The State of Queensland, Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, 2012.

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2 PR The State of Queensland, Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, The Queensland Government supports and encourages the dissemination and exchange of its information. The copyright in this publication is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia (CC BY) licence. Under this licence you are free, without having to seek permission from DAFF, to use this publication in accordance with the licence terms. You must keep intact the copyright notice and attribute the State of Queensland, Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry as the source of the publication. For more information on this licence visit

3 Contents List of figures... ii List of tables... ii Executive summary...iii 1.0 Introduction Purpose Background Statutory background Purpose Scope Duration Matters to consider Developing a successful plan Establish a working group Develop a draft plan Undertake community consultation Submit the draft plan for ministerial endorsement Adopt ministerial advice and implement the plan Review the plan Pest management principles, strategies and guidelines Principles of pest management State pest management strategies Guidelines for pest management Other legislation and plans Format, scope and content Format Scope and content of the strategic (general) program (Part B) Checklist of strategic objectives and critical strategic actions (Part B) Scope and content of pest-specific programs (Part C) Annual action plan...21 Appendix 1: Example of a model plan...23 Appendix 2: Examples of success indicators...43 i

4 List of figures Figure 1: Six steps to develop a LGAPMP... 7 Figure 2: LGAPMP guide List of tables Table 1: Classes of declared pests under the Act... 2 Table 2: Checklist to promote consistency with principles, state strategies and guidelines relating to pest management... 8 Table 3: LGAPMPs and the broader planning framework Table 4: Example of possible format and content relating to the desired outcome (DO) of awareness and education Table 5: Checklist of critical operational actions in reference to desired outcomes (DO) Table 6: Main components of a species-specific management program Table 7: Example of possible content for an annual action plan Table 8: Example of success indicators for inclusion in a LGAPMP ii

5 Executive summary Weeds and pest animals cost Queensland more than $710 million every year in lost production and control costs. They cause significant economic losses, cause degradation of natural resources (including vegetation), threaten conservation of biodiversity and interfere with human health and recreational activities. The Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002 (the Act) provides legislative requirements for the management of weeds and pest animals throughout Queensland. Under the Act, all local governments are required to have pest management plans in place for declared pests in their area. In 2003, the state government produced a resource kit entitled Resource kit for local government area pest management plans. The resource kit was an interactive CD-ROM that provided guidance on the development and preparation of local government area pest management plans (LGAPMPs), including generic templates on the scope and content of a pest management plan. In particular, the resource kit sought to assist local government regarding content requirements outlined in section 25 of the Act, and the need to be consistent with the principles of pest management, state pest management strategies and guidelines for pest management. Five years on, most local governments have developed their LGAPMPs and applied the advice contained in the resource kit. Many of these plans are now due for review. Accordingly, it is timely for Biosecurity Queensland part of the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (DAFF) to update the resource kit to incorporate recent information and best practice. This document is largely based on advice previously developed, following extensive consultation with local governments in However, the advice has been refined following further consultation with local and state governments, to ensure the ongoing relevance of the information and to promote further efficiencies based upon our experiences. This document presents an overview of the planning process and the recommended format, scope and content of LGAPMPs. The appendices include an example of a LGAPMP and examples of success indicators that could be included in the plan. This guidance is based on best practice. Biosecurity Queensland trusts that the resource kit will continue to be an essential resource for local governments to create successful LGAPMPs. If you require further information, please contact Biosecurity Queensland on Further assistance is also available from your local Biosecurity Officer. iii

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7 1.0 Introduction 1.1 Purpose The Guidelines for local government area pest management plans has been prepared by Biosecurity Queensland part of the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (DAFF) to assist local government planning practitioners develop and review their local government area pest management plans (LGAPMPs). LGAPMP template There is a word template that can be used by local governments to develop their LGAPMP. Visit DAFF s Biosecurity Queensland website at to download a copy. 1.2 Background Weeds and pest animals are in every local government area. Weeds and pest animals cost Queensland more than $710 million every year in lost production and control costs. They also cause degradation of natural resources (including vegetation), threaten biodiversity values and interfere with human health and recreational activities. The Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002 (the Act) specifically requires local governments to develop, adopt and implement LGAPMPs. The development of LGAPMP will support an integrated planning framework for managing weeds and pest animals across Queensland. LGAPMPs must be prepared in consultation with state government agencies and other stakeholders. This planning process is a critical component of the Act and must be undertaken to an appropriate and consistent standard by all local governments as part of the successful implementation of the Act. Since the proclamation of the Act in 2002, most local governments in Queensland will have already developed LGAPMPs and many plans are due for review (LGAPMPs have a maximum duration of four years). Following local government changes, it is timely for many councils to prepare new plans for their new area. This document has been prepared to assist councils review or develop LGAPMPs, and provides: an overview of the statutory background to LGAPMPs, including their purpose, scope and context an outline of the six-step process for developing, preparing or reviewing LGAPMPs an overview of essential links between a LGAPMP and the principles of the Act, state pest management strategies, guidelines for pest management, and other legislation and plans the recommended form, structure and content of a LGAPMP an example of a LGAPMP based on advice contained in this document (see Appendix 1) examples of success indicators that could be included in a LGAPMP (see Appendix 2). Introduction 1

