The Recognition of Professional Qualifications in Canada

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "The Recognition of Professional Qualifications in Canada"

Transcription

1 The Recognition of Professional Qualifications in Canada ANNEX Questionnaire on Selected Occupations Prepared for Mobility of the Skilled Workforce: A European Union-Canada Roundtable September 29-30, 2009 Brussels

2 Accountants Responsibility for professional qualification recognition In Canada there are 150,000 professional accountants: 75,000 Chartered Accountants (CAs), 40,000 Certified Management Accountants (CMAs), and 35,000 Certified General Accountants (CGAs). Chartered Accountants are the only professional accountants in Canada with comprehensive audit rights that are fully transportable within all Canadian jurisdictions and internationally, through Mutual Recognition Agreements, with the world s leading accounting bodies. In order to practice as a Chartered Accountant (CA), and to use the designation Chartered Accountant, one must be a member of a provincial or territorial Institute of Chartered Accountants. There are 14 such institutes one in each of the ten provinces, three territories, and the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Bermuda. Each is responsible under provincial/territorial law for certifying Chartered Accountants. The Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants was created under federal legislation to support the setting of national standards, undertake research, and represent the interests of Canada s Chartered Accountants nationally and internationally. Canada s Chartered Accountants have established national standards for CA qualification, overseen by the Board of the Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants. These standards are developed in partnership with and are implemented by the provincial/territorial institutes under a Protocol Agreement. These national standards ensure a national professional qualification that meets the regulatory requirements of all provinces and territories, and that is fully mobile across Canada. CA qualification is competency-based, with three critical elements: Academic qualifications, including an undergraduate degree in business, and graduate level professional education provided through the profession s regional delivery systems; Formal evaluation, culminating in the profession s Uniform Evaluation UFE a rigorous, three-day exam that tests not just knowledge but competency, i.e., not just what candidates know but how they can apply what they know; Practical Experience: all CA candidates must complete at least three years of progressively responsible experience in an approved CA Training Office, which may be a CA firm or an organization in the corporate or government sector. Practical experience requirements for the right to practice public accounting are particularly strict, requiring mandatory supervised hours in progressively responsible positions in audit, assurance and taxation. The Society of Management Accountants of Canada and the Certified General Accountants of Canada each have their own provincial and national society structures and responsibility for overseeing education, examination and practical experience requirements for recognition as a CMA or CGA, respectively. As IFAC member bodies, all three professional accounting bodies support the education standards of the International Accounting Education Standards Board; however, the individual requirements for qualification vary depending upon the mandate of the three organizations. Qualifying to practice public accounting in Canada In Canada, accounting, taxation and advisory services are unregulated; anyone may provide these services to the public. In all provinces except Saskatchewan, Manitoba and New Brunswick, however, 1

3 provincial regulations govern public accounting i.e., the business of rendering independent assurance (audit or review) on financial statements, and, in some jurisdictions, providing compilation reports. These regulations vary across jurisdictions. In Ontario, Quebec and Newfoundland, licensure to practice public accounting is overseen by an independent provincial licensing Board. To practice public accounting, accountants and auditors must comply with the regulations of the province in which they practice. Generally, to practice of public accounting in Canada, one must be a member of one of the three professional accounting bodies, and meet the specific licensing requirements of the jurisdiction in which one practices. The CA profession s national qualification standards meet or exceed the public accounting requirements in all jurisdictions. International mobility: recognizing foreign qualifications in Canada Although the admission to membership and granting of the CA designation is a matter of provincial jurisdiction, the CA profession s national qualification standards ensure complete mobility of the CA designation within Canada. With regard to the international mobility, the CA profession is committed to fair and transparent processes for certifying foreign-trained professional accountants. Historically, our process for credential recognition has been conducted by our International Qualification Assessment Board (IQAB). IQAB assesses the qualification processes of foreign accounting bodies for substantial equivalency, based on the same expectations of CAs trained in Canada, and negotiates Mutual Recognition Agreements on behalf of the provincial and territorial institutes. We currently have Mutual Recognition Agreements with the leading professional accounting bodies in 13 countries. Members of these accounting bodies can become Canadian CAs simply by writing an exam in Canadian tax and Canadian law; Canadian CAs enjoy the same rights in these countries. We are currently in the process of transitioning from having to sit an exam on this local knowledge to having to attend a professional education program for members of accounting bodies with whom we have Mutual Recognition Agreements. Canadian immigration patterns have changed dramatically since our IQAB was established more than two decades ago. In 2008, the CICA and the provincial and territorial institutes forged a new pan- Canadian approach to the recognition of foreign credentials that recognizes three levels of credentials: Level 1: Mutual Recognition Agreement (based on an IQAB report): for members of foreign professional accounting bodies with education, examination and experience requirements that are substantially equivalent to our own. Level 2: Bridging to Membership Agreement (based on an IQAB report) for members of foreign professional accounting bodies with education, examination and experience requirements not substantially equivalent to our own, with a clearly defined gap in education/evaluation/experience. Level 3: Individual Applicant Assessment and Review (based on national criteria) for individuals who are members of non-reviewed professional accounting bodies, or are not members of any professional accounting body. We are now in the process of implementing this new approach, developing clear guidelines and identifying appropriate bridging programs (education, evaluation and experience) that will smooth the way to CA qualification for foreign-trained professionals while maintaining the excellence and integrity of Canadian standards. 2

4 Current labour market challenges There are a number of significant challenges facing the CA profession. As part of implementing our new credential assessment process, we are currently consulting with Canada s major accounting firms, and other major employers of CAs to better understand the challenges they face. Emerging issues include: The aging Canadian workforce: the CA profession, like the Canadian workforce at large, faces the retirement of a significant percentage of its membership over the next ten to fifteen years. Immigration will provide a significant and growing source of new members. Managing immigrant expectations: Accountants have been identified by the Canadian government as one of the professions for which demand currently outpaces supply. Consequently, the federal government has developed a policy to fast-track immigration applications for skilled workers in occupations such as finance, auditing and accounting. We expect this will create an influx of professionals interested in the Canadian CA designation. Reflective of the rigour and responsibility involved in the work of accounting and audit and its impact of the integrity and reputation of Canada s capital markets, the competency standards for becoming a Chartered Accountant in Canada are extremely high; many aspiring Canadian accountants do not meet it. Managing expectations and not compromising our standards is a significant challenge for the profession. The assessment of international experience: The CA is a professional designation, and requires the demonstration of competencies acquired through significant progressive professional experience under the guidance of an experienced CA. Assessing experience gained internationally is a significant challenge, especially for professionals coming from countries with significantly different or underdeveloped capital markets, accounting and auditing standards and cultures. Developing bridging programs: developing bridging programs that address gaps in competency is a major challenge for the profession, and may be seen as a barrier by some potential immigrants. Language skills: CAs must have sophisticated and specialized business language skills in English or French both to pass our Uniform Evaluation, and to interact with clients and employers effectively. Cultural fluency: research indicates that cultural fluency is a significant issue for employers and for foreign-trained professionals. Building cultural bridges is critical to retention and career success. Insufficient supply of specific expertise: the last few years have seen dramatic changes in international standards, most notably Canada s move to International Financial Reporting Standards in Since the EU has already adopted IFRS, the demand for IFRS expertise, potentially on a temporary basis, will offer significant Canadian opportunities to EU professionals. International mobility of professionals: the accounting world is dominated by four international firms who service international clients. They need increasing flexibility to move professionals around the globe on an as-needed basis. What would be the impact of facilitating labour mobility between Canada and the EU? The Canadian CA profession has had Mutual Recognition Agreements with a number of EU countries notably the United Kingdom, France, Belgium, and The Netherlands for many years. The movement of professionals between Canada and these countries has benefitted all. Extending mobility with other EU 3

5 countries will continue to build on that foundation, increasing career options and access to expertise for professionals in Canada and the EU. Architects Who is responsible for overseeing the recognition of professional qualifications? Is there a national exam? The eleven provincial and territorial licensing authorities (Associations of Architects) are responsible for the recognition of professional qualifications. Yes, there is a national examination. Recently the licensing authorities have developed a Canadian examination for architects called the ExAC (Examination for Architects in Canada). The US examination developed by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards or NCARB, called the ARE (Architect Registration Examination) is also recognized by the Canadian licensing authorities. What steps must be taken in order to practice in Canada? Specify recent developments and proposed changes, if any. Candidates must apply to the provincial licensing authority. The following must be assessed or evaluated; B1 - Profession Education if the professional degree is not from an accredited Canadian University School of Architecture or a School of Architecture in the USA accredited by NAAB then the candidate s education must be certified by the Canadian Architectural Certification Board (CACB). B2 - Experience the candidate must complete three years of internship (some foreign experience is recognized depending on the policies of the licensing authority). B3 - Examination the candidate must successfully pass an examination as described above in Question A. New Developments Currently the Canadian Architectural Licensing Authorities (CALA) are developing a process, called BEFA or Broadly Experienced Foreign Architect process, which will allow those candidates with training from abroad to have their competency assessed at one time (rather than in the three steps described above). Generally speaking, if a candidate can demonstrate appropriate professional experience as an architect in responsible control, for seven years following licensure or registration as an architect in the foreign jurisdiction, the candidate would qualify for registration in the Canadian jurisdiction. This process is in place in British Columbia but not yet in other jurisdictions. How do inter-provincial and international mobility procedures differ? Generally speaking, an architect licensed in one province, who is a member in good standing, can apply for registration in another province without additional assessment of their credentials What are some of the current labour market challenges facing this sector? Prior to the current economic recession there was a severe shortage of architects. There remains a demand for architects in certain regions for certain project types; however, commercial development projects and multi-unit development projects have virtually dried up. 4

