders Lesson 11 Renaming a Folder The name of a folder can be as long or short as required (up to 255 characters), although with longer names, the entire title may not be visible in certain views. To change a folder s name, use one of the following methods: Click the folder icon to select it and then press to activate the Edit mode, or click the folder icon, then click inside the folder name to activate the Edit mode, or right-click the folder and then click Rename from the shortcut menu, or on the Command bar, click and then click Rename. Whenever you see the folder name highlighted as shown here, you are in Edit mode. Once the name is highlighted, you can type in a new name for the folder. Alternatively, you can use the mouse pointer or arrow keys to move the cursor to the exact location in the folder name where you would like to insert or delete characters. Exercise Unit 2: Using Windows 7 1 Ensure you are viewing your folder and the items appear in the Contents pane. You will now rename the Documents folder created in the previous exercise to prevent confusion between this folder and the Windows folder that share the same name. 2 Click the Documents folder in the Contents pane to select it. Then point at the name Documents and click once more to activate the Edit mode. 3 Press the key to move quickly to the beginning of the highlighted name. Type: General to rename this folder to General Documents and then press. You have now successfully changed the name of this folder. Changing Folder Options You can change the appearance of the folder to suit your preferences by changing the properties. You can also change the way you view folders and files, and display file types or extensions. To change the properties for a folder, select the folder and on the Command bar, click Folder and search options. and then Browse folders Specifies whether each folder will open in the same window, or in a different window so you can switch between the windows. Click items as follows Provides options on whether to single- or double-click to open items. Navigation pane Choose which folders should appear in the Navigation pane, or if you want Windows to automatically expand the current folder v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 79

30 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 11 Looking at Files and Folders Changing the View There are different ways to display information for files or folders. Occasionally you may want to sort files in a specific order, or to see more information for the files or folders. Select the view options using one of the following methods: Click the arrow of the button on the Command bar, or right-click in a blank area of the Contents pane and then View, or on the Command bar, click the Views button to cycle through the different views. Extra Large Icons Shows files and folders as very large icons, which can be helpful for visually impaired users; file and folder names display below the icon v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

31 Looking at Files and Folders Lesson 11 Large Icons Displays files and folders as large icons with file or folder names below the icon, and is helpful when you want to preview picture files. Medium Icons Displays files and folders as medium-sized icons with the names below the icons, and is helpful when you want an overview of folders or files in a certain location. Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Small Icons Lists files and folders as smaller icons with the names displayed to the right. The main difference between this view and the List view is how the contents are sorted. In this view, the contents are sorted alphabetically in multiple columns from left to right. In the List view, the contents are sorted alphabetically in multiple columns starting with the first column. List Displays the contents of a folder as a list of names preceded by small icons. This view is useful if your folder contains many files and you want to scan the list for a file name. Files and folders can be arranged in the same options as with other views. Details Lists the contents of the open folder and provides detailed information about the files and folders inside it, including name, type, size, and date modified; this view also shows files in groups v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 81

32 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 11 Tiles Displays files and folders as medium-sized icons with the file names to the right of the icon. The file format and file size also display. Contents Displays some of the file s contents. Looking at Files and Folders Whenever you can see the column headings in the Contents pane, you can use these buttons to sort the contents or to manipulate the view further, as follows: To adjust the width of a column, position the mouse pointer over the vertical line at the right of the column you want to adjust; the mouse pointer changes to display (thick cross hair with double horizontal arrows). Click and drag to the left or right to make the column narrower or wider. To sort the contents by item type, click the Type column heading. An arrow symbol means the items are sorted in ascending order (that is, A Z or 0 9); a arrow symbol means the items are sorted in descending order (that is, Z A or 9 0). Viewing the File Extensions You may see file extensions or types such as.doc,.exe,.xlsx,.pdf or.bmp with file names. To keep things simple, the default setting in Windows is to hide file extensions. In general, the icon to the left of the file name is a visual reminder of the software program. Having the extensions display is helpful to see how the file was saved, or to provide a quick method of organizing files (for example, to see which pictures use the.jpg format rather than.gif or.bmp). To display the file extensions at all times for the files, on the Command bar, click. Click Folder and search options and then on the View tab, in the Advanced settings list, uncheck Hide extensions for known file types v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

33 Looking at Files and Folders Lesson 11 When you need to see hidden files, you can uncheck the Hide protected operating systems (Recommended) option. Important files such as system files or the data file for your are hidden to prevent them from being deleted or changed inadvertently. You may need to display these when you are making a backup of these files. Exercise 1 From the Command bar, click and then Folder and search options. 2 On the General tab, in the Click items as follows area, click Single-click to open an item (point to select). 3 Ensure Underline icon titles only when I point at them is selected and then click OK. 4 In the Contents pane, position the mouse pointer over the General Documents folder. Notice that the folder is now highlighted and the name is underlined. This is a visual indicator that you can single-click this folder to open it. Simply pointing to an item selects it, and everything that used to require you to double-click now only requires a single-click. 5 In the Contents pane, point at the Slide Shows folder and then click to open it. 6 Click the (Back) button to return to the previous view. Now set the file extensions to display for all files. 7 On the Command bar, click and then click Folder and search options. 8 Click the View tab and then in the Advanced settings list, click Hide extensions for known file types to turn this feature off. Then click OK. 9 Click the Unit 2 Windows folder in the Address bar. Then the Command bar, click the down arrow for and click Medium Icons. Notice how Windows now displays larger icons for the files and your folder, as well as the file extensions. 10 On the Command bar, click the down arrow for and then click Details. 11 Click the Type column heading to sort the contents by the file type. 12 On the Command bar, click and then click Folder and search options. 13 Click the View tab and then in the Advanced settings area, click Hide extensions for known file types to turn this feature back on. Then click OK. Unit 2: Using Windows v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 83

