BANGOR BUSINESS SCHOOL in the College of Business, Social Sciences and Law

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1 BANGOR BUSINESS SCHOOL in the College of Business, Social Sciences and Law Bangor University Gwynedd LL57 2DG Reception Tel: (01248) Reception Fax: (01248) Head of School: Professor John Thornton Deputy Head of School: Professor John Goddard Directors of Postgraduate Studies: Dr Gareth Griffiths (Business, Management, Marketing) Professor Owain ap Gwilym (Accounting, Banking, Finance) Senior Tutor: Dr John Ashton School Manager: Sarah Wale Postgraduate Office Manager: Bethan Hamilton-Hine Postgraduate Administrative Team: Lynda Jones, Rebecca Owen Jones, Debbie Pritchard International Liaison and Support Officer: Yizheng Wang Student Liaison and Research Assistant: Peter Westmoreland IT Coordinator and Teaching Assistant: Huw Hughes

2 Bangor Business School makes all reasonable efforts to ensure that the information in this handbook is correct at the time of printing (September 2012). Bangor Business School reserves the right to make changes to the information contained in this handbook without notice.

3 CONTENTS WELCOME TO BANGOR 3 BANGOR UNIVERSITY STUDENT CHARTER 4 1. BANGOR BUSINESS SCHOOL (BBS) 5 2. STAFF DETAILS 6 3. INFORMATION, ADVICE AND PERSONAL SUPPORT 8 4. POLICY ON ATTENDANCE HEALTH AND SAFETY UNIVERSITY CALENDAR FOR THE 2012/2013 ACADEMIC YEAR MODULE SELECTION, TIMETABLE, LECTURES AND TUTORIALS DEGREE PROGRAMME STRUCTURES SUMMARY MODULE OUTLINES CONTINUOUS ASSESSMENT AND ASSIGNMENTS MARKING CRITERIA, DEGREE CLASSIFICATION AND APPEALS ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT AND UNFAIR PRACTICE ELECTRONIC RESOURCES TO SUPPORT YOUR STUDIES 84 APPENDIX: MINUTES OF THE BANGOR BUSINESS SCHOOL STUDENT 92 LIAISON COMMITTEE MEETINGS HELD DURING 2011/12 Page 2

4 WELCOME TO BANGOR Message from the Head of Bangor Business School Welcome to Bangor Business School! Our emphasis within Bangor Business School is very much on friendly and informal relationships between staff and students. One of the advantages of studying in a School with a relatively small number of students (in comparison with some of the big city campuses) is that you will easily make personal contact with members of staff, who are always ready and willing to help out with any difficulties which you may encounter during your studies. Bangor Business School, therefore, offers you the opportunity to study in a School which combines an international academic reputation with a friendly, welcoming and hospitable atmosphere. We look forward to working with you to enhance your university experience. Professor John Thornton Head of Bangor Business School 3

5 BANGOR UNIVERSITY STUDENT CHARTER Our commitments to all our students: To help you make the most of your time at university, we will endeavour to: Ensure the highest possible standards of teaching and learning by: Providing an excellent academic programme inspired by the latest top-quality research Providing quality teaching, learning and research facilities Supporting an active Course Representative system Regularly asking for and responding to your feedback Regularly asking for and responding to feedback from independent external sources Operating an effective system for assuring academic quality and standards Providing relevant staff development Ensure that our curriculum is flexible, relevant and research-led by: Regularly reviewing our modules and courses to ensure quality in delivery and content Seeking advice from employers, professional bodies and student representatives in course design Utilising a range of modes of course delivery Ensure that we engage with you promptly and proactively by: Providing clear information about your modules and course / research programme Communicating with you as quickly and effectively as possible Setting a clear deadline for the provision of feedback on academic work Giving you advance notice of your timetable and any changes to it Responding to any complaints promptly and fairly Ensure that your environment is inclusive, welcoming and supportive by: Providing appropriate academic and pastoral support Ensuring ready access to general information about the university and its organisation Ensuring easy access to counselling, disability and financial advisory services Fostering cultural wealth and community involvement Fostering a safe environment, free from negative discrimination or harassment, based on mutual respect Ensure that you are prepared for employment and lifelong learning by: Helping you to develop skills to support your learning and employability Giving you opportunities to develop your employability, including the opportunity to participate in the Bangor Employability Award scheme Providing access to careers advice and publicising employment opportunities Ensure that through our bilingual policy you can choose to: Study where possible through the medium of Welsh Submit assessments and receive feedback where possible through the medium of Welsh, irrespective of the language of tuition Have access to support services through the medium of Welsh Interact with the University through the medium of Welsh Learn Welsh or further develop Welsh language skills through classes and specific modules 4

6 1. BANGOR BUSINESS SCHOOL (BBS) Bangor Business School is a multidisciplinary school, which employs over 40 fulltime academic staff (including 15 professors), together with external lecturers, tutorial assistants and other support staff. The broad range of business subject areas in which Bangor Business School specialises includes accounting, banking, finance, economics, management, marketing and entrepreneurship. Bangor Business School is one of three Schools comprising the College of Business, Social Sciences and Law (CoBSSL). CoBSSL also contains the School of Social Sciences and the School of Law. In the 2008 UK-wide RAE (Research Assessment Exercise), Bangor Business School achieved a score of This result put Bangor in 1st position of the 14 universities that submitted to the Accounting and Finance unit of assessment. In the larger Business and Management unit of assessment, to which 90 universities submitted including many that teach the same subjects as Bangor, a score of 2.75 would place Bangor in 16th position out of 90. Times Higher Education Table of Excellence RAE 2008 Subject rankings Source: Times Higher Education Supplement... (and 47 others) 5

7 2. STAFF DETAILS Lecturing Staff Most of the School s lecturers, other than those indicated, are based in the Hen Goleg Building. For their room numbers and contact details, please see below. Name Room Ext. Adjei, Dr Elvis Alsakka, Dr Rasha Altunbas, Professor Yener ap Gwilym, Professor Owain ap Gwilym, Dr Rhys Ashurst, Wendy Ashton, Dr John Ayling, Dr Dave Bartels, Dr Koen A1.05 Alun Building 8790 Batiz-Lazo, Professor Bernardo Beelitz, Annika Bradley, Mr Colin Carbo-Valverde, Professor Santiago Chakravarty, Professor Shanti Closs-Stacey, Sara Dobbins, Dr Tony A3.03 Alun Building 2718 Doloriert, Dr Clair Dowdney, Penny n/a n/a Ebrahim, Professor M. Shahid Ellams, Mr David B Goddard, Professor John Griffiths, Dr Gareth Hanna, Dr Sonya Hassan, Dr Louise tbc tbc tbc Hodgkinson, Professor Lynn Hughes, Mr Huw Jaafar, Dr Aziz James, Mr David Jones, Mr Brian Jones, Mr Stephen Karami, Dr Azhdar Mantovan, Dr Noemi A0.08 Alun Building 8081 McGowan, Dr Danny A1.07 Alun Building 3948 Merkl-Davies, Dr Doris Mitchelmore, Dr Siwan Molyneux, Professor Phil A3.01 Alun Building 2170 Nikolopoulos, Professor Kostas Onali, Dr Enrico tbc 3650 Parry, Dr Sara Sambrook, Professor Sally Schaeck, Professor Klaus Shiu, Professor Edward Thornton, Professor John Verousis, Dr Thanos Wale, Sarah Wang, Dr Qingwei Williams, Mr Gwion Williams-Jones, Mr Jeff n/a n/a Williams, Professor Jonathan Xie, Dr Ru

8 Support Staff The first point of contact for Bangor Business School postgraduate students is the Postgraduate Office in the College of Business, Social Sciences and Law Administrative Centre. For staff contact details, please see below. Name Role Room Ext. Hamilton-Hine, Bethan Office Manager Postgraduate Office 2644 Jones, Lynda Office Administrator Postgraduate Office 2127 Jones, Rebecca Owen Office Administrator Postgraduate Office 3192 Owen, Dwynwen Receptionist Reception 3231 Pritchard, Caryl Receptionist Reception 8056 Pritchard, Debbie Office Administrator Postgraduate Office 3023 Additional administrative support is provided by other staff members within Bangor Business School and the College of Business, Social Sciences and Law Administrative Centre. For staff room numbers and contact details, please see below. Name Role Room Ext. Barker, Lyn BBS Office Manager 0.08 Hen Goleg 3032 Ellis, Huw Hughes, Huw Parry, Rachel College Manager IT Coordinator and Teaching Assistant Academic Manager College Administrative Centre Hen Goleg 8601 College Administrative Centre 8197 Wale, Sarah School Manager 0.09 Hen Goleg 8863 Wang, Yizheng Westmoreland, Peter International Liaison and Support Officer Student Liaison and Research Assistant 0.15 Hen Goleg Hen Goleg 3031 The College Reception is open from 9.00am 5.00pm, Monday to Friday, and remains open throughout the lunch period. The support teams aim to provide a friendly, efficient and confidential service to all students. 7

9 3. INFORMATION, ADVICE AND PERSONAL SUPPORT 3.1 Who should I ask for information, advice or assistance with my course? Postgraduate Curriculum Administrators For most routine and administrative enquiries related to your course, your timetable, your assessment and examinations, the Postgraduate Administrators are here to help. Bethan Hamilton-Hine is the Postgraduate Office Manager, and Lynda Jones, Rebecca Owen Jones and Debbie Pritchard are the Postgraduate Administrators. Please visit the College of Business, Social Sciences and Law Reception if you would like to speak to any of these members of staff. If you wish to ask a question without visiting us in person, please send an to one of the following: School Manager Sarah Wale, the Bangor Business School Manager, offers information, advice and support to postgraduate students on a wide variety of matters. Module Organisers Every Bangor Business School module has a named Module Organiser, who is responsible for the academic content and delivery of the module. The names of all Module Organisers can be found in Section 9 of this Handbook. If you encounter an academic problem that is specific to a particular module, please contact the Module Organiser in the first instance. Directors of Postgraduate Studies The Directors of Postgraduate Studies have overall responsibility for the academic management of the postgraduate programmes in Bangor Business School. The Directors of Postgraduate Studies are Gareth Griffiths (Business, Management and Marketing programmes) and Owain ap Gwilym (Accounting, Banking and Finance programmes). They can be seen by prior appointment, to discuss any question or problem relating to your degree course or your academic studies. Senior Tutor John Ashton, the Senior Tutor is available during office hours or by prior appointment for consultation, advice and support on any personal issue that may be affecting your academic studies. Advice, information and support for international students Yizheng Wang, Bangor Business School s International Liaison and Support Officer, offers friendly and informal advice, information and support to international students 8

10 on a wide range of academic and non-academic matters. Head of Bangor Business School John Thornton, Head of Bangor Business School, may be seen whenever available, or by prior appointment, to discuss matters that are of specific concern and that have not been resolved by other means. John Goddard is the Deputy Head of Bangor Business School. College of Business, Social Sciences and Law If there are issues of concern that have not been resolved to your satisfaction by staff members of Bangor Business School, you can contact one of the following staff members at the College of Business, Social Sciences and Law: Huw Ellis, College Manager, or Rachel Parry, Academic Manager. They will ensure the appropriate help and advice are offered, depending upon the nature of the problem. Student Liaison Committee / Student Representatives The Bangor Business School Postgraduate Student Liaison Committee meets twice in each semester. This important committee is chaired by Owain ap Gwilym and Gareth Griffiths, Directors of Postgraduate Studies. During the meeting, Student Representatives are invited to raise any issues, problems or suggestions relating to degree courses, modules, resources, facilities or anything else that we may need to address in order to improve your experience as students within Bangor Business School. Apart from attending the four meetings during the course of the academic year, there is no other commitment if you decide to become a Student Representative. Bangor Business School would like to appoint a good number of Student Representatives from taught and research postgraduate degrees in order to ensure that a full cross-section of views is aired at the Student Liaison Committee meeting. In particular, it is important that we have representatives from across the full range of programmes that we teach. Student Representatives should talk to other students prior to the meeting, in order to gauge other people's views and find out what specific points need to be raised at the meeting. Why not consider volunteering to become a Student Representative? It is a good idea to volunteer, because by doing so you will be helping the School and your fellow students through participation in this important forum. Experience of involvement in this type of activity certainly cannot do any harm, and it might be helpful later on, when you are applying for jobs. At the very least, it looks good to put down on a CV or application form. Calls for volunteers will be made during the first few weeks of Semester 1. If you do not serve as a Student Representative yourself, you can contact any of the Student Representatives if you have any issues or concerns that you wish to be raised at the next meeting of the Student Liaison Committee. The names and contact details of the Student Representatives will be publicised on the Student Liaison Committee Blackboard site. The minutes of the Student Liaison Committee meetings held during the 2011/12 session are reproduced in the Appendix to this Handbook. 9

11 3.2 Who should I approach if I encounter a personal or health-related problem? When you first arrive in Bangor, you will be assigned to a member of academic staff, who will act as your Personal Tutor. There is no problem with changing your Personal Tutor if you wish to do so. Your Personal Tutor s role is to help you navigate your way through your studies, by providing general advice and guidance at critical points. If you are falling behind with your studies, or if you are experiencing any personal, family or health difficulties, you can seek advice and support from your Personal Tutor. Sometimes your Personal Tutor may be able to offer advice directly; on other occasions, your Personal Tutor might suggest that you should seek assistance from the professional counselling services that are available from Student Services. During the first 2-3 weeks of the academic year, an will be sent to your university account to arrange a brief meeting with your Personal Tutor. Attendance at this meeting is compulsory, and non-attendance will be reported in accordance with the Policy on Attendance (see Section 4). You will also be asked to meet your Personal Tutor at other times during the academic year. However, you can ask for an appointment to meet your Personal Tutor at any time you do not have to wait for an invitation! Different Personal Tutors may have slightly different systems for notifying students of their office hours and availability and for making appointments, but if you are unsure the best approach is simply to send your Personal Tutor an requesting an appointment. Your Personal Tutor s primary role is to offer general assistance as well as personal advice and support, but it is NOT to offer assistance with specific academic subjects or modules. This is because your Personal Tutor will probably not be a specialist in the academic subject that might be causing you difficulties at some particular point during your studies. For academic and subject-specific advice and support, please try approaching the Module Organiser in the first instance, or the Directors of Postgraduate Studies, subsequently, if you and the Module Organiser are unable to resolve the problem. If you are unable to contact your Personal Tutor, John Ashton, the Senior Tutor is available during office hours or by prior appointment for consultation, personal advice and support. 10

12 4. POLICY ON ATTENDANCE Residency It is expected that full time students studying at Bangor University will normally live in Bangor or in the immediate vicinity. All students must provide an up to date address and contact telephone number whilst studying at the University. Monitoring Your Attendance The University has a duty of care to its students; ensuring that each student makes the most of the learning opportunities available to them. In line with the Student Charter, students will be expected to attend ALL timetabled teaching sessions for their degree programme. Bangor Business School will monitor: Your attendance at seminars, tutorials, laboratory sessions and on professional placements (including placements for language students) Your attendance at exams Your submission of assignments Your attendance at Personal Tutor / Supervisor meetings Bangor Business School will also undertake a random sampling of attendance at lectures. Any unauthorised absences will be recorded by Bangor Business School. A pointsbased system will be used to record unauthorised absences and the School will monitor your attendance record throughout the year. Points awarded will depend upon the event/activity missed. Where your attendance record gives cause for concern, the School will contact you to discuss the reasons for this and also to identify any additional support that you may require. If any absences occur due to special circumstances (e.g. illness or family bereavement) you must inform the Bangor Business School Postgraduate Office (contact details on p7) as soon as possible so that your records can be updated. To support your absence, the School may seek additional evidence e.g. a doctor s note If you require time away from University and from your studies, you must contact the Bangor Business School Postgraduate Office to inform them of your plans in advance of your absence. If you feel that an unauthorised absence has been mistakenly recorded, you should contact the Bangor Business School Postgraduate Office as soon as possible. 11