6 In general, there is a shortage of licensed architects. Nearly one third of all graduates from the Canadian University Schools of Architecture leave Canada for work experience and adventure. Many do not return to Canada. Excellent communication skills, both oral and written, as well as visual in both official languages, are very important for those practicing architecture in Canada. Understanding building envelope design for cold climates and severe weather as well as differences in building codes is also critical for architectural practice in Canada. What would be the impact of facilitating labour mobility between Canada and the EU? The following are possible impacts: Reduction in the shortage of architects; Sharing of technology related to buildings and design; Greater opportunities for international experience for intern architects. Other Comments and Considerations: It is often very difficult for those professionals and officials from other countries to understand that in Canada, due to our Constitution Act, that the regulation of professionals including licensing and recognition of credentials is a provincial responsibility and NOT a federal responsibility. Because of several different jurisdictions (eleven architecture licensing authorities for the architecture profession) reaching consensus on international agreements can be difficult. It is also important for the federal government to understand that international agreements cannot be imposed upon the profession and support from the federal government is necessary to negotiate and conclude Mutual Recognition Agreements (MRAs) with various jurisdictions or multilateral groups. Construction Workers Who is responsible for overseeing the recognition of professional qualifications? Is there a national exam? In the construction industry, the Interprovincial Standards Red Seal Program provides national endorsements for certified workers in Red Seal trades (not all occupations or trades are Red Seal). The Red Seal endorsement means the certification is recognized across Canada and facilitates the mobility of workers. Each province / territory is responsible for apprenticeship training. Legislation permits each jurisdiction to designate occupations for apprenticeship. Designated trades are governed by regulations under Provincial and Territorial Apprenticeship Acts. These regulations outline the standards and conditions of training for specific trades (e.g. methods of registering apprentices, curriculum, accreditation, and certification). The designation of a new trade is normally initiated by industry working with the provincial and territorial apprenticeship authorities. Employers, employer associations or unions can petition their provincial or territorial Director of Apprenticeship to have an occupation designated. Occupations are classified as either compulsory or voluntary. Generally, compulsory occupations require workers to be certified or registered as apprentices in order for them to practice in the occupation. 5

7 Voluntary occupations often have certification and apprenticeship available to indicate the level of competency the holder has, however, workers are not required to be registered or certified in order to practice in the occupation. Even though many occupations deemed compulsory in some of the jurisdictions are also "Red Seal" trades, participation in the the Red Seal Program itself is not mandatory except where indicated as such by jurisdictions in specific legislation. What steps must be taken in order to practice in Canada? Specify recent developments and proposed changes, if any. This is dependent on the specific trade or occupation and the status under which the individual is entering the country (Temporary Foreign Worker, landed immigrant). As indicated above, the requirements vary by province and by trade/occupation. Workers must meet the certification requirements of the province. If the certification requirements include a Red Seal endorsement, the worker s certification is automatically recognized throughout Canada. The Red Seal program is administered in each province and territory under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). Each province and territory has an appointed Director of Apprenticeship for this purpose. The federal government is also represented in the CCDA membership. A national occupational analysis, developed for each Red Seal trade, is used as a base document for the development of interprovincial standards and examinations and is encouraged to be used by the provinces and territories for curriculum development. Efforts are underway both to expand the Program and to streamline the existing process for the development and revision of national occupational analyses and examinations. How do inter-provincial and international mobility procedures differ? Inter-provincial mobility is dependent on the individual having the appropriate credentials as recognized in that province or through the Red Seal Program. In the case of voluntary trades or occupations, the certification has to be recognized by the employer. International mobility requires the same credentials as inter-provincial mobility plus the government is involved with respect to requirements to enter the country as an immigrant or temporary foreign worker program. What are some of the current labour market challenges facing this sector? Aging labour force and resulting retirements of skilled workers. Ability to manage workforce requirements through peaks and valleys. Ability to have the right skills in the right place at the right time. Recruiting new workers when demographics create increasing competition for workers. Comprehensive and accurate supply side data to plan for workforce needs. What would be the impact of facilitating labour mobility between Canada and the EU? The ability to draw on workers from the EU would enable Canada to meet short term peak demand in a tight labour market. 6

8 Engineers Who is responsible for overseeing the recognition of professional qualifications? Is there a national exam? The responsibility for regulating the practice of engineering in Canada lies with the 12 provincial and territorial associations. To be licensed in one of these jurisdictions an applicant must: satisfy the academic requirements, satisfy the work experience requirements, write and pass the Professional Practice Examination (an exam on law and ethics as they relate to engineering in Canada), satisfy the language requirements, be of good character and pay the relevant fees and dues. There is no national exam. Each jurisdiction is responsible for setting any technical examinations that are assigned to the applicant to satisfy the academic requirements. One jurisdiction does offer the technical examination service to the other jurisdictions but not all of them use it. Every applicant for licensure in Canada must write the Professional Practice Examination. One jurisdiction does offer the examination service to the other jurisdictions but not all of them use it. What steps must be taken in order to practice in Canada? Specify recent developments and proposed changes, if any. To be licensed to practice professional engineering in one of the provincial or territorial jurisdictions an applicant must: satisfy the academic requirements, satisfy the work experience requirements, write and pass the Professional Practice Examination (an exam on law and ethics as they relate to engineering in Canada), satisfy the language requirements, be of good character and pay the relevant fees and dues. One year of the work experience must be done in a Canadian environment to ensure the applicant is familiar with the Canadian codes, climate and culture. Recent and new developments include: The accreditation system used to assess Canadian undergraduate engineering programs is transitioning from an input based assessment to an outcomes based assessment. This will ensure that the new graduates have attained the necessary proficiency of the given competencies. The profession is looking at a competency based assessment model for the work experience requirement for licensure to replace the current 4 year time-based assessment of acceptable work experience. How do inter-provincial and international mobility procedures differ? The engineering profession in Canada has had an Inter-Association Mobility Agreement in place since This has allowed for relatively free mobility of licensed professional engineers between jurisdictions in a matter of a few days. Engineers Canada currently has mobility agreements with the Hong Kong Institution of Engineers, Engineers Australia and Engineers Ireland for licensed professional engineers. The assessment process for national and international mobility based on the aforementioned agreements is relatively similar and straightforward. The applicant must demonstrate that he/she is a member in good standing with the organization from which he/she is applying. This may take longer to confirm for the international organizations. The only difference between the national and international mobility agreements is that all individuals applying from international organizations must complete the one-year of work experience in a Canadian environment prior to being licensed in a Canadian jurisdiction. 7

9 What are some of the current labour market challenges facing this sector? The engineering profession in Canada is extremely diverse with over 20 different areas of practice. Add to this the vastness and the geographical diversity of Canada. This leads to major challenges for the labour market. Today s professional engineers in Canada must be open to travel and relocation to maintain and acquire employment. Engineers Canada and the Canadian Council of Technicians and Technologists with financial support from the Federal Government conducted the Engineering and Technology Labour Market Study. The study illustrated that certain imbalances in the engineering and technology labour market had become more evident. There were significant skills shortages in some regions and in a number of technical fields. These shortages were exacerbated by an apparent worsening of the gap between the skills that employers required and the skill profile of new entrants into the engineering and technology labour market. In some regions skills shortages co-existed with a more than adequate supply of formally qualified job-seekers. What would be the impact of facilitating labour mobility between Canada and the EU? In 2008 the 12 provincial associations received applications for licensure as professional engineers from representatives of 21 member states of the EU. The total number of applicants was 754 in There are no statistics available on how many Canadian professional engineers or engineering graduates wished to work in EU member states. Nurses Who is responsible for overseeing the recognition of professional qualifications? Is there a national exam? Canada has four regulated groups of nurses: registered nurses (RNs), nurse practitioners (NPs), registered or licensed practical nurses (R-LPNs) and registered psychiatric nurses (RPNs) (in our four Western provinces). The information included below will be specific to registered nurses and nurse practitioners. There are 12 registered nurse regulatory bodies in Canada for the 13 provinces and territories. The Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) is a federation of organizations that includes 10 of these regulatory bodies that are responsible for the regulation of registered nurses and nurse practitioners. The remaining two provincial organizations that are not members of CNA are the College of Nurses of Ontario (CNO) and the l Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers du Québec (OIIQ). These two regulatory bodies are responsible for the regulation of registered nurses and nurse practitioners. CNO is also responsible for regulating practical nurses. The regulatory bodies are responsible for setting the standards for entry into the profession and providing initial registration of both Canadian and internationally educated applicants. They are also responsible for establishing and enforcing professional practice standards; continuing competence requirements and professional conduct review processes for registered nurses and nurse practitioners. One of the standards for entry into the profession, for both Canadian educated and internationally educated nurses, is passing an entry-level registration exam. In Canada, there are two examinations used for registration of registered nurses - the CNA owned Canadian Registered Nurse Examination (CRNE) that is used by all provinces and territories except Quebec, and the Quebec licensure examination (Professional Examination of the l Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers du Québec) which is owned by OIIQ. Examinations are also required to be granted the title of nurse practitioner. Most provinces use the following exams for nurse practitioners - the Canadian Nurse Practitioner 8