8 2.0 Statutory background 2.1 Purpose The purpose of LGAPMPs is to bring together all sectors of a local community to manage declared pests in the local government s area. In so doing, LGAPMPs: set strategies, activities and responsibilities for pest management on a local scale set achievable objectives for the local community that address the economic, environmental and social impacts of weeds and pest animals incorporate monitoring and evaluation of the effectiveness of the plan inform regional planning processes regarding local pest management priorities. LGAPMPs ensure resources are targeted at the highest priority pest management activities and those most likely to succeed. The plans also help to develop and maintain crucial partnerships between all stakeholders (including local and state governments) in relation to pest management in the local government area. 2.2 Scope The LGAPMP must cover all land within the boundaries of the local government area, including state land. By agreement, land owned by the Australian Government or held by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities under a Deed of Grant in Trust may also be included. Pests targeted in a LGAPMP include exotic species and some indigenous species such as locusts. Pests are defined as species declared under the three declaration classes identified by the Act (see Table 1) or model local laws, or other species that are having an impact in the area. Table 1: Classes of declared pests under the Act Class* Description 1 A Class 1 pest is one that is not commonly present in Queensland, and if introduced would cause an adverse economic, environmental or social impact. Class 1 pests established in Queensland are subject to eradication from the state. Landowners must take reasonable steps to keep land free of Class 1 pests. 2 Class 2 pests are established in Queensland and have, or could have, an adverse economic, environmental or social impact. Management of these pests requires coordination and they are subject to programs led by local government, the community or landowners. Landowners must take reasonable steps to keep land free of Class 2 pests. 3 Class 3 pests are established in Queensland and have, or could have, an adverse economic, environmental or social impact. Landholders are not required to control Class 3 pests unless their land is adjacent to an environmentally significant area. * Declared pest species are identified in Schedule 2 of the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Regulation 2003 (to view or download the Regulation, visit Statutory background 2

9 2.3 Duration Under the Act, the LGAPMP must not extend for more than four years (s.31 (1)), and ceases to have effect at the end of the stated period or when the local government adopts another plan (s.31 (2)). To view or download a copy of the Act, visit Matters to consider When preparing or reviewing a LGAPMP, the local government must ensure the plan is consistent with the: principles of pest management (s. 9 of the Act) Queensland weeds and pest animal strategies guidelines for pest management. This information is available on Biosecurity Queensland s website at (under Weeds, pest animals and ants ). To view or download a copy of the Act, visit In addition, the local government must also consider any plans for managing declared pests on state-controlled land in its area, and the interests of all stakeholders including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, industry groups and landholders (s. 27 (5)(d) and (e) of the Act). A LGAPMP should prioritise the management of all declared weed and pest animal species in the area. Statutory background 3

10 3.0 Developing a successful plan A local government is responsible for sponsoring the development of their LGAPMP. There are six steps involved in the development of a LGAPMP: 1. Establish a working group. 2. Develop a draft plan. 3. Undertake community consultation. 4. Submit the draft plan for ministerial endorsement. 5. Adopt ministerial advice and implement the plan. 6. Review the plan. 3.1 Establish a working group A working group must be established to provide advice to the local government in relation to the preparation of its draft LGAPMP (s. 27(1) of the Act). It is suggested that the working group include a wide cross-section of stakeholders. Pest management is a complex issue relevant to many stakeholders who will be affected by, or are going to play an integral part in, the implementation of a LGAPMP. It is advisable that all key stakeholders be engaged and provided with the opportunity to have early input into the preparation of a LGAPMP. This engagement also recognises that there is an abundance of knowledge within communities that individuals and representative bodies are willing to contribute. According to the Act (s. 27(2)), local government may invite representatives from state government agencies with large local landholdings to join the working group. Generally, there will be other groups, agencies or individuals that could be invited to participate in the working group given their particular interests, knowledge and expertise on local pest management matters. Other groups or agencies typically represented on a working group include: local government (e.g. council, operations, planning) Biosecurity Queensland other state government agencies with large local landholdings in the area infrastructure providers such as Queensland Rail regional natural resource management groups Landcare, Bushcare and catchment groups rural industry and business groups Indigenous communities. 3.2 Develop a draft plan A local government must prepare a draft LGAPMP for declared pests in its area. Under the Act (s. 25 (2)), the draft LGAPMP may include provisions addressing: achievable objectives strategies, activities and responsibilities to achieve objectives Developing a successful plan 4