34 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 11 Looking at Files and Folders The files are now sorted with folders listed first, followed by files alphabetized according to the name of the software program they were created in. 14 Place the mouse pointer on the vertical line between the Name column and the Date modified column. When the mouse pointer turns into a, drag it to adjust the width of the column until you can see the full name for every file. 15 Try changing the view to other styles to see how this affects the view. Make List the last view style you use. Selecting Files or Folders As you work with programs and files, you may need to reorganize your files to find documents quickly. Before performing any actions such as copying, moving, or deleting, you must select the file or folder. Consider the following methods of selecting files or folders: To select one file or folder, point to that file or folder. To select all the files and folders in this location, click and click Select All, or press +. To select multiple files or folders that are consecutive, point to the first file or folder in the list, press and hold the key, and then point to the last file or folder in the list. To select files using the lasso method, point at the right of the first file or folder to be selected, then click and drag up or down to select the rest of the files or folders in the selection. A box will appear as confirmation of the selection, along with the files or folders being highlighted. To select multiple files or folders that are non-consecutive, point to the first file or folder to be selected, press and hold the key, and then point at each file or folder to be selected. At any time files or folders are selected, if you need to change any part of the selection, use either the or key to deselect specific parts of the selection. To de-select or turn off the selection of any files or folders, click anywhere away from the selection. Exercise Every exercise will now use the single-click option for working with files and folders. If your system is not set for this, please go to the previous exercise and perform steps 1 to 3, 11 before proceeding with this exercise. 1 Ensure the Unit 2 - Windows folder is active. 2 In the Contents pane, point the mouse pointer at the first file (the RapidTyping file) to select it, press and then point to the Letter to Henry Warburn file. 3 Click in a blank area of the Contents pane to de-select the list v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

35 Looking at Files and Folders Lesson 11 You will now select files in random order. 4 Position the mouse pointer over the Annual Sales Report file to select it, press and hold the key, and then point at the History of the Internet file. These two files are now selected. 5 Click in a blank area to deselect the list. Now try the lasso technique to select files. 6 Position the mouse pointer over a blank space to the right of the Water Presentation file, and then press the left mouse button as you drag down and slightly to the left of the News with RSS file. Unit 2: Using Windows 7 7 When the files are selected, release the mouse. 8 Click anywhere away from the selection to de-select the list. You will now select all contents in this location. 9 Press Click anywhere away from the selection to de-select the list. Copying and Moving Files or Folders Files or folders may be copied or moved from one drive location to another, from one folder to another, or to the desktop. Use the Folders list to see the hierarchical structure of the folders and subfolders, and to quickly navigate between the different folders or drives. Copying Files or Folders When you copy a file or folder, the original remains in the source location and a copy is placed in the destination location the same information will be in both locations. For example, suppose you want a copy of a file from the network to edit. The new file, with your edits, should be the version everyone in the office uses from now on, so you must make a copy of your file to replace the network copy. To do this, you must first select the files or folders. Then, to copy a file or folder, use one of the following methods: Click and then Copy, navigate to the new location and then click, Paste, or press +, move to the new location and then press +, or right-click the selection and then click Copy, navigate to the new location, right-click and then click Paste, or if you are copying files from one drive to another, Windows will automatically copy the selection as you drag the selection to the new location, or v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 85

36 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 11 Looking at Files and Folders if you are copying files in the same drive, press as you drag the selected file or folder to the new location. As Windows copies the files from the original location to the new one, it will check to see if there are other files with the same name as the one you are copying into this location. If so, you will see a message similar to the screen shown: Always double-check whether you want the new file to be copied over the existing file. You can choose to keep both copies and let Windows create a file with a number at the end of the filename to indicate that it is a copy. In this example, the original file will be named logo.jpg and the copy in the same location will be named logo (2).jpg. Exercise 1 Ensure you are viewing the contents of the Unit 2 - Windows folder. 2 Press + to select everything in this folder. Then press and point at the folder with your name to deselect this folder. 3 On the Command bar, click and then Copy. 4 In the Contents pane, click the the folder with your name. 5 On the Command bar, click and then Paste. The files are now copied from the student data folder to your folder. Moving Files or Folders When you move a file or folder, it physically moves to the destination location. When you move a folder, all the contents in that folder (such as the subfolders and files) move as well. After selecting the files or folders to move, use one of the following methods: Click and then click Cut, move to the new location, click and then click Paste, or press +, move to the new location and then press +, or right-click the selection and then click Cut, move to the new location, right-click, and then click Paste, or drag the selected files or folders to the new location on the same drive. For different drives, Windows will automatically copy the selection unless you press the key as you drag v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