10 Examination: Family/All Ages owned by CNA, and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) Adult and Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Exams owned by ANCC but provided in Canada through CNA. The province of British Columbia utilizes the ANCC nurse practitioner exam for the family/all ages context and also requires NPs to take an Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE) in addition to the written exams. Quebec has its own nurse practitioner exams which also include an OSCE component. What steps must be taken in order to practice in Canada? Specify recent developments and proposed changes, if any. In order to practice nursing in Canada you must be registered with the regulatory body of the province/ territory in which you practice and be a member in good standing. For accurate and jurisdiction-specific information please go to the following websites: CNA member regulatory organizations: College of Registered Nurses of British Columbia (CRNBC) < College and Association of Registered Nurses of Alberta (CARNA) < Saskatchewan Registered Nurses Association (SRNA) < College of Registered Nurses of Manitoba (CRNM) < Nurses Association of New Brunswick (NANB) < College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia (CRNNS) < Association of Registered Nurses of Newfoundland and Labrador (ARNNL) < Association of Registered Nurses of Prince Edward Island (ARNPEI) < Registered Nurses Association of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut (RNANT/NU) < Non-CNA member regulatory organizations: College of Nurses of Ontario < L Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers du Québec < There are some differences across Canada, but primarily Canadians graduating from approved Canadian nursing programs must: establish his/her identity for registration complete an application for registration and pay a fee show proof of having completed an approved nursing education program successfully complete a Canadian entry-to-practice examination or acceptable equivalent (see question A) show evidence of good character and suitability to practice if moving from another Canadian jurisdiction, show evidence of registration in the jurisdiction where the nursing program was completed, or in some cases, evidence of eligibility for registration is acceptable show proof of recent safe nursing practice - specified numbers of hours of practice within a specified number of years, or graduation within a specified period prior to registration in some cases, satisfy the jurisdiction that the applicant does not have any health condition or disorder that impacts the applicant s ability to practice safely as a registered nurse in some cases, provide a criminal record check once licensed/registered meet the requirements for continuing competency and maintain their fitness to practice 9

11 In 2008, 11 of the nursing regulatory bodies signed an updated mutual recognition agreement (MRA) in the interest of enabling qualified registered nurses having access to employment opportunities in nursing in each province and/or territory in Canada. This agreement stipulated, among other things, that no residency requirement would be adopted, or maintained, and agreed that the scope of practice for registered nurses is similar in each Canadian jurisdictions. It also agreed that a registered nurse who has established registration in a Canadian jurisdiction will be granted registration by endorsement in another Canadian jurisdiction, provided that the applicant meets the above criteria and has met the continuing competency requirements of each jurisdiction in which the nurse is licensed, or is most recently licensed or registered. With this recent update of the MRA, nurses who have successfully written either of the previously mentioned Canadian RN entry-to-practice exams can move within Canada without being required to re-write an exam (i.e. the CRNE is recognized for licensure in Quebec and the Quebec exam is recognized for licensure in the other provinces and territories). Canada has made considerable progress on harmonizing the policies and processes for regulation of nurse practitioners. There has been extensive work completed in identifying any barriers to mobility between provinces and territories for nurse practitioners, and the nursing regulatory bodies continue to work towards standardized requirements. In addition to MRAs, and other dialogue on mobility, work is underway in many areas to develop national approaches that will help harmonize policy and process. For example, national professional nursing standards are being developed that will be used by nursing regulatory bodies across the country. Also, there are core competencies for entry-to-practice for registered nurses and nurse practitioners being used by most jurisdictions in Canada. How do inter-provincial and international mobility procedures differ? Nurses educated outside of Canada who are seeking registration in Canada for the first time, must meet the criteria listed in section B, as well as those that follow. Again there are some differences across the country, but primarily the additional criteria are: Show evidence of fluency in written and spoken English or French (in some jurisdictions) if this is not the first language Show that their education is substantially equivalent to that required of Canadian graduates. In some cases, and in some provinces, this may involve a substantially equivalent competency assessment which involves both knowledge and clinical assessment (see below) A period of supervised practice may be required before full registration is granted in some jurisdictions Internationally educated professionals are assessed to determine if the education and practice experience they have has substantially similar competencies to those required for practice in Canada. If this determination can t be made based on a paper application, a "Substantially Equivalent Competence" assessment is required. This assessment may include written, oral and/or clinical exams. Any identified gaps are remediated through additional education and/or supervised practice before an applicant can progress with registration. A 2005 pan-canadian Internationally Educated Nurses (IEN) project, examined the policies, practices and procedures used by provincial/territorial nursing regulatory organizations to assess internationally educated nurses (IENs) for licensure/registration in Canada, as well as their integration into the workplace. This project also provided recommendations for action. One recommendation was to create a national assessment service for internationally educated nurses and to create a standard evidence- 10

12 based approach to the assessment of IENs eligibility for registration in Canada. Work is underway to explore the development of a national assessment service which should result in a streamlined national assessment process and reduce the time and effort involved in becoming registered in Canada for IENs. Another recommendation was to create a centralized source of information for IENs interested in coming to Canada. Work is also underway to enhance the Working in Canada portal with information specific to RNs, NPs, LPNs and RPNs. What are some of the current labour market challenges facing this sector? There are a quarter-million registered nurses (RNs) in Canada. Representing the largest profession in the health care workforce, the RN labour market must be carefully managed to meet the diverse and changing health care needs of Canadians now, and in the future. The proportion of the RN workforce that is internationally educated has remained constant at 6-9% over the past decade or more. In 2007, there was a shortage of nearly 11,000 full-time equivalent (FTE) RNs for the purposes of delivering direct care in Canada. If the health needs of Canadians continue to change according to past trends, and if no policy interventions are implemented, the shortage of RNs in Canada will increase to almost 60,000 FTEs by The reasons for this shortage are numerous and include: an aging nursing workforce an aging population a significant decrease in number of Canadian graduates over the 1990 s due to fiscal restraints an increased incidence of chronic diseases a growing complexity of care driven by ethical considerations, technology, growing patient expectations, etc. What would be the impact of facilitating labour mobility between Canada and the EU? Increasing exposure to European regulatory bodies and building closer ties between nursing regulatory bodies would provide greater opportunity to share information and practices and improve co-operation between these organizations. However, it would not be in the public interest to bind health care professions to any trade agreement that would require full, unrestricted mobility between countries, as education; scopes of practice; and practice environments and expectations differ significantly between Canada and many member states of the EU. There is concern that labour mobility agreements could lead to standards being set at the lowest common denominator, diluting the ability of the regulatory body to meet its mandate of public protection. Mobility agreements can become tools for deregulation and, as such, can endanger the public's health. There is the possibility that provisions on labour mobility can undermine the capacity to regulate professions such as nursing and compromise public safety. It is imperative that regulatory bodies maintain their ability to assess potential registrants for language fluency and competence to safely practice nursing within the Canadian context. Within the EU directive, we are aware of significant challenges with respect to language fluency in that the regulator cannot require demonstration of language fluency from an applicant who is from an EU country. This important regulatory function carried out in the public interest is falling by default to employers. It is essential that further dialogue, information sharing and exploration of areas of commonality and differences occur between national and regional regulatory organizations to have a better 11