11 strategies to inform the local community about the plan s content and achievements monitoring implementation of the plan and evaluating its effectiveness other aspects that the local government considers will assist in the management of declared pests. Under the Act (s. 27 (95)), when preparing the draft LGAPMP a local government must consider the: principles of pest management state pest management strategies guidelines for pest management plans for managing declared pests on state-controlled land in its area interests of its local community including, for example, the interests of landholders, Indigenous communities, industry groups and members of the public. LGAPMPs must also include references to the following critical actions under the Act: urban district maps are available for inspection by members of the public at the local government s public office (s. 96) a register of pest control and entry notices is kept by local government (s. 86). Do we use existing state pest management strategies when preparing the draft LGAPMP? Local governments currently revising and renewing their LGAPMP will continue to be guided by the desired outcomes of the current strategies (the Queensland weeds strategy and the Queensland pest animal strategy ). Once new strategies are developed, local governments will be guided by the desired outcomes of the new strategies. When developing a LGAPMP, it is essential for weeds and pest animals to be prioritised according to their declaration status, impact on the local community and the potential for success in the implementation of control measures. Detailed advice on the form, structure and contents of a plan is provided in section Undertake community consultation Under the Act, the local government must make the draft plan available for public inspection (free of charge) upon completion (s. 28(2)(b)). Notice of the plan must be published in the local newspaper (s. 28(2)(a)), and written submissions from the public invited for 28 days afterwards (s. 28(3)). At the end of this period, local governments must consider these submissions and review the plan if necessary (s. 28(3)). 3.4 Submit the draft plan for ministerial endorsement Under the Act, the local government must submit the draft LGAPMP to the Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry for consideration within 60 days of the end of the public submission period (s. 29(1)(a)). A draft plan must also be submitted at least three months prior to the end of any existing plan (s. 29(1)(b)). Developing a successful plan 5

12 The Minister considers whether the LGAPMP is: consistent with the principles for pest management, the state pest management strategies and the guidelines for pest management suitable for managing declared pests in the local government s area. If the Minister is not satisfied with a LGAPMP, the local government will be advised on what amendments are required (s. 29(3)). If the Minister is satisfied with the LGAPMP, the Minister will advise the local government that it may adopt the plan. To assist the Minister in the consideration of a LGAPMP, an assessment group may be formed to provide advice. Where do I send our draft LGAPMP for ministerial endorsement? Forward draft LGAPMPs for ministerial endorsement to the: General Manager Invasive Plants and Animals Biosecurity Queensland Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry Level 5 Primary Industries Building GPO Box 46 Brisbane Qld Adopt ministerial advice and implement the plan Under the Act, the local government must (by resolution) adopt the LGAPMP, if so advised by the Minister (s.30), and implement it (s.32). The adopted LGAPMP must be made available for public inspection (free of charge) at the local government office (s. 45(1)) in either written or electronic form (s.35(2)). 3.6 Review the plan Local governments may review or renew their LGAPMPs at their own discretion (s. 33(1)) of the Act). However, two types of review are mandatory: an annual review at least three months before the start of each financial year (s.33(2)) a full review when a state pest management strategy is amended (s. 33(3)). LGAPMPs have a maximum duration of four years (s. 31(1)). After four years, an LGAPMP ceases to have effect and a new plan is required. If a LGAPMP is renewed before this time, the old plan ceases to have effect immediately before the new one commences (s. 31(2)). The four-year review does not necessarily involve making changes to the old LGAPMP. A local government may simply wish to renew the plan, although you would expect some changes to take into account experiences implementing the old plan. Amended LGAPMPs must be re-submitted to the Minister for consideration as outlined in section 3.4 (s. 34). Developing a successful plan 6

