Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security Performance Audit

Save this PDF as:

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security Performance Audit"

Transcription

1 Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security Performance Audit November 2011 Office of the Auditor Audit Services Division City and County of Denver Dennis J. Gallagher Auditor

2 The Auditor of the City and County of Denver is independently elected by the citizens of Denver. He is responsible for examining and evaluating the operations of City agencies for the purpose of ensuring the proper and efficient use of City resources and providing other audit services and information to City Council, the Mayor and the public to improve all aspects of Denver s government. He also chairs the City s Audit Committee. The Audit Committee is chaired by the Auditor and consists of seven members. The Audit Committee assists the Auditor in his oversight responsibilities of the integrity of the City s finances and operations, including the integrity of the City s financial statements. The Audit Committee is structured in a manner that ensures the independent oversight of City operations, thereby enhancing citizen confidence and avoiding any appearance of a conflict of interest. Audit Committee Dennis Gallagher, Chair Maurice Goodgaine Jeffrey Hart Timothy O Brien Robert Bishop Robert Haddock Bonney Lopez Audit Staff John Carlson, Deputy Director, CIA Sonia Montano, Internal Audit Supervisor, CGAP, CICA Rudy Lopez, Lead Internal Auditor Emily Gibson, Senior Auditor, M.S. You can obtain free copies of this report by contacting us at: Office of the Auditor 201 West Colfax Avenue, Department 705 Denver CO, (720) Fax (720) Or download and view an electronic copy by visiting our website at:

3 City and County of Denver 201 West Colfax Avenue, Department 705 Denver, Colorado FAX Dennis J. Gallagher Auditor Mr. Scott Field, Director Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security City and County of Denver Dear Mr. Field: November 17, 2011 Attached is the Auditor s Office Audit Services Division s performance audit report of the Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security. The purpose of the audit was to evaluate the preparedness of the City and County of Denver for emergency situations. We evaluated current policies, procedures, and responses to functional exercises and incidents in We determined whether necessary internal controls are in place and functional under the circumstances. Being prepared for unforeseen situations and emergencies is a major responsibility of government. Recent events across the nation have highlighted what can happen when local communities do not have essential activities identified and when agencies do not communicate well in times of crisis. Our audit determined that the Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security is committed to emergency preparedness and has built a strong centralized function in terms of developing an Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) for the City and building relationships with stakeholders. However, the ability to execute the EOP is at risk in a few areas. The finding and recommendations presented in this report have identified areas for improvement. If you have any questions, please call Kip Memmott, Director of Audit Services, at Sincerely, Dennis J. Gallagher Auditor DJG/sam cc: Honorable Michael Hancock, Mayor Honorable Members of City Council Members of Audit Committee Ms. Janice Sinden, Chief of Staff Ms. Stephanie O Malley, Deputy Chief of Staff Ms. Cary Kennedy, Chief Financial Officer Mr. Doug Friednash, City Attorney Mr. L. Michael Henry, Staff Director, Board of Ethics Ms. Beth Machann, Controller To promote open, accountable, efficient and effective government by performing impartial reviews and other audit services that provide objective and useful information to improve decision making by management and the people. We will monitor and report on recommendations and progress towards their implementation.

4 City and County of Denver Dennis J. Gallagher Auditor 201 West Colfax Avenue, Department 705 Denver, Colorado FAX AUDITOR S REPORT We have completed a performance audit of the Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security. The purpose of the audit was to evaluate the preparedness of the City and County of Denver for emergency situations and to identify possible inefficiencies and opportunities for improvement. This performance audit is authorized pursuant to the City and County of Denver Charter, Article V, Part 2, Section 1, General Powers and Duties of Auditor, and was conducted in accordance with generally accepted government auditing standards. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain sufficient, appropriate evidence to provide a reasonable basis for our findings and conclusions based on our audit objectives. We believe that the evidence obtained provides a reasonable basis for our findings and conclusions based on our audit objectives. Effective emergency preparedness, response, and recovery require coordinated planning and actions by various internal and external stakeholders including federal, state, and local government agencies. Understanding these responsibilities and ensuring that best practices are followed is critical for saving lives, protecting infrastructure and property, and minimizing costs from natural or man-made disasters. The audit revealed that the Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security (OEMHS) is committed to emergency preparedness and has built a strong centralized function in terms of developing an Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) for the City and building relationships with stakeholders. However, our audit determined that the ability to execute the EOP is at risk in the following three areas: how the City prioritizes and understands emergency responsibilities; uncertainty surrounding future OEMHS funding; and unclear structures for tracking resources during emergency situations. The finding and associated recommendations in this report should enhance the ability of OEMHS to execute the EOP and raise awareness of the important function of this agency. We extend our appreciation to the Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security and other personnel involved in City emergency operations that assisted and cooperated with us during the audit. Audit Services Division Kip Memmott, MA, CGAP, CICA Director of Audit Services To promote open, accountable, efficient and effective government by performing impartial reviews and other audit services that provide objective and useful information to improve decision making by management and the people. We will monitor and report on recommendations and progress towards their implementation.

5 TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1 Although the City s Centralized Emergency Management Function is Strong, the Ability to Execute the Emergency Operations Plan is at Risk 1 Other Pertinent Information 2 INTRODUCTION & BACKGROUND 4 Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security Organizational Structure 4 Emergency Management Governance 5 Man-made and Natural Disasters 8 Colorado Disaster Overview and History 8 Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security Planning, Training, and Exercise Activities 10 Public Outreach and Involvement Initiatives 11 Emergency Management Accreditation Program 12 SCOPE 15 OBJECTIVE 15 METHODOLOGY 15 FINDING 19 Although the City s Centralized Emergency Management Function is Strong, the Ability to Execute the Emergency Operations Plan is at Risk 19 RECOMMENDATIONS 28 OTHER PERTINENT INFORMATION 30 The City and County of Denver is not a Signatory of an Intergovernmental Agreement for Resource Sharing 30 To promote open, accountable, efficient and effective government by performing impartial reviews and other audit services that provide objective and useful information to improve decision making by management and the people. We will monitor and report on recommendations and progress towards their implementation.

6 TABLE OF CONTENTS (cont d) The Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security has High-Quality Communication with City Agencies and External Stakeholders 31 Social Media is Becoming an Integral Part of Emergency Management 32 APPENDICES 35 Appendix A Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security Organizational Chart 35 Appendix B List of Colorado Declared Disasters 36 Appendix C U.S. Department of Homeland Security Emergency Supply List 37 Appendix D Colorado s Nine All-Hazard Regions 39 Appendix E 2010 Urban Area Security Initiative Grant Expenditures 40 Appendix F 2011 Urban Area Security Initiative Grant Expenditures 41 AGENCY RESPONSE 42

7 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security (OEMHS) has the primary responsibility for ensuring the City and County of Denver (City) is prepared for any type of emergency or disaster. Specifically, OEMHS is responsible for ensuring that the City has a comprehensive Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) and that its staff and City agency personnel are prepared to carry out the EOP. The Office also manages the City s Emergency Operations Center (EOC), which is activated during situations that require cooperation and immediate communication between City agencies as well as with other jurisdictions. The Office has activated the EOC in many instances, including severe floods and winter storms; an Xcel Energy transformer explosion; a plane crash and a sewage spill at Denver International Airport; and special events such as the Democratic National Convention and the USA Pro Cycling Challenge. OEMHS also provides resources and support to other Colorado jurisdictions during emergencies, such as was the case for the 2010 Four Mile Canyon fire in Boulder, CO. In addition, OEMHS provides a wealth of training and exercises on emergency management for City agencies as well as citizens. Although the City s Centralized Emergency Management Function is Strong, the Ability to Execute the Emergency Operations Plan is at Risk Although OEMHS is a small agency, it is a strong centralized function that has fostered good communication between all emergency management stakeholders. In fact, OEMHS is one of the first local governments in the nation to have received conditional accreditation for the Emergency Management Accreditation Program. However, audit work identified three significant risk factors that threaten the ability to execute the EOP. These factors include: how the City prioritizes and understands emergency responsibilities, uncertainty surrounding future OEMHS funding, and unclear structures for tracking resources during emergency situations. More specifically: Some City agencies lack key components to solidify internal emergency processes, and some agency personnel did not fully understand how to use emergency management systems. As a result, the ability of these agencies to effectively carry out their duties as outlined in the EOP is at risk. For example, some City agencies do not require their employees to respond to the EOC as part of their job duties. In addition, the election of a new administration in 2011 means an influx of new personnel and City leaders. It is crucial that new personnel immediately receive adequate training about OEMHS and the EOP and that these duties are prioritized accordingly. OEMHS only receives approximately 15 percent of its funding from the general fund, with the remainder coming from grant funds. The largest grant, the Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI), will decrease by 30 percent this year and could be eliminated entirely over the next few years due to federal funding cuts. The UASI grant primarily funds regional projects, not core operations for the City. While OEMHS will not see any immediate impact to their operations as a result of the decrease, a long-term, sustainable funding plan is needed to ensure that OEMHS P a g e 1 Office of the Auditor