37 Looking at Files and Folders Lesson 11 Exercise 1 Ensure you are in your folder. On the Command bar, click View and then click Details. Click the Type column to sort the files by file format. Hint: Resize the Type column to see 2 Select all the Microsoft Word files and then press +. the names of the programs. 3 In the Contents pane, click the General Documents folder and then press +. The Microsoft Word data files are moved to this folder. 4 Click your folder in the Address bar, and then repeat step 3 moving the Microsoft Excel files into Worksheets, Microsoft PowerPoint files into Slide Shows, and the remaining data files into the Misc folder. Your folder should then display the folders and shortcut only, as all files are organized into appropriate folders. Suppose you now want to move your folder to another location, which in this case will be Documents. 5 Click Unit 2 Windows in the Address bar to go to this level, then click and drag your folder so it hovers over Documents in the Libraries area. Unit 2: Using Windows 7 6 Release the mouse when Documents highlights as seen in the above screen. You have now successfully moved your folder to Documents. Now move it back to where the data files are. 7 In the Folders list, click Documents and then click the Expand arrow for My Documents. 8 Select your folder in the Contents pane and press +. For this demonstration, we have chosen to use the shortcut keys to move the folder back as there is no visible folder in the Navigation pane for your student data files. In a situation like this, it is recommended you use another method other than click and drag to move a file or folder to another location. 9 Under Favorites, click Desktop and then in the Contents pane, click 7310 Student Data. 10 In the Contents pane, click Unit 2 Windows and then press + to paste your folder into this location. Renaming Files or Folders You can rename a file or folder to make it more descriptive. Whenever you see a black line around the name of a file or folder, this means you are in Edit mode and can now change the text shown in the box. Edit mode can be activated either by pressing the key or by clicking once inside a selected file or folder name. Remember the two limitations for file or folder naming conventions: a maximum of 255 characters; and the following characters \ / : * < > cannot be used in the file or folder name. Be very careful not to rename any program files or folders and ensure you keep the same extension for the file. Otherwise, Windows will display an error message indicating the file type is not recognizable and may not be accessible if you accept the new name v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 87

38 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 11 Looking at Files and Folders To activate the Rename feature using single-click, use one of the following methods: Point at the file or folder to select it and then press. Right-click the file or folder and then click Rename. To activate the Rename feature using double-click, use one of the following methods: Click the file or folder to select it, and then press. Click the file or folder to select it, and then click once in the file or folder name. Right-click the file or folder and then click Rename. Exercise 1 In the Unit 2 Windows folder, click your folder and then click the Misc folder. 2 In the Contents pane, point at the logo file to select it and press. 3 Click at the beginning of the file name, type: TEC (include a space) and then press. The file is now renamed as TEC logo and is now listed again alphabetically. 4 Point at the Sales and Revenue Report file to select it. 5 Right-click and then click Rename. 6 Double-click the word and, type: & (include a space) and press. The file is renamed. Viewing File or Folder Properties Each file or folder has a property sheet you can use to determine the size, when it was created, last modified, or last accessed. The number of tabs that appear when viewing the properties for a file or folder depend on the folder and file type, or the network connection and access rights. To display the properties for a file or folder, use one of the following methods: Select the file or folder, then on the Command bar, click and click Properties, or right-click the file or folder and then click Properties. Viewing Folder Properties General Displays information such as the type, location, size, contents, date information, and attributes such as read-only or hidden. Sharing Allows you to share the folder and files with other users on your network. Security Shows who on your network has access rights to this folder and the type of rights they are assigned; you can change the rights for your own user ID, but only the network administrator can change rights for other people who share this file or folder. Previous Versions Displays copies of the file created by a Windows backup as part of a restore point. Customize Allows you to select or change options for how the folder appears, such as changing the folder icon v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

39 Looking at Files and Folders Lesson 11 Viewing File Properties General Displays information such as file type, location, size, date created, date last modified, date last accessed, and attributes such as read-only or hidden. Security Displays who has access rights to this file; to add people who can share this file, check with your network administrator. Details Displays a list of general information about the file such as who the author was, keywords that can be used to search for this file, when it was created, total number of words in this document, and so on. Previous Versions Displays copies of the file created by a Windows backup as part of a restore point. Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Exercise 1 In the Address bar, click your folder. 2 Right-click the Worksheets folder and then click Properties. 3 Take a few moments to scan the contents of each tab in this dialog box. 4 On the Customize tab, click Change Icon in the Folder icons area. 5 Scroll through the selection of icons, click one. Then click OK. 6 Click Cancel to exit the folder properties. Notice how Windows does not change anything as you chose to cancel this task. 7 Click the Worksheets folder, right-click the Department Budget file, and then click Properties. 8 Click the Details tab v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 89

40 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 11 Looking at Files and Folders 9 Position the mouse cursor to the right of Title and, when the text field box appears, click in the box and type: Sales Department Budget. 10 In the Tags field box, type: yearly budget and then click OK to exit the file properties. You should notice that the file name does not change but the details you entered for the file now appear at the bottom in the Details pane. Finding Files You can search for a file or folder in various disk drives or folders on your system using specific criteria, such as name, type, size, date created, date last modified, and so on. To activate the Search feature, enter the search criteria in. Click the in the Search field to clear all search results. Exercise 1 Click the General Documents folder in your folder. 2 Click in the Search field and type: letter v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

41 Looking at Files and Folders Lesson 11 Notice that, as you begin entering the text, Windows displays any file it finds that matches the criteria, including any subfolders within your folder. Windows also displays a new folder in the Folders list confirming the search it made for the specified folder. For example:. Now try performing a different search. 3 Click in the Search field and then click to clear the search results. 4 In the Search field, click in the field and then click Date modified. Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Note: To move from one month to another, click the appropriate arrow on either side of the current month. 5 Click A long time ago. 6 Click to clear the search results. 7 Close Windows Explorer v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 91