13 Figure 1: Six steps to develop a LGAPMP Developing a successful plan 7

14 4.0 Pest management principles, strategies and guidelines When preparing or reviewing a LGAPMP, local governments must ensure their plans are consistent with: the principles of pest management the state pest management strategies the guidelines for pest management (s. 26 of the Act). 4.1 Principles of pest management Section 9 of the Act sets out eight pest management principles (see Table 2) that are incorporated in the Queensland pest animal strategy, Queensland weeds strategy and pest management guidelines. Local governments must ensure their LGAPMPs address these principles. Table 2: Checklist to promote consistency with principles, state strategies and guidelines relating to pest management Essential links Integration Public awareness Description Pest management is an integral part of managing natural resources and agricultural systems. Public awareness and knowledge of pests must be raised to increase the capacity and willingness of individuals to manage pests. Principles of pest management Commitment Consultation and partnership Planning Prevention Best practice Improvement Effective pest management requires a long-term commitment to pest management by the community, industry groups and government entities. Consultation and partnership arrangements between local communities, industry groups, state government agencies and local governments must be established to achieve a collaborative approach to pest management. Pest management planning must be consistent at local, regional, state and national levels to ensure resources target priorities for pest management identified at each level. Preventative pest management is achieved by: (a) preventing the spread of pests and viable parts of pests, especially by human activity (b) early detection and intervention to control pests. Pest management must be based on ecologically and socially responsible pest management practices that protect the environment and the productive capacity of natural resources. Research about pests, and regular monitoring and evaluation of pest control activities, is necessary to improve pest management practices. 4.2 State pest management strategies The Act specifies that LGAPMPs must be consistent with state weed and pest animal management strategies. These strategies were developed in accordance with the Act, in consultation with all major stakeholders. To download the Queensland pest animal strategy and Queensland weeds strategy, visit State pest management strategies are particularly relevant to the preparation of the four-year strategic (general) program part of a LGAPMP (see section 5.2). Desired outcomes based on those set out in the state strategies are recommended for inclusion in the LGAPMP. The inclusion of desired outcomes (and the development of relevant strategic objectives and Pest management principles, strategies and guidelines 8

15 actions) will ensure that a LGAPMP is consistent with both the pest management principles and the state pest management strategies. Local governments currently revising and renewing their LGAPMP will continue to be guided by the desired outcomes of the current strategies (Queensland weeds strategy and Queensland pest animal strategy ). Once new strategies are developed, local governments revising and renewing their LGAPMP will be guided by the desired outcomes of the new strategies. 4.3 Guidelines for pest management The Act specifies that LGAPMPs must be consistent with pest management guidelines. To download these guidelines, visit Essentially, pest management guidelines are strategic plans for the three declared classes of pests. In the case of Class 2 pests, the guidelines are species specific. In the case of Class 1 and Class 3 pests, the guidelines are more generic. Guidelines establish an objective and include best practice and a range of operational actions that are consistent with the eight principles of pest management. Pest management guidelines are particularly relevant for the preparation of the priority pest management program part of a LGAPMP (as shown in Figure 2). Pest management principles, strategies and guidelines 9

16 Figure 2: LGAPMP guide Pest management principles, strategies and guidelines 10

17 4.4 Other legislation and plans In addition to preparing their LGAPMPs in accordance with the Act, local governments must ensure that the plan does not breach the requirements of other legislation. Legislation that local governments may need to consider include the: Vegetation Management Act 1999 (e.g. permits for clearing native vegetation to control weeds) Nature Conservation Act 1992 (e.g. protection of dingoes in conservation areas) Water Act 2000 (e.g. the impact of management activities in watercourses) Environmental Protection Act 1994 (e.g. the release of contaminants when undertaking pest management actions) Wild Rivers Act 2005 (e.g. permits for clearing native vegetation to control weeds) Transport Infrastructure Act 1994 and the Land Title Act 1994 (e.g. managing road reserves that extend beyond identified state-controlled roads) Animal Care and Protection Act 2001 (e.g. providing seized pest animal with appropriate food, shelter and water) Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals (Queensland) Act 1994 (e.g. using pesticides appropriately). In accordance with the Planning and Integration Pest Management Principles local governments should integrate their LGAPMPs with other local government, regional and state plans. Related plans that local governments may need to consider include the following: Regional statutory plans These are statutory plans that include regulatory processes where required, as set out in the Integrated Planning Act (e.g. Far North Queensland regional plan and South East Queensland regional plan ). State agency pest management plans These are plans under the Act that assist in the management of declared pests on state-controlled land. These plans provide the basis for the development of locally or regionally relevant state agency implementation plans. These plans can also provide valuable input to the development of a LGAPMP. Regional vegetation management plans These plans provide for the management of vegetation at a bioregional level. They include statutory codes for assessing applications to clear vegetation on freehold and leasehold land. Regional pest management plans These are non-statutory plans prepared by some regional pest management groups. These plans provide a communication forum, standardise activities and enable the sharing of resources (e.g. the Central Highlands pest management plan, the Capricorn pest management plan, the Burdekin Dry Tropics pest management plan and the Far North Coast pest management plan). Natural resource management (NRM) plans These are non-statutory plans prepared by regional NRM bodies. These plans integrate all aspects of NRM planning within a catchment, including some pest management issues. Stock route network (SRN) management plans The Act requires local governments to prepare plans for the management of the SRN within their area. These plans provide for stock movement and agistment, while minimising the impact of stock on other users of the network and values contained within the SRN. Pest management for the SRN may be done either under a SRN management plan or LGAPMP (the two plans must, however, be consistent). For those local governments not required to prepare a SRN management plan, but with a section of the SRN within their area, planning for pest management on the SRN must be done under the LGAPMP. Local government corporate plans These plans are required under the Local Government Act These plans state the local government s vision for the community, objectives, Pest management principles, strategies and guidelines 11