13 International Students As an International Student, if you miss a succession of timetabled teaching sessions, Bangor Business School will contact you to discuss further why you have been absent. If the reasons for your unauthorised absences are not deemed satisfactory, the University is obliged by UK law to inform the UK Border Agency which may have consequences for your student visa and on your ability to continue studying in the UK. Therefore it is extremely important that you attend all of your timetabled teaching sessions and inform the Bangor Business School Postgraduate Office if you have any planned absences. If you plan to be absent from the University at any point during your studies as a registered student, you must inform the Bangor Business School Postgraduate Office of your plans well in advance of your absence and ensure that your contact information is up to date. Please remember that you must have a valid student visa for the whole duration of your university course. If you need help with your visa application, please contact the International Student Support Office. 12

14 5. HEALTH AND SAFETY All staff and students of the University are expected to comply with all health and safety arrangements that are in force within the University. It is the legal duty of all staff and students whilst within the University to: 1. take reasonable care for the health and safety of themselves and other persons who may be affected by the way in which they carry out their work; 2. co-operate with all staff and students to enable them to carry out their own health and safety duties; 3. report to supervisory staff any situation, working practice or procedure which they may suspect is potentially hazardous; 4. report incidents to supervisory staff; 5. use, but not misuse, protective clothing, equipment or materials provided; 6. comply with the health and safety instructions, both written and spoken, which are issued to them; 7. use machinery, plant or equipment only with the appropriate guards or safety devices in position. Any persons contravening these requirements may be subject to University disciplinary proceedings or possible legal action. Accident and Incident Reporting All accidents involving injury to staff, students or visitors to the University must be reported to the Department of Health and Safety Services as soon as possible using the report forms provided for this purpose which are available in all Schools and Halls of Residence. If accidents involve serious injury (e.g. major fracture, head injuries, etc.) or if the casualty is taken to hospital, the Department of Health and Safety Services ext must be informed immediately by telephone outside of normal hours call University Security on ext This is necessary because the University has a legal requirement to notify the Health and Safety Executive of such occurrences as soon as they occur. The usual accident report form must also be completed in these cases. In addition to reporting accidents involving injury, impersonal incidents must be reported using the same form. In this context an incident is regarded as an accident in which, fortuitously, no-one was injured. The object of reporting incidents is to help identify potentially dangerous situations. Examples of incidents which should be reported are: near misses by falling objects; explosions in unattended experiments; fires; gas leaks. The Health and Safety Officer for the College of Business, Social Sciences and Law is Huw Ellis, College Manager, ext. 3229, 13

15 Disability Statement Our declared aim in Bangor Business School is to take all possible, practicable steps to enable all our students to participate in all aspects of School life. Equal Opportunities Statement Please note the following: The University will comply with all relevant legislation and good practice and will not tolerate any individual receiving less favourable treatment on grounds of religious or political beliefs, gender, sexual orientation, family circumstance, race or ethnic origin, nationality, age, social or economic class, or disability, and will not be disadvantaged by any other condition or requirement which is not relevant to good practice and cannot be shown to be justifiable. Further Information For additional information relating to general health and safety issues at Bangor University, please refer to the Health and Safety Services website: 14

16 6. UNIVERSITY CALENDAR FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR Semester 1 Week Monday Oct Oct Oct Oct Oct Nov Nov Nov Nov Dec Dec Dec Terms Autumn Term (Teaching) Reading Week Autumn Term (Teaching) Christmas Vacation (3 weeks) Jan Jan Examination Period Semester 2 Week Monday Jan Feb Feb Feb Feb Mar Mar Mar Terms Spring Term (Teaching) Easter Vacation (3 weeks) Apr Apr Apr May May May May June Summer Term (Teaching) Examination Period Full semester details and vacation dates can be viewed online at: The timetable of your lectures and seminars will be available at the start of each semester online at: https://www.bangor.ac.uk/itservices/admin/timetable/ 15

17 7. MODULE SELECTION, TIMETABLE, LECTURES AND TUTORIALS 7.1 Information about modules Your selection of modules is coordinated by the Directors of Postgraduate Studies. You will make your initial selection of modules for Semesters 1 and 2 during Welcome Week. You have three weeks at the start of each semester to make the final choice of your optional modules. After three weeks no student may change modules. You must complete a change of module form (available from the College Reception) if you wish to change your initial choice of optional modules within the first three weeks. Module Organisers will give detailed information in the first lecture of each module. They will provide a detailed course syllabus, details of tutorials, a list of reading material, assessments and examinations. You should also look at the noticeboards in the College Reception for further details and for any changes made to the timetable during the course. Please check your university account regularly, as important information about modules and timetabling will be sent to you in this way. 7.2 Timetable When you have completed module registration and the data has been entered into the University s student records database, your personal timetable will be accessible via inside.bangor.ac.uk/ 360 (see page 87). You can also check the timetable for any module by entering the University s online timetable at the following webpage: https://www.bangor.ac.uk/itservices/admin/timetable/ 7.3 Tutorials For a few modules, the lectures are supplemented by tutorials. It may be necessary to divide some classes into several groups for tutorials. You will be assigned to a tutorial group automatically, and the details will appear in your personal timetable. You should ensure that you know which group you are in, and the timetable and arrangements for your group. If you are uncertain about the arrangements please contact the Module Organiser. Requests to move to a different tutorial group should be sent by to Rachel Parry, Academic Manager for CoBSSL, 7.4 Cancellation of lectures or tutorials Every effort will be made to notify you via if a lecture or tutorial is cancelled. It is very important, therefore, that you check your s before attending a lecture or tutorial. 16

18 8. DEGREE PROGRAMME STRUCTURES The following pages provide a summary of the compulsory and optional modules for each postgraduate degree programme in Bangor Business School. Use the tables to find the module requirements of your degree programme. Please note that the following information is correct at the time of printing. Since our degree programmes and modules are reviewed on a regular basis, you are asked to consult the online gazettes for updates to module and degree programme information. The online gazette can be accessed by clicking on the module information icon under quick links on the Bangor University Intranet page or via: 17

19 MSc ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE Compulsory modules (90 credits) Semester Credits ASB-4403 International Financial Markets 1 15 ASB-4418 Accounting Theory 1 15 ASB-4601 Research Methods 1 15 ASB-4406 Financial Analysis 2 15 ASB-4419 Advanced Financial Reporting and Regulation 2 15 ASB-4420 Management Accounting 2 15 Optional modules (30 credits) ASB-4414 Corporate Risk Management 1 15 ASB-4424 Islamic Finance 1 15 ASB-4405 International Financial Management 2 15 ASB-4408 Financial Econometrics 2 15 ASB-4425 Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management 2 15 ASB-4427 Islamic Accounting and Financial Reporting 2 15 ASB-4437 Merger and Acquisition 2 15 ASB-4903 ASB Credits Either Financial Research Seminar Series or MSc Dissertation Summer 2 + Summer MBA BANKING AND FINANCE Compulsory modules (75 credits) Semester Credits ASB-4411 International Banking 1 15 ASB-4415 Management Research 1 15 ASB-4431 Organisations and People 1 15 ASB-4402 Bank Financial Management 2 15 ASB-4407 Financial Institutions Strategic Management 2 15 Optional modules (45 credits) ASB-4006 Marketing Strategy ASB-4409 Banking and Development 1 15 ASB-4413 Strategic Management ASB-4424 Islamic Finance 1 15 ASB-4432 Marketing Financial Services ASB-4405 International Financial Management 2 15 ASB-4423 Islamic Banking $ 2 15 ASB-4426 Contemporary Issues in Management 2 15 ASB-4434 Financial Intermediation 2 15 ASB-4437 Merger and Acquisition 2 15 Taught Summer Programme or Dissertation (60 credits) ASB-4904 ASB-4901 Either Applied Business Projects or MBA Dissertation Summer 2 + Summer + Your optional modules must include either ASB-4006 Marketing Strategy or ASB-4413 Strategic Management or ASB-4432 Marketing Financial Services. $ ASB-4424 Islamic Finance is a pre-requisite for ASB-4423 Islamic Banking

20 MA BANKING AND FINANCE Compulsory modules (75 credits) Semester Credits ASB-4403 International Financial Markets 1 15 ASB-4411 International Banking 1 15 ASB-4601 Research Methods 1 15 ASB-4402 Bank Financial Management 2 15 ASB-4405 International Financial Management 2 15 Optional modules (45 credits) ASB-4414 Corporate Risk Management 1 15 ASB-4424 Islamic Finance 1 15 ASB-4406 Financial Analysis 2 15 ASB-4407 Financial Institutions Strategic Management 2 15 ASB-4423 Islamic Banking $ 2 15 ASB-4425 Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management 2 15 ASB-4430 Financial Crises and Bank Regulation 2 15 ASB-4433 Behavioural Finance 2 15 ASB-4434 Financial Intermediation 2 15 ASB-4437 Merger and Acquisition 2 15 Taught Summer Programme or Dissertation (60 credits) ASB-4903 ASB-4900 Either Financial Research Seminar Series or MA Dissertation $ ASB-4424 Islamic Finance is a pre-requisite for ASB-4423 Islamic Banking. Summer 2 + Summer MSc BANKING AND FINANCE Compulsory modules (90 credits) Semester Credits ASB-4403 International Financial Markets 1 15 ASB-4411 International Banking 1 15 ASB-4416 Financial Modelling 1 15 ASB-4601 Research Methods 1 15 ASB-4402 Bank Financial Management 2 15 ASB-4408 Financial Econometrics 2 15 Optional modules (30 credits) ASB-4424 Islamic Finance 1 15 ASB-4406 Financial Analysis 2 15 ASB-4407 Financial Institutions Strategic Management 2 15 ASB-4417 Financial Engineering 2 15 ASB-4423 Islamic Banking $ 2 15 ASB-4425 Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management 2 15 ASB-4430 Financial Crises and Bank Regulation 2 15 ASB-4433 Behavioural Finance 2 15 ASB-4434 Financial Intermediation 2 15 ASB-4437 Merger and Acquisition 2 15 Taught Summer Programme or Dissertation (60 credits) ASB-4903 ASB-4902 Either Financial Research Seminar Series or MSc Dissertation $ ASB-4424 Islamic Finance is a pre-requisite for ASB-4423 Islamic Banking. Summer 2 + Summer

21 MA BUSINESS AND MARKETING Compulsory modules (105 credits) Semester Credits ASB-4006 Marketing Strategy 1 15 ASB-4413 Strategic Management 1 15 ASB-4415 Management Research 1 15 ASB-4431 Organisations and People 1 15 ASB-4010 New Venture Creation 2 15 ASB-4429 Entrepreneurial Marketing 2 15 ASB-4521 Marketing Communication 2 15 Optional modules (15 credits) ASB-4030 Knowledge Management 1 15 ASB-4426 Contemporary Issues in Management 2 15 ASB-4516 Public Sector Management 2 15 Taught Summer Programme or Dissertation (60 credits) ASB-4904 ASB-4900 Either Applied Business Projects or MA Dissertation Summer 2 + Summer MBA FINANCE Compulsory modules (75 credits) Semester Credits ASB-4403 International Financial Markets 1 15 ASB-4415 Management Research 1 15 ASB-4431 Organisations & People 1 15 ASB-4405 International Financial Management 2 15 ASB-4425 Investment Strategy & Portfolio Management 2 15 Optional modules (45 credits) ASB-4413 Strategic Management ASB-4416 Financial Modelling 1 15 ASB-4424 Islamic Finance 1 15 ASB-4432 Marketing Financial Services ASB-4407 Financial Institutions Strategic Management 2 15 ASB-4423 Islamic Banking $ 2 15 ASB-4426 Contemporary Issues in Management 2 15 ASB-4430 Financial Crises and Bank Regulation 2 15 ASB-4437 Merger and Acquisition 2 15 Taught Summer Programme or Dissertation (60 credits) ASB-4904 ASB-4900 Either Applied Business Projects or MA Dissertation Summer 2 + Summer + Your optional modules must include either ASB-4413 Strategic Management or ASB-4432 Marketing Financial Services. $ ASB-4424 Islamic Finance is a pre-requisite for ASB-4423 Islamic Banking

22 MA FINANCE Compulsory modules (75 credits) Semester Credits ASB-4403 International Financial Markets 1 15 ASB-4414 Corporate Risk Management 1 15 ASB-4601 Research Methods 1 15 ASB-4405 International Financial Management 2 15 ASB-4425 Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management 2 15 Optional modules (45 credits) ASB-4416 Financial Modelling 1 15 ASB-4418 Accounting Theory 1 15 ASB-4424 Islamic Finance 1 15 ASB-4406 Financial Analysis 2 15 ASB-4407 Financial Institutions Strategic Management 2 15 ASB-4419 Advanced Financial Reporting and Regulation 2 15 ASB-4423 Islamic Banking $ 2 15 ASB-4430 Financial Crises and Bank Regulation 2 15 ASB-4433 Behavioural Finance 2 15 ASB-4437 Merger and Acquisition 2 15 Taught Summer Programme or Dissertation (60 credits) ASB-4903 ASB-4900 Either Financial Research Seminar Series or MA Dissertation $ ASB-4424 Islamic Finance is a pre-requisite for ASB-4423 Islamic Banking. Summer 2 + Summer MSc FINANCE Compulsory modules (90 credits) Semester Credits ASB-4403 International Financial Markets 1 15 ASB-4416 Financial Modelling 1 15 ASB-4601 Research Methods 1 15 ASB-4408 Financial Econometrics 2 15 ASB-4417 Financial Engineering 2 15 ASB-4425 Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management 2 15 Optional modules (30 credits) ASB-4414 Corporate Risk Management 1 15 ASB-4424 Islamic Finance 1 15 ASB-4405 International Financial Management 2 15 ASB-4406 Financial Analysis 2 15 ASB-4407 Financial Institutions Strategic Management 2 15 ASB-4430 Financial Crises and Bank Regulation 2 15 ASB-4433 Behavioural Finance 2 15 ASB-4437 Merger and Acquisition 2 15 Taught Summer Programme or Dissertation (60 credits) ASB-4903 ASB-4902 Either Financial Research Seminar Series or MSc Dissertation Summer 2 + Summer

23 MSc INTERNATIONAL BANKING AND DEVELOPMENT FINANCE Compulsory modules (75 credits) Semester Credits ASB-4403 International Financial Markets 1 15 ASB-4409 Banking and Development 1 15 ASB-4411 International Banking 1 15 ASB-4601 Research Methods 1 15 ASB-4402 Bank Financial Management 2 15 Optional modules (45 credits) ASB-4424 Islamic Finance 1 15 ASB-4405 International Financial Management 2 15 ASB-4407 Financial Institutions Strategic Management 2 15 ASB-4408 Financial Econometrics 2 15 ASB-4423 Islamic Banking $ 2 15 ASB-4425 Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management 2 15 ASB-4430 Financial Crises and Bank Regulation 2 15 ASB-4433 Behavioural Finance 2 15 ASB-4434 Financial Intermediation 2 15 ASB-4437 Merger and Acquisition 2 15 Taught Summer Programme or Dissertation (60 credits) ASB-4903 ASB-4902 Either Financial Research Seminar Series or MSc Dissertation $ ASB-4424 Islamic Finance is a pre-requisite for ASB-4423 Islamic Banking. Summer 2 + Summer MBA ISLAMIC BANKING AND FINANCE Compulsory modules (75 credits) Semester Credits ASB-4411 International Banking 1 15 ASB-4415 Management Research 1 15 ASB-4424 Islamic Finance 1 15 ASB-4431 Organisations and People 1 15 ASB-4423 Islamic Banking 2 15 Optional modules (45 credits) ASB-4006 Marketing Strategy ASB-4409 Banking and Development 1 15 ASB-4413 Strategic Management ASB-4432 Marketing Financial Services ASB-4426 Contemporary Issues in Management 2 15 ASB-4427 Islamic Accounting and Financial Reporting 2 15 ASB-4428 Islamic Insurance 2 15 ASB-4434 Financial Intermediation 2 15 ASB-4437 Merger and Acquisition 2 15 Taught Summer Programme or Dissertation (60 credits) ASB-4904 ASB-4901 Either Applied Business Projects or MBA Dissertation Summer 2 + Summer + Your optional modules must include either ASB-4006 Marketing Strategy or ASB-4413 Strategic Management or ASB-4432 Marketing Financial Services