13 understanding of education, practice and regulatory structures in the two regions before any commitments are made. It would be very beneficial to CNA and the regulatory bodies, to have a conversation with those countries that are signatories to Article 39 (ex 48) of the EC Treaty. This section of the treaty allows for the free movement of people from country to country, assuring them that they will not be discriminated against due to their nationality. This is the key directive driving labour mobility rights in the EU. As such, we hear of challenges with the directive and the appropriate management of regulatory requirements, across the EU jurisdictions. Cooperation would be sitting down as a collective and determining what, if any, commonalities there are and deciding if there are methods for creating consistent approaches between nations/jurisdictions. Other Comments and Considerations: In a recent survey that CNA and its members responded to from the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade we indicated that we recommend no changes be made to Canada s current approach to bilateral trade agreements, and we supported registered nurses and nurse practitioners remaining exempt from the list of professionals covered by the trade agreement. We maintain this position. We do however appreciate the opportunity to be involved in any early discussions on mobility and trade agreements with the EU. We welcome the opportunity to dialogue with our European counterparts and maintain that it is essential that this dialogue occurs before consideration of making any commitments with respect to professional mobility. Pharmacists Who is responsible for overseeing the recognition of professional qualifications? Is there a national exam? In Canada, the National Association of Pharmacy Regulatory Authorities members which are the provincial and territorial pharmacy regulatory authorities (PRAs) is responsible to set the licensure requirements for the practice of pharmacy in their respective jurisdictions. They also have to ensure that the persons seeking licensure are qualified. All PRAs, except for the province of Québec, rely on the Pharmacy Examining Board of Canada (PEBC) to conduct the assessment of qualifications of Canadian and foreign pharmacy graduates on their behalf. This assessment involves national examinations developed to ensure that candidates possess the necessary knowledge, skills and abilities to safely and effectively practice pharmacy. These examinations are mainly based on the documents developed by NAPRA regarding the professional competencies for Canadian Pharmacists at entry- to-practice (2007) as well as standards of practice for Canadian Pharmacists (2009). In addition to the national examinations, PEBC also provides services for all PRAs, except for the province of Québec, in the evaluation of documents from international pharmacy graduates (IPGs) to confirm the authenticity, legitimacy or a candidate s credentials from bona fide programs from universities and pharmacy schools around the world. Results of the evaluation and national examinations are used by the PRA, except for the province of Québec, during the review of the candidate s application for licensure. In the province of Québec the assessment of qualifications is performed by the Comité d admission à la pratique of the PRA (Ordre des Pharmaciens du Québec) for outside of Quebec trained pharmacy graduates as specified in provincial regulations. Successful completion of PEBC national examinations is not mandatory in the province of Québec for Canadian or foreign pharmacy graduates. 12

14 PEBC is a non-profit, self-supporting organization that was established by Special Act of Parliament on December 21, 1963, and functions under statute of the Federal government as an arms-length national examining board for the pharmacy profession in Canada. What steps must be taken in order to practice in Canada? Specify recent developments and proposed changes, if any. A copy of the newly signed Mobility Agreement for Canadian Pharmacists (July 2009) is attached to this document for reference. Please refer to Appendix 1 of the agreement. It is self-explanatory and outlines the requirements for entry-to-practice in no particular order. Recent developments will be covered in the next question. How do inter-provincial and international mobility procedures differ? Inter-provincial mobility procedures are facilitated by the signature of the Mobility Agreement for Canadian Pharmacists (formerly known as the Mutual Recognition Agreement) by our members. In the case of IPGs, additional steps might be required to fill out identified gaps in the education or training of IPGs when compared with the requirements that Canadian pharmacy graduates must meet. Gaps may be filled by taking additional training at a university bridging program. IPGs are tested for proficiency in one of Canada official languages (English or French) depending on the area of the country where they hope to practice. Acquiring knowledge of the Canadian health care system, being exposed to Canadian culture and possessing the ability to communicate very well within professional health care settings are extremely important for success. In one province training at a university level bridging program is part of the licensure requirements for IPGs with the possibility for candidates of applying to the PRA registration panel for exemption. Recent developments within NAPRA are the directions received from its Board last April to establish, subject to availability of funding, a single window of entry for IPGs through a IPGs Gateway to Canada. The Gateway, through the medium of a website, would provide information, assessment and triage prior to an IPG s involvement with individual Pharmacy Regulatory Authorities. The goal is to provide a fair, accessible, transparent, consistent and rigorous service that optimizes the effectiveness and efficiency of registering IPGs in Canada. What are some of the current labour market challenges facing this sector? Canada continues to require a highly skilled workforce to sustain its economic growth and competitiveness. However, reports indicate that both employers and workers are experiencing the pressure of skills and labour shortages associated with the rapid demographic and technological changes affecting the Canadian economy. Studies demonstrate that immigration will account for all net labour force growth in Canada over the next several years. Accordingly, immigration is vital in addressing skills and labour shortages as well as Canada s continued prosperity. It is also reported that the credential recognition processes for immigrants needs to be more fair and transparent to ensure that employers have access to a large pool of qualified, talented workers. This situation also applies to regulated health professions. A recently completed initiative Moving Forward: Pharmacy Human Resources for the future, led by the Canadian Pharmacists Association with funding from the Human Resources and Skills Development Canada s Foreign Credential Recognition Program, examined the factors contributing to pharmacy human resource challenges in Canada. A particular component of this initiative resulted in an in-depth examination of the barriers and facilitators 13

15 for the integration of International Pharmacy Graduates (IPGs) into the Canadian pharmacy workforce. In order to overcome the challenges observed regarding the integration of IPGs into the pharmacy workforce in Canada, the following recommendations were formulated: Establish and maintain a plain-language website with comprehensive information about licensure and integration into pharmacy practice Increase the availability of, and improve access to, pharmacy bridging programs and training for international pharmacy graduates Identify, and promote the adoption of, common standards for teaching and assessment within pharmacy bridging programs for international pharmacy graduates Develop pan-canadian standards and model training programs to support preceptors and mentors of international pharmacy graduates Develop a diagnostic tool and support system to assist international pharmacy graduates in assessing and customizing their learning needs Promote the availability of an inter-professional orientation program on the Canadian health care system, suitable for international pharmacy graduates and other health professionals Develop pan-canadian standards for the level of communicative competency required for safe and effective pharmacy practice What would be the impact of facilitating labour mobility between Canada and the EU? Although additional pharmacists in Canada would be good to address the current and anticipated labour shortage, facilitation of labour mobility between Canada and the EU would be a significant and complex exercise. The complexity comes mainly from the fact that they are several EU member countries with potentially different working languages, education/ training and standards of pharmacy practice. In assessing comparability with the Canadian requirements gaps are expected and will require the mean to address them. Our Canadian system may not have enough capacity to support additional demands for specific education/training. As well, interested IPGs may not have the financial support to undertake all of the required steps to licensure. It is too early to speculate on the type of impact. However, an assessment of the impact from various dimensions would be warranted including impact on IPGs arriving into Canada and Canadian pharmacists leaving Canada for other countries. Lessons learned from current discussions occurring between France and Québec would be useful to assist in developing a way forward. 14

16 15

17 Physiotherapists Who is responsible for overseeing the recognition of professional qualifications? Is there a national exam? Canadian Physiotherapy Regulators are responsible for overseeing the recognition of professional qualifications. There is a national exam: Physiotherapy Competency Examination (PCE). The Alliance administers the credentialing program (Educational Credentials & Qualifications Assessment) for all internationally educated applicants on behalf of the regulators except Quebec, Nunavut and Northwest Territories. The Alliance also administers the PCE. The following physiotherapy regulators require Canadian educated applicants to pass the PCE in order to become licensed or registered: Yukon Consumer Services College of Physical Therapists of British Columbia College of Physical Therapists of Alberta Saskatchewan College of Physical Therapy College of Physiotherapists of Manitoba College of Physiotherapists of Ontario Nova Scotia College of Physiotherapists Prince Edward Island College of Physiotherapists Newfoundland & Labrador College of Physiotherapists The physiotherapy regulators listed above, as well as the College of Physiotherapists of New Brunswick, require internationally educated physiotherapists to pass the PCE in order to become licensed or registered. What steps must be taken in order to practice in Canada? Specify recent developments and proposed changes, if any. Each province and territory in Canada (except Northwest Territories and Nunavut) has a physiotherapy regulator that licenses or registers physiotherapists to practice in its jurisdiction. The provincial or territorial regulator decides who can become licensed or registered. To become a licensed or registered physiotherapist in Canada, applicants must meet all the licensing or registration requirements of the province or territory in which they want to practice. The flow chart in the next page outlines the steps involved in order to practice in Canada. 16