18 means to achieve these objectives, and how council evaluates success. LGAPMPs should all be linked to corporate planning. Local government planning schemes Planning schemes are prepared and implemented under the Integrated Planning Act Planning schemes outline development and environmental outcomes, allocate land for different uses (and the location and nature of infrastructure), identify the kinds of development requiring approval, and set out assessment criteria to determine the suitability of development proposals. Table 3 cites the other plans in operation and shows where LGAPMPs fit in the broader planning framework. Please note that the table is not exhaustive. Pest management principles, strategies and guidelines 12

19 Table 3: LGAPMPs and the broader planning framework SCALE National SCOPE Natural resource management Biosecurity Management Pest management Pest species National strategy for the National Biosecurity Committee National weeds strategy conservation of Australia s Managing vertebrate pests biodiversity principles and strategies National guidelines for rangeland management National action plan for salinity and water quality Reef water quality plan State Queensland Biosecurity Strategy Queensland weeds strategy Queensland pest animals strategy Control of exotic pest fishes strategy State agency pest management plans Regional and catchment Regional natural resource management plans Integrated catchment management strategies Regional pest management plans (e.g. Central Highlands, Capricornia and Mary River regional pest management plans) Strategies for Weeds of National Significance National pest animal species threat abatement plans National management strategy for carp control Queensland strategies for wild dogs, locusts, mice, rabbits and parthenium Problem crocodile conservation plan Burnett Catchment Care Association water weeds initiative strategic plan Local government Property Local government planning schemes Property resource management plans Sub-catchment plans Local government area pest management plans Property biosecurity Plans Property pest management plans Mesquite property management plans Pest management principles, strategies and guidelines 13

20 5.0 Format, scope and content 5.1 Format The Act does not specify a standard format for a LGAPMP. However, based upon state pest management strategies and a review of LGAPMPs prepared over time, the following model of a LGAPMP format is recommended for local government consideration. Executive summary Acronyms Part A: Introduction Part A sets the scene. It introduces Plan title the plan and provides background Commencement and duration information, including general Area covered by the plan provisions relating to the development, Statutory and planning context: implementation and review of the plan. legislative framework strategic linkages to other legislation and/or related planning processes pest management overview (local overview of the current situation impacts/level of control and the consequences of doing nothing) Stakeholder responsibilities (overview of those stakeholders that are identified later in the plan as having key responsibilities for implementing actions in the plan) Development, implementation and review (outline consultation process for the plan, and provisions for monitoring implementation of the plan and evaluating its effectiveness) Part B: Strategic (general) programs Mission/purpose/aims of the plan Part B sets out the overarching Desired outcomes: strategic direction adopted by the local awareness and education government for pest management in the area. reliable information strategic directions It is based on desired outcomes adopted prevention, eradication and containment in state pest and weed strategies. effective integrated management systems commitment and partnerships Further guidance on desired outcomes For each desired outcome identify issues, objectives, is provided in section 5.2. strategic actions and stakeholder responsibilities based on state pest management strategies Part C: Priority pest species programs Part C sets out the individual pest Overview of the prioritisation given to all pests in species programs. the local government area (based upon threat, distribution, declaration status, achievability of Programs should be consistent with pest management objectives rank the management of management guidelines (refer to the candidate pests as either high, medium or low Queensland pest management priority) guidelines). High priority weed and pest animal programs relates to species-specific programs for those species identified in the preceding section as being high priority to manage. Examples might include: alligator weed feral pigs lantana rabbit Format, scope and content 14