8 has the resources required to carry out the EOP and related duties. There is also an opportunity to reduce grant costs in the next year by restructuring grant staffing agreements. OEMHS currently does not have detailed standard operating procedures (SOP) related to logistics, which causes confusion of roles and responsibilities related to acquiring resources during an emergency situation. The ability to acquire resources in a short time frame is a major component of emergency management and the EOP. It is also important that emergency resource costs are documented and comply with federal reimbursement requirements. Other Pertinent Information The City and County of Denver is not a Signatory of an Intergovernmental Agreement for Resource Sharing Intergovernmental Agreements (IGA), are commonly utilized to outline resource sharing roles and responsibilities between neighboring jurisdictions to ensure effective response to emergency incidents when response needs exceed the capability of the local jurisdiction. An IGA is in place between some jurisdictions in Colorado but, the City and County of Denver City Attorney s Office has advised against entering the IGA due to gaps and contradictions between the IGA, State of Colorado Emergency Resource Mobilization Plan, and the Colorado Procedures for Emergency Management Assistance Compact. Despite the fact that Denver is not a party to the IGA, if an emergency situation was to arise that required receiving or providing assistance to other jurisdictions, assistance would be provided in accordance to the State of Colorado Emergency Resource Mobilization Plan. In addition, if applicable, Denver could utilize one of the mutual agreements already in place. Further, OEMHS could send a request to the Colorado Department of Emergency Management if immediate assistance was needed in Denver. Understanding the importance of having an IGA in place, OEMHS has taken the initiative to provide suggested revisions to address gaps and contradictions between the IGA and other governing documents. However, OEMHS has no control as to how, if, or when the revisions will be made; it is up to the State of Colorado Division of Emergency Management to address the issue further. Nevertheless, by not having a mutual aid agreement in place, the associated risks with resource sharing increase. The Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security has High- Quality Communication with City Agencies and External Stakeholders Audit work determined that OEMHS exhibits high-quality communication with internal and external stakeholders, which is central to any life saving operations, preparations, and recovery efforts that follow an emergency or disaster. More specifically, it was acknowledged by various internal and external stakeholders that OEMHS communication efforts have improved dramatically over the past several years, and that current efforts were outstanding. Moreover, 90 percent of respondents to our internal City and County of Denver P a g e 2

9 survey indicated that OEMHS provides proper oversight and follow-up regarding various internal issues or concerns. Social Media is Becoming an Integral Part of Emergency Management At the beginning of the audit, OEMHS stated that social media was minimally used in public outreach and other emergency management efforts but, during the course of the audit, OEMHS made progress towards developing its use of social media. Social media offers a new and innovative way to share information, both during an emergency and to enhance citizen preparedness activities and public awareness. Recent emergency incidents, such as the August 2011 Virginia earthquake, and various studies show that social media is growing as an information source during emergencies. Thus, in order for OEMHS to maintain and continue building a strong central function, the use of social media should be continually developed and incorporated into Denver s emergency management activities. P a g e 3 Office of the Auditor

10 INTRODUCTION & BACKGROUND Natural and man-made disasters affect thousands of lives each year. These disasters have significant financial repercussions that not only impact people, but private and public property and infrastructure as well. Additionally, the events of September 11, 2001 awoke our nation to the real threat of international terrorism and highlighted the importance and need for emergency management programs. Terrorism was no longer a crisis that happened across oceans, but a tragedy that unfolded on U.S. soil, clearly pointing out vulnerabilities at national, state and local levels. Federal, state, and local governments have a crucial role and responsibility in planning, preparing, and responding to such disasters. The Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security (OEMHS) plays a vital role in protecting the citizens of Denver and surrounding jurisdictions. OEMHS is responsible for ensuring that the City and County of Denver (City) is prepared by properly planning for emergencies, training essential personnel, and ensuring optimal communication between the various stakeholders in order to effectively address any type of emergency or disaster situation. Originally, OEMHS was known as the Office of Emergency Preparedness and was under the Department of Safety. OEMHS was formally established by City ordinance in July 1996 with a mission to protect and better prepare the City for emergency and disaster situations. OEMHS is responsible for various aspects related to natural and man-made disasters. In order to accomplish this mission, OEMHS plays a key role in developing and maintaining the City s Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) and managing the Emergency Operations Center (EOC). Additionally, OEMHS provides planning, training, exercises, and educational outreach programs that educate Denver residents on how to plan and prepare for emergency or disaster situations. OEMHS coordinates these activities with various City agencies and departments, as well as with local, state, and federal, and private and public sector stakeholders. Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security Organizational Structure OEMHS is a small agency comprising a Director, appointed by the Mayor, and thirteen full time employees who are either assigned to work for OEMHS from other City agencies or who are employed by OEMHS directly. OEMHS has two general functions, which include core emergency management operations funded by general fund dollars and various grant funded activities. 1 The amount of funding from grant sources greatly exceeds general fund contributions. Specifically, OEMHS was appropriated 1 See Appendix A, Office of Emergency Management & Homeland Security Organizational Chart. City and County of Denver P a g e 4

11 approximately $600,000 in general fund dollars for 2011 as compared to the $3.3 million in anticipated grant funded expenditures for Core Operations Core emergency management operations for the City are supported by five OEMHS employees, one Denver Police Department (DPD) liaison, and one Denver Fire Department (DFD) liaison. Responsibilities of these employees include writing and updating the EOP, conducting hazard identification and risk assessments, maintaining and activating tornado sirens, performing public awareness and preparedness activities, and conducting various preparedness exercises and training activities. Additional responsibilities include rotating on-call duties, gathering and maintaining situational information on emergency and disaster situations, receiving support requests and providing assistance when possible. Further, OEMHS employees are responsible for advising the Director of OEMHS on the need to activate the EOC and assist in managing it. Grant Activities OEMHS is currently the recipient of three grants. The largest grant is the federal Department of Homeland Security s Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) grant totaling approximately $2.6 million of the Office s anticipated total grant fund expenditures for There are five employees who support the management of the UASI grant and its related projects, one of whom is a DPD Captain assigned to perform duties for OEMHS grant projects. The UASI grant funds many projects throughout the Colorado North Central Region, a ten-county region including Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Broomfield, Clear Creek, Denver, Douglas, Elbert, Jefferson, and Gilpin counties as defined by the Department of Homeland Security. Denver performs grant administration functions including fund distribution and reporting for the UASI grant. Emergency Management Governance In accordance with Executive Orders 85, 85A, and 85B, and the Denver Revised Municipal Code (D.R.M.C.), OEMHS is responsible for managing and coordinating efforts that help prepare for, respond to, and recover from various man-made and natural disasters within the City and County of Denver. 4 The mission of OEMHS is to create a safer city and region by effectively collaborating with our stakeholders to increase the city s and the region s all-hazard protection, preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery capabilities. 5 These guiding policies and mission statement lay the foundation for OEMHS to be better prepared for a disaster or emergency situation, which in turn minimizes damages and saves lives. Executive Order 85 Defines the mission, organizational structure, and responsibilities of OEMHS. The Order provides that governments have responsibility for ensuring the public s health and safety, and indicates that the Director of OEMHS shall advise and 2 Source: City and County of Denver Mayor s 2011 Budget. Please note that the anticipated grant fund expenditures may differ from the actual grant amounts awarded to the City for 2011 since grants are awarded for multi-year periods. 3 Other grant awards include the Emergency Management Performance Grant and All-Hazards Incident Management Team Pilot Program. 4 D.R.M.C., (2011). 5 Mission of OEMHS, Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security, 2010 Recap Report, accessed October 11, 2011, P a g e 5 Office of the Auditor