18 17

19 How do inter-provincial and international mobility procedures differ? The recent amendments to the Agreement on Internal Trade call for workers registered for an occupation in one jurisdiction to be recognized as qualified for registration in that occupation by all other jurisdictions within Canada. As no such agreement exists yet with other countries, the internationally educated must meet requirements as previously described. What are some of the current labour market challenges facing this sector? Demographic changes over the next 15 to 20 years are expected to profoundly affect Canada s labour market. These changes present particular challenges for the physiotherapy community. As the general population ages, there will likely be an increasing demand for physiotherapy services. At the same time, pending workforce retirements within the physiotherapy community could put ever-increasing pressures on the supply of physiotherapy professionals. Citizenship and Immigration Canada estimates that by 2012, 100% of all net, new labour market growth will be the result of immigration. At the beginning of 2009, there were approximately 19,000 physiotherapists registered in Canada. For the past decade, the number of registered physiotherapists has been increasing at a faster rate than overall population growth. Despite increases in service levels, initial indications based on comparative workforce statistics suggest that a substantial demand exist for physiotherapists in this country. Moreover, the confluence of policy changes, pending retirements and an aging population are likely to increase the demand for new physiotherapists in the future. What would be the impact of facilitating labour mobility between Canada and the EU? The impact will be a significant decrease in the amount of time spent in assessing individual credentials and to facilitate faster access to the PCE. Other Comments and Considerations: Providing access to professional certification to individuals educated outside a domestic context is not simple. We need to be vigilant in ensuring that the candidates meet the same qualifications stipulated for the domestic graduates. Determining eligibility can present a significant challenge because of variance in educational systems and professional preparation in the sending jurisdiction. In order to facilitate labor mobility between Canada and EU, we have to ensure the comparability of the education and other credentials and qualifications to qualify an internationally educated applicant for registration. We need to first undertake extensive research to understand: the variation among physiotherapists in the sending jurisdiction as compared with the receiving one; the nature of the country-specific education system and context of physiotherapy practice that vary with population need and a country s political environment; the features of a physiotherapist s qualifications in the sending jurisdiction to determine commonalities with the features in Canada; the processes; what the intent of the education is, both preparatory and professional education, and the outcome of professional education 18

Public Accounting Rights for Certified General Accountants in Canada. Issue Brief

Public Accounting Rights for Certified General Accountants in Canada. Issue Brief Public Accounting Rights for Certified General Accountants in Canada Issue Brief IMPORTANT NOTE: Some information regarding Ontario is out of date pursuant to the adoption of the Public Accounting Act,

More information

National Association of Pharmacy Regulatory Authority s Privacy Policy for Pharmacists' Gateway Canada

National Association of Pharmacy Regulatory Authority s Privacy Policy for Pharmacists' Gateway Canada Introduction National Association of Pharmacy Regulatory Authority s Privacy Policy for Pharmacists' Gateway Canada This Privacy Policy describes the manner in which the National Association of Pharmacy

More information

NCLEX-RN 2015: Canadian Results. Published by the Canadian Council of Registered Nurse Regulators (CCRNR)

NCLEX-RN 2015: Canadian Results. Published by the Canadian Council of Registered Nurse Regulators (CCRNR) NCLEX-RN 2015: Canadian Results Published by the Canadian Council of Registered Nurse Regulators (CCRNR) March 31, 2016 Contents Message from the president 3 Background on the NCLEX-RN 4 The role of Canada

More information

Labour Mobility Act QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

Labour Mobility Act QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS Labour Mobility Act QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS Background: Agreement on Internal Trade... 1 Background: Labour Mobility Act... 3 Economic Impacts... 5 Role of Professional and Occupational Associations... 5

More information

Credentialling Application Process Guide

Credentialling Application Process Guide CANADIAN ALLIANCE OF PHYSIOTHERAPY REGULATORS Credentialling Application Process Guide January 1, 2015 Revised: September 23, 2015 P a g e 2 Contents Practicing Physiotherapy in Canada... 3 Before Applying...

More information

The Deputy Minister of Community Services Harvey Brooks

The Deputy Minister of Community Services Harvey Brooks Recommendations by the: Chartered Accountants of the Yukon Certified Management Accountants of the Yukon Submitted to: The Minister of Community Services Hon. Elaine Taylor Date: March XX, 2013 The Deputy

More information

The Chair Academy Training for Organizational Leaders Jacksonville, Florida March 7-10, 2007

The Chair Academy Training for Organizational Leaders Jacksonville, Florida March 7-10, 2007 The Chair Academy Training for Organizational Leaders Jacksonville, Florida March 7-10, 2007 Reducing the Learning Recognition Gap for Internationally Educated Nurses (IENs): Leading Change through Prior

More information

Fair Registration Practices Report

Fair Registration Practices Report Fair Registration Practices Report Nurses (2013) The answers that you submitted to OFC can be seen below. This Fair Registration Practices Report was produced as required by: the Fair Access to Regulated

More information

College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia. Interpreting and Modifying the Scope of Practice of the Registered Nurse

College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia. Interpreting and Modifying the Scope of Practice of the Registered Nurse Interpreting and Modifying the Scope of Practice of the Registered Nurse Table of Contents Executive Summary...2 Introduction...3 Purpose...4 Definitions...4 Principles related to Scope of Practice...5

More information

Regulated Nurses, 2013

Regulated Nurses, 2013 Report July 2014 Spending and Health Workforce Our Vision Better data. Better decisions. Healthier Canadians. Our Mandate To lead the development and maintenance of comprehensive and integrated health

More information

Forum of Labour Market Ministers Forum des ministres du marché du travail

Forum of Labour Market Ministers Forum des ministres du marché du travail Forum of Labour Market Ministers Forum des ministres du marché du travail CA-561-11-09 Forum of Labour Market Ministers (FLMM) The FLMM is an intergovernmental forum established to strengthen co-operation

More information

Fair Registration Practices Report

Fair Registration Practices Report Fair Registration Practices Report Nurses (2014) The answers that you submitted to OFC can be seen below. This Fair Registration Practices Report was produced as required by: the Fair Access to Regulated

More information

AGREEMENT ON MOBILITY OF WITHIN CANADA

AGREEMENT ON MOBILITY OF WITHIN CANADA Canadian Council of Professional Engineers OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS * WITHIN CANADA * The term professional engineer is an official mark held by the Canadian Council of Professional Engineers. AMONG:

More information

APPLICATION FOR EVALUATION OF FOREIGN SOCIAL WORK CREDENTIALS

APPLICATION FOR EVALUATION OF FOREIGN SOCIAL WORK CREDENTIALS APPLICATION FOR EVALUATION OF FOREIGN SOCIAL WORK CREDENTIALS For persons located in, or immigrating to, the province of Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, Nova Scotia,

More information

An Update. Pharmacy. Technician Regulation in Canada

An Update. Pharmacy. Technician Regulation in Canada C o n t i n u i n g E d u c a t i o n tech talkce the national continuing education program for pharmacy technicians 1.0 CEU Answer online for instant results www.pharmacygateway.ca JUNE/JULY 2008 Approved

More information

Organization of the health care system and the recent/evolving human resource agenda in Canada

Organization of the health care system and the recent/evolving human resource agenda in Canada Organization of the health care system and the recent/evolving human resource agenda in Canada 1. Organization - the structural provision of health care. Canada has a predominantly publicly financed health

More information

Frequently Asked Questions Members Unification of the profession Coming into force of the Act

Frequently Asked Questions Members Unification of the profession Coming into force of the Act Frequently Asked Questions Members Unification of the profession Coming into force of the Act Are you already on your way to becoming a CA, CGA or CMA? Read the FAQ prepared for candidates for the practice

More information

SUGGESTED SPEAKING POINTS

SUGGESTED SPEAKING POINTS SUGGESTED SPEAKING POINTS Introduction Thank you, Brad, for your insights into labour mobility and the recognition of qualifications. My thanks also to World Education Services, the Canadian Bureau for

More information

If you have experience and academic. The Applied Science and Engineering Technology Professions in Canada ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY

If you have experience and academic. The Applied Science and Engineering Technology Professions in Canada ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY The Applied Science and Engineering Technology Professions in Canada If you have experience and academic credentials in applied science or engineering, a career as a certified technician or technologist

More information

NEPAB. Nursing Education Program Approval Board

NEPAB. Nursing Education Program Approval Board NEPAB Nursing Education Program Approval Board Standards for Alberta Nursing Education Programs Leading to Initial Entry to Practice as a Nurse Practitioner January 2011 Ratified by the College and Association

More information

MULTILATERAL INSTRUMENT 33-107 PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRANTS HOLDING THEMSELVES OUT AS PROVIDING FINANCIAL PLANNING AND SIMILAR ADVICE

MULTILATERAL INSTRUMENT 33-107 PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRANTS HOLDING THEMSELVES OUT AS PROVIDING FINANCIAL PLANNING AND SIMILAR ADVICE MULTILATERAL INSTRUMENT 33-107 PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRANTS HOLDING THEMSELVES OUT AS PROVIDING FINANCIAL PLANNING AND SIMILAR ADVICE PART 1 PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS 1.1 Proficiency Requirements

More information

THE COLLEGE OF PSYCHOLOGISTS OF ONTARIO L'ORDRE DES PSYCHOLOGUES DE L'ONTARIO ENTRY-TO-PRACTICE REVIEW

THE COLLEGE OF PSYCHOLOGISTS OF ONTARIO L'ORDRE DES PSYCHOLOGUES DE L'ONTARIO ENTRY-TO-PRACTICE REVIEW THE COLLEGE OF PSYCHOLOGISTS OF ONTARIO L'ORDRE DES PSYCHOLOGUES DE L'ONTARIO ENTRY-TO-PRACTICE REVIEW March 2011 Table of Contents Executive Summary..... 2 General Objectives and Scope.....2 Section (A)