42 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 11 Summary Looking at Files and Folders In this lesson, you looked at the different ways files or folders display and how to manipulate them. You should now be familiar with: what a file or folder is how to recognize a file or folder on the desktop how to recognize the drives available selecting files or folders moving files or folders copying files or folders Review Questions changing the view for drives, files or folders how to create, customize or change a folder s properties renaming files or folders viewing file or folder properties finding files 1. A data file can be any type of document containing information you have entered and saved. a. True b. False 2. How can showing the path for a folder or file be helpful? a. It tells you which drive the file or folder is stored in. b. It tells you whether the file or folder is stored on a network. c. It tells you the name of the folder and how many levels you must go through to get to it. d. Any of the above 3. An item on the desktop that has an arrow on the lower left corner is a shortcut to the actual file location. a. True b. False 4. There is no difference between copying and moving files or folders. a. True b. False 5. Why might you want to change the details for a file s properties? a. To add more information to help find the file b. To change or update the name of the file c. To prevent anyone else from looking at the file contents d. Any of the above e. Only a or b v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

43 Using the Recycle Bin Lesson 12 Lesson 12 Objectives Using the Recycle Bin In this lesson, you will look at how to delete files or folders to the Recycle Bin and how to restore deleted items. You will also look at some ways to help resolve problems you may have with files or folders. On completion, you will be familiar with: deleting files or folders what the Recycle Bin is restoring files from the Recycle Bin emptying the Recycle Bin identifying common problems with accessing files Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Skills Manipulate desktop folders and icons/shortcuts Manage files Identify precautions one should take when manipulating files Solve common problems associated with working with files Looking at the Recycle Bin The Recycle Bin is a temporary storage area for files and folders that you delete from the local hard disk. Files and folders deleted from an external disk (such as a flash drive, memory card, or virtual storage device) or from a network drive are permanently deleted and cannot be restored from the Recycle Bin. The Recycle Bin has an icon on the desktop for easy access, but is also accessible from the file management tools Windows Explorer and Computer. The Recycle Bin can look like either of the following: Indicates there is something in the Recycle Bin that can be restored or emptied. Indicates the Recycle Bin is empty. If the computer is shared by multiple users, a separate Recycle Bin exists for each user who is set up on this computer. To permanently delete a file and bypass the Recycle Bin, press and hold the key while deleting the file. Deleting Files and Folders When you no longer need files or folders, or want to save disk space, delete these items. Always check the contents of a folder before you delete the entire folder. This is especially crucial if the folder was stored on a network drive or external disk, as they are not moved to the Recycle Bin. To delete a file or folder, select the required file or folder and then use one of the following methods: Click and then Delete, or select the file or folder and then press, or right-click and click Delete, or drag the item to the Recycle Bin folder v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 93

44 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 12 Using the Recycle Bin Exercise 1 Click the Misc folder in the your folder to open it, point at the IC3 Web Site file and then press. 2 Click Yes to delete this file. 3 Right-click the Misc folder in the Folders list and then click Delete. Click Yes to confirm the deletion. The entire folder was deleted, including the files that were still in that folder. Restoring a File or Folder You can restore a deleted file or folder to its original location. You can only restore the entire folder, including its contents. To restore a file or folder from within the Recycle Bin feature, use one of the following methods: Select the file or folder to be restored, and then click, or to restore multiple files or folders, select the appropriate files or folders, and then click, or if you want to restore all items, click, or right-click the selected files or folders, and then click Restore. Exercise 1 On the desktop, open the Recycle Bin. 2 Select the Misc folder, and then on the Command bar, click. 3 Point at the IC3 Web Site file, and then on the Command bar, click. 4 In Windows Explorer, navigate to your folder. The Misc folder appears in the Contents list. 5 Click Misc to see which files are stored here. Emptying the Recycle Bin Deleted files remain in the Recycle Bin until you empty it or it is full; in the latter case, Windows will automatically delete older files and folders to free up enough space for new items. When a file or folder is deleted from the Recycle Bin, they are permanently deleted. To empty the Recycle Bin, use one of the following methods: On the Command bar, click, or right-click in a blank area of the Recycle Bin window and click Empty Recycle Bin, or right-click the Recycle Bin icon on the desktop and then click Empty Recycle Bin. Use this option only when you are sure that you will not want to restore anything from the Recycle Bin v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

45 Using the Recycle Bin Lesson 12 Exercise 1 In Windows Explorer, right-click your folder and press. 2 Click Yes. 3 At the far right of the taskbar, click Show Desktop, and then click the Recycle Bin to open it. 4 On the Command bar, click. Unit 2: Using Windows 7 5 Click Yes. Notice the Contents pane is now blank, and the Recycle Bin icon on the Desktop is also empty. 6 Close Windows Explorer. Identifying Common Problems with Files When working with files, you may occasionally encounter a problem accessing, using, or finding a file. Following are some ways to identify problems and resolve issues: Use a standard naming convention when saving files. Try to ensure each file name is unique and do not overwrite any files unless you are sure you do not need the original version. Try to adhere to any file management standards that have been set so others can find files and folders easily. For instance, if you are working with several files saved on your hard drive, on completion move the files to the appropriate folders on the network so that others can access them. If you display the file extensions or file types with the file names, be careful not to change these extensions or, if you rename the file, be careful to type the file extension correctly. Also when renaming files, keep in mind the characters you cannot use. When moving files, be careful in selecting the appropriate file. You may want to use a method other than dragging to prevent accidentally moving something that should not be moved. When you need a file on a portable storage device such as a memory card, consider copying it from the hard drive to the storage device. This ensures that you have a copy of the original as well as one on the storage device in case you lose the portable device or it does not work. Always delete files to the Recycle Bin if there is a possibility you may need them at a later date. This may also include copying a file from a network drive to your hard drive, which will then move the file into the Recycle Bin if you delete it at a later date. Carefully read any error messages Windows displays about files before closing that message. This will help identify what could be causing problems with accessing that file. For example, if you cannot access a file, or if you can only view the list of files in that location but cannot open them, read the message to determine if the file exists. If the message indicates the file no longer exists in this location, perform a search for the file to see if it was moved or renamed v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 95