12 assist the Mayor in determining City emergency preparedness, prevention, protection, mitigation, response, and recovery goals and policies for the performance of functions. Executive Order 85 also formally adopts the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and establishes the Critical Infrastructure Protection Program. 6 Executive Order 85A Establishes the EOP for the City and County of Denver. The EOP establishes Emergency Support Function (ESF) roles and responsibilities that require City agencies to prepare for, respond to, and recover from emergency and disaster incidents. The EOP contains fifteen ESF annexes, which detail all City departments that provide emergency support functions in the case of an emergency response. There are also six support annexes and four incident annexes in the EOP. 7 Within the EOP, the ESF annexes identify primary and support departments and agencies responsible for delivering critical resources during emergencies and disasters. The ESF annexes group common capabilities and resource functions, and describes the purpose, concept of operations and emergency planning, response, and recovery responsibilities. The annexes provide the administrative resources that are necessary to support emergency or disaster planning, response operations, and recovery activities. These support annexes address planning, logistics, operations, financial management, community relations, and health and safety. The incident annexes define situations, concepts of operations, and responsibilities that are pertinent to specific types of emergency or disaster incident response and recovery. Executive Order 85B Contains the City s portion of the Denver Regional Natural Hazard Mitigation Plan. This is a five-year plan approved by Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in November The purpose of this plan is to: Identify natural hazards and the people and places at risk at a regional scale and then identify actions and measures to reduce or eliminate longterm risk. These mitigation measures are developed and implemented locally in order to protect people, structures and natural resources from natural hazards and their effects. The plan involves several cities and counties in the Denver region, and state and federal agencies. Thus, this plan identifies goals, background information, and measures for hazard mitigation and risk reduction in order to make communities more disaster resistant and sustainable. Some natural hazards identified within this plan include avalanche, drought, earthquakes, flood, hail, heat wave, and landslides. D.R.M.C. Chapter 16 Establishes the creation of OEMHS under the Mayor and explains the Director's powers and duties. Specifically, it states that OEMHS shall be responsible for 6 According to Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), NIMS provides a systematic, proactive approach to guide departments and agencies at all levels of government, nongovernmental organizations, and the private sector to work seamlessly to prevent, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate the effects of incidents, regardless of cause, size, location, or complexity, in order to reduce the loss of life and property and harm to the environment. 7 Within the EOP annexes provide additional information in the following Support categories: Policy, Planning, Operations, Logistics, Finance & Administration, and Safety & Health. The Incident annexes include: Denver International Airport, Natural Hazards, Terrorism, and Pandemic response. City and County of Denver P a g e 6

13 coordinating preparedness and management activities related to disasters and major emergencies within the City and must: Develop, revise, and exercise Denver's emergency plan and its annexes in coordination with other City agencies Manage the EOC to provide a coordinated response by the City to disasters and other emergencies Coordinate the activities of municipal and private agencies cooperating in the emergency management program Sponsor and carry out instruction and training of City personnel and privately owned or operated logistic support groups At the direction of the Mayor provide City and County of Denver resources to neighboring jurisdictions in time of crises for the prevention of injury or loss of life OEMHS manages the City s EOC during a major emergency or disaster and is responsible for maintaining the EOP. The EOC is the central location where the various internal and external stakeholders come together during an emergency or disaster to coordinate response and recovery activities, which includes sharing of information and resources. The EOC is designed to optimize communication and coordination between the various stakeholders. Two essential positions that help facilitate communication and coordination are the DPD and DFD liaisons. For example, the DPD liaison provides law enforcement input on various issues that assist OEMHS develop policies and strategic plans, and helps ensure DPD is compliant with the related Executive Orders. These liaison positions also provide the policy linkage to their departments in order to ensure that proper support and resources are available. During an emergency or disaster the DPD liaison communicates in various ways depending on the situation, including: Performing the role of Duty Officer on a rotational basis, which involves disseminating alerts, entering current situational information into a collaborative stakeholder database, WebEOC, and providing situational awareness and status reports to the OEMHS Director May act as the Police Emergency Support Function lead at the EOC Is available to support OEMHS on the operational side, if the EOC is activated, by assisting with planning and reaching out to other cities for law enforcement resources The primary program used to manage, communicate, and coordinate information among the various stakeholders is WebEOC. WebEOC is a web-based computer program designed to facilitate communication and other interaction across agencies in the event of an emergency. Information can be shared with individuals from various P a g e 7 Office of the Auditor

14 internal and external agencies including state representatives. In general, WebEOC is an information-sharing, resource-requesting, and tracking program that is utilized by all Colorado counties, the State of Colorado, and FEMA. Man-made and Natural Disasters There are various types of man-made and natural disasters that occur daily throughout the world and that result in significant physical damage and loss of life. Disasters can strike anywhere and anytime without warning. Man-made disasters are disasters resulting from human intent, negligence, or error. Some examples of man-made disasters include hazardous material spills, nuclear power plant melt-downs, and acts of terrorism. Conversely, natural disasters occur without human involvement. Some examples are earthquakes, wildfires, hurricanes, tornados, winter storms, and floods. Both can lead to severe financial and environmental impacts, which include loss of lives. Federal, state, and local government agencies work together to help prepare, respond, and recover from man-made and natural disasters. According to FEMA, the Congressional Act of 1803 was the earliest effort to provide disaster relief on a federal level after a fire devastated a New Hampshire town. In 1979, FEMA was established by an executive order, which merged many of the separate disaster-related responsibilities into a single agency. 8 FEMA is headquartered in Washington, DC and has ten regional offices located throughout the U.S. including Denver (Region VIII). These regional offices work with federal agencies, strategic partners, and tribal, state, and local government officials to support and assist emergency management efforts. FEMA s mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards. 9 Colorado Disaster Overview and History Since 1955, Colorado has declared sixteen Major Disaster Declarations and four Emergency Declarations. 10 Also, from 2003 to present Colorado has declared Fire Management Assistance on twenty occasions. 11 Only through the Governor s request to the applicable FEMA Regional Office can a disaster declaration be made. Federal, state, and local government officials conduct a Preliminary Damage Assessment to determine the extent of the disaster and its impact on individuals and public facilities. This assessment is submitted to the Regional Office in order to show that the severity and 8 FEMA B-653, FEMA (July 2008), accessed August 31, 2011, 9 FEMA Mission, FEMA, accessed August 31, 2011, 10 Colorado Disaster History, FEMA, accessed August 31, 2011, 11 Ibid. City and County of Denver P a g e 8

15 damage is beyond the capabilities of the state and local government. 12 However, not all disasters rise to the level of a declaration if local and state governments are able to manage the situation. There are two types of disaster declarations that can be provided according to the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, which includes the Major Disaster Declaration and Emergency Declaration. 13 FEMA explains the declarations as follows: Major Declaration: If the President of the United States believes damages from any natural event which includes tornados, snowstorms, earthquakes, etc. is beyond the capabilities of state and local governments a major declaration may be declared, which allows for various federal assistance for individuals and public infrastructure. 14 Emergency Declaration: The President of the United States can declare an emergency declaration for any occasion or instance where federal assistance is needed to help protect lives, property, public health, etc. The total amount of assistance for a single emergency may not exceed $5 million dollars. If this amount is exceeded, the President shall report to Congress. 15 Furthermore, the Fire Management Assistance Grant Program requires the Governor of the State to submit a request to the Regional Director requesting fire management assistance while the fire is uncontrolled. The approval is based on the current condition at the time of the request and whether or not the fire would amount to a major disaster. 16 Fire Management Assistance Grant Program: Provides a 75 percent federal cost share to assist state, local, and tribal governments for mitigation, management, and control of fires on public or privately owned forest or grasslands in order to prevent such damages that would amount to a major disaster. 17 Examples of how OEMHS has interacted with various stakeholders to address a disaster include the 2010 Four Mile Canyon fire and the 2010 Xcel Energy transformer explosion. On September 6, 2010 FEMA authorized funds to fight the Four Mile Canyon Fire in Boulder County. According to FEMA at the time of the request, the fire burned more than 2,500 acres and threatened more than 250 homes, forcing approximately 1,000 residents to evacuate. The funding did not provide assistance to individual homes or business owners and did not cover other infrastructure damage 12 See Appendix B, List of Colorado Declared Disasters. 13 The Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, 42 U.S.C (2007). 14 Disaster Declarations, FEMA, accessed August 31, 2011, 15 Ibid. 16 Declaration Process, FEMA, accessed August 31, 2011, 17 Fire Management Assistance Grant Program, FEMA, accessed August 31, 2011, P a g e 9 Office of the Auditor