21 Singapore daisy wild dogs etc. In relation to each species, provide common and scientific names; a description of the problem; the local distribution; management priority across the adjacent local area, regions and state; and operational actions (including respective roles and responsibilities for undertaking those actions) Appendices Maps of urban district, environmentally significant areas List of weed and pest species declared under the Regulation (useful in terms of identifying declared pests not known to be present in the area but could be in the future) Glossary of terms (define technical terms to assist readers of the LGAPMP) The appendices include useful supporting information (e.g. maps, annual action program, standard operating procedures, glossary of terms etc.). An example of possible content to include in a LGAPMP (based upon the above format) is presented in Appendix Scope and content of the strategic (general) program (Part B) It is recommended that Part B of a LGAPMP sets out generic strategic programs for the plan s four-year duration. Part B of a LGAPMP identifies general strategic actions that are required for all pest management in the area (i.e. low and medium priority pests as well as the high priority pests) and are not specific to the management of any one species. The following section headings are broadly based on the desired outcomes adopted in the Queensland weed and pest animal strategies (see section 5.3 and Appendix 2 for further information): Awareness and education Reliable information Strategic directions Prevention, eradication and containment Effective integrated systems Commitment and partnerships. Table 4 (overleaf) presents an example of possible format and content relating to the desired outcome of awareness and education. Similar type provisions would need to be repeated/developed for other desired outcomes in Part B of a LGAPMP. Format, scope and content 15

22 Table 4: Example of possible format and content relating to the desired outcome (DO) of awareness and education DO 1: Awareness and education Desired outcome 1: Stakeholders are informed, knowledgeable and have ownership of pest animal management A.1 Public awareness Strategic objective To increase community, industry, agribusiness and government awareness of pests and their impacts Strategic actions (List strategic actions that include but are not restricted to those actions identified in Table 5 and Appendix 2) Make use of all current communication technologies including print and electronic media and the internet Develop and disseminate enhanced information packages to all sectors of the community A.2 Education and training Strategic objective To enhance stakeholder capacity and skills in pest management Measure of success The degree to which public awareness programs close public knowledge gaps By whom (Identify organisation) When (Identify ongoing, yearly, monthly etc) Status Measure of success The degree to which individuals and stakeholders pursue training in pest management Strategic actions (List strategic actions that include but By whom When Status are not restricted to those actions identified in Table 5 and Appendix 2) (Identify (Identify Accredited training of local government officers organisation) ongoing, Local government officers participation in relevant yearly, workshops, conferences and forums monthly etc) 5.3 Checklist of strategic objectives and critical strategic actions (Part B) Potentially there are hundreds of strategic or operational actions that could be identified in a LGAPMP to demonstrate consistency with Queensland s pest management principles, strategies and guidelines. Some prioritisation is required to ensure commitments made in plans are realistic and achievable. As part of the exercise of developing a LGAPMP, the following checklist (Table 5) has been provided to help you determine whether the plan adequately addresses Queensland s pest management principles, strategies and guidelines. The actions identified in Table 5 represent the minimum that should be considered for inclusion in your LGAPMP. Some of the actions are high level and/or generic (i.e. across all pest management) and these should be included in Part B of the plan. In other cases there will be actions that are species specific and these should be included in Part C of the plan. Format, scope and content 16

23 Table 5: Checklist of critical operational actions in reference to desired outcomes (DO) Critical operational actions LGAPMP actions Yes No DO 1. Awareness and education (principle public awareness) 1.1 Public awareness Undertake community, industry, agribusiness and government awareness of pests and their impacts 1.2 Education and training Enhance stakeholder knowledge of pest impacts and improve skills in pest management DO 2. Reliable information (principle improvement) 2.1 Data collection and assessment Collect, use and make available data relevant to weed and pest animal management 2.2 Biology and impacts Further the understanding of the biology, ecology and impacts of weeds and pest animals DO 3. Strategic directions (principles planning and integration) 3.1 Planning Create and maintain a planning framework for weed and pest animal management 3.2 Strategy management and coordination Implement, evaluate and review integrated weed and pest animal programs 3.3 Resources Efficiently and adequately resource weed and pest animal management Raise awareness so that the public are able to identify the weed or pest species and have knowledge of their impacts and management. Target awareness campaigns at landholders in areas at risk of the introduction/invasion of a species and prevent its establishment. Alert the public to any inclusion to Class 1 and other new pests. Undertake professional training of council officers and other stakeholders in relation to pest identification and best management practices. Map all Class 1 and priority Class 2 declared pests. Contribute pest data to statewide mapping of all declared species (DAFF s annual pest survey). Continue to consider pest behaviour (biology and ecology), pest impacts (economic, social and environmental) and pest control costs in the local declaration and prioritisation of pest species. Include practical measures for the detection, eradication or management of species in the local government area. Ensure that pest management programs are consistent with similar programs in neighbouring areas. Ensure that pest management programs are consistent with other resource management and related plans (e.g. regional natural resource management plans, stock route network management plans, vegetation management plans etc.). Review the LGAPMP three months before the end of each financial year. Complete a new LGAPMP three months prior to the expiry of its predecessor. Secure adequate resources for local pest management actions. Support DAFF statewide services that are of benefit to local government such as research, extension, plague pest control, barrier fences etc. DO 4. Prevention, eradication and containment (principle prevention) 4.1 Prevention of introduction Prevent the introduction of new weeds and pest animals Prohibit the cultivation, distribution, sale or other supply of pest species. Use weed hygiene declarations for stock entering stock routes, movement of harvesters and construction equipment, and movement of fodder, soil and turf. Adopt weed prevention protocols and support their adoption by other local stakeholders. Format, scope and content 17

