corporate plan Defence construction canada Including the Operating and Capital Budgets for

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1 corporate plan Defence construction canada to Including the Operating and Capital Budgets for

2 DEFENCE CONSTRUCTION CANADA CORPORATE PLAN TO TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. ABOUT DCC 2 2. BUSINESS OPERATIONS HIGHLIGHTS 4 3. STRATEGIC PLAN OVERVIEW 7 4. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 9 5. GLOBAL PLANNING CONTEXT AND STRATEGIC ISSUES BUSINESS STRATEGY 20 PLANNING THEMES, OUTCOMES, INITIATIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 20 PLANNING THEME 1: BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 22 PLANNING THEME 2: SERVICE DELIVERY 26 PLANNING THEME 3: PEOPLE 33 PLANNING THEME 4: STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP 39 PLANNING THEME 5: CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND STAKEHOLDER RELATIONSHIPS FINANCIAL PLAN 50 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT POLICY 50 DEFICIT REDUCTION ACTION PLAN 50 STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME 51 STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY 52 STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION 56 STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS 61 STAFF STRENGTH 62 CAPITAL BUDGET 63 STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME APPENDIX: CORPORATE PROFILE 65 Photo (opposite page): Melissa Vestby, Environmental Services Coordinator, 4 Wing Cold Lake

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4 DEFENCE CONSTRUCTION CANADA CORPORATE PLAN TO ABOUT DCC Defence Construction (1951) Limited (operating as Defence Construction Canada or DCC) is a Crown corporation that provides innovative and cost-effective contracting, construction contract management, infrastructure and environmental services for the Department of National Defence (DND), the Canadian Forces (CF), and Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC), as required for the defence of Canada. Operating on a fee-for-service basis, DCC does not receive any appropriations from the Government of Canada. DCC s resources are divided among five service lines. Construction Services THE CONSTRUCTION SERVICES TEAM SUPPORTS THE CREATION, RENOVATION AND MAINTE- NANCE OF FACILITIES FOR DND S INFRASTRUCTURE AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAM. Contract Services THE CONTRACT SERVICES TEAM OVERSEES THE PROCUREMENT OF GOODS AND PROFESSIONAL, CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE SERVICES TO FULFILL CANADA S DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL DEFENCE INFRASTRUCTURE NEEDS. Environmental Services ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES HELPS DND MEET ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE TARGETS, COMPLY WITH REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS, AND MANAGE DUE DILIGENCE AND RISK. Project and Program Management Services PROJECT AND PROGRAM MANAGEMENT SERVICES ADVISES ON MATTERS SUCH AS BUILDING REQUIREMENTS, PROGRAM PLANNING, AND SCHEDULE AND DOCUMENT CONTROL. Real Property Management Services FROM NEEDS PLANNING TO FACILITY DECOMMISSIONING, THE REAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT SERVICES TEAM ENSURES DND S REAL PROPERTY ASSETS ARE MANAGED EFFICIENTLY THROUGHOUT THEIR LIFECYCLES. 2

5 Mandate The principal mandate of DCC, pursuant to the Defence Production Act, is to meet the infrastructure and environmental needs of DND/CF by providing quality services. DCC s mission is to deliver and maintain infrastructure and environmental projects and services, and provide full lifecycle infrastructure support, required for the defence of Canada. DCC is an agent of the Crown incorporated for the purpose of carrying out the procurement for and delivering of defence infrastructure projects. The Defence Production Act defines a defence contract as a contract with an agent of Her Majesty that in any way relates to defence projects or to the designing, manufacturing, producing, constructing, finishing, assembling, transporting, repairing, maintaining, servicing or storing of or dealing in defence projects. DCC s Letters Patent permit DCC to take on, lease, or in exchange, procure, purchase or otherwise acquire, construct, alter, renovate, add to, improve, and to hold, manage, maintain, operate, supervise, repair, heat, sell, salvage, realize or otherwise dispose of real and personal property and in particular, lands and buildings. DCC reports to Parliament through the Minister of Public Works and Government Services. Mission TO PROVIDE TIMELY, EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT PROJECT DELIVERY AND FULL LIFECYCLE SUPPORT FOR INFRASTRUCTURE AND ENVIRONMENTAL ASSETS REQUIRED FOR THE DEFENCE OF CANADA. Vision TO BE A KNOWLEDGEABLE AND INNOVATIVE LEADER AND EMPLOYER OF CHOICE, VALUED BY THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA AND INDUSTRY, IN THE ACHIEVEMENT OF OUR MISSION. Values Dedication Collaboration Competence Fairness DCC is dedicated to supporting DND s infrastructure and environment requirements. For over 60 years, DCC employees have dependably and diligently carried out that mission. DCC is committed to developing collaborative relationships with its Client-Partners, industry and employees. Together, we leverage our shared expertise toward our common goals. DCC has created a dynamic working environment in which the qualifications, experience and expertise of employees are focused on developing innovative solutions to the Client-Partner s needs. DCC deals with its Client-Partners, industry and employees in a fair and ethical manner, advocating mutual respect and professionalism in the attainment of the common objectives of all parties. 3