More information

SPECIAL EDITION MARCH 2015 SPECIAL EDITION PHARMACY TECHNICIANS

SPECIAL EDITION MARCH 2015 SPECIAL EDITION PHARMACY TECHNICIANS SPECIAL EDITION MARCH 2015 SPECIAL EDITION PHARMACY TECHNICIANS Contents Bill 151 1 The Regulation of Pharmacy Technicians 2 Professional Competencies for Canadian Pharmacy Technicians at Entry to Practice

More information

Report of the CMEC Quality Assurance Subcommittee

Report of the CMEC Quality Assurance Subcommittee Report of the CMEC Quality Assurance Subcommittee 2007 2007 CMEC Jurisdictional Update on Activities Related to Quality Assurance Introduction In February 2007, ministers responsible for advanced education

More information

PHASE II FINAL REPORT

PHASE II FINAL REPORT May 2006 Building the Future: An integrated strategy for nursing human resources in Canada PHASE II FINAL REPORT Phase II Final Report This Phase II Final Report is part of an overall project entitled

More information

Occupational Therapists in Canada, 2010 National and Jurisdictional Highlights and Profiles

Occupational Therapists in Canada, 2010 National and Jurisdictional Highlights and Profiles Occupational Therapists in Canada, 2010 National and Jurisdictional Highlights and Profiles October 2011 Spending and Health Workforce Who We Are Established in 1994, CIHI is an independent, not-for-profit

More information

Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2007 to 2011

Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2007 to 2011 Spending and Health Workforce Our Vision Better data. Better decisions. Healthier Canadians. Our Mandate To lead the development and maintenance of comprehensive and integrated health information that

More information

Nurse Practitioner Education in Canada

Nurse Practitioner Education in Canada 0 Nurse Practitioner Education in Canada Final Report November 2011 1 2 Contents Background...4 Key Findings on Nurse Practitioner Programs in Canada...5 Nursing Programs in Canada...5 Age of Nurse Practitioner

More information

Canadian Provincial and Territorial Early Hearing Detection and Intervention. (EHDI) Programs: PROGRESS REPORT

Canadian Provincial and Territorial Early Hearing Detection and Intervention. (EHDI) Programs: PROGRESS REPORT Canadian Provincial and Territorial Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) Programs: PROGRESS REPORT www.sac-oac.ca www.canadianaudiology.ca 1 EHDI PROGRESS REPORT This progress report represents

More information

Practical Experience Requirements

Practical Experience Requirements CPA Practical Experience Requirements Effective September 1, 2015 NATIONAL STANDARDS CPA Alberta CPA provincial/ regional bodies CPA Atlantic Region CPA British Columbia CPA Canada International CPA Manitoba

More information

PositionStatement NATIONAL PLANNING FOR HUMAN RESOURCES IN THE HEALTH SECTOR CNA POSITION

PositionStatement NATIONAL PLANNING FOR HUMAN RESOURCES IN THE HEALTH SECTOR CNA POSITION PositionStatement NATIONAL PLANNING FOR HUMAN RESOURCES IN THE HEALTH SECTOR CNA POSITION CNA believes that successful human resources planning in the Canadian health sector requires a collective and integrated

More information

Pharmacy Technician Structured Practical Training Program MANUAL AND SUBMISSION FORMS. December 2014 (Updated July 2015)

Pharmacy Technician Structured Practical Training Program MANUAL AND SUBMISSION FORMS. December 2014 (Updated July 2015) Pharmacy Technician Structured Practical Training Program MANUAL AND SUBMISSION FORMS December 2014 (Updated July 2015) *To be reviewed by Supervisor and Pharmacy Technician-in-Training and used in conjunction

More information

Canada Post Group Economic Impact on Canada. Corporate Planning and Strategy

Canada Post Group Economic Impact on Canada. Corporate Planning and Strategy Canada Post Group Economic Impact on Canada Corporate Planning and Strategy July 27 Section 1 1. The National Impact 2. Impact on the Provinces Corporate Planning and Strategy, July 27 Page 2 Study of

More information

Nurse Practitioners in Canada

Nurse Practitioners in Canada Nurse Practitioners in Canada Prepared for the Health Care Co-operative Federation of Canada Biju Mathai, BSc Policy and Research Intern Canadian Co-operative Association March 20, 2012 Nurse Practitioners

More information

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS MOBILITY

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS MOBILITY FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS MOBILITY These FAQs are intended to provide you with an overview to the provisions respecting mobility. The questions and answers are intended as a guide, only. Lawyers seeking

More information

College of Nurses of Ontario. Membership Statistics Highlights 2014

College of Nurses of Ontario. Membership Statistics Highlights 2014 College of Nurses of Ontario Membership Statistics Highlights 2014 Revised February 25, 2015 VISION Leading in regulatory excellence MISSION Regulating nursing in the public interest Membership Statistics

More information

If you have experience and academic. The Applied Science and Engineering Technology Professions in Canada MECHANICAL TECHNOLOGY

If you have experience and academic. The Applied Science and Engineering Technology Professions in Canada MECHANICAL TECHNOLOGY The Applied Science and Engineering Technology Professions in Canada MECHANICAL TECHNOLOGY If you have experience and academic credentials in applied science or engineering, a career as a certified technician

More information

Child Care Human Resources Sector Council

Child Care Human Resources Sector Council Child Care Wages and a Quality Child Care System Child Care Human Resources Sector Council Prepared for the Child Care Human Resources Sector Council Authors: Jane Beach & Bozica Costigliola 2 Child Care

More information

PROVINCIAL/TERRITORIAL COUNCIL Of MINISTERS OF SECURITIES REGULATION (Council) ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT January 2013 to December 2013

PROVINCIAL/TERRITORIAL COUNCIL Of MINISTERS OF SECURITIES REGULATION (Council) ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT January 2013 to December 2013 PROVINCIAL/TERRITORIAL COUNCIL Of MINISTERS OF SECURITIES REGULATION (Council) ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT January 2013 to December 2013 BACKGROUND Since its formation in 2004, the Provincial-Territorial Council

More information

CA Practical Experience Requirements

CA Practical Experience Requirements CA Practical Experience Requirements 2010 Mission for the CICA Our mission is to foster public confidence in the CA profession by acting in the public interest and helping our members excel. Vision Statement

More information

Engineers Canada 2012 Membership Survey

Engineers Canada 2012 Membership Survey Engineers Canada 2012 Membership Survey June 3, 2013 Contents List of Tables... i List of Figures... ii Descriptions of Membership Categories... iii 1 Introduction... 1 2 Membership Composition... 1 2.1

More information

How the practice of medicine is regulated in Canada

How the practice of medicine is regulated in Canada Regulatory Bodies The federal government s authority over health care is limited to issues concerning spending, criminal law, patent regulation, aboriginal health services, and matters relating to the

More information

KEY ELEMENTS PSYCHOLOGIST REGULATIONS

KEY ELEMENTS PSYCHOLOGIST REGULATIONS Objective: PSYCHOLOGIST REGULATIONS The is seeking feedback from professionals and the public on the proposed key elements that will comprise the new Regulations. All feedback is welcome and may be submitted

More information

RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE CANADIAN NURSE PRACTITIONER INITIATIVE PROGRESS REPORT

RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE CANADIAN NURSE PRACTITIONER INITIATIVE PROGRESS REPORT RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE CANADIAN NURSE PRACTITIONER INITIATIVE PROGRESS REPORT December 2009 This report has been prepared by CNA to provide information on a particular topic or topics. The views and opinions

More information

SECURING THE FUTURE. Of the Accounting Profession in Bermuda CPA BERMUDA PROPOSAL VISION BACKGROUND

SECURING THE FUTURE. Of the Accounting Profession in Bermuda CPA BERMUDA PROPOSAL VISION BACKGROUND CPA BERMUDA PROPOSAL VISION To be the pre-eminent, internationally recognized accounting designation and business credential in Bermuda that best protects and serves the public interest. BACKGROUND The

More information

Internationally Educated Medical Radiation Technologists APPLICATION for ASSESSMENT

Internationally Educated Medical Radiation Technologists APPLICATION for ASSESSMENT Internationally Educated Medical Radiation Technologists APPLICATION for ASSESSMENT Discipline for which you are applying: Radiological Technology Magnetic Resonance Nuclear Medicine Technology Radiation

More information

ONTARIO NURSES ASSOCIATION

ONTARIO NURSES ASSOCIATION ONTARIO NURSES ASSOCIATION Submission to Consultations on Regulation of Physician Assistants (PAs) under the Regulated Health Professions Act, 1991 Health Professions Regulatory Advisory Council (HPRAC)

More information

Nursing Education in Canada, Consolidated Statistics for Entry-to-Practice Certificate, Diploma and Baccalaureate Programs: 2006-2007

Nursing Education in Canada, Consolidated Statistics for Entry-to-Practice Certificate, Diploma and Baccalaureate Programs: 2006-2007 STATISTICS Nursing Education in Canada, Consolidated Statistics for Entry-to-Practice Certificate, Diploma and Baccalaureate Programs: 2006-2007 The Canadian Association of Registered Psychiatric Nurse