16 caused by the fire, rather funding was used to help reimburse the state for their firefighting costs. 18 Denver s OEMHS sent staff members to assist at the Boulder s EOC. Additionally, on June 7, 2010 an Xcel Energy transformer explosion and power outage affected approximately 30,000 residents in central and east Denver including National Jewish Health and Rose Medical Center. During the incident Rose Medical Center backup generators were not working. The EOC was activated by OEMHS and within one hour the EOC was staffed by representatives from OEMHS, DFD, DPD, the Department of Public Works, the Department of Environmental Health, Emergency Medical Services, and the Red Cross. 19 As a result, the EOC was able to successfully coordinate resources and share information with various agencies including Denver International Airport (DIA), which supplied a generator that restored power to Rose Medical Center. Also, air and water samples were taken for analysis to ensure there was no oil leakage in the storm sewers or air. The Red Cross opened a shelter for those who were impacted by the power outage and coordinated clean-up activities. In all, no lives were lost and the incident was stabilized within a few hours. These two examples demonstrate how crucial the roles and responsibilities of OEMHS are. In both examples OEMHS assisted in minimizing damage and helped to save lives. Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security Planning, Training, and Exercise Activities In order to respond in emergency situations OEMHS personnel need to be properly prepared and trained. FEMA defines preparedness as a continuous cycle of planning, organizing training, equipping, exercising, evaluating, and taking corrective action in an effort to ensure effective coordination during an incident response. 20 In fact, OEMHS makes great efforts through various planning, training, and exercise activities with various internal and external stakeholders to help ensure that the City and County of Denver is well prepared for an emergency situation. Initially, OEMHS conducts a risk assessment analysis that identifies the various natural and man-made disasters relevant to Colorado and the City and County of Denver. Identifying risks include conducting research of historical hazards, pulling census data, utilizing committees and volunteer groups. The information obtained is used to help plan, prepare, and reduce potential threats and disasters. Furthermore, the risk assessment provides a statistical summary of risks based on the probability and severity of potential disasters that 18 FEMA Authorizes Funds to Help Fight Four Mile Canyon Fire in Boulder County. FEMA (September 2010), accessed August 31, 2011, 19 The Emergency Medical Services function is comprised of Denver Health Paramedics. 20 Preparedness, FEMA, accessed August 31, 2011, City and County of Denver P a g e 10

17 could impact the City and County of Denver. Once all potential disasters have been identified, they are ranked based on their probability of occurrence and an assessment of their impact on vulnerable populations, critical infrastructure, life and property. Once OEMHS identifies and ranks potential risks, OEMHS will develop specific training and exercise activities that assist the various internal and external stakeholders plan, prepare, and respond to various disasters. Depending on the type of training activity, which includes drills, tabletop exercises, functional exercises, and full-scale exercises, it may take anywhere from six months to a year to develop. Additionally, there are many training opportunities offered at the national, state, and regional levels that must be coordinated by OEMHS for targeted groups of participants. OEMHS is also responsible for designing and managing exercises, which includes developing an After Action Report (AAR). Following each exercise, an AAR is completed by evaluators and facilitators. The report is completed in order to ensure the objectives of the exercise were met and to identify strengths and weaknesses of the exercise so that OEMHS can make improvements to the centralized emergency management function. As a result of the AAR, OEMHS creates a plan to address the issues by developing a corrective action matrix. The matrix includes the responsible party, the root cause, and next steps. The City conducted a recent functional exercise on May 17, The purpose of the exercise was to simulate post-disaster response and the transition of EOC staff between shifts. The exercise simulated a tornado disaster that caused major structural damage and mass casualties within the City and County of Denver. Details of the scenario included a seven-thousand-gallon spill of diesel fuel, missing jail inmates, damage to I-70 and Peoria, and damage to the south-east terminal windows at DIA. Participants included, but were not limited to, various stakeholders from 311, CenturyLink (formally Qwest Communications), Denver Water, Red Cross, State of Colorado, DIA, Denver Health Paramedics, Department of Environmental Health, DFD, DPD, Department of Parks and Recreation, Denver Public Health Inspections Division, the City s Purchasing Division, and media relations within the EOC. Overall, OEMHS was able to identify several strengths and areas for improvement. Public Outreach and Involvement Initiatives A core function of OEMHS is performing public outreach to help the general public prepare for emergency situations. OEMHS utilizes many methods in their public outreach efforts, such as through their website, the use of flyers and brochures, and citizen preparedness trainings, most of which are organized by the OEMHS Community Relations Coordinator. More recently, OEMHS has begun to explore utilizing social media in outreach efforts, which is quickly becoming a necessity in the field of emergency management. The most significant of these activities is the Denver Citizen Emergency Response Training (CERT) program also referred to as the Community Emergency Response Team. These free training courses aim to educate citizens about disaster preparedness and basic disaster response skills. The courses cover a wide range of topics from fire safety and P a g e 11 Office of the Auditor

18 disaster medical operations to disaster psychology and terrorism. Auditors had the opportunity to attend one of these trainings and found it to be very informative with good participation from the citizenry and private sector. During the course of 2010, OEMHS hosted 15 CERT classes, educating over 330 people. 21 The Office conducts another type of outreach through publicly held meetings, such as Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC) meetings. The LEPC is required by the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act, enacted by the United States Congress in The LEPC provides community stakeholders, such as business representatives, with the opportunity to receive information regarding local hazards and provide input on emergency plans. Auditors attended a recent LEPC meeting, which had strong representation from the private sector, City agencies, and other emergency response personnel. Emergency Management Accreditation Program The Emergency Management Accreditation Program (EMAP) is the voluntary national accreditation process for state, territorial, tribal, and local emergency management programs. Using collaboratively developed, recognized standards and independent assessment, EMAP provides a means for strategic improvement of emergency management programs, culminating in accreditation. An emergency management program is defined as a jurisdiction s (state, territory, county, or city) system for management and coordination of prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery activities for all hazards. In addition to the emergency management department or agency, the program encompasses all organizations, agencies, and individuals responsible for emergency management functions. There are multiple steps to attaining emergency management accreditation, which include: Self-assessment and documentation On-site assessment by an EMAP assessor team Assessment report Committee review and recommendation Accreditation decision by the EMAP Commission Annual Compliance Reports Reaccreditation (every five years) 21 See Appendix C, U.S. Department of Homeland Security Emergency Supply List. 22 The Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act (EPCRA), U.S.C. Title 42, Chapter 116 (1986). City and County of Denver P a g e 12

19 In order to obtain EMAP accreditation, applicants must meet certain criteria. The EMAP Emergency Management Standard defines a quality emergency management program. The program also can be a tool for strategic planning and improvement efforts. EMAP began as a concept presented at the 1997 Annual Conference of the National Emergency Management Association (NEMA). 23 Numerous organizations were involved in the creation of EMAP, including NEMA, FEMA, the International Association of Emergency Managers (IAEM), the Council of State Governments, the National Governors Association (NGA), the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs, and the U.S. Department of Transportation. EMAP is a non-profit organization and is governed by an independent ten-member governing board, known as the EMAP Commission. Appointments to the Commission are made by NEMA and IAEM, based on criteria to ensure broad stakeholder input into the accreditation program. The Emergency Management Standard established by EMAP is designed as a tool for continuous improvement as part of a voluntary accreditation process for local and state emergency management programs. EMAP makes no representation or guarantee as to the efficacy of any program as a result of use of or compliance with the standards. The Emergency Management Standard is subject to review every three years. 24 Additionally, EMAP has identified best practices related to emergency management, which have been utilized by other emergency managers. 25 EMAP's Best Practices program was created to allow emergency management programs involved in the EMAP assessment and accreditation program the ability to share, promote, and utilize those practices and documents found to be outstanding and of benefit to the field of public safety and emergency preparedness. Two of these best practices include working with all departments to develop a standardized template and guidance for continuity of operations planning by an emergency management office. City and County of Denver s Involvement with EMAP In 2010 OEMHS initiated the process to become accredited by EMAP. OEMHS noted that receiving national certification from EMAP as a strategic initiative, serving to assess the office's performance standards against national standards. At the conclusion of an onsite assessment, the assessor team provides its findings to the Program Review Committee in an assessment report that includes summaries of compliance issues for the program for each of the 63 EMAP standards. The report outlines key documentation that supported the assessors findings of compliance or non-compliance. 23 NEMA is a nonpartisan, nonprofit association dedicated to enhancing public safety by improving the nation s ability to prepare for, respond to, and recover from all emergencies, disasters, and threats to our nation s security. See for more information. 24 Emergency Management Standard, Emergency Management Accreditation Program (September 2010), accessed August 31, 2011, 25 Best Practices, Emergency Management Accreditation Program (April 2011), accessed August 31, 2011, P a g e 13 Office of the Auditor

20 As a result of the on-site assessment, EMAP noted 32 compliance issues and OEMHS received conditional accreditation. OEMHS prepared an action plan to focus on the issues that need to be addressed in order to obtain accreditation status and has until January 15, 2012 to do so. If successful, OEMHS will join a group of 32 programs in the United States that are accredited by EMAP which includes the State of Colorado. The City would join a group of only five other cities or counties that have been accredited nationally Other cities and counties with EMAP accreditation include: Orange County, FL, Pierce County, WA, County of San Diego, CA, Consolidated City/County of Jacksonville/Duval, FL, and City of Providence, RI. City and County of Denver P a g e 14