24 MA ISLAMIC BANKING AND FINANCE Compulsory modules (75 credits) Semester Credits ASB-4403 International Financial Markets 1 15 ASB-4411 International Banking 1 15 ASB-4424 Islamic Finance 1 15 ASB-4601 Research Methods 1 15 ASB-4423 Islamic Banking 2 15 Optional modules (45 credits) ASB-4414 Corporate Risk Management 1 15 ASB-4402 Bank Financial Management 2 15 ASB-4407 Financial Institutions Strategic Management 2 15 ASB-4425 Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management 2 15 ASB-4427 Islamic Accounting and Financial Reporting 2 15 ASB-4428 Islamic Insurance 2 15 ASB-4430 Financial Crises and Bank Regulation 2 15 ASB-4433 Behavioural Finance 2 15 ASB-4434 Financial Intermediation 2 15 ASB-4437 Merger and Acquisition 2 15 Taught Summer Programme or Dissertation (60 credits) ASB-4903 ASB-4900 Either Financial Research Seminar Series or MA Dissertation Summer 2 + Summer MSc ISLAMIC BANKING AND FINANCE Compulsory modules (90 credits) Semester Credits ASB-4403 International Financial Markets 1 15 ASB-4411 International Banking 1 15 ASB-4424 Islamic Finance 1 15 ASB-4601 Research Methods 1 15 ASB-4408 Financial Econometrics 2 15 ASB-4423 Islamic Banking 2 15 Optional modules (30 credits) ASB-4414 Corporate Risk Management 1 15 ASB-4407 Financial Institutions Strategic Management 2 15 ASB-4425 Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management 2 15 ASB-4427 Islamic Accounting and Financial Reporting 2 15 ASB-4428 Islamic Insurance 2 15 ASB-4430 Financial Crises and Bank Regulation 2 15 ASB-4433 Behavioural Finance 2 15 ASB-4434 Financial Intermediation 2 15 ASB-4437 Merger and Acquisition 2 15 Taught Summer Programme or Dissertation (60 credits) ASB-4903 ASB-4902 Either Financial Research Seminar Series or MSc Dissertation Summer 2 + Summer

25 MA MANAGEMENT AND FINANCE Compulsory modules (90 credits) Semester Credits ASB-4403 International Financial Markets 1 15 ASB-4413 Strategic Management 1 15 ASB-4431 Organisations and People 1 15 ASB-4601 Research Methods 1 15 ASB-4010 New Venture Creation 2 15 ASB-4405 International Financial Management 2 15 Optional modules (30 credits) ASB-4030 Knowledge Management 1 15 ASB-4424 Islamic Finance 1 15 ASB-4406 Financial Analysis 2 15 ASB-4425 Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management 2 15 ASB-4426 Contemporary Issues in Management 2 15 ASB-4433 Behavioural Finance 2 15 ASB-4437 Merger and Acquisition 2 15 ASB-4516 Public Sector Management 2 15 Taught Summer Programme or Dissertation (60 credits) ASB-4903 ASB-4900 Either Financial Research Seminar Series or MA Dissertation Summer 2 + Summer MSc MANAGEMENT AND FINANCE Compulsory modules (105 credits) Semester Credits ASB-4403 International Financial Markets 1 15 ASB-4413 Strategic Management 1 15 ASB-4431 Organisations and People 1 15 ASB-4601 Research Methods 1 15 ASB-4010 New Venture Creation 2 15 ASB-4405 International Financial Management 2 15 ASB-4408 Financial Econometrics 2 15 Optional modules (15 credits) ASB-4030 Knowledge Management 1 15 ASB-4416 Financial Modelling 1 15 ASB-4424 Islamic Finance 1 15 ASB-4406 Financial Analysis 2 15 ASB-4425 Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management 2 15 ASB-4426 Contemporary Issues in Management 2 15 ASB-4433 Behavioural Finance 2 15 ASB-4437 Merger and Acquisition 2 15 Taught Summer Programme or Dissertation (60 credits) ASB-4903 ASB-4902 Either Financial Research Seminar Series or MSc Dissertation Summer 2 + Summer

26 MBA MANAGEMENT Compulsory modules (75 credits) Semester Credits ASB-4006 Marketing Strategy 1 15 ASB-4413 Strategic Management 1 15 ASB-4415 Management Research 1 15 ASB-4431 Organisations and People 1 15 ASB-4007 Finance for Managers 2 15 Optional modules (45 credits) ASB-4030 Knowledge Management 1 15 ASB-4010 New Venture Creation 2 15 ASB-4405 International Financial Management 2 15 ASB-4426 Contemporary Issues in Management 2 15 ASB-4516 Public Sector Management 2 15 Taught Summer Programme or Dissertation (60 credits) ASB-4904 ASB-4901 Either Applied Business Projects or MBA Dissertation Summer 2+Summer MBA MARKETING Compulsory modules (105 credits) Semester Credits ASB-4006 Marketing Strategy 1 15 ASB-4413 Strategic Management 1 15 ASB-4415 Management Research 1 15 ASB-4431 Organisations and People 1 15 ASB-4007 Finance for Managers 2 15 ASB-4429 Entrepreneurial Marketing 2 15 ASB-4521 Marketing Communication 2 15 Optional modules (15 credits) ASB-4030 Knowledge Management 1 15 ASB-4432 Marketing Financial Services 1 15 ASB-4010 New Venture Creation 2 15 ASB-4426 Contemporary Issues in Management 2 15 ASB-4516 Public Sector Management 2 15 Taught Summer Programme or Dissertation (60 credits) ASB-4904 ASB-4901 Either Applied Business Projects or MBA Dissertation Summer 2+Summer

27 MBA BANKING AND LAW Compulsory modules (90 credits) Semester Credits ASB-4411 International Banking 1 15 ASB-4415 Management Research 1 15 ASB-4431 Organisations and People 1 15 ASB-4402 Bank Financial Management 2 15 ASB-4407 Financial Institutions Strategic Management 2 15 SXL-4405 International Banking and Capital Markets Law 2 15 Optional modules (30 credits) SXL-4404 Intellectual Property Law 1 15 SXL-4406 International Commercial Arbitration 1 15 SXL-4410 Global Trade Law 1 15 SXL-4411 Comparative Corporate Governance 1 15 SXL-4414 Employment Law 1 15 SXL-4421 International Environmental Law 1 15 SXL-4424 European Union Internal Market Law 1 15 SXL-4401 Competition Law 2 15 SXL-4403 International Insurance Law 2 15 SXL-4413 International Taxation Law 2 15 Taught Summer Programme or Dissertation (60 credits) ASB-4904 ASB-4901 Either Applied Business Projects or MBA Dissertation Summer 2+Summer MA BANKING AND LAW Compulsory modules (75 credits) Semester Credits ASB-4411 International Banking 1 15 ASB-4601 Research Methods 1 15 ASB-4402 Bank Financial Management 2 15 ASB-4407 Financial Institutions Strategic Management 2 15 SXL-4405 International Banking and Capital Markets Law 2 15 Optional modules + (45 credits) ASB-4430 Financial Crises and Bank Regulation 2 15 ASB-4434 Financial Intermediation 2 15 SXL-4404 Intellectual Property Law 1 15 SXL-4406 International Commercial Arbitration 1 15 SXL-4410 Global Trade Law 1 15 SXL-4411 Comparative Corporate Governance 1 15 SXL-4414 Employment Law 1 15 SXL-4421 International Environmental Law 1 15 SXL-4424 European Union Internal Market Law 1 15 SXL-4401 Competition Law 2 15 SXL-4403 International Insurance Law 2 15 SXL-4413 International Taxation Law 2 15 Taught Summer Programme or Dissertation (60 credits) ASB-4904 ASB-4900 Either Applied Business Projects or MA Dissertation Summer 2 + Summer + Your optional modules must include 15 credits Banking (ASB codes) and 30 credits Law (SXL codes)

28 MBA LAW AND MANAGEMENT Compulsory modules (60 credits) Semester Credits ASB-4415 Management Research 1 15 ASB-4431 Organisations and People 1 15 SXL-4411 Comparative Corporate Governance 1 15 ASB-4007 Finance for Managers 2 15 Optional modules + (60 credits) ASB-4006 Marketing Strategy 1 15 ASB-4030 Knowledge Management 1 15 ASB-4413 Strategic Management 1 15 SXL-4404 Intellectual Property Law 1 15 SXL-4406 International Commercial Arbitration 1 15 SXL-4410 Global Trade Law 1 15 SXL-4414 Employment Law 1 15 SXL-4421 International Environmental Law 1 15 ASB-4010 New Venture Creation 2 15 ASB-4426 Contemporary Issues in Management 2 15 SXL-4401 Competition Law 2 15 SXL-4403 International Insurance Law 2 15 SXL-4405 International Banking and Capital Markets Law 2 15 SXL-4413 International Taxation Law 2 15 Taught Summer Programme or Dissertation (60 credits) ASB-4904 ASB-4901 Either Applied Business Projects or MBA Dissertation Summer 2+Summer + Your optional modules must include 30 credits Management (ASB codes) and 30 credits Law (SXL codes) MBA INFORMATION MANAGEMENT Compulsory modules (120 credits) Semester Credits ASB-4413 Strategic Management 1 15 ASB-4415 Management Research 1 15 ASB-4431 Organisations and People 1 15 ICP-4125 Web Technologies 1 15 ASB-4007 Finance for Managers 2 15 ICP-4121 Databases 2 15 ICP-4123 Technologies for Internet Systems 2 15 ICP-4143 Information Systems 2 15 Taught Summer Programme (60 credits) ASB-4905 Applied Business Projects Summer 60 27

29 MA/MSc BUSINESS WITH CONSUMER PSYCHOLOGY Compulsory modules (75 credits) Semester Credits ASB-4006 Marketing Strategy 1 15 ASB-4415 Management Research 1 15 PCP-4004 Consumer Psychology 1 15 PCP-4007 Nudges and Behavioural Change 1 15 PRP-4009 Applied Consumer Psychology 2 15 Optional modules (45 credits) ASB-4431 Organisations and People 1 15 ASB-4007 Finance for Managers 2 15 ASB-4010 New Venture Creation 2 15 ASB-4426 $ Contemporary Issues in Management 2 15 ASB-4429 Entrepreneurial Marketing 2 15 ASB-4521 Marketing Communication 2 15 Dissertation (60 credits) ASB-4900 ASB-4902 Either MA Dissertation or MSc Dissertation 2 + Summer 2 + Summer $ ASB-4431 Organisations and People is a pre-requisite for ASB-4426 Contemporary Issues in Management MBA ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Compulsory modules (65 credits) Semester Credits ASB-4413 Strategic Management 1 15 ASB-4415 Management Research 1 15 ASB-4431 Organisations and People 1 15 DXX-4524 Strategic Environmental Management 1 20 Optional modules (55 credits) ASB-4007 Finance for Managers 2 15 DXX-4518 Green Economies 2 20 DXX-4525 Green Technologies 2 20 Dissertation (60 credits) ASB-4901 MBA Dissertation 2 + Summer 60 MA/MSc CONSUMER PSYCHOLOGY WITH BUSINESS Please refer to the online gazettes or to the School of Psychology for module details. 28

30 9. SUMMARY MODULE OUTLINES This section contains summary outlines for all Bangor Business School postgraduate modules. More detailed module outlines will be provided by the Module Organisers at the start of each module. For Law and Psychology modules you should consult the online gazette: The details given in the summary module outlines are subject to change from time to time. In particular, you should check with the Module Organiser before you commit to purchasing a textbook. 29

31 ASB-4006 MARKETING STRATEGY Credits: 15 Contact hours: 30 Semester: 1 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Stephen Jones Aims: To introduce the fundamentals of marketing, by illustrating strategies in a wide range of situations, and covering the various schools of thought in marketing, together with relevant analytical models and management practices. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Demonstrate basic understanding and knowledge of concepts of marketing; Appreciate the wide-ranging applications in which marketing applies and the adjustments required; Analyse specific situations and propose appropriate marketing strategies; Evaluate the challenges of implementing effective strategies. Module Content: The philosophy and process of marketing, including service operations; Planning in the marketing environment; Market research to understand the consumer; Organisational Behaviour as Buyers and Suppliers; Creating value for customers; Managing Competition and Managing Products; Communicating Value for Customers, versus Competitors; Implementing Integrated Marketing; Future threats and opportunities? Internet, International and Integrity. Teaching Format: One 2-hour lecture per week. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (100%). Text(s): Jobber, D. (2009). Principles and practice of marketing, 6th ed. McGraw-Hill. Fisk, R.P., Grove, S.J. and John, J. (2008). Interactive services marketing, 3rd ed. South Western. 30

32 ASB-4007 FINANCE FOR MANAGERS Credits: 15 Contact hours: 30 Semester: 2 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Colin Bradley Aims: To enable students to gain a basic understanding of accounting and financial management, by examining basic principles and concepts in accounting statements and financial information so that they can be used to improve the quality of decision-making. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Appreciate the need for, and gain an understanding of, the principles underlying the preparation of accounting information; Understand the principles used in recording business transactions and be able to prepare and analyse financial statements; Understand the use of accounting information for decision-making, planning and control. Module Content: The different roles of accounting and its relationship to shareholder value and business structure; Measuring and reporting financial performance: the balance sheet and the profit and loss account; Management control and the use of budgets; The role of accounting information in marketing, operating, human resource and accounting decisions; Strategic investment decisions; The management of working capital; Sources of finance and financial markets. Teaching Format: One 2-hour lecture per week; One workshop per week. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (60%); Coursework assignment (40%). Text(s): Collier, P. (2006). Accounting for managers: Interpreting accounting information for decisionmaking. Wiley. 31

33 ASB-4010 NEW VENTURE CREATION Credits: 15 Contact hours: 25 Semester: 2 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Siwan Mitchelmore Aims: To evaluate the role of entrepreneurs and small firms as the lifeblood of an economy; to examine their contribution to innovation, wealth creation and employment; and to gain insights into the concepts of entrepreneurship and routes to new venture creation. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Identify the characteristics of entrepreneurs and appreciate the different types of entrepreneur that can exist and their role in society; Understand the role of entrepreneurship in new venture development; Understand the role of small firm in the economy; Demonstrate familiarity with the routes available to new venture creation; Evaluate and screen new venture opportunities. Module Content: Entrepreneurship theory and evolution of the concept; Starting your own business; Franchising; Buying a business; Succeeding in family business. Teaching Format: One 3-hour lecture per week. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (50%); Coursework assignment (50%). Text(s): Kirby, D. (2002). Entrepreneurship. McGraw-Hill. Timmons, J. and Spinelli, S. (2004). New venture creation: Entrepreneurship for the 21st century. McGraw-Hill/Irwin. Zimmerer, T. and Scarborough, N. (2008). Essentials of entrepreneurship and small business management. Pearson. 32