24 4.2 Early detection and eradication Identify pests prioritised for early detection and eradication. Prevent the local establishment of new Survey areas at risk from new infestations of Class 1 weeds and pest animals pests. Implement a rapid response program, together with the state government, for handling new infestations of Class 1 pests. 4.3 Containment Destroy all infestations outside national or local Minimise the spread of weeds and pest containment lines. animals to new areas Eradicate small, isolated infestations. Contain local Class 2 pests in core infestation areas (e.g. by maintaining the wild dog barrier fence and the Darling- Downs Moreton rabbit board fence). Manage pest animals inside barrier fences (if applicable). DO 5. Effective integrated systems (principles best practice, improvement and commitment) 5.1 Development of management Contribute to developing local best practice. practices Develop new, and improve existing, weed and pest animal management practices 5.2 Adoption of management Adopt timely and effective integrated best practice practices management for priority pest species that considers timing, Adopt and promote best practice in integrated techniques, non-target damage and workplace weed and pest animal management health and safety. Collate and distribute best practice information to land managers. 5.3 Management incentives Continue to offer effective existing incentives. Offer incentives to stakeholders for practicing pest management Assess the effectiveness of existing and potential incentives. 5.4 Population and impact Coordinate plague pest animal management with management stakeholders (if relevant). Reduce pest populations and impacts Coordinate impact reduction programs for established pest animals (e.g. baiting, trapping, harbour removal). 5.5 Environmentally significant areas Identify environmentally significant areas. Protect environmentally significant areas from weeds and pest animals Prioritise weed and pest animal management in environmentally significant areas. DO 6. Commitment and partnerships (Principle public awareness) 6.1 Long-term commitment Build working partnerships between stakeholders to Establish long-term stakeholder generate a holistic approach to pest management and a commitment to weed and pest animal sense of community ownership of the problem. management Include resource allocations in annual work programs. 6.2 Roles and responsibilities Establish, through consultation, agreed roles and Establish roles and responsibilities for responsibilities for all stakeholders in the implementation of weed and pest animal management the program. that are accepted by landholders, Develop actions for all stakeholders in consultation with community, industry and government them and include in annual action programs. 6.3 Compliance and enforcement Enforce compliance when landowners do not take reasonable steps to control pests. Ensure compliance with the Act in weed and pest animal management Adopt/refine/implement operational procedures developed by DAFF (e.g. seizures; quarantine; confiscation and destruction of declared pests; entering land, vehicles and property; recovering costs; survey and inspections; straying dogs). Other actions in addition to these critical actions may also be desirable depending upon local circumstances and priorities. Examples of other desirable operational actions that a local Format, scope and content 18

25 government could consider for inclusion in a LGAPMP or in annual action plans (see section 6.0) are included in Appendix Scope and content of pest-specific programs (Part C) It is recommended that Part C of a LGAPMP sets out the four-year programs for high priority weeds and pest animals identified for that area. Part C of a LGAPMP contains two sections: The first section provides an overview/summary of the prioritisation given to all pests in the local government area. Many potential weed and pest animal species are likely to be present in the area and some prioritisation in resources and management effort is required. Many LGAPMPs include a table (example in Appendix 1, section 6.1) ranking the management of candidate pests as either high priority, medium priority or low priority. The ranking given to a candidate pest is based upon threat, distribution, declaration status and achievability of management objectives. Weeds and pest animals already declared to be pests in Queensland, and present in the area, are a starting point for considering what species should be addressed in a LGAPMP. Local governments will also need to consider other harmful species with adverse effects of local significance. Process for determining pest priories Step 1: Develop list of declared and other locally significant weeds and pest animals present in the local government area. Step 2: Source distribution maps of species, including containment line maps and hot spots for pest animals. Step 3: For each species, determine appropriate level(s) of control for pests based upon their density and distribution, their threats and the achievability of control, including: A. exclusion from entering the shire B. eradication of isolated, strategic infestations/populations C. containment within specified areas D. broadscale management with biological control or fire/protection of strategic areas. N.B. Pest species guidelines may offer some assistance Step 4: For each species, rank its management as high, medium or low based upon the potential detrimental impact to the shire of not doing anything to control the pest (based on predictive pest management models). The second section outlines species-specific management programs for each of the high priority pests. Each high priority pest species requires a management program that: - identifies the pest status of the species and the priority given to its management across Australia, Queensland, the region, and adjacent local areas - states the program objectives as far as is practicable, align program objectives with any state pest management guidelines and your success indicators (e.g. To eradicate small, isolated infestations of xxx ; To manage the economic, social and environmental impacts of established xxx populations ). - outlines operational actions to achieve program objectives as far as is practicable, align actions with any pest management guidelines, any state pest strategy and/or the six desired outcomes in the Queensland weed and pest animal strategies (see Table 5). - identifies key stakeholder groups responsible for implementing each operational action, the lead agency, when actions will be carried out and implementation status. Format, scope and content 19