21 SCOPE This audit evaluated the preparedness of the City and County of Denver for emergency or disaster situations. We examined various aspects of the Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security (OEMHS) and also considered the roles and responsibilities of other Denver City departments as well as those of federal and state agencies. 27 OBJECTIVE The objectives for this audit included: Determining if the Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security (OEMHS) structure, governance, and oversight capacity is effective and efficient Determining if OEMHS has properly planned for various emergencies and disasters Evaluating if the various OEMHS information systems provide the necessary support for emergency and disaster situations Determining if resources are immediately available during emergency and disaster situations Establishing if public awareness activities are reaching the majority of the pubic, especially in high-risk areas Verifying if training and exercise activities are conducted on a regular basis and involve all stakeholders Determining if communication between OEMHS and other stakeholders is adequate to ensure preparedness for emergencies and disasters METHODOLOGY We utilized several methodologies to achieve the audit objectives. These evidence gathering techniques included, but were not limited to: Interviews with: o Director and Deputy Director of the Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security (OEMHS) 27 Grant program effectiveness was not included in the scope of the audit as grant funds are routinely subject to several audits. P a g e 15 Office of the Auditor

22 o OEMHS Urban Area Security Initiative Grant Administrator, Community Relations Coordinator, Planning Section Coordinator, and Exercise and Training Coordinator o Various City agency representatives responsible for emergency management efforts including Denver International Airport, the Budget and Management Office, the Division of Real Estate, the Denver Police Department, and the Denver Fire Department o State representatives responsible for emergency management coordination and assistance Reviewing and analyzing: o o o o o o o o o o o o o Federal and state regulations related to emergency management City and County of Denver Executive Orders Denver Revised Municipal Code The City and County of Denver Budget Book Internal and external audit reports OEMHS grant funding and support details Denver s Emergency Operations Plan Emergency Management Accreditations Program requirements and results of the on-site assessment 28 Internal agency emergency policy and procedure manuals After Action Plans Social media and public awareness activities Current Emergency Operations Center location and alternatives OEMHS staffing and funding levels Attending and observing: o o o Functional tornado exercise at the Emergency Operations Center Citizens Emergency Response Training activity Local Emergency Planning Committee meeting Conducting benchmarking analysis activities: Effective emergency preparedness, response, and recovery require coordinated planning and actions by various internal and external stakeholders including federal, state, and local government agencies. Understanding these responsibilities and ensuring that best practices are followed is critical for saving 28 Auditors considered compliance issues identified from the EMAP on-site assessment during the planning phase of the audit to avoid duplicate efforts. City and County of Denver P a g e 16

Assessor s Office Performance Audit

Assessor s Office Performance Audit Assessor s Office Performance Audit June 2012 Office of the Auditor Audit Services Division City and County of Denver Dennis J. Gallagher Auditor The Auditor of the City and County of Denver is independently

More information

911 Data Center Operations Performance Audit

911 Data Center Operations Performance Audit 911 Data Center Operations Performance Audit June 2010 Office of the Auditor Audit Services Division City and County of Denver Dennis J. Gallagher Auditor The Auditor of the City and County of Denver is

More information

Citywide Social Media Usage Follow-up Report

Citywide Social Media Usage Follow-up Report Citywide Social Media Usage Follow-up Report May 2015 Office of the Auditor Audit Services Division City and County of Denver Dennis J. Gallagher Auditor The Auditor of the City and County of Denver is

More information

Network Security Management Phases 1 and 2 Follow up Report

Network Security Management Phases 1 and 2 Follow up Report Network Security Management Phases 1 and 2 Follow up Report March 2015 Office of the Auditor Audit Services Division City and County of Denver Dennis J. Gallagher Auditor The Auditor of the City and County

More information

Denver 311 Follow up Report

Denver 311 Follow up Report Denver 311 Follow up Report December 2014 Office of the Auditor Audit Services Division City and County of Denver Dennis J. Gallagher Auditor The Auditor of the City and County of Denver is independently

More information

City Attorney s Office: Litigation and Claims Management Follow-up Report

City Attorney s Office: Litigation and Claims Management Follow-up Report City Attorney s Office: Litigation and Claims Management Follow-up Report April 2015 Office of the Auditor Audit Services Division City and County of Denver Dennis J. Gallagher Auditor The Auditor of the

More information

DIA Network Security Management Follow up Report

DIA Network Security Management Follow up Report DIA Network Security Management Follow up Report March 2015 Office of the Auditor Audit Services Division City and County of Denver Dennis J. Gallagher Auditor The Auditor of the City and County of Denver

More information

Citywide Identity Management Follow up Report

Citywide Identity Management Follow up Report Citywide Identity Management Follow up Report July 2015 Office of the Auditor Audit Services Division City and County of Denver Dennis J. Gallagher Auditor The Auditor of the City and County of Denver

More information

The Department of General Services Contract Administration Follow up Report

The Department of General Services Contract Administration Follow up Report The Department of General Services Contract Administration Follow up Report June 2015 Office of the Auditor Audit Services Division City and County of Denver Dennis J. Gallagher Auditor The Auditor of

More information

Police Records Management System IT General Controls Follow up Report

Police Records Management System IT General Controls Follow up Report Police Records Management System IT General Controls Follow up Report March 2015 Office of the Auditor Audit Services Division City and County of Denver Dennis J. Gallagher Auditor The Auditor of the City

More information

PeopleSoft IT General Controls

PeopleSoft IT General Controls PeopleSoft IT General Controls Performance Audit December 2009 Office of the Auditor Audit Services Division City and County of Denver Dennis J. Gallagher Auditor The Auditor of the City and County of

More information

Table of Contents ESF-12-1 034-00-13

Table of Contents ESF-12-1 034-00-13 Table of Contents Primary Coordinating Agency... 2 Local Supporting Agencies... 2 State, Regional, and Federal Agencies and Organizations... 2 Purpose... 3 Situations and Assumptions... 4 Direction and

More information

Western Washington University Basic Plan 2013. A part of Western s Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan

Western Washington University Basic Plan 2013. A part of Western s Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan 2013 A part of Western s Record of Changes Change # Date Entered Description and Location of Change(s) Person making changes 2 1. PURPOSE, SCOPE, SITUATION OVERVIEW, ASSUMPTIONS AND LIMITATIONS A. PURPOSE

More information

Emergency Support Function 14 Long-Term Community Recovery and Mitigation

Emergency Support Function 14 Long-Term Community Recovery and Mitigation ESF Coordinator: Grant County Emergency Management Primary Agencies: Grant County Emergency Management Grant County Assessor s Office Grant County Public Works Grant County Building Department Support

More information

DIA Network Device Security Management Performance Audit

DIA Network Device Security Management Performance Audit DIA Network Device Security Management Performance Audit June 2014 Audit Services Division City and County of Denver Dennis J. Gallagher Auditor The Auditor of the City and County of Denver is independently

More information

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM GUIDE FOR COLORADO

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM GUIDE FOR COLORADO EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM GUIDE FOR COLORADO January 2013 Colorado Office of Emergency Management Department of Public Safety Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management Office of Emergency

More information

Table of Contents ESF-3-1 034-00-13

Table of Contents ESF-3-1 034-00-13 Table of Contents Primary Coordinating Agency... 2 Local Supporting Agencies... 2 State, Regional, and Federal Agencies and Organizations... 3 Purpose... 3 Situations and Assumptions... 4 Direction and

More information

Denver International Airport Emergency Preparedness Program Performance Audit

Denver International Airport Emergency Preparedness Program Performance Audit Denver International Airport Emergency Preparedness Program Performance Audit November 2015 Audit Services Division City and County of Denver Timothy M. O Brien, CPA Auditor The Auditor of the City and

More information

FOLLOW-UP REPORT Change Management Practices

FOLLOW-UP REPORT Change Management Practices FOLLOW-UP REPORT Change Management Practices May 2016 Office of the Auditor Audit Services Division City and County of Denver Timothy M. O Brien, CPA The Auditor of the City and County of Denver is independently

More information

ST. JOHNS COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN APRIL 2012. Appendix E. Training Program

ST. JOHNS COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN APRIL 2012. Appendix E. Training Program ST. JOHNS COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN APRIL 2012 Appendix E Training Program Appendix E Training - 1 I. PURPOSE St. Johns County Training Appendix To outline a training program that

More information

Texas Department of Public Safety Texas Division of Emergency Management. Preparedness Standards for Emergency Management in Texas TDEM-100