34 ASB-4030 KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT Credits: 15 Contact hours: 30 Semester: 1 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Clair Doloriert Aims: To develop a critical understanding of Knowledge Management theory from a multidisciplinary perspective. To explore whether knowledge can be managed, and other topical debates relating knowledge workers, sharing and hoarding, and organisational learning. To explore knowledge management as an implicit versus explicit strategy and its organisational fit with strategy, innovation and culture. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Develop an epistemic awareness of the nature of knowledge within organisations and the practical significance this has for Knowledge Managers; Develop a critical awareness of some of the key KM and OL models within the research literature, and of how such models inform practice; Develop a critical awareness of organisational challenges associated with knowledge work and sharing; Explore the challenges of international KM and KM across borders and nations, and the impact of culture on KM; Develop an applied understanding of KM in practice and its importance for learning, communication and effective teamwork. Module Content: The nature of knowledge in organisations; KM strategy, systems and processes; KM in groups and communities of practice; KM culture, HR and leadership; KM and the learning organisation; International KM; Personal KM. Teaching Format: One 3-hour lecture per week. Assessment: Coursework incorporating group activity (100%). Text(s): Hislop, D. (2009). Knowledge management in organizations: A critical introduction. Oxford University Press. 33

35 ASB-4402 BANK FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Credits: 15 Contact hours: 20 Semester: 2 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Yener Altunbas Aims: To provide a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks, and other financial services firms. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Appreciate the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of practical financial management in banks and similar financial service firms; Understand how bank financial management contributes towards meeting a bank s strategic and related objectives; Apply the skills and practical competences needed for high-level financial management in banking; Understand contemporary problems and issues that bear on bank financial management; Develop a suitable analytical framework from the bank financial management corpus to be capable of addressing new and contemporary issues. Module Content: External and internal drivers that shape bank financial management; Financial and performance analysis; Asset and liability management; Lending and securitisation; Risk and capital adequacy; Capital allocation and VAR (Value-At-Risk) modelling; Current issues in bank financial management. Teaching Format: One 2-hour lecture per week; One 1-hour class per fortnight. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (75%); Coursework assignment (25%). Text(s): Saunders, A. and Millon Cornett, M. (2008). Financial institutions management: A risk management approach. Irwin. Hempel, G.H. and Simonson, D.G. (1999). Bank management: Text and cases. John Wiley. Mullineux, A.W. and Murinde, V. (2003). Handbook of international banking. Edward Elgar. Casu, B., Girardone, C. and Molyneux, P. (2006). Introduction to banking. FT Prentice Hall. Matthews, K. and Thompson, J. (2008). The economics of banking. John Wiley. 34

36 ASB-4403 INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL MARKETS Credits: 15 Contact hours: 30 Semester: 1 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Owain ap Gwilym Aims: To provide an introduction to finance theory, and its practical applications for investors, analysts and portfolio managers. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Demonstrate a good understanding of the pricing of the main financial assets traded in international financial markets; Apply finance theory to portfolio selection and asset pricing; Demonstrate an awareness of the implications of finance theory for best practice in investment strategy and portfolio management; Demonstrate a good understanding of the derivative and foreign exchange markets, including the roles of hedging, speculation and arbitrage; Critically evaluate empirical evidence concerning the operation of international financial markets. Module Content: An overview of financial markets and instruments; Review of the concepts of risk and return; Portfolio theory and diversification; The capital asset pricing model; Other asset pricing models; Efficient markets, behavioural finance and anomalies; Hedging, speculation and arbitrage; Foreign exchange and derivative markets; Option characteristics and option pricing; Forwards and futures markets. Teaching Format: One 2-hour lecture and one 1-hour workshop per week. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (75%); Coursework assignment (25%). Text(s): Cuthbertson, K. and Nitzsche, D. (2008). Investments, 2nd ed. Wiley. [main text] Bodie, Z., Kane, A. and Marcus, A.J. (2008). Investments, 7th ed. McGraw-Hill. Elton, E.J., Gruber, M.J., Brown, S.J. and Goetzmann, W.N. (2007). Modern portfolio theory and investment analysis, 7th ed. Wiley. Kolb, R.W. (2003). Futures, options and swaps, 4th ed. Blackwell. 35

37 ASB-4405 INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Credits: 15 Contact hours: 20 Semester: 2 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Lynn Hodgkinson Aims: To analyse the financial management of multinational companies, and the influence of the macroeconomic, fiscal, currency and political environments on financial decision-making. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Evaluate the impact of interest rates and inflation rates on exchange rates and the usefulness of the parity relationships; Assess transaction and economic currency exposures and their management using external (derivatives and money markets) and internal techniques; Evaluate the implications of the globalisation of financial markets for the financial management of multinational companies; Analyse the factors that influence the evaluation and implementation of international investment projects; Evaluate the impact of taxation issues on MNCs, and demonstrate how internal techniques are used to position profits and manage liquidity and risk. Module Content: The financial management of multinational companies (MNCs); The macroeconomic, fiscal, currency and political environments; Determinants of exchange rates, and purchasing power and interest rate parity; Management of exchange rate exposure through forwards, options; Corporate financing decisions and the role of the global financial markets; Cost of capital and performance evaluation; capital investment appraisal; Taxation and its implications for MNC decision-making; Working capital management and the positioning of funds in the MNC. Teaching Format: One 2-hour lecture per week. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (75%); Group coursework assignment, written report and class presentation (15%); 4 on-line tests (2.5% each:10%). Text(s): Moffett, M. H., Stonehill, A. I. and Eiteman, D.K. (2009). Fundamentals of multinational finance, 3rd ed. Pearson. [main text] Eiteman, D. K., Stonehill, A. I. and Moffett, M. H. (2010). Multinational business finance, 12th ed. Pearson. Shapiro, A. C. (2010). Multinational financial management, 9th ed. Wiley. Madura, J. and Fox, R. (2007). International financial management, 8th ed. Thomson South Western. 36

38 ASB-4406 FINANCIAL ANALYSIS Credits: 15 Contact hours: 25 Semester: 2 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Aziz Jaafar Aims: To analyse the techniques that are used to evaluate a company s financial position and performance, and develop a critical awareness of the uses of financial data by capital markets for valuation purposes. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Apply appropriate methodologies in order to produce inter-firm comparisons of performance, and comparisons between the performance of the same firm over time; Appreciate the uses of financial information by capital markets; Demonstrate competence for purposes of equity valuation; Apply basic and advanced techniques for the purposes of financial forecasting and the assessment of equity and credit risk. Module Content: Balance sheet and income statement analysis; Financial ratio analysis and inter-firm comparison; Trend analysis and financial forecasting; Analysis of profitability and growth; The quality of financial statements, and using financial statements in valuation; Cash accounting, accrual accounting and discounted cash flow valuation; Pricing book values and earnings; Assessment of credit and equity risk. Teaching Format: One 2-hour lecture per week; Computer workshop; Workshops included during some lectures. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (75%); Coursework assignment (25%). Text(s): Penman, S.H. (2004). Financial statement analysis and security valuation, 2nd ed. McGraw-Hill. Palepu, K.G., Bernard, V.L. and Healy, P.M. (1999). Business analysis and valuation: Using financial statements, 2nd ed. South-Western and ITP. Rees, B. (1995). Financial analysis, 2nd ed. Prentice Hall. Mayes, T. and Shank, T. (2003). Financial analysis with Microsoft Excel, 3rd ed. Dryden Press. 37

39 ASB-4407 FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT Credits: 15 Contact hours: 20 Semester: 2 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Phil Molyneux Aims: To provide academic training and practical insight into some of the main structural, performance and strategic management problems faced by banks and other financial service firms (FSFs); to provide an appreciation of the kinds of trade-offs and operational difficulties faced by FSFs in developing and implementing strategic management; and to develop an understanding of the competitive environment that shapes practical strategy within banking and other financial firms. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Critically evaluate the rationale for banks and banking business; Analyse the important determinants of bank performance and efficiency; Demonstrate awareness of the dynamic aspects of banking business, such as bank growth and innovation; Critically evaluate theoretical and empirical evidence on the principal determinants of bank behaviour and performance. Module Content: Structure - Performance Relationships in European banking; The Structure of Major Banking Markets; Competition in banking; Financial innovation; Technology in banking; Bank regulation and introduction to risk; Loan sales and securitisation; Internationalisation in banking. Teaching Format: One 2-hour lecture per week. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (60%); Coursework assignment (40%). Text(s): There is no set general text. A list of selected readings, comprising journal articles and book chapters, is provided for each lecture. 38

40 ASB-4408 FINANCIAL ECONOMETRICS Credits: 15 Contact hours: 30 Semester: 2 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Thanos Verousis Aims: To provide advanced coverage of econometric methods and practices that are used to model financial and business data, and to develop a critical awareness of the strengths and limitations of modelling techniques. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Demonstrate an understanding of the key theoretical underpinnings and practical applications of econometrics for financial and business analysts; Design, estimate and evaluate econometric models to financial and business data sets using the Stata econometrics software package; Demonstrate a critical awareness of the implicit assumptions and the limitations underlying empirical models based on financial and business data; Demonstrate an understanding of recent developments in time series econometrics, and their implications for modelling the returns and volatility of financial assets; Critically evaluate academic literature with an empirical content in economics, finance and business. Module Content: Review of the linear regression model: estimation and hypothesis testing; Dynamic regression models: distributed lag and autoregressive models; Non-stationarity and testing for unit roots; Modelling long-run relationships: cointegration; Modelling volatility: univariate ARCH and GARCH models; Regression analysis using panel data. Teaching Format: Two 1-hour lectures per week; One 1-hour computer workshop per week. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (75%); Coursework assignment (25%). Text(s): Brooks, C. (2008). Introductory econometrics for finance, 2nd ed. Cambridge University Press. [main text] Campbell, J., Lo, A. and MacKinlay, A. (1997). The econometrics of financial markets. Princeton University Press. Greene, W.H. (2002). Econometric analysis, 5th ed. Prentice Hall. Wang, P. (2002). Financial econometrics: Methods and models. Routledge. 39

41 ASB-4409 BANKING AND DEVELOPMENT Credits: 15 Contact hours: 20 Semester: 1 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Jonathan Williams Aims: To evaluate the theory underlying the policy of financial liberalisation, and examine its implementation, primarily in developing countries. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Understand why financial development is important in relation to economic growth; Evaluate the general policy prescription of financial liberalisation; Comprehend the importance of institution building; Explain interest rate behaviour after liberalisation; Understand why bank efficiency is an important part of liberalisation programmes; Discuss the role of entry barriers and ownership criteria; Comprehend stock market liberalisation and the process of financial integration; Evaluate arguments for and against capital account liberalisation and consider contagion effects across national financial systems. Module Content: Financial development and economic growth; Developments in financial sector policy; Governance, institutions and law; Financial fragility and the institutional environment; Interest rate spreads and financial liberalisation; Financial liberalisation and bank efficiency; The role and performance of foreign banks; Privatising the banking system; Financial development and the role of stock markets; International capital flows: causes, consequences and policy responses. Teaching Format: One 2-hour lecture per week. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (75%); Coursework assignment (25%). Text(s): There is no core text for this module. A full set of journal article and discussion paper readings is provided for each lecture. 40

42 ASB-4411 INTERNATIONAL BANKING Credits: 15 Contact hours: 20 Semester: 1 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Jonathan Williams Aims: To examine the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk in international banking. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Explain why banks operate across national boundaries, the nature of their presence in foreign banking markets, and identify the characteristics of international financial centres; Understand the expansion of international banking markets and identify where efficiency gains reside; Discuss the issues associated with, and methods used by banks to lend to multinational companies including syndicated lending and the measurement and monitoring of international credit risk; Appraise the causes of major international financial crises and appraise the policy responses of multi-lateral financial institutions; Comprehend the issues relating to the regulation and supervision of international banks. Module Content: The evolution of international banking; International bank activities; International bank strategies; Market structure and bank efficiency; Evaluating country risks; Cross-border bank mergers and acquisitions; Financial crises: the international debt crisis, the Asian crisis, the IMF as crisis manager; Issues in international bank regulation; Beyond the crisis. Teaching Format: One 2-hour lecture per week. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (75%); Coursework assignment (25%). Text(s): Hughes, J.E. and MacDonald, S.B. (2002). International banking: Text and cases. Addison-Wesley. Smith, R.C. and Walter, I. (1997). Global banking. Oxford University Press. 41

43 ASB-4413 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT Credits: 15 Contact hours: 30 Semester: 1 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Gareth Griffiths Aims: To introduce the language of strategy: Explore the link between strategic and operational management; Discuss strategic management as a core management process; Outline the dangers of strategic drift; Ensure familiarity with the work of key writers; To place strategic decision making in a culturally defined, dynamic environment. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Use the terminology of strategic management in an organisational context; Distinguish between and understand the relationship of strategic and operational management; View strategy as a continuing managerial process and appreciate the dangers of drift; Identify and cite the key theorists and concepts; Understand the dynamics of strategic decision making and implementation and the significance of culture and cultural change. Module Content: The concepts of strategic management; The vocabulary of strategy; prescriptive and emergent strategies; Strategy, the organisation and the environment; The core processes: strategic analysis; strategy formulation; strategic choice; Vertical integration; make/buy decision; corporate parenting and internationalisation. Teaching Format: One 2 hour session per week which will consist of formal lectures, group discussions and the extensive use of case studies. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (100%). Text(s): Johnson, G., Whittington, R. and Scholes, K. (2011). Exploring strategy: Text and cases, 9 th ed., FT Prentice Hall. Johnson, G., Scholes, K. and Whittington, R. (2008). Exploring corporate strategy, 8th ed., FT Prentice Hall. 42

44 ASB-4414 CORPORATE RISK MANAGEMENT Credits: 15 Contact hours: 20 Semester: 1 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Dave Ayling Aims: To provide an understanding of pure risk and its management; to provide an analytical background to identifying, measuring, controlling and financing loss exposures; to examine decision rules for choosing between alternative risk management strategies; and to apply risk management concepts and techniques in practical situations. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Understand the risk management function in business, risks faced by business organisations, risk management objectives and the interaction of risk management with other business functions; Understand principles of risk identification and measurement (including the uses and limitations of probability distributions) and costs and benefits of risk control and financing techniques; Understand the uses and limitations of insurance within the overall risk management strategy and interactions between insurance and internal risk management activities. Module Content: The nature of risk management; Risk identification; Business loss exposures; Risk measurement; Probability distributions (uses and limitations); Risk control tools; Risk financing tools; Influence of the market on risk management decisions; The interdependence of insurance and loss prevention decision; Insurance versus alternatives. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (60%); Coursework assignment, comprising a written essay and a class presentation (40%). Teaching Format: One 2-hour lecture per week. Text(s): Harrington, S.E. and Niehaus, G.R. (2004). Risk management and insurance, 2nd ed. McGraw-Hill. Williams, C.A. Jr., Smith, M.L. and Young, P.C. (1998). Risk management and insurance, 8th ed. McGraw-Hill. 43

45 ASB-4415 MANAGEMENT RESEARCH Credits: 15 Contact hours: 30 Semester: 1 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Bernardo Bátiz-Lazo Aims: To examine key methodological issues and approaches to research in the management sciences, and to critically evaluate the strengths and limitations of data gathered from interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Demonstrate an awareness of the historical development of both quantitative and qualitative approaches to research in management; Explain how a researcher s philosophical position may influence the choice of research methods; Critically evaluate the shift towards qualitative and interpretive research in management; Compare, contrast and critically evaluate alternative research strategies and designs; Demonstrate the capability to employ the most appropriate method of analysis to any specific business or management research agenda. Module Content: Research methodologies and philosophy: positivism and interpretivism; Qualitative research methods and the search for meaning; The process: selecting a research strategy and design; Data gathering, documentary records, triangulation and mixed methods; Content analysis, conversation analysis, discourse analysis, grounded theory; Quantitative research design and methodologies; Analysis of quantitative data; Univariate and multivariate analysis, factor analysis, cluster analysis, manova and mancova, discriminant analysis. Teaching Format: One 2-hour lecture per week; One 1-hour class per fortnight. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (60%); Coursework assignment (40%). Text(s): Karami, A. ed., (2010). Management research: Custom publication. Palgrave Macmillan. 44