46 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 12 Using the Recycle Bin If you see an error message indicating that you are low on space on the hard drive, first delete data files you do not need or use. Then uninstall any application programs you no longer use. Be very careful with this option and choose only those application programs you recognize. Do not uninstall a program if you do not recognize the program name; always check with a technical specialist before attempting any further action. Be very careful when using passwords with confidential or sensitive files; ensure you choose a password that is logical but not easy to guess. You will see an error message if an incorrect password is entered. If you cannot make changes to a file, it is likely the file has been set to read-only status. Depending on how this attribute was set, you can turn it off by de-selecting it in the file s properties. Some programs provide the ability to apply this feature to files (such as PDF files); if that is the case, you will not be able to change this attribute without having a password or using the correct program. A file set as read-only usually indicates this when you try to open it. There is no absolute method to prevent your files from being corrupted. Corruption can occur due to hardware failure, power surges, software or hardware incompatibilities, software issues, or viruses. If the error message indicates the file may be corrupted, try opening the file on another computer to see if you can duplicate the message. It may be a problem with the hardware and not the actual file. For instance, if you can open a file from a USB memory key on another system, it may be that the USB port on your system is not working correctly. Hidden files can display onscreen when you change the options for the folders. Be very careful when using this option and consider changing these files back to hidden status once you have completed the necessary actions, such as backing them up. A message similar to the following means Windows cannot find a program on your system that will automatically accept or open this file, perhaps because you do not have the software installed: In most cases, choose another program that is already installed on your system to try and open this file. If you are unsure which program to use, check with your network administrator or a technical specialist prior to selecting a program in this dialog box v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

47 Using the Recycle Bin Lesson 12 Summary In this lesson, you looked at how to delete files to the Recycle Bin and how to restore deleted files. You also looked at some ways to help resolve problems you may have with files. You should now be familiar with: deleting files or folders what the Recycle Bin is restoring files from the Recycle Bin Review Questions emptying the Recycle Bin identifying some common problems with accessing files 1. The Recycle Bin is a temporary storage area for files and folders that have been deleted from the hard drive. a. True b. False 2. When you empty the Recycle Bin, you can still restore these files or folders. a. True b. False 3. Always be careful when renaming a file that displays a file type or file extension to ensure you do not accidentally change the file to become unrecognizable to a program in Windows. a. True b. False 4. How can corruption of a file occur? a. Virus b. Hardware Failure c. Power Surges d. Software Issues e. Any of the above f. b or c 5. An error message indicating the system cannot associate the file with a program means you do not have a software program that can open that file type. a. True b. False Unit 2: Using Windows v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 97

48 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 13 Lesson 13 Objectives Customizing the System Settings Customizing System Settings In this lesson, you will learn how to use the Control Panel to customize the appearance or behavior of different system options. On completion, you will be familiar with: what the Control Panel is changing or customizing the desktop display changing the date or time changing or customizing mouse settings changing or customizing multimedia devices working with printers installed on your system Skills Display control panels/system preferences Identify different control panel/system preference settings Change simple settings Display and update a list of installed printers Identify precautions regarding changing system settings Using the Control Panel The Control Panel is the area in Windows where you can access features to either install or customize the settings for devices on your system. Use one of the following methods to access the Control Panel: Click Start, Control Panel; or in Windows Explorer, click Computer in the Navigation pane, then click in the Command bar v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

49 Customizing the System Settings Lesson 13 System and Maintenance Security Network and Internet Hardware and Sound Programs Mobile PC User Accounts Appearance and Personalization Clock, Language, and Region Ease of Access Additional Options Provides options for maintaining system integrity and performing data backups. Provides options for security purposes such as checking for antivirus updates and scanning downloads. Allows you to set up or modify how your system connects to a network or the Internet, and to share files with others. Enables you to set up or modify the way hardware items such as sound devices will work. Provides access to system management tasks such as installing and uninstalling programs. Provides options for managing your notebook such as how long the screen display should continue in battery mode. Provides options for setting the computer up to be used by more than one person. Allows you to customize your screen with screen savers, desktop backgrounds, and so on. Provides access so you can change dates, times, currency, or numbers to reflect regional standards or languages. Provides options for changing accessibility specifications, such as turning on voice recognition or altering visual displays. Allows you to set or modify requirements for additional software installed on your machine, such as QuickTime or special monitor drivers. Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Some of the more commonly used features in Control Panel include changing options for the: desktop background date or time screen saver sounds that accompany specific actions in Windows mouse or keyboard audio volume If you prefer to see icons for Control Panel items, you can switch the display to the Large icons or Small icons: v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 99