Texas Department of Public Safety Texas Division of Emergency Management. Preparedness Standards for Emergency Management in Texas TDEM-100 Texas Department of Public Safety Texas Division of Emergency Management Preparedness Standards for Emergency Management in Texas June 2000 FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION Requests for additional copies of

More information

Fixed Assets Management Performance Audit

Fixed Assets Management Performance Audit Fixed Assets Management Performance Audit May 2010 Office of the Auditor Audit Services Division City and County of Denver Dennis J. Gallagher Auditor The Auditor of the City and County of Denver is independently

More information

Commonwealth of Virginia EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PLAN

Commonwealth of Virginia EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PLAN EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PLAN 2012 Updated: 2015 March Terence McAuliffe Governor Jeffrey D. Stern, PH.D. State Coordinator of Emergency Management Emergency Operations Plan FOREWORD The Virginia Department

More information

Flood Hazard Mitigation

Flood Hazard Mitigation District of Columbia Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency Flood Hazard Mitigation DC Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency 2720 Martin Luther King Jr., Avenue, SE Washington, DC

More information

ready? are you [ ] An Elected Official s Guide to Emergency Management

ready? are you [ ] An Elected Official s Guide to Emergency Management ready? are you An Elected Official s Guide to Emergency Management [ ] The emergency management system was created in the 1950s and evolved over decades through the periods of détente in the 70s to the

More information

Plan Development and Review Guidance for local Emergency Operations Plans

Plan Development and Review Guidance for local Emergency Operations Plans Nancy J. Dragani, Executive Director Ohio Emergency Management Agency 2855 West Dublin-Granville Road Columbus, Ohio 43235-2206 www.ema.ohio.gov Plan Development and Review Guidance for local Emergency

More information

Workers Compensation Program Performance Audit

Workers Compensation Program Performance Audit Workers Compensation Program Performance Audit February 2012 Office of the Auditor Audit Services Division City and County of Denver Dennis J. Gallagher Auditor The Auditor of the City and County of Denver

More information

LAWRENCE COUNTY, KENTUCKY EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PLAN ESF-13

LAWRENCE COUNTY, KENTUCKY EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PLAN ESF-13 LAWRENCE COUNTY, KENTUCKY EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PLAN LAW ENFORCEMENT AND SECURITY ESF-13 Coordinates and organizes law enforcement and security resources in preparing for, responding to and recovering from

More information

PART 2 LOCAL, STATE, AND FEDERAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE SYSTEMS, LAWS, AND AUTHORITIES. Table of Contents

PART 2 LOCAL, STATE, AND FEDERAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE SYSTEMS, LAWS, AND AUTHORITIES. Table of Contents PART 2 LOCAL, STATE, AND FEDERAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE SYSTEMS, LAWS, AND AUTHORITIES (Updates in Yellow Highlight) Table of Contents Authorities: Federal, State, Local... 2-1 UCSF s Emergency ManagemenT

More information

FY 2012 PERFORMANCE PLAN. Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency

FY 2012 PERFORMANCE PLAN. Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency FY 2012 PERFORMANCE PLAN District of Columbia MISSION The Mission of the District of Columbia is to support and coordinate homeland security and emergency management efforts, ensuring that the District

More information

This page intentionally left blank.

This page intentionally left blank. This page intentionally left blank. This page intentionally left blank. CONTENTS List of Tables...vii List of Figures...vii What Is the National Incident Management System?...1 PREFACE... 3 INTRODUCTION

More information

Emergency Support Function 14. Recovery

Emergency Support Function 14. Recovery Emergency Support Function 14 Recovery ESF COORDINATOR: PRIMARY AGENCY: SUPPORT AGENCIES: Iowa County Emergency Management Agency Iowa County Emergency Management Agency Chief Elected Officials County

More information

NIMS ICS 100.HCb. Instructions

NIMS ICS 100.HCb. Instructions NIMS ICS 100.HCb Instructions This packet contains the NIMS 100 Study Guide and the Test Questions for the NIMS 100 final exam. Please review the Study Guide. Next, take the paper test - record your answers

More information

Emergency Operations Plan ANNEX K - UTILITIES RESTORATION ESF #3, #12 I. MNWALK REQUIREMENTS. Item #: 1, 4, 46, 53, 54

Emergency Operations Plan ANNEX K - UTILITIES RESTORATION ESF #3, #12 I. MNWALK REQUIREMENTS. Item #: 1, 4, 46, 53, 54 ANNEX K - UTILITIES RESTORATION ESF #3, #12 I. MNWALK REQUIREMENTS Item #: 1, 4, 46, 53, 54 II. PURPOSE The purpose of this annex is to describe the organization, operational concepts and responsibilities

More information

ESF 14. Long-Term Community Recovery

ESF 14. Long-Term Community Recovery 1. Purpose This annex provides an overview of the general process to be followed in recovering from the economic results of a natural disaster or other major emergency that may impact Coos County. It outlines

More information

GAO FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY. Workforce Planning and Training Could Be Enhanced by Incorporating Strategic Management Principles

GAO FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY. Workforce Planning and Training Could Be Enhanced by Incorporating Strategic Management Principles GAO United States Government Accountability Office Report to Congressional Requesters April 2012 FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY Workforce Planning and Training Could Be Enhanced by Incorporating Strategic

More information

AMBULATORY SURGICAL CENTERS

AMBULATORY SURGICAL CENTERS AMBULATORY SURGICAL CENTERS STATUTE RULE CRITERIA Current until changed by State Legislature or AHCA Hospitals and Ambulatory Surgical Centers Statutory Reference 3 395.1055 (1)(c), Florida Statutes Rules

More information

Maricopa County Emergency Management

Maricopa County Emergency Management Maricopa County Emergency Management Mission Provide community-wide education, planning, coordination, and continuity of government for the people of Maricopa County in order to protect lives, property

More information

The Role of Government in a Disaster

The Role of Government in a Disaster Chapter 3: During the Disaster The Role of Government in a Disaster Government agencies play a critical role during times of disaster, but the exact role of government is often unclear to disaster victims.

More information

DISASTER RECOVERY PLANNING FOR CITY COMPUTER FACILITIES

DISASTER RECOVERY PLANNING FOR CITY COMPUTER FACILITIES APPENDIX 1 DISASTER RECOVERY PLANNING FOR CITY COMPUTER FACILITIES March 2008 Auditor General s Office Jeffrey Griffiths, C.A., C.F.E. Auditor General City of Toronto TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...1

More information

Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan

Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Washington State Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan - Basic Plan - June 2011 Washington State Military Department Emergency Management Division INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Page ii Basic Plan June 2011

More information

Emergency Management Certification and Training (EMC & T) Refresher Terry Hastings, DHSES Senior Policy Advisor

Emergency Management Certification and Training (EMC & T) Refresher Terry Hastings, DHSES Senior Policy Advisor Emergency Management Certification and Training (EMC & T) Refresher Terry Hastings, DHSES Senior Policy Advisor 2015 NYSEMA Conference 2 Please sign in to ensure that you receive credit for the refresher

More information

UCF Office of Emergency Management. 2013-2018 Strategic Plan

UCF Office of Emergency Management. 2013-2018 Strategic Plan UCF Office of Emergency Management 2013-2018 Strategic Plan Table of Contents I. Introduction... 2 Purpose... 2 Overview... 3 Mission... 5 Vision... 5 II. Mandates... 6 III. Accomplishments and Challenges...

More information

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLANNING CRITERIA FOR AMBULATORY SURGICAL CENTERS

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLANNING CRITERIA FOR AMBULATORY SURGICAL CENTERS EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLANNING CRITERIA FOR AMBULATORY SURGICAL CENTERS The following criteria are to be used when developing Comprehensive Emergency Management Plans (CEMP) for all ambulatory surgical

More information

Office of Homeland Security

Office of Homeland Security Office of Homeland Security City Council City Manager OFFICE OF HOMELAND SECURITY Mitigation Program Preparedness Program Recovery Program Response Program Mission Statement To establish and maintain a

More information

The Role of Elected Officials During Disasters. The Florida Division of Emergency Management

The Role of Elected Officials During Disasters. The Florida Division of Emergency Management The Role of Elected Officials During Disasters The Florida Division of Emergency Management Bryan W. Koon Director Florida Division of Emergency Management Introduction Florida s elected officials play

More information

Emergency Management Standard

Emergency Management Standard Emergency Management Standard Emergency Management Accreditation Program Publication Note The Emergency Management Standard by the Emergency Management Accreditation Program (EMAP) is designed as a tool

More information

ANNEX C - EMERGENCY PUBLIC INFORMATION ESF #15

ANNEX C - EMERGENCY PUBLIC INFORMATION ESF #15 I. MNWALK REQUIREMENTS Item #: 1, 3, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20 ANNEX C - EMERGENCY PUBLIC INFORMATION ESF #15 II. PURPOSE Provide for the development, coordination and dissemination of emergency public information.