More information

National Instrument Definitions. (3) In a national instrument or multilateral instrument

National Instrument Definitions. (3) In a national instrument or multilateral instrument PART 1 DEFINITIONS AND INTERPRETATION 1.1 and Interpretation (1) Every term that is defined or interpreted in the statute of the local jurisdiction referred to in Appendix B, the definition or interpretation

More information

AGREEMENT IN PRINCIPLE Labour Mobility Chapter of the Agreement on Internal Trade/Teaching Profession 1999 09 29

AGREEMENT IN PRINCIPLE Labour Mobility Chapter of the Agreement on Internal Trade/Teaching Profession 1999 09 29 AGREEMENT IN PRINCIPLE Labour Mobility Chapter of the Agreement on Internal Trade/Teaching Profession 1999 09 29 This agreement in principle is developed in conformity with the provisions of Chapter 7

More information

MUTUAL RECOGNITION AGREEMENT Agreement on the Mobility of Massage Therapists between British Columbia, Newfoundland and Labrador and Ontario

MUTUAL RECOGNITION AGREEMENT Agreement on the Mobility of Massage Therapists between British Columbia, Newfoundland and Labrador and Ontario MUTUAL RECOGNITION AGREEMENT Agreement on the Mobility of Massage Therapists between British Columbia, Newfoundland and Labrador and Ontario This Agreement is between: THE COLLEGEOF MASSAGE THERAPISTS

More information

College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia

College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia FRPA Review Report Province of Nova Scotia Table of Contents Background of the Regulatory Body... 1 The Role of the Registered Nurse and Nurse Practitioner...

More information

Canada s Agreement on Internal Trade (AIT): Some things to think about for the practice and mobility of psychology and other health practitioners

Canada s Agreement on Internal Trade (AIT): Some things to think about for the practice and mobility of psychology and other health practitioners Canada s Agreement on Internal Trade (AIT): Some things to think about for the practice and mobility of psychology and other health practitioners What is the AIT 1?...The AIT, an agreement first signed

More information

ANDRE BELLEFEUILLE Anne-Marie Gammon, MBA, FCMA, CPA(NB), CMA Chief Executive Officer

ANDRE BELLEFEUILLE Anne-Marie Gammon, MBA, FCMA, CPA(NB), CMA Chief Executive Officer ANDRE BELLEFEUILLE Anne-Marie Gammon, MBA, FCMA, CPA(NB), CMA Chief Executive Officer Andre Bellefeuille, CMA Director, Marketing, Business Dev & Comm CPA Atlantic School of Business April 15, 2015 Agenda

More information

Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators (The Alliance) Application

Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators (The Alliance) Application Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators (The Alliance) Application Assessment of academic credentials (Cost: $995) Possible outcomes of credentialing assessment: ñnot ñ substantially different from

More information

Occupational Injuries and Diseases in Canada, 1996 2008

Occupational Injuries and Diseases in Canada, 1996 2008 Fair, Safe and Productive Workplaces Labour Occupational Injuries and Diseases in Canada, 1996 2008 Injury Rates and Cost to the Economy Jaclyn Gilks and Ron Logan Research and Analysis, Occupational Health

More information

For Foreign Applicants Outside Canada and USA Obtaining An Architectural Licence in Canada

For Foreign Applicants Outside Canada and USA Obtaining An Architectural Licence in Canada For Foreign Applicants Outside Canada and USA Obtaining An Architectural Licence in Canada The architectural profession in Canada is both self-governing and self-regulating. Provincial legislation or "Architects

More information

2016 CARE. Chartered Accountancy Reciprocity Examination

2016 CARE. Chartered Accountancy Reciprocity Examination 2016 CARE Chartered Accountancy Reciprocity Examination Information for Applicants Seeking to Qualify as Chartered Professional Accountants, Chartered Accountants and as Public Accountants in Ontario Preface

More information

Access to Basic Banking Services

Access to Basic Banking Services Access to Basic Banking Services Opening a personal deposit account and cashing Government of Canada cheques or other instruments In order to improve access to basic banking services, legislation requires

More information

Entry-to-Practice Requirements for Five Professions in Five Canadian Provinces:

Entry-to-Practice Requirements for Five Professions in Five Canadian Provinces: Entry-to-Practice Requirements for Five Professions in Five Canadian Provinces: Physicians Nurses Teachers Lawyers & Surgeons Office of the Fairness Commissioner 595 Bay Street, Suite 1201 Toronto ON M7A

More information

1.1.3 Professional Conduct and Ethics

1.1.3 Professional Conduct and Ethics 1.1 The Architectural Profession 1.1.3 Professional Conduct and Ethics 1.1.3 Canadian Handbook of Practice for Architects Introduction The Role of the Provincial and Territorial Associations of Architects

More information

NOVA SCOTIA S. Nursing Strategy 2015

NOVA SCOTIA S. Nursing Strategy 2015 NOVA SCOTIA S Nursing Strategy 2015 NOVA SCOTIA S Nursing Strategy 2015 Contents Background...1 Support at Every Stage...2 Evidence & Experience...3 A Multi-Faceted Approach...4 Nursing Education...5 Maintain

More information

The Regulation and Supply of Nurse Practitioners in Canada. Preliminary Provincial and Territorial Government. Health Expenditure Estimates

The Regulation and Supply of Nurse Practitioners in Canada. Preliminary Provincial and Territorial Government. Health Expenditure Estimates The Regulation and Supply of Nurse Practitioners in Canada Preliminary Provincial and Territorial Government Health Expenditure Estimates 1974 1975 to 2004 2005 All rights reserved. Contents of this publication

More information

The Regulation and Supply of Nurse Practitioners in Canada: Health Expenditure Estimates

The Regulation and Supply of Nurse Practitioners in Canada: Health Expenditure Estimates The Regulation and Supply of Nurse Practitioners in Canada: Preliminary Technical Provincial Appendix and Territorial Government Health Expenditure Estimates 1974 1975 to 2004 2005 The Regulation and

More information

March 2014 Second survey report: skills shortages in Canada

March 2014 Second survey report: skills shortages in Canada Second survey report: skills shortages in Canada About the Initiative This document is one of a series of reports and briefs prepared for Taking Action for Canada: Jobs and Skills for the 21 st Century,

More information

University tuition fees, 2014/2015 Released at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time in The Daily, Thursday, September 11, 2014

University tuition fees, 2014/2015 Released at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time in The Daily, Thursday, September 11, 2014 University tuition fees, 2014/2015 Released at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time in The Daily, Thursday, September 11, 2014 Canadian full-time students in undergraduate programs paid 3.3% more on average in tuition

More information

National Nursing Assessment Service (NNAS)

National Nursing Assessment Service (NNAS) National Nursing Assessment Service (NNAS) Applicant Handbook NNAS Application Information NNAS Website: http://www.nnas.ca/ NNAS Customer Care: +1-855-977-1898 (If toll free is not available): +1-215-349-9370

More information

The CPA Certification Program

The CPA Certification Program The CPA Certification Program Contents The CPA Certification Program An Overview... 2 Terminology... 3 The CPA Competency Map: Defining the competencies of the newly qualified CPA... 4 Details of the Canadian

More information

Health Human Resources Action Plan

Health Human Resources Action Plan December 2005 Message from the Minister and Deputy Minister of Health Angus MacIsaac, Minister Cheryl Doiron, Deputy Minister In Nova Scotia, we are fortunate to have more than 30,000 dedicated and talented

More information

FREQUENTLY ASKED. Questions MAY 2015 PHARMACY TECHNICIAN REGULATION

FREQUENTLY ASKED. Questions MAY 2015 PHARMACY TECHNICIAN REGULATION FREQUENTLY ASKED Questions MAY 2015 PHARMACY TECHNICIAN REGULATION General 1. Can I still use the title Pharmacy Technician if I don t register with the Saskatchewan College of Pharmacists (SCP)?... 5

More information

Regulated Nurses, 2012 Summary Report

Regulated Nurses, 2012 Summary Report Spending and Health Workforce Our Vision Better data. Better decisions. Healthier Canadians. Our Mandate To lead the development and maintenance of comprehensive and integrated health information that

More information

SUPPORTING. Immigrants and Immigration to Alberta AN OVERVIEW

SUPPORTING. Immigrants and Immigration to Alberta AN OVERVIEW SUPPORTING Immigrants and Immigration to Alberta AN OVERVIEW Table of Contents Introduction...1 Alberta s Vision of Immigration...3 Attracting and Retaining Immigrants to Alberta...3 The Need for Immigration...4

More information

BY-LAW 6 PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY INSURANCE PART I LICENSEES HOLDING A CLASS L1 LICENCE GENERAL

BY-LAW 6 PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY INSURANCE PART I LICENSEES HOLDING A CLASS L1 LICENCE GENERAL BY-LAW 6 May 1, 2007 Amended: June 28, 2007 February 21, 2008 September 24, 2009 November 24, 2011 September 27, 2012 April 25, 2013 October 24, 2013 October 29, 2015 December 10, 2015 (editorial changes)