50 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 13 Customizing the System Settings The Control Panel has a number of features that you should not use unless you are very comfortable with the computer. Be sure you fully understand what each option can do and when you might want to use it before attempting any changes. If you choose not to work with someone who has advanced knowledge, record the original settings before making any changes so that you will have the option of returning to them if the changes you make do not work. For example, if you change the device driver for an output device such as a printer, be sure to record what the original device driver was in case the printer does not work after you make a change. This is very important if you choose to change any of the security options such as the firewall or for the Internet. Note that, because some of these features can affect how the computer works, they may be deactivated and therefore will not display on the Control Panel. Your network administrator will set access to these features according to organization standards. For example, a school administrator may allow students to customize the background for the system but the User Accounts feature never appears in the Control Panel window, or a retail store may set the background so that it will always display the company logo and cannot be changed in the Control Panel. Customizing the Desktop Display Customizing the desktop display includes changing the background, screen saver, desktop appearance, or screen resolution. To change the display, use one of the following options: Click Start, Control Panel, Appearance and Personalization, Personalization or right-click a blank area of the desktop, click Personalize, and then click the display option to change, or if in one of the icon views, click Personalization in the Control Panel window. Exercise 1 Right-click a blank area of the desktop, and click Personalize. 2 Click Desktop Background v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

51 Customizing the System Settings Lesson 13 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 3 Click the Picture location field and then click Solid Colors. Pick a light color such as the light grey in the first row. Click Save changes. The background, behind the Personalization window, should have changed to the color you ve chosen. 4 Click Screen Saver. 5 Click the arrow for the Screen saver field and click Bubbles. Windows displays a preview of this screen saver. Take note that some screen savers are transparent such as this one, which still shows what you were working on before the screen saver activated. 6 Ensure the Wait time is 1 minute. Click OK. 7 Do not touch your mouse for at least 1 minute so you can view the screen saver. 8 Close the Personalization window v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 101

52 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 13 Changing the Date and Time Customizing the System Settings By default, the current time displays in the notification area; when you hover the mouse pointer over the time, a screen tip also displays the current date. The operating system uses the date and time settings to identify when you create or modify files. These date and time settings are obtained from a battery-operated clock inside the computer (its internal clock), which should be current. If you are connected to a network, the time may be determined by the server and only the network administrator can change it permanently. If you are connected to the Internet, it will also synchronize its clock with a time server on the Internet. You can set this by selecting the Internet Time tab in the Date and Time window. To view the current date and time, click the time in the notification area: You can change the date or time using one of the following methods: Click Start, Control Panel, Clock, Language, and Region, and then click Date and Time or Set the time and date, or if in an icon view, click Start, Control Panel, and then click Date and Time, or click the time in the notification area and then click Change date and time settings. Date and Time Additional Clocks Changes the existing time and date, or the existing time zone. Displays additional clocks in the notification area so you can see the time in different parts of the world v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

53 Customizing the System Settings Lesson 13 Exercise 1 Click the time in the notification area and then click Change date and time settings. 2 Click the Additional Clocks tab. Unit 2: Using Windows 7 3 Click the first Show this clock option to turn it on and then change the time zone to somewhere far away from your current location. 4 In the Enter display name field, type a large city for that time zone, such as Seattle, Toronto, Edinburgh, or Beijing. 5 Click OK. 6 Point at the time in the notification area. 7 Click the time in the notification area and then click Change date and time settings. 8 Click the Additional Clocks tab and then click Show this clock to turn this clock off. Click OK. Customizing the Mouse You can customize features for the mouse such as the double-click speed, motion speed, or mouse pointers. These options will vary based on the type of mouse or pointing device installed. Another reason you may need to customize the mouse would be if you have a new pointing device or need to update the device driver for your existing one. To make these changes, use one of the following methods: Click Start, Control Panel, Hardware and Sound, and under Devices and Printers, click Mouse, and then click Change mouse pointers, or right-click anywhere on the desktop, click Personalize, and then click Change mouse pointers v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 103

54 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 13 Customizing the System Settings If you are using a notebook without a mouse, you may have an additional tab to customize the glide pad or touchpad included with the notebook. The number of tabs or options available depend on the type of mouse you have connected and installed. Exercise 1 Click Start, Control Panel, Hardware and Sound, Mouse. 2 On the Buttons tab, drag the Double Click Speed slider slightly towards the Fast side, and then doubleclick the picture of the folder to test the speed. Drag the slider towards the left for the Double Click Speed, and then double-click the folder again to test the speed. 3 Click the Pointers tab. Hint: Take note of the settings before proceeding with the following steps as you will be asked to reset them to the original settings at the end of the exercise. 4 In the Scheme area, click the down arrow, scroll through the list of schemes, and select one. 5 Click the Pointer Options tab. 6 In the Motion area, slow the mouse speed by dragging the slider slightly to the left, and then click Apply. 7 In the Motion area, increase the mouse speed by dragging the slider slightly to the right, and then click Apply. 8 Move the mouse around and notice the mouse pointer and mouse motion. Adjust the slider until you find the desired speed, and then click Apply. 9 Under Snap To, place a check mark next to Automatically move pointer to the default button in a dialog box. Click OK. 10 Click, Mouse. Notice that the mouse pointer s default position is over the OK button. 11 Following steps 4 to 9, return the mouse options to the previous settings. Then click OK. 12 Close the Control Panel window v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