More information

B E F O R E T H E E M E R G E N C Y

B E F O R E T H E E M E R G E N C Y B E F O R E T H E E M E R G E N C Y RESPONSIBILITY / LIABILITY for Homeland Security / Emergency Management Duty of Care - Counties and Cities ARE responsible for the safety of their citizens. Following

More information

Texas Department of Public Safety Texas Division of Emergency Management. Local Emergency Management Planning Guide. TDEM-10 Revision 4

Texas Department of Public Safety Texas Division of Emergency Management. Local Emergency Management Planning Guide. TDEM-10 Revision 4 Texas Department of Public Safety Texas Division of Emergency Management Local Emergency Management Planning Guide TDEM-10 Revision 4 January 2008 FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION Requests for additional copies

More information

CITY OF KENT, WASHINGTON COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN APPENDIX 3 REFERENCES

CITY OF KENT, WASHINGTON COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN APPENDIX 3 REFERENCES CITY OF KENT, WASHINGTON COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN APPENDIX 3 REFERENCES The City of Kent Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan was developed and is maintained pursuant to, but not limited

More information

MONTGOMERY COUNTY, KANSAS EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PLAN. ESF14-Long Term Community Recovery

MONTGOMERY COUNTY, KANSAS EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PLAN. ESF14-Long Term Community Recovery MONTGOMERY COUNTY, KANSAS EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PLAN ESF14-Long Term Community Recovery Planning Team Support Agency Coffeyville Public Works Independence Public Works Montgomery County Public Works 1/15/2009

More information

Houston County Emergency Management Agency Emergency Operations Plan

Houston County Emergency Management Agency Emergency Operations Plan County Emergency Management Agency Emergency Operations Plan Plan Approved: 30-OCT-09 Revised: 06-NOV-09 Please insert your local resolution here. RECORD OF REVISIONS Date Author Section Detail 10-30-2009

More information

United States Department of the Interior

United States Department of the Interior United States Department of the Interior NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 1849 C Street, N.W. Washington D.C. 20240 IN REPLY REFER TO: DIRECTOR'S ORDER #55: INCIDENT MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Effective Date: Sunset Date:

More information

Emergency Management Performance Grants Providing Returns on a Nation s Investment

Emergency Management Performance Grants Providing Returns on a Nation s Investment Emergency Management Performance Grants Providing Returns on a Nation s Investment 2014 Edition Joint Report Presented by the National Emergency Management Association and the U.S. Council of International

More information

ESF-9 LAW ENFORCEMENT

ESF-9 LAW ENFORCEMENT ESF-9 LAW ENFORCEMENT CONTENTS PAGE I. PURPOSE ESF 9.1 II. SITUATIONS AND ASSUMPTIONS ESF 9.1 A. Situations ESF 9.1 B. Assumptions ESF 9.1 III. CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS ESF 9.2 A. General ESF 9.2 B. Operational

More information

DIVISION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

DIVISION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT DIVISION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Florida Division of Emergency Management (DEM) is responsible for maintaining a comprehensive statewide program of emergency management. In addition,

More information

Local Emergency Operations Plan

Local Emergency Operations Plan Local Emergency Operations Plan April 2014 1 City of Shawnee LOCAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN RECORD OF CHANGES Change # Date Page # Paragraph # Change Summary 2 3 City of Shawnee COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY

More information

NIMS Study Guide. Lesson One: What Is the National Incident Management System (NIMS)? What is NIMS?

NIMS Study Guide. Lesson One: What Is the National Incident Management System (NIMS)? What is NIMS? NIMS Study Guide Lesson One: What Is the National Incident Management System (NIMS)? What is NIMS? NIMS is a comprehensive, national approach to incident management that is applicable at all jurisdictional

More information

BASIC EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT FOR ELECTED OFFICIALS. M a r y l a n d M a y o r s A s s o c i a t i o n. W i n t e r C o n f e r e n c e A n n a p o l i s

BASIC EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT FOR ELECTED OFFICIALS. M a r y l a n d M a y o r s A s s o c i a t i o n. W i n t e r C o n f e r e n c e A n n a p o l i s BASIC EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT FOR ELECTED OFFICIALS M a r y l a n d M a y o r s A s s o c i a t i o n W i n t e r C o n f e r e n c e A n n a p o l i s SPEAKERS Mayor Michael E. Bennett City of Aberdeen Mayor

More information

Denver International Airport Airport Legal Services Section Performance Audit

Denver International Airport Airport Legal Services Section Performance Audit Denver International Airport Airport Legal Services Section Performance Audit July 2014 Audit Services Division City and County of Denver Dennis J. Gallagher Auditor The Auditor of the City and County

More information

DRF 1 COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS ACTIVE IN DISASTER (COAD)

DRF 1 COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS ACTIVE IN DISASTER (COAD) DRF 1 COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS ACTIVE IN DISASTER (COAD) CONTENTS PAGE I. PURPOSE 1 II. SCOPE 1 III. SITUATION AND ASSUMPTIONS 1 A. Situation 1 B. Assumptions 2 IV. CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS 2 A. General 2

More information

Massachusetts Department of Fire Services Implementation Plan for State and Local Level National Incident Management Systems (NIMS)

Massachusetts Department of Fire Services Implementation Plan for State and Local Level National Incident Management Systems (NIMS) Massachusetts Department of Fire Services Implementation Plan for State and Local Level National Incident Management Systems (NIMS) June 2005 Incident Commander Public Information Officer Safety Officer

More information

HAZARD VULNERABILITY & RISK ASSESSMENT

HAZARD VULNERABILITY & RISK ASSESSMENT Hazard Vulnerability Analysis Purpose and Scope A Hazard Vulnerability Analysis (HVA) evaluates risk associated with a specific hazard. During this analysis, the hazard is evaluated for its probability

More information

Program Outline & Accreditation Application

Program Outline & Accreditation Application Program Outline & Accreditation Application The field of emergency management is emerging into higher visibility in communities throughout the nation as they are victimized by disasters that are increasing

More information

Chester County Emergency Operations Plan

Chester County Emergency Operations Plan Section I Basic Plan February 2014 Chester County Department of Emergency Services 601 Westtown Road, Suite 012 West Chester, PA 19380-0990 Section I Basic Plan THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK February

More information

Flooding Emergency Response Exercise

Flooding Emergency Response Exercise Flooding Emergency Response Exercise James Woodward, Senior Exercise Planner California Emergency Management Agency 3650 Schriever Ave. Mather, CA 95655 Cell: (916) 439-3546 Email: james.woodward@calema.ca.gov

More information

Pike County General Health District. Emergency Response Plan

Pike County General Health District. Emergency Response Plan Pike County General Health District Emergency Response Plan Updated October 2014 Basic Plan Primary Agency Support Agencies Introduction Purpose Scope Phases of Emergency Management Situations Assumptions

More information

ENHANCED COORDINATION BETWEEN THE SAN DIEGO OFFICE OF HOMELAND SECURITY EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT EFFORTS

ENHANCED COORDINATION BETWEEN THE SAN DIEGO OFFICE OF HOMELAND SECURITY EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT EFFORTS Performance Audit of the Office of Homeland Security ENHANCED COORDINATION BETWEEN THE SAN DIEGO OFFICE OF HOMELAND SECURITY AND CITY DEPARTMENTS WOULD STRENGTHEN EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT EFFORTS JULY 2014

More information

The Joint Commission s 2012 Emergency Management Standards and HRSA Health Center Emergency Management Program Expectations. NACHC Webex Training

The Joint Commission s 2012 Emergency Management Standards and HRSA Health Center Emergency Management Program Expectations. NACHC Webex Training The Joint Commission s 2012 Emergency Management Standards and HRSA Health Center Emergency Management Program Expectations NACHC Webex Training February 2, 2012 Presented by: Virginia McCollum, MSN, RN

More information

Emergency Management 101 The Questions You Should Be Asking In Your Community

Emergency Management 101 The Questions You Should Be Asking In Your Community Emergency Management 101 The Questions You Should Be Asking In Your Community Question: What s emergency management and why is it so important? The value that an emergency management program adds to a

More information

DIA Information Security Management Performance Audit

DIA Information Security Management Performance Audit DIA Information Security Management Performance Audit November 2010 Office of the Auditor Audit Services Division City and County of Denver Dennis J. Gallagher Auditor The Auditor of the City and County

More information

Lesson 1: What Is the National Incident Management System (NIMS)? Summary of Lesson Content

Lesson 1: What Is the National Incident Management System (NIMS)? Summary of Lesson Content Lesson 1: What Is the National Incident Management System (NIMS)? Lesson Overview On February 28, 2003, President Bush issued Homeland Security Presidential Directive 5. HSPD 5 directed the Secretary of

More information

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020: PRIORITY ACTIONS

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020: PRIORITY ACTIONS TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020: PRIORITY ACTIONS INTRODUCTION The purpose of this document is to list the aligned with each in the Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan 2015-2020 (THSSP).