46 ASB-4416 FINANCIAL MODELLING Credits: 15 Contact hours: 28 Semester: 1 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Qingwei Wang Aims: To provide an introduction to techniques of financial modelling and the practical implementation of financial models in Microsoft Excel. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Demonstrate a good understanding of the process of financial modelling; Demonstrate understanding of the theoretical and mathematical background underpinning the financial modelling of the core finance topics covered in the module; Implement financial models in Microsoft Excel, demonstrating good modelling practice in addition to sound analytical skills; Demonstrate a good understanding of practical applications of financial modelling skills. Module Content: Valuation of Financial Cash Flows and Rates of Return; Expected return models and Event Studies in Finance; The Law of One Price in finance and pricing financial claims via arbitrage; Portfolio Theory and the modelling of Investment Portfolios; Value at Risk; Bootstrap Methods; Brownian Motion; Monte Carlo methods in finance; Pricing financial claims via replication and Black-Scholes option pricing. Teaching Format: One 3-hour lecture per week (7 weeks); Accompanying computer lab sessions. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (60%); Coursework assignment (40%). Text(s): Benninga, S. (2008). Financial modeling, 3rd ed. MIT Press. 45

47 ASB-4417 FINANCIAL ENGINEERING Credits: 15 Contact hours: 28 Semester: 2 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Gwion Williams Aims: To provide an introduction to the key concepts of financial engineering and financial innovation from a practical perspective. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Demonstrate a good understanding of the core principles of financial innovation and financial engineering; Apply the methods of financial engineering to create new and "as new" financial products; Understand the importance of both pricing and hedging methodologies and how these may be implemented; Demonstrate understanding of the broader range of risks associated with financial engineering, including legal and reputational risks, and the means by which these may be mitigated; Provide and discuss examples of past financial innovations, highlighting as appropriate the reasons for the innovation, the parties and techniques involved, and the rationale for the ultimate success or otherwise of the innovation. Module Content: Introduction to financial engineering; Static replication creation, decomposition, and analysis of financial products; Dynamic replication; Hedging strategies; Convexity, volatility and credit risk in financial engineering; Case studies in financial engineering. Teaching Format: One 3-hour lecture per week (7 weeks); Accompanying computer lab sessions. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (75%); Coursework assignment (25%). Text(s): Hull, J.C. (2006). Options, futures and other derivatives, 6th ed. FT Prentice Hall. Neftci, S.H. (2004). Principles of financial engineering. Elsevier Academic Press. Campbell, J.Y., Lo, A.W. and MacKinlay, A.C. (1997). The econometrics of financial markets. Princeton University Press. 46

48 ASB-4418 ACCOUNTING THEORY Credits: 15 Contact hours: 30 Semester: 1 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Doris Merkl-Davies Aims: To critically evaluate the various theories in accounting and to understand how accounting theories can be used to explain the behaviour of preparers and users of accounting information. Learning Outcomes: On successfully completing this module, students are expected to be able to: Critically evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various accounting theories; Analyse the development and intellectual underpinning of rival theories that seek to explain accounting behaviour; Analyse the structure of the key accounting theories; Analyse the options and strategy of accounting regulators; Examine the nature and content of key accounting standards in relation to their theoretical content. Module Content: Introduction to financial accounting theory; Theories of regulation; Normative theories of accounting; Positive accounting theory; Behavioural accounting theories; Systems-oriented theories; Critical accounting theories. Teaching Format: One 2-hour lecture per week; One 1-hour tutorial every other week. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (75%); Coursework assignment (25%). Text(s): Gaffikin, M. (2008). Accounting theory: Research, regulation and accounting practice, 1st ed. Pearson. [Main text] Drever, M., Stanton, P. and McGowan, S. (2007). Contemporary issues in accounting, 1st ed. Wiley. [Main text] Deegan, C. and Unerman, J. (2006). Financial accounting theory, European edition, 1st ed. McGraw-Hill. Godfrey, J., Hodgson, A., Holmes, S. and Tarca, A. (2006). Accounting theory, 6th ed. Wiley. 47

49 ASB-4419 ADVANCED FINANCIAL REPORTING AND REGULATION Credits: 15 Contact hours: 20 Semester: 2 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Aziz Jaafar Aims: To enhance students understanding of advanced topics in financial reporting and regulation within the context of International Accounting Standards and GAAP, to assess the impact of accounting theory and regulation in resolving key reporting issues, and to examine the importance of relevant academic research to the area. Learning Outcomes: On successfully completing this module, students are expected to be able to: Understand and explain the options and strategies of accounting regulators, in particular in relation to the evolution of international GAAP and the conceptual framework; Analyse the development and intellectual underpinning of key financial reporting standards; Explain the relationship between accounting information and capital markets and evaluate this relationship with reference to empirical evidence; Analyse, summarise and synthesise independently researched academic and professional studies of financial reporting and regulation. Module Content: Evolution of international GAAP and the conceptual framework; Regulatory environment of financial reporting; Accounting for business combinations; Accounting for goodwill and intangible assets; Earnings management; Financial reporting and capital markets. Teaching Format: One 2-hour lecture per week; Advanced seminars and workshops (3 hours). Assessment: 2-hour written examination (75%); Coursework assignment (25%). Text(s): Alexander, D., Britton, A. and Jorissen, A. (2005). International financial reporting and analysis, 2nd ed. Thomson. Ernst and Young. (2007). International GAAP. Lexis Nexis. 48

50 ASB-4420 MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING Credits: 15 Contact hours: 20 Semester: 2 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Wendy Ashurst Aims: To enable students to understand appropriate management accounting techniques and methods and provide them with the ability to apply them. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Demonstrate an analytical understanding of cost classification, cost assignment, and the ability to apply linear and non-linear models to pricing and analysis; Develop a practical ability to assign service department costs, to assist in operational decision making; Develop a rigorous appreciation of the concepts and principles of variance analysis, and the understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the methods used; Understand the methods, principles and application of the allocation of joint product costs; Understand cost and effect, based on case research and application to appropriate cases; Understand the application of the principles of Activity Based Costing (ABC) and Strategic Activity Based Management (SABM) to the organisation and its strategic aims. Module Content: The use of financial data in assessing business performance; Using this data to set the strategic aims of the organisation; The methods available to the management accountant for developing effective management in any specific situation; Cost classification, allocation and the use of various analytical models; Discussion of the issues of variance analysis; Study of ABC and SABM principles, their strengths and weaknesses, and their place in current management thinking. Teaching Format: Two 1-hour lectures per week. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (75%); Coursework assignment (25%). Text(s): Drury, C. (2007). Management and cost accounting, 7th ed. Cengage. Atkinson, A. et al. (2007). Management accounting, 5th ed. Pearson. Seal, W. (2006). Management accounting, 2nd ed. McGraw-Hill. 49

51 ASB-4423 ISLAMIC BANKING Credits: 15 Contact hours: 30 Semester: 2 Pre-requisites: ASB-4424 Module organiser: Muhammed-Shahid Ebrahim Aims: To provide participants with an objective and professional assessment of Islamic banking theory and practice and to identify the salient features of Islamic banking as a model for financial intermediation. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Explain the implications of the application of Islamic principles in banking and financial intermediation; Understand the implications of the traditional Islamic financial instruments for the practical commercial operations of banks and financial institutions; Draw comparisons between the conventional and Islamic banking business models; Identify the challenges currently facing the Islamic banking sector, and the prospects and opportunities for future growth and development. Module Content: Theoretical foundations of Islamic banking; Development of the Islamic banking model; Islamic banking products and services; Islamic insurance (Takaful); Challenges facing the Islamic financial development. Teaching Format: One 2-hour lecture per week. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (100%). Text(s): Iqbal, M. and Molyneux, P. (2005). Thirty years of Islamic banking. Wiley. Iqbal, Z. and Mirakhor, A. (2006). An introduction to Islamic finance: Theory and practice. Wiley. Rosly, S.A. (2005). Critical issues on Islamic banking and financial markets. AuthorHouse. Hassan, M.K. and Lewis, M.K. (2007). Handbook of Islamic banking. Edward Elgar. Khan, M.S. and Mirakhor, A. (1987). Theoretical studies in Islamic banking and finance. Institute for Research and Islamic Studies. 50

52 ASB-4424 ISLAMIC FINANCE Credits: 15 Contact hours: 20 Semester: 1 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Muhammed-Shahid Ebrahim Aims: To provide participants with an understanding of the core principles of Islamic finance, and the working of Islamic financial markets and financial instruments; and to examine the role played by Islamic finance in the wider process of economic and financial development. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Explain the distinction between Islamic commercial transactions and conventional ones; Understand the economic rationale behind the Islamic injunctions; Understand the traditional Islamic financial instruments and their efficiency; Apply the principles of Islamic finance in structuring a range of applications form project finance to consumer finance; Demonstrate understanding of the contribution of Islamic finance to the growth of the financial sector and broader economic development. Module Content: The injunction of Riba, Gharar and Maysir; Traditional Islamic financial instruments; The role of the capital market; Risk management, and Structured Islamic financial products. Teaching Format: One 2-hour lecture per week. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (100%). Text(s): Kamali, M.H. (2002). Islamic commerical law: An analysis of futures and options. Ilmiah Publishers. Thomas, A.S. (1995). What is permissible now? The Muslim Converts Association of Singapore. Thomas, A.S. (2006). Interest in Islamic economics: Understanding riba. Routledge. Iqbal, Z. and Mirakhor, A. (2006). An introduction to Islamic finance: Theory and practice. Wiley. El Gamal, M.A. (2006). Islamic finance: Law, economics and practice. Cambridge University Press. Hassan, M.K. and Lewis, M.K. (2005). Islamic finance. Edward Elgar. 51

53 ASB-4425 INVESTMENT STRATEGY AND PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT Credits: 15 Contact hours: 30 Semester: 2 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Rasha Alsakka Aims: To analyse portfolio strategies which can effectively control risk and enhance returns; to develop intellectual skills and research expertise in the area of investment analysis and portfolio management; and to demonstrate appropriate modelling techniques for investment decision-making and risk management. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Demonstrate awareness of the process of investment management; Apply the principles of investment theory and practice to the optimal selection of investments to satisfy a specific set of risk-return objectives; Construct a portfolio from a range of available investment instruments, including bonds, equities and derivative securities; Explain the different sources of risk and return in managing equity and bond portfolios; Analyse appropriate benchmarks and methods for the evaluation of the performance of a portfolio of investments; Explain the key considerations in risk measurement and risk management of portfolios. Module Content: The characteristics and roles of investment institutions; Investment objectives and the asset allocation decision; Principles of portfolio management; Bond valuation and bond portfolio management strategies; Equity portfolio management strategies; Performance measurement; Risk measurement and risk management. Teaching Format: One 3-hour lecture/class per week. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (75%); Coursework assignment (25%). Text(s): Blake, D. (2000). Financial market analysis, 2nd ed. Wiley. Bodie, Z., Kane, A. and Marcus, A.J. (2008). Investments, 7th ed. McGraw-Hill. Cuthbertson, K. and Nitzsche, D. (2008). Investments, 2nd ed. Wiley. 52

54 ASB-4426 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN MANAGEMENT Credits: 15 Contact hours: 30 Semester: 2 Pre-requisites: ASB-4431 Module organiser: Azhdar Karami Aims: To develop theories and concepts introduced in Organisations and People, critiquing key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and management. It provides a detailed and critical analysis of management, further developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Critically evaluate contemporary issues in management; Explain the tensions and dilemmas faced in managing in turbulent economies; Appreciate the different approaches to leadership and their relevance in a multi-cultural context; Critically assess the management processes involved in managing in an increasingly complex, fragile global environment; Critically reflect on personal experiences of, and dilemmas faced in, contemporary management and organisations. Module Content: Ethical dilemmas in management and organisation (critical management studies); Changing organisation structures and the implications for management; Managing across cultures; Contemporary approaches to leadership; Managing complexity and change; Managing for sustainability. Teaching Format: One 3-hour lecture per week. Assessment: Individual written coursework assignment (40%); Group coursework assignment, written report and class presentation (60%). Text(s): Huczynski, A. and Buchanan, D. (2007). Organisational behaviour: An introductory text, 6th ed. FT Prentice Hall. Mullins, L. J. (2005). Management and organisational behaviour, 7th ed. FT Prentice Hall. Knights, D. and Wilmott, H. (2007). Introducing organizational behaviour and management. Thomson. 53

55 ASB-4427 ISLAMIC ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL REPORTING Credits: 15 Contact hours: 20 Semester: 2 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Mohamed Iqbal Asaria Aims: To develop a critical awareness of theoretical and practical approaches to Islamic accounting and financial reporting, to compare Islamic accounting standards with IFRS, and to examine the content and impact of relevant academic research to the area. Learning Outcomes: On completing this module, students are expected to be able to: Demonstrate an understanding of the objectives and concepts of Islamic accounting and financial reporting; Understand the requirements of the Accounting Standards promulgated by the Accounting and Auditing Organisation for Islamic Financial Institutions (AAOIFI); Compare and contrast the AAOIFI s accounting standards with the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS); Assess the practical application of AAOIFI s accounting, shari a and governance standards; Analyse, summarise and synthesise independently researched academic and professional studies of Islamic accounting and financial reporting. Module Content: Objectives, conceptual framework of Islamic accounting; Islamic ethics in accounting; Islamic and conventional accounting: similarities and differences; Accounting for Islamic financial contracts: Murabaha, Mudaraba, Ijarah and Istisna; Accounting for zakah and provisions/reserves; Accounting for Islamic mutual funds, Sukuk and Investments; Accounting for Islamic insurance (Takaful); Presentation and disclosure for financial statements of Islamic financial institutions. Teaching Format: 20 hours of lectures, delivered in four blocks of 5 hours each. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (75%); Coursework assignment (25%). Text(s): 54

56 ASB-4428 ISLAMIC INSURANCE Credits: 15 Contact hours: 20 Semester: 2 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Mohamed Iqbal Asaria Aims: To develop a critical awareness of theoretical and practical approaches to Islamic insurance. The module aims to outline the operational modes and practice of Islamic insurance; analyze the nature and principles of Islamic insurance; the structure of Islamic insurance markets; and finally to highlight constraints and opportunities for Islamic insurance and Islamic insurance accounting. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Demonstrate an understanding of the objectives and concepts of Islamic insurance; Understand the nature of different Islamic insurance contracts; Understand how Islamic insurance markets differ in various countries; Compare and contrast the features of conventional and Islamic insurance business; Understand key concepts relating to the regulation and accounting treatment of Islamic insurance; Analyse, summarise and synthesise independently researched academic and professional studies on Islamic insurance. Module Content: Main features of Islamic contracts relating to insurance (Takaful); Comparison of Islamic and conventional insurance business; Islamic insurance operations in different countries; Managerial and corporate governance aspects relating to Islamic insurance firms and role of Sharia board; Management and underwriting policies of Islamic insurance firms; Limits and opportunities for Islamic insurance; Ethical framework under which Islamic insurance is conducted. Teaching Format: 20 hours of lectures, delivered in four blocks of 5 hours each. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (75%); Coursework assignment (25%). Text(s): 55