More information

Retail Training and Employee Development Benchmark Survey 2015

Retail Training and Employee Development Benchmark Survey 2015 Retail Training and Employee Development Benchmark Survey 2015 Sponsored By Retail Training and Employee Development Benchmark Survey 2015 Retail Council of Canada (RCC), in partnership with WCG International

More information

Pharmacist Workforce, 2012 Provincial/Territorial Highlights

Pharmacist Workforce, 2012 Provincial/Territorial Highlights pic pic Pharmacist Workforce, 2012 Provincial/Territorial Highlights Spending and Health Workforce Our Vision Better data. Better decisions. Healthier Canadians. Our Mandate To lead the development and

More information

The CPA Certification Program

The CPA Certification Program The CPA Certification Program Contents The CPA Certific atio n Prog ram An Overview... 1 The CPA Competency Map: Defining the competencies of the newly qualified C PA...2 Details of the Canadian CPA Certification

More information

Professional Competencies for Canadian Pharmacists at Entry to Practice

Professional Competencies for Canadian Pharmacists at Entry to Practice Professional Competencies for Canadian Pharmacists at Entry to Practice Second revision March 2007 National Association of Pharmacy Regulatory Authorities, 2007. All rights reserved. No part of this document

More information

AUSTRALIA-CANADA ROUNDTABLE ON FOREIGN QUALIFICATION RECOGNITION

AUSTRALIA-CANADA ROUNDTABLE ON FOREIGN QUALIFICATION RECOGNITION AUSTRALIA-CANADA ROUNDTABLE ON FOREIGN QUALIFICATION RECOGNITION April 13-15, 2011 Committee for Economic Development of Australia (CEDA) Melbourne Office Level 13, 440 Collins Street, Melbourne, Australia

More information

Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions Frequently Asked Questions The New CPA Certification Program: Overview 3 1. How will the competencies of the legacy programs be incorporated into the new CPA competency map?... 3 2. What will the new CPA

More information

Chartered Professional Accountant

Chartered Professional Accountant Chartered Professional Accountant Certification Process Chartered Professional Accountants of Alberta (CPAA) Evaluation Assessment of: Academic credentials Professional standing Practical experience CPAA

More information

Funds for Fleets. A guide to government funding opportunities for employers in Canada s trucking industry

Funds for Fleets. A guide to government funding opportunities for employers in Canada s trucking industry Funds for Fleets A guide to government funding opportunities for employers in Canada s trucking industry Funds for Fleets Government funding opportunities for employers in Canada s trucking industry 1.

More information

An Environmental Scan of Pharmacy Technicians

An Environmental Scan of Pharmacy Technicians An Environmental Scan of Pharmacy Technicians (Roles and responsibilities, education and accreditation, and certification) Funded by the Government of Canada's Foreign Credential Recognition Program. An

More information

National Instrument 62-103 The Early Warning System and Related Take-Over Bid and Insider Reporting Issues. Table of Contents

National Instrument 62-103 The Early Warning System and Related Take-Over Bid and Insider Reporting Issues. Table of Contents National Instrument 62-103 The Early Warning System and Related Take-Over Bid and Insider Reporting Issues Table of Contents PART PART 1 PART 2 PART 3 PART 4 PART 5 PART 6 TITLE DEFINITIONS AND INTERPRETATION

More information

Professional Standards For Dietitians In Canada

Professional Standards For Dietitians In Canada Professional Standards For Dietitians In Canada Developed by: Dietitians of Canada College of Dietitians of Ontario in collaboration and with financial support from: British Columbia Dietitians' and Nutritionists'

More information

Accounting Profession. A POSITION PAPER PRepared by:

Accounting Profession. A POSITION PAPER PRepared by: Uniting the Canadian Accounting Profession A POSITION PAPER PRepared by: MAY 2011 ABSTRACT With a view to securing the strongest possible future for the Canadian accounting profession, the leaders of the

More information

Control and sale of alcoholic beverages, for the year ending March 31, 2012 Released at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time in The Daily, Thursday, April 11, 2013

Control and sale of alcoholic beverages, for the year ending March 31, 2012 Released at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time in The Daily, Thursday, April 11, 2013 Control and sale of alcoholic beverages, for the year ending March 31, 2012 Released at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time in The Daily, Thursday, April 11, 2013 Beer and liquor stores and agencies sold $20.9 billion

More information

PROVINCIAL/TERRITORIAL COMPASSIONATE LEAVE LEGISLATION Provinces/Territories with Compassionate Care Leave Legislation

PROVINCIAL/TERRITORIAL COMPASSIONATE LEAVE LEGISLATION Provinces/Territories with Compassionate Care Leave Legislation PROVINCIAL/TERRITORIAL COMPASSIONATE LEAVE LEGISLATION Provinces/Territories with Compassionate Care Leave Legislation Almost all of the provinces and territories either had existing labour legislation

More information

Engineering Labour Market Conditions 2011-2020

Engineering Labour Market Conditions 2011-2020 Engineering Labour Market Conditions 2011-2020 Table of Contents Executive Summary... 4 Part 1 Introduction and Methodology... 12 Part 2 National Overview... 19 Part 3 Risks and Alternative Scenarios...

More information

Standards for Nursing Education in New Brunswick

Standards for Nursing Education in New Brunswick Standards for Nursing Education in New Brunswick February 2013 (1/ 13) Mission The Nurses Association of New Brunswick is a professional regulatory organization that exists to protect the public and to

More information

JVS Toronto December 17, 2012 Ivan Martinovic, OAA, MRAIC The Broadly Experienced Foreign Architects (BEFA) Program Overview

JVS Toronto December 17, 2012 Ivan Martinovic, OAA, MRAIC The Broadly Experienced Foreign Architects (BEFA) Program Overview JVS Toronto December 17, 2012 Ivan Martinovic, OAA, MRAIC The Broadly Experienced Foreign Architects (BEFA) Program Overview a national program in Canada to assess the competencies of internationally trained

More information

National certification program for Canadian environmental practitioners

National certification program for Canadian environmental practitioners National certification program for Canadian environmental practitioners The Canadian Environmental Certification Approvals Board (CECAB) launched in 2000 a national certification program that formally

More information

New Brunswick Association of Counselling Therapists

New Brunswick Association of Counselling Therapists Membership Information NBACT - New Brunswick Association of Counselling Therapists, formerly known as the Stakeholder s Group, was incorporated in January 2009. Members of the Association are professional

More information

4.0 Health Expenditure in the Provinces and Territories

4.0 Health Expenditure in the Provinces and Territories 4.0 Health Expenditure in the Provinces and Territories Health expenditure per capita varies among provinces/territories because of different age distributions. xii Population density and geography also

More information

Pathways to Early Childhood Education Credentialing in Canada

Pathways to Early Childhood Education Credentialing in Canada Pathways to Early Childhood Education Credentialing in Canada Child Care Human Resources Sector Council Prepared for the Child Care Human Resources Sector Council 151 Slater St, Suite 505 Ottawa, ON K1P

More information

Analytical Bulletin Certified and Non-Certified Specialists: Understanding the Numbers

Analytical Bulletin Certified and Non-Certified Specialists: Understanding the Numbers Analytical Bulletin Certified and Non-Certified Specialists: Understanding the Numbers CIHI Physician Databases 2004:2 Introduction Physician count information is available from a number of Canadian data

More information

THE ENGINEERING LABOUR MARKET IN CANADA: PROJECTIONS TO 2020 FINAL REPORT, OCTOBER, 2012

THE ENGINEERING LABOUR MARKET IN CANADA: PROJECTIONS TO 2020 FINAL REPORT, OCTOBER, 2012 THE ENGINEERING LABOUR MARKET IN CANADA: PROJECTIONS TO 2020 FINAL REPORT, OCTOBER, 2012 Prepared By: Prism Economics and Analysis October, 2012 Monitoring the pulse of the ENGINEERING* profession Table

More information

Part I Title and Definitions and Registration Title

Part I Title and Definitions and Registration Title Reference in this document to Act, Regulations, Policies and Bylaws refer to the Licensed Practical Nurses Act (2002); the Licensed Practical Nurses Regulations (2002) LPNRB Policies and the Bylaws incorporated

More information

HEALTH INFORMATION ACT (HIA) BILL QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

HEALTH INFORMATION ACT (HIA) BILL QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS HEALTH INFORMATION ACT (HIA) BILL QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS KEY HIA CONCEPTS AND PROVISIONS Q. What is the purpose of the legislation? To protect clients personal health information. To set rules on the collection,

More information

Hiring Foreign Workers in Alberta. Information for employers who want to find and hire temporary foreign workers

Hiring Foreign Workers in Alberta. Information for employers who want to find and hire temporary foreign workers Hiring Foreign Workers in Alberta Information for employers who want to find and hire temporary foreign workers Content Solving Alberta s labour shortage 5 Government of Alberta services for employers

More information