55 Customizing the System Settings Lesson 13 Customizing the Keyboard If you have a different keyboard than the one provided with the computer, such as a secondary cordless keyboard for your notebook, or a keyboard for a different language, you can customize it to suit your needs. Windows provides options to assist users with special needs when they are entering information or troubleshooting keyboard problems. To customize the keyboard, using one of the icon views, click Start, Control Panel, Hardware and Sound, Keyboard. If using the category view, type keyboard in the Search field, click, and click Keyboard. The type and number of options that appear in this dialog box may vary depending on the type of keyboard you have installed on your system. Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Exercise 1 Click Start, Control Panel, Hardware and Sound, Keyboard. 2 Click the Speed tab, if not already active. Select the speed at which you want the keys to react when held down. You can also set the speed for the cursor in a text field or application program. 3 Drag the slider arrow in the Repeat rate field to halfway on the slider. 4 In the Click here and hold down a key to test repeat rate, press and hold the key. How did you find the speed? Was it too slow for you? 5 Drag the slider arrow in the Repeat rate field to your preference. 6 Drag the slider arrow in the Cursor blink rate to two notches before the Fast end. 7 Click on Apply to set this speed. 8 Click the Hardware tab. Use this to see if your keyboard is working properly. If not, click the Properties button to see the driver associated with this keyboard and then use the Change Settings button. 9 Click OK to leave the keyboard options. 10 Close the Control Panel window v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 105

56 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 13 Changing the Volume Customizing the System Settings If your system has a sound card and speakers hooked up, a (speaker) icon appears in the notification area. When you point at this icon, it displays a screen indicating where the volume level is currently set. To display the volume window, click the icon. To adjust the volume when playing sounds or to mute any sounds, click this icon and drag the slider up or down. To change or set more options, click the sound icon and then click Mixer. You can also go to the Sound feature in the Hardware and Sound area of the Control Panel, select the speaker device you want to customize, and adjust the volume level or other options for your speakers v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

57 Customizing the System Settings Lesson 13 Depending on the type of microphone, use the Recording tab to set up how to record sounds on your computer. Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Also in the Sounds tab, you can apply sounds to certain Windows events v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 107

58 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 13 Use the Communications tab to set the volume for other sounds if you are using the PC to make or receive telephone calls. Customizing the System Settings Exercise The following exercise assumes that a sound device is installed on your system and you can hear the sounds. If not, simply review the following steps for what can be done with sound devices. 1 Click Start, Control Panel, Hardware and Sound, Sound. 2 Click the default sound device in the list and then click Configure. Depending on your speakers, you may be able to use this option to configure how and where the speakers sound. We will not go further here as this is a demonstration only. 3 Click Cancel. 4 Ensure the speaker type is still selected in the list and then click Properties. 5 Click each of the tabs to see what options are available for your speakers, how they were set up, and how they could be changed. 6 Click Cancel. 7 In the Sound window, click the Sounds tab. 8 Ensure Windows Default is selected in the Sound Scheme field. 9 In the Program Events area, click Critical Stop to select it. 10 Click the Test button to hear the sound. 11 Click the icon in the taskbar and increase the volume level. 12 Click Test again to hear the sound. 13 Scroll down the list until you see Exit Windows and select it. 14 Click Test to hear the sound. 15 Click OK to exit the Sound window. 16 Close the Control Panel window v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

59 Customizing the System Settings Lesson 13 Accessibility Settings If you have devices installed on the computer to assist a person with physical disabilities, use the Ease of Access Center option to customize these devices. Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Click the option in this window to customize the device to your requirements. Security Settings Windows 7 includes a number of settings for security purposes, such as firewall protection, antispyware software, and program updates. You can make changes to each of these options as appropriate; if you are unsure about any of them, work with a technical specialist or record the settings before making any changes so that you can revert to the original settings if your changes don t work. To activate security options, use one of the following: Click Start, Control Panel, System and Security, Action Center, or click Start, in the search field, type: security and then click Check security status v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 109

60 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 13 Exercise Customizing the System Settings The following exercise is only a demonstration of what can be changed. You will not change the actual settings as these will vary from one computer to another. 1 Click Start, Control Panel, System and Security, and then Action Center. 2 Click the down arrow for Security. The number and type of options available depends on what has been installed and updated on the system you are using. 3 Read the information shown here and then click the up arrow to close this box. 4 Click the down arrow for the Maintenance option. 5 View some of the other options to see what may need to be set up on your computer. 6 Close the Action Center window. 7 Close the Control Panel window. Looking at Printers When you print a document, the software program or Windows sends the document to print in the background so you can continue to work on that document, other documents in the same program, or with different programs. Once a document has been sent to print, you can use the print queue to check the printing status of documents or to cancel a print request. To view the printers available, click Start, Control Panel, and listed below the Hardware and Sound option, click View devices and printers. Note: The number and type of devices or printers depend on what has been set up on your system. The printer with the check mark is the default printer; all documents print on this printer unless otherwise specified. To change this, right-click the printer in the list you want to be the default and then click Set as Default Printer. To see what may be printing or what is in the queue to be printed, use one of the following methods: Select the printer and then on the toolbar, click, or click the printer to view its status. You can add a printer using printer., which prompts you with screens for each step required to add a new Each printer is slightly different, with some offering more options than others. The quality may also vary with each printer. To check the features of a printer, use one of the following methods: Right-click the selected printer and then click Printing Preferences, or right-click the selected printer and then click Properties v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

61 Customizing the System Settings Lesson 13 Exercise 1 Click Start, Control Panel, and in the Hardware and Sound option, click View devices and printers. 2 Right-click the printer set as your default printer and then click Properties. 3 Review the options available for your printer. When complete, close the dialog boxes. Summary In this lesson, you looked at how to use the Control Panel to customize the appearance or behavior of different system options. You should now be familiar with: what the Control Panel is changing or customizing the desktop display changing the date or time changing or customizing mouse settings changing or customizing multimedia devices working with printers installed on your system Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Review Questions 1. How can you access the Control Panel? a. From the Start menu b. From a file management tool c. By pressing + d. Any of the above e. Only a or b 2. If you cannot access certain commands in Control Panel, what is the most likely cause? a. You do not have access rights to these commands. b. You have selected the wrong command. c. Windows has restricted your access based on what you used last. d. Any of the above 3. The date and time on a computer is determined by the internal clock of the computer, which can be controlled by the network. a. True b. False 4. Reasons why you might want to change the options for the mouse include: a. You have a new mouse with customizable buttons. b. You need to change or update the mouse driver. c. You want to decrease the speed of the double-click action. d. Any of the above e. a or b 5. To view which options are available for your printer, which option would you use? a. Printing Preferences b. See what s printing c. Properties d. Default Printer e. Any of the above f. a or c v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 111