57 ASB-4429 ENTREPRENEURIAL MARKETING Credits: 15 Contact hours: 25 Semester: 2 Pre-requisites: Module organiser: Sonya Hanna Aims: To explore and examine the contribution of Entrepreneurial Marketing to the growth and development of organisations. Learning Outcomes: On completing this module, students are expected to be able to: Evaluate entrepreneurial marketing concepts in respect of the following three aspects: Marketing in SMEs and in the early stages of an organisation s development, As an umbrella strategy for a number of existing marketing techniques and methods, As a strategic contribution for gaining competitive advantage for firms; Analyse entrepreneurial marketing in specific business sectors and propose appropriate entrepreneurial marketing strategies; Discuss and debate issues associated with developing a successful entrepreneurial marketing strategy with successful outcomes; Undertake case study analysis of entrepreneurial marketing in a range of contexts. Module Content: Introduction to Entrepreneurial Marketing; Theoretical developments in Entrepreneurial Marketing; Marketing and Entrepreneurship and their interfaces; The role of Innovation in business; Marketing Orientation and Entrepreneurial Orientation in firms; Entrepreneurial Marketing in larger organisations; Entrepreneurial marketing in SMEs; Implementing Entrepreneurial Marketing strategy in firms. Teaching Format: One 2-hour lecture per week; One 1-hour tutorial per fortnight. Assessment: Two individual coursework assignments (100%). Text (s): Bjerke, B. and Hultman, C. M. (2002). Entrepreneurial marketing: The growth of small firms in the new economic era. Edward Elgar. Carson, D., Cromie, S., McGowan, P. and Hill, J. (1995). Marketing and entrepreneurship in SMEs: An innovative approach. Prentice Hall. Schindehutte, M., Morris, M.H. and Pitt, L.F. (2009). Rethinking marketing: The entrepreneurial imperative. Pearson. 56

58 ASB-4430 FINANCIAL CRISES AND BANK REGULATION Credits: 15 Contact hours: 20 Semester: 2 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: John Thornton Aims: To provide a theoretical and historical approach to explaining why banks and financial markets are inherently vulnerable to crises and to analyse the role of policy makers and institutions; and examine the role of monetary policy, bank supervision and regulation, corporate governance and ratings agencies in mitigating or exacerbating crises. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Understand the main theoretical models in which frictions such as asymmetric information and coordination failures create a role for intermediaries and produce problems such as bank runs, asset price bubbles and herding; Understand the role of monetary policy, bank supervision and regulation, corporate governance, and ratings agencies in mitigating or exacerbating bad outcomes; Understand the different policy options for dealing with financial crises. Module Content: Asymmetric information in financial markets: how adverse selection and moral hazard create a role for banks and can lead to credit rationing and liquidity crises; Coordination failures: how self-fulfilling expectations can lead to bank runs, contagion and bubbles; A history of bubbles and banking crises: US in the 1930s, Japan and Scandinavia in the early 1990s; Europe and the USA in ; Individual remuneration and the culture of banking: how poor corporate governance can lead to excessive risk taking; Securitisation and the subprime mortgage crisis; The role of government; the central bank as lender and market maker of last resort; bank structure and regulation, Basel II and the role of the ratings agencies. Teaching Format: One 2-hour lecture per week. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (75%); Coursework assignment (25%). Text(s): Acharya, V.V. and Richardson, M. (2009). Restoring financial stability: How to repair the failed financial system. Wiley. Akerlof, G.A. and Shiller, R.J. (2009). Animal spirits: How human psychology drives the economy, and why it matters for global capitalism. Princeton University Press. Allen, F. and Gale, D. (2007). Understanding financial crises. Oxford University Press. Davies, H. and Green, D. (2008). Global financial regulation. Polity. Freixas, X. and Rochet, J.C. (2008). Microeconomics of banking, 2nd ed. MIT Press. Goodhart, G.A.E. (2009). The regulatory response to the financial crisis. Edward Elgar. Kindleberger, C.F. and Aliber, R.A. (2005). Manias, panics, and crashes, 5th ed. Wiley. 57

59 ASB-4431 ORGANISATIONS AND PEOPLE Credits: 15 Contact hours: 30 Semester: 1 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Sally Sambrook Aims: to provide an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts, drawing on key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). Learning outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Critically evaluate management and organisational theory and practice; Relate management theory to personal experience of a working environment; Distinguish between types of organisational structure, culture and job design; Appreciate the human resourcing aspects of managing and leading people; Critically assess the management processes involved in managing in an increasingly complex, global, changing environment. Module content: Theories and models of management: classical and contemporary; Organisation structures: strategy, design and function, job design; Organisation cultures: values, ethics, norms of behaviour; Organisation processes: survival, change, growth and development; Organisational learning, and learning organisations; Individual differences: perception, learning, motivation, equality and diversity; Groups and teams in the organisation; Managing relationships: power, control, conflict resolution, communication; Managers as leaders, people developers, coaches; Managing and rewarding performance. Teaching Format: One 3-hour lecture/workshop per week. Assessment: Individual written coursework assignment (60%); Group coursework assignment, written management report (40%). Texts: Huczynski, A. and Buchanan, D. (2010). Organisational behaviour: An introductory text, 7th ed., FT Prentice Hall. Mullins, L. J. (2010). Management and organisational behaviour, 9th ed. FT Prentice Hall. 58

60 ASB-4432 MARKETING FINANCIAL SERVICES Credits: 15 Contact hours: 20 Semester: 1 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: John Ashton Aims: To introduce and critically assess approaches to and tools of modern financial services marketing. The lectures focus on the key methods of financial services marketing in the acquisition of customers and sale and distribution of financial services. The module progresses considering consumer behaviour, the changing customer demands, consumer heuristics and biases and ways in which financial services marketing has succeeded and failed. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Understand the key methods through which financial services are marketed to customers; Evaluate the potential benefits and drawbacks of marketing financial services within a regulated marketplace; Comprehend the importance of consumer behaviour and financial literacy in financial services sales; Evaluate how different marketing practices can lead to both customer satisfaction and dissatisfaction. Module Content: What is a financial service? Understanding the customer and financial literacy; Marketing planning tools; Market segmentation and product positioning; Methods of customer acquisition; Choice in financial services; Financial services pricing; Price differentiation and discrimination; Regulated sales of financial services; Customer relationship management strategies. Teaching Format: One 2-hour lecture per week. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (60%); Coursework assignment (40%). Text(s): Ennew, C.T. and Waite, N. (2007). Financial services marketing: An international guide to principal and practice. Butterworth-Heinemann. Farquhar, J.D. and Meidan, A. (2010). Marketing financial services. Palgrave Macmillan. 59

61 ASB-4433 BEHAVIOURAL FINANCE Credits: 15 Contact hours: 20 Semester: 2 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Qingwei Wang Aims: To provide an in-depth coverage of behavioural finance, which replaces the rationality assumption with behavioural biases that have been documented by psychologists. This approach will be applied to explain puzzles in asset pricing. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Demonstrate a good understanding of major concepts in behavioural finance; Analyse stylised facts of aggregate market and the cross-section of returns; Analyse investors irrational behavior; Demonstrate an awareness of the implications of behaviour finance theory for investment strategies; Demonstrate a good understanding of the pros and cons of behavioural approach relative to alternative approaches to financial market anomalies. Module Content: An overview of behaviour finance; Rational expectation, market efficiency and financial market puzzles; Beliefs, biases and heuristics; Application to asset pricing: sentiment, heterogeneous beliefs, and limits to arbitrage; Alternative approaches to financial anomalies such as bounded rationality and learning. Teaching Format: One 2-hour lecture/class per week. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (60%); Individual coursework assignment (20%); Group coursework assignment and class presentation (20%). Text(s): Shiller, R. J. (2000). Irrational exuberance. Princeton University Press. Shefrin, H. (2002). Beyond greed and fear: Understanding behavioural finance and the psychology of investing. Oxford University Press. Shefrin, H. (2005). A behavioural approach to asset pricing. Academic Press. Shleifer, A. (2000). Inefficient markets: An introduction to behavioural finance. Oxford University Press. Thaler, R. and Tucker, S. (1994). The winner s curse: Paradoxes and anomalies of economic life. Princeton University Press. 60

62 ASB-4434 FINANCIAL INTERMEDIATION Credits: 15 Contact hours: 20 Semester: 2 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Klaus Schaeck Aims: To provide a theoretical foundation for the theory of financial intermediation, and examine core empirical papers in the banking literature. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Develop the microeconomic foundations of financial intermediation; Critically evaluate empirical papers in banking; Demonstrate familiarity with conceptual frameworks for transforming theory into empirical tests; Compile data sets for empirical research in financial intermediation; Develop a research strategy for dissertation/phd research projects. Module Content: Banks as delegated monitors and information producers (theory and evidence); Banks as liquidity producers; The industrial organisation approach to banking; Relationship lending; Bank risk management; Monetary policy and banks; Banks and economic growth; Market segmentation and branching; Crises; Regulation. Teaching Format: One 2-hour lecture per week. Assessment: Individual coursework assignment (60%); Group assignment (40%). Text(s): There is no core text. Students will be notified of individual book and journal titles/articles prior to each lecture. 61

63 ASB-4437 MERGER AND ACQUISITION Credits: 15 Contact hours: 20 Semester: 2 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Yener Altunbas Aims: To introduce the theoretical and institutional aspects of M&A. To provide a theoretical basis for an empirical analysis of governance issues concerned with M&A incentives and outcomes, and the reciprocal relation between M&A incentives and its constituencies. To analyse the typology of M&A, the development and execution of an acquisition strategy, the valuation of the target, the conduct of the negotiation, and the implementation of the post-merger integration plan. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Understand the theoretical, regulatory and institutional framework of M&A; Understand current empirical research in the field of M&A valuation; Undertake active research in the M&A field by applying a variety of methodologies and adjusting for a number of factors that affect synergies and performance; Understand financial modelling related to M&A; Understand and evaluate critically the important economic activity of M&A; Understand the implications of cross-border restructuring strategies. Module Content: Theory of the firm: "Build vs Buy"; Current issues in the M&A landscape; Motives for M&A; How do mergers work? When do mergers work? Winners and losers; Valuation in the context of an acquisition; Criteria for value-adding acquisitions; Cross-border vs domestic acquisitions. Teaching Format: One 2-hour lecture per week. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (60%); Individual coursework assignment (40%). Text(s): DePamphilis D. (2009). Mergers, acquisitions, and other restructuring activities, 5th ed. Elsevier. Bruner, F.R. (2004). Applied mergers and acquisitions. Wiley. Sudarsanam, P.S. (2010). Creating value from mergers and acquisitions: The challenges, 2nd ed. Prentice Hall. 62

64 ASB-4516 PUBLIC SECTOR MANAGEMENT Credits: 15 Contact hours: 20 Semester: 2 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Koen Bartels Aims: To identify the distinctive characteristics of the public sector; to review the various organisational forms that the public sector takes; to consider the nature of managerial work in the public sector including issues of resource and performance management in politically controlled policy environments; to examine strategy development and change management in multiple stakeholder environments; to evaluate diverging management paradigms and practices; and to consider trends and emergent issues with leadership, citizenship, collaboration, and democracy. Learning Outcomes: Understand the context of public sector management and its contemporary social, political and economic context; Develop a critical understanding of the distinctive characteristics of the public sector; Critically review various organisational forms used in the public sector; Understand the characteristics of various management practices in the public sector including managing networks, issues of resource and performance management; Understand the complex nature of strategy development and change management in multiple stakeholder environments; Develop a critical awareness of trends and emergent issues with leadership, citizenship, collaboration, and democracy. Module Content: Introduction and overview: managing in the public sector; The environment of public organisations; The challenge of effective public organisation and management; Design and delivery: strategies, tools, and structures; Implementation: management practice across the world; New Public Management: running government like a business; Collaborative governance: managing complex networks; New Public Service: not steering, but serving; Leadership: managing change, conflict, and learning; Innovation in management theory and practice. Teaching Format: One 2-hour lecture per week. Assessment: Coursework assignment, in the form of a case study (100%). Texts: Bovaird, T. & Löffler, E. (Eds.) (2009). Public management and governance. 2nd ed. London/New York: Routledge. Denhardt, R.B. (2011). Theories of public organization. 6th ed. Boston: Wadsworth Cengage Learning. 63

65 ASB-4521 MARKETING COMMUNICATION Credits: 15 Contact hours: 20 Semester: 2 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Edward Shiu Aims: To examine the processes by which an integrated marketing communications program is planned, developed and executed; and to examine the environment in which advertising and promotion take place and the various regulatory, social and economic factors that affect an organisation s integrated marketing communications program. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Understand and critically evaluate the theories and principles underlying marketing communication practice; Apply the techniques used by marketers in developing marketing communications; Develop a creative integrated marketing communication plan; Implement the plan from a managerial and strategic perspective; Apply managerial judgement and analytical and critical skills to promotion problems. Module Content: Integrated marketing communication; Application of contemporary communication theory and research methods; Marketing communications strategies and planning; Advertising and media planning; Sales promotion and online marketing communication; Public relations and exhibitions; Packaging and field marketing; Implementation and evaluation of integrated marketing communications strategy. Teaching Format: One 2-hour lecture per week. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (60%); Group project (40%). Text(s): Shimp, T. A. (2010). Integrated marketing communication in advertising and promotion, 8th ed. South Western Cengage Learning. [main text] Fill, C. (2009). Marketing Communications: Interactivity, communities and content, 5th ed. FT Prentice Hall. Belch, G. E. and Belch, M. (2009). Advertising and promotion: An integrated marketing communications perspective, 8th ed. McGraw Hill: Boston. Picton, D. and Broderic, A. (2005). Integrated marketing communications, 2nd ed. FT Prentice Hall. Percy, L. and Elliott, R. (2005). Strategic advertising management, 2nd ed. OUP. Yeshin, T. (2006). Advertising. Thomson. 64

66 ASB-4601 RESEARCH METHODS Credits: 15 Contact hours: 30 Semester: 1 Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Kostas Nikolopoulos Aims: To provide the student with knowledge of intermediate and advanced qualitative and quantitative research methods, and provide a basis in research methodology. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Demonstrate an understanding of basic statistical concepts, basic ideas of sampling and statistical inference; Demonstrate a good foundation in research methods and techniques that can be applied in writing reports; Obtain data from primary and secondary sources, and carry out investigations using summary statistics, graphs, techniques of exploratory data analysis, correlation and regression; Formulate feasible research questions and strategies; and assemble, select and present the results of data analysis and data modelling; Demonstrate computer skills for data analysis and modelling, and use statistical computer packages. Module Content: Describing and summarising data; Probability and probability distributions; Principles of statistical inference; Correlation and regression analysis; Regression models for panel data. Teaching Format: One 2-hour lecture per week; One 1-hour practical session per week. Assessment: 2-hour written examination (75%); Coursework assignment (25%). Text(s): Brooks, C. (2008). Introductory econometrics for finance, 2nd ed. Cambridge University Press. Gujarati, D.N. (2009). Basic econometrics, 5th ed. McGraw-Hill. Newbold, P., Carlson, W.L. and Thorne, B. (2010). Statistics for business and economics, 7th ed. Pearson. Stock, J.H. and Watson, M.W. (2007). Introduction to econometrics, 2nd ed. Pearson. Verbeek, M. (2008). A guide to modern econometrics, 3rd ed. Wiley. 65