More information

Cornell University EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

Cornell University EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Cornell University EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Table of Contents Table of Contents Section 1 INTRODUCTION... 2 Section 2 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT COMPONENTS... 3 Prevention-Mitigation Plan... 3 Preparedness

More information

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY AND

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY AND MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY AND THE NORTH AMERICAN MISSION BOARD SOUTHERN BAPTIST CONVENTION DISASTER RELIEF 1. PARTIES The

More information

Emergency Management Planning Criteria for Ambulatory Surgical Centers (State Criteria Form)

Emergency Management Planning Criteria for Ambulatory Surgical Centers (State Criteria Form) Emergency Management Planning Criteria for Ambulatory Surgical Centers (State Criteria Form) FACILITY INFORMATION: FACILITY NAME: FIELD (Company) FAC. TYPE: ASC STATE RULE: 59A-5, F.A.C CONTACT PERSON:

More information

Office of Homeland Security

Office of Homeland Security Page Intentionally Left Blank Department Description The San Diego Office of Homeland Security (SD-OHS) oversees the City's Homeland Security, Disaster Preparedness, Emergency Management, and Recovery/Mitigation

More information

Arlington, Virginia. May 2009. Comprehensive Emergency Management Program

Arlington, Virginia. May 2009. Comprehensive Emergency Management Program Comprehensive Emergency Management Program Arlington, Virginia May 2009 Comprehensive Emergency Management Program This document was prepared by the Arlington County, Virginia Office of Emergency Management.

More information

Emergency Preparedness Guidelines

Emergency Preparedness Guidelines DM-PH&SD-P7-TG6 رقم النموذج : I. Introduction This Guideline on supports the national platform for disaster risk reduction. It specifies requirements to enable both the public and private sector to develop

More information

Denver International Airport Planning and Development Division Performance Audit

Denver International Airport Planning and Development Division Performance Audit Denver International Airport Planning and Development Division Performance Audit June 2013 Office of the Auditor Audit Services Division City and County of Denver Dennis J. Gallagher Auditor The Auditor

More information

MASSACHUSETTS EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY

MASSACHUSETTS EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY MASSACHUSETTS EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN REVISION #6 SEPTEMBER 2007 Commonwealth of Massachusetts Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Reviewed by: Approved

More information

Emergency Management Plan. Basic Plan

Emergency Management Plan. Basic Plan Emergency Management Plan Basic Plan June 2011 Chapter 1 Basic Plan I. Letter of Promulgation June 2011 Page 1 1 II. Purpose, Scope, Situations, and Assumptions A. Purpose and Scope 1. This basic plan

More information

Network Security Management Phase 1 Performance Audit

Network Security Management Phase 1 Performance Audit Network Security Management Phase 1 Performance Audit March 2012 Office of the Auditor Audit Services Division City and County of Denver Dennis J. Gallagher Auditor The Auditor of the City and County of

More information

Arizona Department of Homeland Security

Arizona Department of Homeland Security Arizona Department of Homeland Security Arizona Integrated Planning System (AZIPS) Five-Year Strategic Plan 2013-2018 SEPTEMBER 2012 MISSION STATEMENT The mission of the Arizona Department of Homeland

More information

Draft 8/1/05 SYSTEM First Rev. 8/9/05 2 nd Rev. 8/30/05 EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PLAN

Draft 8/1/05 SYSTEM First Rev. 8/9/05 2 nd Rev. 8/30/05 EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PLAN Draft 8/1/05 SYSTEM First Rev. 8/9/05 2 nd Rev. 8/30/05 EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PLAN I. INTRODUCTION A. PURPOSE - The University of Hawaii System Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) provides procedures for managing

More information

Overview of Homeland Security Funding 1999 to Present National Incident Management System Mandates and Training Requirements

Overview of Homeland Security Funding 1999 to Present National Incident Management System Mandates and Training Requirements Overview of Homeland Security Funding 1999 to Present National Incident Management System Mandates and Training Requirements Jim Weldin Delaware League of Local Governments 1 Homeland Security Grant Funding

More information

ANNEX P HAZARD MITIGATION

ANNEX P HAZARD MITIGATION ANNEX P HAZARD MITIGATION CITY OF HOUSTON TABLE OF CONTENTS ANNEX P MITIGATION COVER... i AUTHORITY & IMPLEMENTATION... ii TABLE OF CONTENTS... iii 1. AUTHORITY...1 2 PURPOSE...1 3. EXPLANATION OF TERMS...1

More information

HOSPITALS STATUTE RULE CRITERIA. Current until changed by State Legislature or AHCA

HOSPITALS STATUTE RULE CRITERIA. Current until changed by State Legislature or AHCA HOSPITALS STATUTE RULE CRITERIA Current until changed by State Legislature or AHCA Hospitals and Ambulatory Surgical Centers Statutory Reference' 395.1055 (1)(c), Florida Statutes Rules and Enforcement.

More information

4-1 Strategic Leadership Training and Education Level

4-1 Strategic Leadership Training and Education Level 4-1 Strategic Leadership Training and Education Level Table 4-1: Leadership in the Emergency Management Environment. This competency area focuses on the knowledge and/or skills that leaders need to: (1)

More information

York County Emergency Management Program Orientation

York County Emergency Management Program Orientation York County Emergency Management Program Orientation October 2014 Preface This presentation is a companion to the York County Local Emergency Management Coordinator s Handbook and is intended to be used

More information

Emergency Management Organization

Emergency Management Organization Organization To save lives, preserve property, and protect the environment during emergencies and disasters through coordinated prevention, protection, preparation, response and recovery actions. Director

More information

December 18, 2008. Dear NIMS Stakeholders:

December 18, 2008. Dear NIMS Stakeholders: December 18, 2008 Dear NIMS Stakeholders: Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD)-5, Management of Domestic Incidents, directed the development and administration of the National Incident Management

More information

Walla Walla County CEMP BASIC PLAN

Walla Walla County CEMP BASIC PLAN BASIC PLAN I. INTRODUCTION A. Mission Coordinate and facilitate resources to minimize the impacts of disasters and emergencies on people, property, the environment and the economy of Walla Walla County.

More information

Audit of the Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security: FEMA Urban Area Security Initiative Grant Management 2012 through 2014

Audit of the Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security: FEMA Urban Area Security Initiative Grant Management 2012 through 2014 Audit of the Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security: FEMA Urban Area Security Initiative Grant Management 2012 through 2014 MARTIN MATSON City Comptroller STACEY MAZMANIAN Audit Manager City

More information

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLANNING CRITERIA FOR HOSPITALS

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLANNING CRITERIA FOR HOSPITALS EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLANNING CRITERIA FOR HOSPITALS The following minimum criteria are to be used when developing Comprehensive Emergency Management Plans (CEMP) for all hospitals. These criteria will

More information

For Official Use Only. Springfield-Greene County, Missouri Multi-Year Training and Exercise Plan 2016-2018 (TEP) July 27, 2015. For Official Use Only

For Official Use Only. Springfield-Greene County, Missouri Multi-Year Training and Exercise Plan 2016-2018 (TEP) July 27, 2015. For Official Use Only For Official Use Only Springfield-Greene County, Missouri Multi-Year Training and Exercise Plan 2016-2018 (TEP) July 27, 2015 For Official Use Only SPRINGFIELD-GREENE COUNTY Point of Contact Erin Pope

More information

Audit Committee. Audit Staff

Audit Committee. Audit Staff The Auditor of the City and County of Denver is independently elected by the citizens of Denver. He is responsible for examining and evaluating the operations of City agencies for the purpose of ensuring

More information

Emergency Support Function #14 Long Term Community Recovery and Mitigation

Emergency Support Function #14 Long Term Community Recovery and Mitigation Emergency Support Function #14 Long Term Community Recovery and Mitigation Primary Agency FEMA Board of Visitors Radford University Cabinet Secondary/Support Agencies Radford University Office of Emergency

More information

North Carolina Emergency Management

North Carolina Emergency Management North Carolina Emergency Management North Carolina Incidents North Carolina Incidents Primary mission is consequence management Must be prepared to: Search and Rescue Provide Mass Care Protect Life and

More information