26 - identifies measures of success in relation to achieving operational objectives these will generally address the distribution, range, abundance and/or density of a weed or pest animal species. Measuring success and implementation Uniform monitoring activities across Australia and consistent, reliable reporting processes are essential for effectively controlling weeds and pests It is recommended that following the annual review of a LGAPMP, local governments update their plan by filling in the status column to record measurements or milestones relating to the implementation of operational actions. It is further recommended that the success of priority pest programs be measured by the distribution, range, abundance and/or density of a weed or pest animal species. Such information can then be collated for local, state and/or national reporting purposes. Table 6 sets out the main components of a species-specific management program (see Appendix 1, section 7 for further information). Table 6: Main components of a species-specific management program Pest species Description of the problem Local distribution Management priority Program objective (Identify management objective, e.g. prevention, eradication, containment, impact mitigation) Operational actions By whom To achieve the program objective, the xxx Council and other (Identify stakeholders will: organisation) (List operational actions that include but are not restricted to those actions identified in Table 4, Appendix 2 and relevant pest management guidelines) Measures of success Success indicators When (e.g. ongoing, yearly, monthly etc.) Status (e.g. completed, in progress, xxx achieved by 1 July 2013) (Distribution/abundance/density etc.) (See Appendix 2 for examples) (Protection of any strategic assets from pest impacts) Format, scope and content 20

27 6.0 Annual action plan The preparation of annual action (work) plans for the implementation of the LGAPMP is optional but strongly recommended. The purpose of an annual action plan is to make a LGAPMP operational. Each year a work plan is prepared that targets those responsible for the delivery of the strategic and priority pest programs. The action plans provide an added level of detail to the LGAPMP and can be used as a planning and reporting tool for implementing the LGAPMP. LGAPMPs versus work plans LGAPMPs are four-year plans requiring ministerial endorsement. While it is optional to include operational details in the LGAPMP, separate annual action plans can be prepared. Such documents would be non-statutory, have an operational focus and be used by those stakeholders implementing actions in support of the plan. The operational planning within the local government should also include pest management. For local government, pest management work plans should be aligned to the local government operational planning. There should be no need to develop separate documentation to cover the operational planning undertaken by local governments. An annual action plan may include: operational objectives addressing both the strategic and species-specific programs set out in the LGAPMP the actions to be undertaken that year for each operational objective who is responsible for each action timeframes and resource allocations for implementation of each action success indicators for each action. Table 7 (overleaf) sets out an example of possible content that could be provided in an annual action plan. Success indicators that could also be included in an annual action plan are listed in Appendix 2. Annual action plan 21

28 Table 7: Example of possible content for an annual action plan Operational objectives: General awareness and education Actions By whom When Erect three pest awareness signs at critical or strategic locations at Seven Mile Crossing, Six Mile Creek and all entry points into the Fairweather State Park. Fairweather Regional Council Operational objectives: Wild dog control June 2012 Actions By whom When Undertake coordinated control program in the Fairweather State Park and adjacent properties. Fairweather Regional Council, affected landholders August/ September 2012 April/May 2012 Measures of success xxx pest awareness signs erected Measures of success xxx% reduction in the abundance of wild dogs in the targeted area Reduction in the number of complaints received about wild dogs across the shire Status Completed May 2012 Status Completed August/ September program April/May program in progress Annual action plan 22

29 Appendix 1: Example of a model plan Appendix I: Example of a model LGAPMP 23

30 Local government area pest management plan Fairweather Regional Council Appendix 1: Example of a model LGAPMP 24

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