67 ASB-4900 MA DISSERTATION Credits: 60 Contact hours: Semester: 2 + summer Pre-requisites: None Module organisers: Owain ap Gwilym/Gareth Griffiths Aims: To provide an opportunity to initiate, plan and accomplish a substantial piece of work entailing an extensive review of the existing published theoretical and empirical literature on a clearly defined topic, augmented by the application of quantitative or qualitative methods in further analysis of that topic. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Identify a suitable topic for research; Plan, organise and manage an extensive research project on the chosen topic; Make use of library and electronic resources to identify literature and locate data; Synthesise and critically appraise a body of academic literature; Apply appropriate analytical, statistical, IT, research design, writing and other research skills in order to present relevant theoretical and/or empirical evidence on the chosen topic; Compile, edit and present a substantial research report. Module Content: There is no set syllabus. The dissertation encourages students to develop a critical awareness of the professional skills relevant to the strategic management of a variety of business practices. Students choose their research topic, provided that there is suitable and sufficient reading material available, and a member of staff is available to supervise in the chosen area of study. Teaching Format: Two 2-hour workshops outline the main features of how to undertake a postgraduate project. The lectures examine the main issues faced in choosing a suitable dissertation subject, research methods used to undertake a successful project, and accessing information sources and databases. The first explores how to conduct a literature review and identify an appropriate research question. The second considers appropriate research methods, including data collection tool design, access, data analysis, resource constraints and ethical issues. Students are allocated a recommended 4 hours of staff consultation time for their postgraduate projects. Here advice is provided on the relevant primary literature, including book chapters, journal articles and internet sources that they are expected to use for dissertation study. Also information on databases, statistical packages and qualitative data software can be provided. Self-study for the dissertation is supported by contact with staff. It is a student s responsibility to initiate meetings and maintain regular contact with their supervisor. Assessment: Research proposal and preliminary literature review (around 3,000 words) (20%), to be prepared independently prior to the allocation of a dissertation supervisor; Submitted dissertation (10,000-15,000 words) (80%). Text(s): There is no set general text. Reading draws heavily on journal articles and book chapters, according to the dissertation topic selected. 66

68 ASB-4901 MBA DISSERTATION Credits: 60 Contact hours: Semester: 2 + summer Pre-requisites: None Module organisers: Owain ap Gwilym/Gareth Griffiths Aims: To provide an opportunity to initiate, plan and accomplish a substantial piece of work entailing an extensive review of the existing published theoretical and empirical literature on a clearly defined topic, augmented by the application of quantitative or qualitative methods in further analysis of that topic. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Identify a suitable topic for research; Plan, organise and manage an extensive research project on the chosen topic; Make use of library and electronic resources to identify literature and locate data; Synthesise and critically appraise a body of academic literature; Apply appropriate analytical, statistical, IT, research design, writing and other research skills in order to present relevant theoretical and/or empirical evidence on the chosen topic; Compile, edit and present a substantial research report. Module Content: There is no set syllabus. The dissertation encourages students to develop a critical awareness of the professional skills relevant to the strategic management of a variety of business practices. Students choose their research topic, provided that there is suitable and sufficient reading material available, and a member of staff is available to supervise in the chosen area of study. Teaching Format: Two 2-hour workshops outline the main features of how to undertake a postgraduate project. The lectures examine the main issues faced in choosing a suitable dissertation subject, research methods used to undertake a successful project, and accessing information sources and databases. The first explores how to conduct a literature review and identify an appropriate research question. The second considers appropriate research methods, including data collection tool design, access, data analysis, resource constraints and ethical issues. Students are allocated a recommended 4 hours of staff consultation time for their postgraduate projects. Here advice is provided on the relevant primary literature, including book chapters, journal articles and internet sources that they are expected to use for dissertation study. Also information on databases, statistical packages and qualitative data software can be provided. Self-study for the dissertation is supported by contact with staff. It is a student s responsibility to initiate meetings and maintain regular contact with their supervisor. Assessment: Research proposal and preliminary literature review (around 3,000 words) (20%), to be prepared independently prior to the allocation of a dissertation supervisor; Submitted dissertation (10,000-15,000 words) (80%). Text(s): There is no set general text. Reading draws heavily on journal articles and book chapters, according to the dissertation topic selected. 67

69 ASB-4902 MSc DISSERTATION Credits: 60 Contact hours: Semester: 2 + summer Pre-requisites: None Module organisers: Owain ap Gwilym/Gareth Griffiths Aims: To provide an opportunity to initiate, plan and accomplish a substantial piece of work entailing an extensive review of the existing published theoretical and empirical literature on a clearly defined topic, augmented by the application of quantitative or qualitative methods in further analysis of that topic. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Identify a suitable topic for research; Plan, organise and manage an extensive research project on the chosen topic; Make use of library and electronic resources to identify literature and locate data; Synthesise and critically appraise a body of academic literature; Apply appropriate analytical, statistical, IT, research design, writing and other research skills in order to present relevant theoretical and/or empirical evidence on the chosen topic; Compile, edit and present a substantial research report. Module Content: There is no set syllabus. The dissertation encourages students to develop a critical awareness of the professional skills relevant to the strategic management of a variety of business practices. Students choose their research topic, provided that there is suitable and sufficient reading material available, and a member of staff is available to supervise in the chosen area of study. Teaching Format: Two 2-hour workshops outline the main features of how to undertake a postgraduate project. The lectures examine the main issues faced in choosing a suitable dissertation subject, research methods used to undertake a successful project, and accessing information sources and databases. The first explores how to conduct a literature review and identify an appropriate research question. The second considers appropriate research methods, including data collection tool design, access, data analysis, resource constraints and ethical issues. Students are allocated a recommended 4 hours of staff consultation time for their postgraduate projects. Here advice is provided on the relevant primary literature, including book chapters, journal articles and internet sources that they are expected to use for dissertation study. Also information on databases, statistical packages and qualitative data software can be provided. Self-study for the dissertation is supported by contact with staff. It is a student s responsibility to initiate meetings and maintain regular contact with their supervisor. Assessment: Research proposal and preliminary literature review (around 3,000 words) (20%), to be prepared independently prior to the allocation of a dissertation supervisor; Submitted dissertation (10,000-15,000 words) (80%). Text(s): There is no set general text. Reading draws heavily on journal articles and book chapters, according to the dissertation topic selected. 68

70 ASB-4903 TAUGHT SUMMER PROGRAMME FINANCIAL RESEARCH SEMINAR SERIES Credits: 60 Contact hours: Semester: Summer Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Owain ap Gwilym Note: This module is available as an alternative to the Dissertation for students on the following programmes: MSc Accounting and Finance; MA/MSc Finance; MA/MSc Banking and Finance; MA/MSc Islamic Banking and Finance; MSc International Banking and Development Finance; MA/MSc Management and Finance. Aims: To familiarise students with a broad range of current research topics and research methodologies in the disciplines of accounting, banking, finance and economics. Learning Outcomes: On completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Demonstrate familiarity with theoretical and applied research in accounting, banking, finance, financial and monetary economics and macroeconomics; Articulate a convincing motivation for a programme of research on specific topics; Access and review literature relevant to a programme of empirical research; Select empirical techniques appropriate for a programme of empirical research, and demonstrate competence in fundamental tasks of data-handling and data analysis; Prepare reports on two research topics, identifying the key issues, synthesising the previous literature, explaining the key research methodologies that have been applied to the topic, and reporting the results of data analysis. Module Content: Accounting: Corporate governance and dividend policy; Impression management, earnings management and earnings quality; Banking: Competition in the banking sector; Implications of bank mergers for efficiency, profitability and competition; Corporate Finance: Event studies and the measurement of abnormal returns; Testing the Capital Asset Pricing Model and multifactor models of asset pricing; Financial Economics: The Efficient Markets Hypothesis and the predictability of asset returns; Market microstructure and the analysis of high frequency data; Money, Banking and Macroeconomics: Macroeconomic convergence, financial development, economic growth; Central bank independence and monetary policy. Islamic money market instruments. Teaching Format: Teaching takes the form of a series of eleven one-day research seminars, scheduled over a three-week period. Each student is assigned to attend six seminars, dependent on their degree programme. Assessment: The material covered in two of the six seminars to which each student is assigned is assessed by means of coursework, and the material covered in the four remaining seminars is assessed by means of an examination in September. Text(s): There is no set general text. 69

71 TAUGHT SUMMER PROGRAMME ASB-4904 APPLIED BUSINESS PROJECTS Credits: 60 Contact hours: 80 Semester: Summer Pre-requisites: None Module organiser: Gareth Griffiths Note: This module is available as an alternative to the Dissertation for students on the following programs: MBA Banking and Finance; MBA Islamic Banking and Finance; MA Business and Marketing; MBA Finance; MBA Management; MBA Marketing; MBA/MA Banking and Law; MBA Law and Management. Aims: To familiarise students with a broad range of current management topics. Learning Outcomes: Depending on the projects selected, on completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Understand the impact of electronic business to individuals, organisations, communities and nations and to develop an understanding of the business models available; Appreciate electronic business from all elements of the supply chain and the issues involved in developing an e-business strategy; Provide an integrated analysis of people management, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts; Demonstrate the ability to analyse the conditions in the international environment that drive trade between nations and the issues facing companies and governments; Provide insights into the behaviour of consumers, workers and managers in multinational enterprises (MNEs), small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and the public sector; Develop a critical awareness of the changing business characteristics of the private banking, wealth management and investment banking sector; Explore the design processes associated with operations management, including service and product design, process design, location layout design and human resource design; Assess the suitability of operations management tools and techniques; Demonstrate awareness and understanding of the process of establishing a venture from idea generation to the completion of a business plan; Follow the process of developing a business plan, including business description and the market, development and production, sales and marketing, management and finance. Module Content: Students will choose four Applied Business Projects from the list below. e-business and Value Chain; Human Resource Management; International Business; Investment and Private Banking; Operations Management; Business Planning. Teaching Format: Four Applied Business Projects (out of six) are selected, each of which is taught in a fiveday series of lectures, workshops and discussions scheduled over a four-week period in June. Assessment: Assessment is by means of coursework. Text(s): There is no set general text. 70

72 TAUGHT SUMMER PROGRAMME ASB-4905 APPLIED BUSINESS PROJECTS (MBA INFORMATION MANAGEMENT ONLY) Credits: 60 Contact hours: 80 Semester: Summer Pre-requisites: None Module organisers: Gareth Griffiths/Sa ad Mansoor Note: MBA Information Management is a joint programme with the School of Computer Science. Students on this programme will carry out a software project (the Software Hut ) organised by School of Computer Science, and will select two Applied Business Projects from the list below. Aims: To familiarise students with a range of current management topics, and develop an understanding of project planning and design expertise through the implementation of software engineering principles. Learning Outcomes: Depending on the projects selected, on completing the module, students are expected to be able to: Develop awareness of software engineering stages including requirements specification, design, architecture, implementation processes, testing and maintenance Demonstrate the ability to plan and project manage software development projects; Understand the impact of electronic business to individuals, organisations, communities and nations and to develop an understanding of the business models available; Provide an integrated analysis of people management, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts; Demonstrate the ability to analyse the conditions in the international environment that drive trade between nations and the issues facing companies and governments; Provide insights into the behaviour of consumers, workers and managers in multinational enterprises (MNEs), small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and the public sector; Explore the design processes associated with operations management, including service and product design, process design, location layout design and human resource design; Assess the suitability of operations management tools and techniques; Follow the process of developing a business plan, including business description and the market, development and production, sales and marketing, management and finance. Module Content: Students take Sofware Hut, and choose two Applied Business Projects from the following list: Business Planning; e-business and Value Chain; Human Resource Management; International Business; Operations Management. Teaching Format: Students must take the Software Hut. In addition, two Applied Business Projects (out of five) are selected, each of which takes the form of a five-day series of lectures, workshops and discussions scheduled over a four-week period in June. Assessment: Assessment of this module is by means of coursework. The Software Hut and the Applied Business Projects components contribute equally to the overall assessment of the module. Text(s): There is no set general text. 71

73 10. CONTINUOUS ASSESSMENT AND ASSIGNMENTS 10.1 Procedure for submission of assignments All assignments must be submitted in two formats: electronically and on paper. The electronic copy must be submitted through the Turnitin software on Blackboard. Please click on the assignments link on the Blackboard site for the module, and follow the instructions. The time and date on which you submit the assignment electronically will be recorded automatically, and this process will provide us with confirmation that you have submitted in compliance with the assignment deadline. If you do not submit an electronic copy of your assignment before the assignment deadline, you will be deemed to have missed the deadline, even if you have submitted a paper copy of the assignment before the deadline. Please note that Turnitin contains plagiarism detection software, which is available to the Module Organiser. We reserve the right to use this software on all submitted assignments. The paper copy (together with an Assignment Cover Sheet) must be deposited in the Assignment Collection Box located in the Reception of the College Administration Building (next to Hen Goleg). The content of the paper copy must correspond exactly to the content of the electronic copy that is submitted through Blackboard. The paper copy should also be submitted before the assignment deadline. The Assignment Cover Sheet may be obtained from the Reception of the College Administration Building (next to Hen Goleg). Work that is submitted without the correct Front of Assignment Cover Sheet will not be accepted. Your Front of Assignment Cover Sheet shows a three-item check list: 1. Have you submitted an electronic copy? (For all work to be processed and treated as a complete submission, an electronic copy must be submitted, in addition to the paper copy.) 2. I have reported the word count and I can confirm that it is accurate. (For many assignments, the Module Organiser will specify the word count. It is important that you comply with this word count, because failure to do so may result in a reduced final mark.) 3. This submission is final. (Once you have submitted a piece of assessed work, you cannot submit the work again or ask for it back before the deadline to make changes/ additions. The first copy that you submit will be the copy that is marked. It is therefore essential that you make sure your work is complete before submitting it.) You MUST make sure that you have ticked all of these before you submit your Front of Assignment Cover Sheet for printing. Finally, You MUST sign and date the Front of Assignment Cover Sheet to indicate that this is your own work, and fold over and staple down the right hand corner, covering your name, so that your work is marked anonymously. If you have problems with the Front of Assignment Cover Sheet, you should report the problem to the College Reception immediately. 72

74 Please avoid submitting work in ways that make it difficult for lecturers to mark it. Common problems include over-zealous stapling of pages, using binders or files that are difficult to open, and binding pages in such a way that writing in the margins cannot be read. The hard-copy can, under exceptional circumstances, be accepted by post, but it is your responsibility to check that the assignment has been received Policy on late submission and deadline extensions An important part of your training is to work to deadlines and for this reason we expect you to adhere strictly to assessment deadlines. Please note that it is your responsibility to make sure that you are aware of submission deadlines and to plan accordingly. According to University regulations, the penalties for late submission of coursework are as follows: Submission within one week after the original deadline: Your recorded mark will be subject to a maximum of 40%. Submission more than one week after the original deadline: Your submission will not be accepted, and a mark of 0% will be recorded. If you find that you are having a problem completing a piece of work because you do not understand what you are required to do or because you are having problems organising yourself, go and see the Module Organiser, your Personal Tutor or the Senior Tutor before the submission date, so that they can help you to solve the problem. If you are unable to meet a submission deadline for good reasons (as explained below) you may submit your work together with documentary evidence as to why you have missed the deadline. The Bangor Business School Examination Board will decide whether or not your work shall be accepted. The only admissible reasons for submitting work late are: Serious personal illness with a doctor s certificate (a self-certificated medical note will not be accepted) The death of a relative or close friend Serious family or personal problems such as divorce, separation, eviction Other reasons will be accepted only in extreme circumstances. Examples of unacceptable reasons for failing to submit work on time include: paid employment having exams having other work to do not having access to a computer having computer-related problems being on holiday not being able to find any books on the subject 73