62 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 14 Lesson 14 Objectives Installing and Uninstalling Programs Installing and Uninstalling Programs In this lesson, you will look at how to manage application programs, and specifically how to install and uninstall programs. On completion, you will be familiar with: how to install a new program what to do if the new program doesn t work how to uninstall a program Skills Install and uninstall software Identify and troubleshoot common problems associated with installing and running applications Managing Application Programs Windows guides you through the process for installing and removing programs. Before you install a program, check your system to see if that program is already installed. If so, it may have been customized and, if you reinstall it, the customization may be lost. If a program that you re sure has been installed on your computer does not appear in the Start menu, it may be a result of the way it was installed previously or it may have been deleted from the Start menu. Use the Programs and Features command in the Programs category of the Control Panel to check if the program is on the list v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

63 Installing and Uninstalling Programs Lesson 14 Installing a New Program You can install programs from a number of different sources such as a hard drive, an optical drive, a USB drive, or the Internet. How you purchase the software will determine the installation process. Some programs will automatically start the install when you insert the CD or DVD; this is the case if there is an Autorun file included with the installation program, which will lead you through a step-by-step installation process. Other programs may require you to start the installation process yourself. Programs from the Internet fall into one of two categories: either you can download the program file for installation, or you can subscribe to a software as a service (SaaS) option with the software vendor. Either option entitles you to updates just as if you purchased the software on some physical type of media, such as a CD. One consideration with software from any source is to make a backup or copy of the original. As the licensed owner of that software, you are allowed to make one copy for backup purposes. You may want to use the backup copy to install the software so that you can keep the original media intact and store it in a safe location. Software can be costly and it makes sense to protect your investment. If you are downloading software from the Internet, always save it and scan it for viruses prior to installing it. It is rare that software from a reputable vendor will have problems; however, if you download software from a site that is not the vendor s official Web site, there could be spyware or viruses included in the download file. When the software vendor notifies you of updates to the program, these updates usually are not critical for you to install immediately; however, be sure to read the notice to decide whether you want to install the update. You might receive notices from the vendor in one of the following ways: an with a link to the Web site where you can download the update to your system. a CD or other media that you can install much the same way as you installed the program initially. a command, button, or link in the program that enables you to check for updates. (Usually this option links you to the vendor s Web site; once activated, a check for updates begins and a list of update options is displayed, from which you can choose what you want to install.) Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Exercise The program used here provides an example for installing and uninstalling a program. This is not an endorsement for any program but merely a demonstration of how software programs can be installed. When performing this exercise, check with your instructor regarding any warnings that may appear about the User Account Control or the need for an administrator to log in and provide you with access. 1 Navigate to the data files location and then click the RapidTyping_Setup_2.9 file. 2 Click Next. Always read the full license so you are aware of your rights and what you can do with this program. With some application programs such as shareware, the software vendor will make the program available to you for use but also include items such as add-on toolbars, or advertisements as a way to pay for the time and effort in creating this program. You may see the choice to install these, or they may automatically be part of the installation. The intent here is that once you purchase a valid license of the program, the additional items will no longer appear. 3 Read the license agreement and then click I Agree. Be sure to read what options come with the program during the installation as you may not want all these installed. For instance, if the only language you plan to use is English, you may not want to install all the different language files. 4 Click Next to accept the defaults here. This Choose Install Location screen confirms where the program will be installed on your system. If an earlier version of the program already exists on your system and you want to keep it in addition to the new program, change the location shown here. You can also type in a new folder that the program will then create for you. 5 Click Next to accept the default shown here v CCI Learning Solutions Inc. 113

64 Unit 2: Using Windows 7 Lesson 14 Installing and Uninstalling Programs The Choose Start Menu Folder screen provides the option to enter a new name for the program if you do not want the default provided. This is what will appear in the Start menu once the program has finished installing. 6 Click Install to begin the process. 7 Click View Homepage to deselect this and then click Finish. You will now set up options for how this program will work on your system. Notice how in keeping the Language Files option selected in step 5 you now see the different languages available with this program. 8 Select the language you want to use (we will use English in our example) and then click Next. 9 Enter your name as the person who will be using this program and then click Next. You can then choose from the type of keyboard you have connected on your system. 10 Select the correct keyboard type for your system (we are using Type #1) and then click Next. You can choose how much animation you want to appear as you work with this program. 11 Leave the default as is and then click Next. With this program, you can now choose whether you are tested on words per minute or characters per minute. 12 Leave the default as shown and then click Finish. The install is now complete and the program is ready for you to use. 13 Click Close to exit this program. Now try installing a program from an online source. In this case, you will download and install a gadget to the Sidebar for Windows Click Start, All Programs and then click Internet Explorer. 15 In the Address Bar, type: US/windows7/products/features/gadgets and press. 16 Scroll to the bottom of the page and then click the gadgets for Windows 7 link. 17 Click Piano in the list. 18 In the new page for this gadget, click Download and then Install v CCI Learning Solutions Inc.

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