75 The Bangor Business School Examination Board will consider all late submissions at its meetings in February and June (a late submission is defined as being work submitted after the deadline on the appropriate submission date as specified by the Module Organiser). Following these meetings, students who have submitted work late shall be informed whether or not their marks have been reduced to zero. This policy applies to all Bangor Business School modules (with module codes ASB-XXXX, ACB-XXXX). It is your responsibility to ensure you are aware of the procedures used for modules in other Schools where you are registered Return of marked work Bangor Business School s policy is that marked work will normally be returned within three working weeks of the submission date, and in all cases marked work will be returned within four working weeks. If you do not receive your marked work within four working weeks, you are entitled to notify the Directors of Postgraduate Studies or the Head of Bangor Business School, either directly or via your representative on the Student Liaison Committee. Module Organisers may mark your work either by annotating the electronic copy, or by writing on the printed copy. Where marking is done electronically, you will be able to access the marks and the comments through Blackboard. Where marking is done by hand, you will be able to collect your marked work either in person from the Module Organiser, or from the pigeon holes in the College of Business, Social Sciences and Law Reception. It is your responsibility to ensure that you collect your marked work. Any work that remains uncollected after one month is liable to be removed from the pigeon holes and destroyed Notification of results Notification of the final marks for your taught modules will take place as follows: Semester 1 modules: mid-february Semester 2 modules: early-july Taught Summer Programme/Dissertation and final degree result: late-november You will be informed in advance of the methods by which you will receive notification. It is your responsibility to ensure that the spelling of your name and the details of your permanent home address are correct on the University s database Banner at all times. You are able to check and update your personal details by logging into Bangor 360. Once you have logged in, if you find that your personal details are not correct you can update them yourself. If for any reason you are unable to amend your details, please inform us of any changes that need to be made via to: 10.5 Workload and planning During your degree course you will complete varying types of assessment, each due at different times and in different formats. You may find it useful to draw up a personal timetable. You can then, for example, fill in dates for submission of assignments in advance and so formulate a plan of work. Having done this you should not find yourself having to do everything at the last minute. You will find that you need access to key textbooks in order to read background material, either by purchasing the books or 74

76 borrowing them from the library. The Module Organiser (the staff member who teaches the module) will provide advice on textbooks during the lecture programme. Efficient organisation and management of your workload will prepare you for all aspects of your studies, and will allow you time for your recreational activities as well! 75

77 11. MARKING CRITERIA, DEGREE CLASSIFICATION AND APPEALS 11.1 Guidelines for marking assignments and examinations Marks for assignments and examinations will be returned to you either in the form of an alphabetic grade, or in the form of a percentage. When an alphabetic grade is reported, the grade will be converted to a percentage when we calculate your overall mark for the module and your degree classification. The scale for converting alphabetic grades to percentages is as follows: Alphabetic Degree Numerical Description grade equivalent grade A* Distinction 95% Outstanding Distinction A+ Distinction 87% Excellent Distinction A Distinction 80% Good Distinction A Distinction 74% Distinction B+ Merit 68% Good Merit B Merit 65% Mid Merit B Merit 62% Merit C+ Pass 58% Pass (top tier) C Pass 55% Pass (2nd tier) C Pass 52% Pass (3rd tier) D+ Pass 48% Pass (4th tier) D Pass 45% Pass (5th tier) D Pass 42% Pass (bottom tier) E Fail 37% Borderline Fail (compensatable) F Fail 33% Fail (compensatable) F(1) Fail 20% Fail (non-compensatable) F(2) Fail 5% Poor Fail (non-compensatable) F(3) Fail 0% Very Poor Fail (non-compensatable) Detailed marking criteria are shown in the table on the following pages. 76

78 Table of marking criteria Categorical Postgrad. General Primary Criteria Secondary Criteria Mark Degree Level overview A* Outstanding Exceeds expectations for most primary criteria Distinction Comprehensive knowledge Complete command of subject and other relevant areas Detailed understanding Ideas/arguments are highly original A+ Excellent Extensive background study Exceeds expectations for some primary criteria Distinction Highly focussed answer and well structured Complete command of subject Logically presented and defended arguments Distinction Ideas/arguments are highly original No factual/computational errors A Good Meets all primary criteria Distinction Original interpretation Command of subject but with minor gaps in knowledge New links between topics are developed Ideas/arguments are mostly original New approach to a problem A- Distinction Meets most but not all primary criteria Excellent presentation with very accurate Command of subject but with some gaps in knowledge communication Ideas/arguments are mostly original B+ Good Merit Strong knowledge Exceeds expectations for some primary criteria Understands most but not all Command of subject but with gaps in knowledge Evidence of background study Some ideas/arguments are original B Mid Merit Focussed answer with good structure Meets all primary criteria Arguments presented coherently Strong factual knowledge and understanding Mostly free of factual/computational errors Ideas/arguments are well presented but few are original B- Merit Merit Some limited original interpretation Meets most but not all primary criteria Well known links between topics are described Strong factual knowledge with minor weaknesses in understanding Problems addressed by existing methods/approaches Most but not all ideas/arguments are well presented and few are original Good presentation with accurate communication C+ Pass (top tier) Exceeds expectations for some primary criteria Knowledge of key areas/principles Strong factual knowledge with some weaknesses in Pass Understands main areas understanding Limited evidence of background study Ideas/arguments are limited but are well presented 77

79 Categorical Postgrad. General Primary Criteria Secondary Criteria Mark Degree Level overview C Pass (2nd tier) Answer focussed on question but also with Matches all primary criteria some irrelevant material and weaknesses in structure Moderate factual knowledge with some weaknesses in understanding Arguments presented but lack coherence Ideas/arguments are limited with weaknesses in Has several factual/computational errors logic/presentation C- Pass (3rd tier) No original interpretation Matches most but not all primary criteria Only major links between topics are described Moderate factual knowledge with several weaknesses in understanding Limited problem solving Ideas/arguments are limited with weaknesses in Some weaknesses in presentation and accuracy logic/presentation D+ Pass (4th tier) Knowledge of key areas/principles only Exceeds expectations for some primary criteria Weaknesses in understanding of main areas Moderate factual knowledge with several weaknesses in Limited evidence of background study understanding Answer only poorly focussed on question and with some irrelevant material and poor A few ideas/arguments are presented but with weaknesses D Pass (5th tier) structure Matches all primary criteria Arguments presented but lack coherence Limited factual knowledge with several weaknesses in Several factual/computational errors understanding No original interpretation Very few ideas/arguments are presented D- Pass (bottom tier) Only major links between topics are Matches most but not all primary criteria described Limited factual knowledge with many weaknesses in Limited problem solving understanding Many weaknesses in presentation and accuracy Very few ideas/arguments are presented and with errors in logic/presentation E F Fail Borderline Fail (compensatable) Fail (compensatable) Insufficient to fulfil the associated learning outcomes Deficiencies in knowledge even of key areas/principles No evidence of understanding, even of main areas No evidence of background study Exceeds expectations for most primary criteria Very limited factual knowledge with many weaknesses in understanding Weak attempt to answer/address question Exceeds expectations for some primary criteria Major gaps in knowledge/understanding Very weak attempt to answer/address question 78

80 Categorical Mark F(1) F(2) F(3) Postgrad. Degree Level General overview Fail (noncompensatable) Poor Fail (noncompensatable) Very Poor Fail (noncompensatable) Primary Criteria Answer relies on tangential material and lacks a coherent structure No arguments presented Many factual/computational errors No original interpretation No links between topics are described No attempt to solve problems The presentation is very weak containing many inaccuracies Secondary Criteria Matches all primary criteria Very limited evidence of knowledge/understanding Ideas/arguments are largely irrelevant to question Matches some primary criteria No evidence of relevant knowledge/understanding Ideas/arguments are irrelevant to question Matches very few primary criteria No evidence to demonstrate even cursory knowledge or understanding No attempt to answer/address question 79

81 11.2 Progression to Taught Summer Programme (ABP or FRSS) or Dissertation, and classification of degree awards This section presents summary details of the rules for assessment and classification of degree awards. Full details of the regulations can be found through the following link: https://www.bangor.ac.uk/ar/main/regulations/bureg02-v pdf In order to proceed from the taught programme, your final module marks in the taught component must satisfy the following three criteria: (i) (ii) (iii) The overall average mark must be 40% or higher. All 120 credits must be individually marked at 30% or higher. At least 80 out of 120 credits must be individually marked at 40% or higher. If your module marks fail to satisfy any of these three criteria, you may be offered the opportunity to take supplementary assessment in August in the modules that have fallen short of (i), (ii) or (iii). The Bangor Business School examination board will decide whether to offer the opportunity of supplementary assessment, and may decide not to do so in cases where many modules have been failed. The form of the supplementary assessment (coursework or examination or both) will be decided by the Bangor Business School examination board. Having completed the taught component of the programme in accordance with the criteria listed above, in order to be awarded your masters degree you must achieve a mark of at least 40% for your dissertation, ABP or FRSS. In order to be awarded your masters degree with Merit, you must satisfy the following two criteria: (i) Your overall average mark for the taught component of the programme must be at least 60%. (ii) Your dissertation, ABP or FRSS mark must be at least 60%. In order to be awarded your masters degree with Distinction, you must satisfy the following three criteria: (i) Your overall average mark for the taught component of the programme must be at least 65%. (ii) Your dissertation, ABP or FRSS mark must be at least 70%. (iii) The average of the overall average mark for the taught component and the dissertation, ABP or FRSS mark must be at least 70% Appeals The University has formal procedures for appealing against decisions taken by examination boards. Your attention is drawn to the University s handbook on Verification and Appeals procedures, a copy of which may be obtained from the Academic Registry, or via the intranet. If you have concerns about the marks awarded for individual modules, in the first instance you should discuss the matter with the Module Organiser. If you remain concerned, you may discuss the matter with one of the Directors of Postgraduate Studies. Please note, however, that there is no formal right of appeal against marks awarded. The Module Organiser s decision in this matter is final and binding. 80

82 11.4 External Examiners The External Examiner system is a key element of the quality assurance process at all UK universities. External Examiners are senior academics who are based at other universities, who are appointed by Bangor University for a fixed term to scrutinise students work and the marking of assignments and examinations, in order to ensure that the appropriate academic standards are being maintained and applied consistently. Currently, the three External Examiners for Bangor Business School (postgraduate) are the following: Mr Daniel Ganly, Oxford Brookes University Dr Claudia Girardone, University of Essex Dr Jens Hagendorff, University of Edinburgh You should not attempt to contact the external examiners directly. 81

83 12. ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT AND UNFAIR PRACTICE Academic dishonesty is defined as: any attempt by a student or any attempt by an individual to aid a student, to gain an unfair advantage in any assessment by deception or fraudulent means. This is viewed very seriously by the University. The following are examples of academic dishonesty read them and be aware of them so that you do not fall into this trap and suffer the consequences: Aiding and abetting dishonest practice; Bribery - paying another student for a copy of their work, paying for an advance copy of an unseen paper; Calculator fraud storing information in the memory of a programmable calculator for use during an exam; Collusion presenting an unauthorised piece of group work as your own; Commissioning another person to complete work and submitting it as your own; Computer fraud the use of material of another person stored on a disc or any electronic device; Duplication inclusion of material which has already been submitted for any other assessment in this University or elsewhere; False declarations like claiming false extenuating circumstances to obtain exemption from work or to explain a missed deadline; Falsification of data e.g. making up data in a project; Misconduct in exams or tests use of crib notes, copying from another student, sitting an examination on behalf of another student or asking someone to do this for you, leaving the exam/test to look at pre-hidden notes, taking any stationery from an exam venue if you are not allowed to do so; Plagiarism is a very serious academic offence. It is the equivalent of stealing someone s work and fraudulently pretending that it is your own in order to gain higher marks than you deserve. Copying, word for word, large chunks of writing from any source (e.g. paper, book, other students work, an internet source) without acknowledgement of the author or owner, is plagiarism as it is wrongly claimed that ideas, models, new techniques are yours. With modern technology this has become increasingly easy to do and anyone who suspects that it is happening should seek advice immediately. This also applies to a situation where you have lent someone your work to help them and they have substantially reproduced it without acknowledgement. Plagiarising someone else s work is very different from the collaborative teamwork that helps you to develop ideas and is a shared learning activity. 82

84 Given the seriousness of the offence, plagiarism can lead to permanent exclusion from the University. Within the School any suspected offences will be investigated by the module organiser concerned. A member of staff who suspects that plagiarism has occurred will ask another member of staff for a second opinion before asking you (and any others involved) to justify your actions. If, in the member of staff s view, there is a case to answer, the Examinations Officer and the Director of the School will be informed. Further investigations will take place and, where plagiarism is identified, appropriate penalties applied. Depending on the extent of the offence, assignments, modules and ultimately your degree, may be failed. All students should be aware that Bangor Business School imposes penalties on any student who is guilty of plagiarising work or of engaging in unfair practice in any assessment. You should be aware that cheating has resulted in disqualification from the degree. The penalty will obviously relate to the seriousness of the offence and to the past record of the student. For further details see the official University Policy on plagiarism. You will have the usual right to appeal against any such decision using the University procedures. If you are unclear about what does or does not constitute plagiarism, you should seek advice from a member of staff. Any suspected academic dishonesty will be investigated thoroughly. Marks will be withheld where it is suspected and you will be notified in writing that your work is under investigation and given details of the process that will be followed. BANGOR UNIVERSITY S WARNING TO STUDENTS DON T CHEAT The University lists the following examples of cheating: 1. Engaging in plagiarism by using other people s work and submitting for examination or assessment as though it were one s own work. 2. Taking unauthorised materials (such as a book, notes or loose papers of any kind) or any source of unauthorised information into an examination room. 3. Communicating with another person in an examination room. 4. Copying or using in any other way unauthorised materials or the work of any other candidate. 5. Impersonating an examination candidate or allowing oneself to be impersonated. 6. Claiming to have carried out experiments, observations, interviews or any form of research that one has not in fact carried out, or claiming to have obtained results that have not in fact been obtained. 7. To present evidence of special circumstances to examination boards which is false, falsified or which in any way is intended to mislead the boards. 83

85 13. ELECTRONIC RESOURCES TO SUPPORT YOUR STUDIES Throughout this handbook and other university literature, you will frequently find references to the internet, intranet, , Bangor 360 and Blackboard. These are all resources which you will need to familiarise yourself with during your time at Bangor, as they will not only enable you to access the wealth of learning material that is available, but will also allow you to update your personal information and to really get the most out of your studies. For information on how to access and use these resources, please see the following pages. You are also advised to visit the Library website, as this will allow you to search the University s holdings for items including books, journals, e-books, e-journals and theses. Please refer to the web page below: 84

86 Internet and Mozilla Firefox is the internet that is used in the University. Double-click this and it will take you to Bangor University s intranet. Mozilla Thunderbird is the system that is used in the University. Doubleclick here and the will appear. Use the password to access s. This is how we communicate with all Bangor Business School students. Enter your personal password to access your s. Bangor account. This is how Bangor University communicates with students and should be read daily. 85

87 Intranet Click on chosen heading. Information for current students A-Z Blackboard 86

88 inside.bangor.ac.uk/360 What is 360? 360 provides you with access to a range of online services including access to your module timetable, assessment and exam marks, financial statement, University news and events, announcements from your school, tools for updating your contact information and much more. How do I access 360? To access Bangor 360 you first need to visit the following website: https://inside.bangor.ac.uk/360 When you do so the screen will look similar to the following: At this point you can see content visible to all 360 users. 87

89 Log in to To Log in use the link in the top right-hand corner of the screen or via the link in the Log in to 360 area of the page (below the watermark of the Bangor University logo). The login page looks like this: Now what? Once you have logged in you will see additional panels of content including a panel on the left of the screen entitled Learning Resource Centre. This panel gives you access to a range of online services such as those for changing your contact address, access to your module timetable, assessment and exam mark. For more information A further guide on using Bangor 360 is available from within the Learning Resource Centre panel at 88

90 Blackboard To login you will need to insert your username and password and click Login You will see a list of all the modules that you are enrolled on. Previous year s modules will also be listed. Choose a module that you want to look at by clicking on module name. 89

91 All lecturers use Blackboard and will post notes, resources, relevant links, book lists and assignments here. Click into any of the folders to reveal notes. The notes can then be downloaded or printed. Assignments are required to be uploaded into TURNITIN in Blackboard. 90

92 To upload an assignment click on the >> View/Complete link. Use the author drop down list to find your name. Insert your first (given) name and also your surname (family) name. Enter the submission title. Click Browse and attach your assignment, and then click upload. You will then receive a receipt by , confirming submission. A hard copy of the assignment also needs to be submitted to the College Reception 91

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