6 HIGHLIGHTS BUSINESS OPERATIONS DCC SERVICES REVENUE ACTUAL FORECAST PROJECTED ($ MILLIONS) DCC CONTRACT EXPENDITURES DCC CONTRACT EXPENDITURES PER FULL-TIME EMPLOYEE ACTUAL FORECAST PROJECTED ($ MILLIONS) ACTUAL FORECAST PROJECTED ($ THOUSANDS) 816 1,003 1,150 1,160 1,007 1,082 1,086 1,149 1,005 1,008 1,

7 DCC SERVICES REVENUE AS A PERCENTAGE OF DND IE RELATED PROGRAMS ACTUAL FORECAST PROJECTED % % % % % % DCC SERVICES REVENUE BY SERVICE LINE AS A PERCENTAGE OF DND IE RELATED PROGRAMS SERVICE LINE ACTUAL FORECAST % CONSTRUCTION SERVICES % % CONTRACT SERVICES ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES % % % % % % REAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT SERVICES PROJECT AND PROGRAM MANAGEMENT SERVICES % % % % % %

8 NUMBER OF CONTRACTS AWARDED ACTUAL FORECAST 1,730 2,075 2,350 2, VALUE OF CONTRACTS AWARDED ACTUAL FORECAST ($ MILLIONS) ABOUT BUSINESS OPERATIONS HIGHLIGHTS These charts are intended to describe DCC s business operations within its planning context. These charts illustrate expected performance trends for DCC, based upon DCC s internal expectations of DND s infrastructure and environment program. Contract expenditures include all services that DCC delivers for the construction and maintenance of defence infrastructure, for environmental projects and services, and for lifecycle infrastructure support.

9 DEFENCE CONSTRUCTION CANADA STRATEGIC PLAN OVERVIEW Stimulating Canada s Economy Protecting Canada Fostering Accountability and Integrity Long-term economic prosperity for Canada An innovative and entrepreneur-based economy Canada as a leader in the global economy Preserving Canada s environment Government of Canada Key Priorities Supported by DCC Mission TO PROVIDE TIMELY, EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT PROJECT DELIVERY AND FULL LIFECYCLE SUPPORT FOR INFRASTRUCTURE AND ENVIRONMENTAL ASSETS REQUIRED FOR THE DEFENCE OF CANADA to Rebuilding the Canadian Forces Defending Arctic sovereignty and national security Values Sustainable public finances Strong fiscal and asset management in Government Transparency (access to information and privacy) Values and ethics in the public sector Vision TO BE A KNOWLEDGEABLE AND INNOVATIVE LEADER AND EMPLOYER OF CHOICE, VALUED BY THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA AND INDUSTRY, IN THE ACHIEVEMENT OF OUR MISSION. Dedication Collaboration Competence Fairness DCC is dedicated to supporting DND s infrastructure and environment requirements. For over 60 years, DCC employees have dependably and diligently carried out that mission. DCC is committed to developing collaborative relationships with its Client-Partners, industry and employees. Together, we leverage our shared expertise toward our common goals. DCC has created a dynamic working environment in which the qualifications, experience and expertise of employees are focused on developing innovative solutions to the Client-Partner s needs. DCC deals with its Client-Partners, industry and employees in a fair and ethical manner, advocating mutual respect and professionalism in the attainment of the common objectives of all parties. Strategic Objectives and Outcomes PLANNING THEME BUSINESS MANAGEMENT SERVICE DELIVERY PEOPLE STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND STAKEHOLDER RELATIONSHIPS STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE To develop and maintain responsive, sustainable business management structures, tools, teams and practices To meet Client-Partner requirements and to achieve value for money To recruit, develop, support and retain a skilled, professional and motivated workforce To provide strong, ethical, efficient and effective strategic management and leadership for the Corporation To be recognized as competent and responsive to government priorities, policies and practices STRATEGIC OUTCOMES 1. Business practices, policies, systems and tools support effective and efficient service delivery, and support strong financial management. 2. Human resources strategies, programs, policies and practices meet business and operational requirements effectively and efficiently. 3. Corporate assets are safeguarded. 4. Service delivery is optimized and principles-based. 5. A strong partnership with DND/CF is maintained. 6. DCC planning is aligned with DND/CF. 7. DCC leverages industry capacity. 8. DCC provides a healthy and productive work environment. 9. DCC encourages and fosters innovation. 10. Employees relate to DCC s mission, vision and values. 11. DCC maintains an effective and efficient risk management framework. 12. DCC responds to changes in business activity. 13. DCC maintains effective and efficient corporate planning and performance management frameworks. 14. DCC continues to show ethical leadership. 15. DCC is accountable to the Government of Canada through appropriate corporate governance. 16. DCC demonstrates its competence and value as an agent of the Crown. 17. Corporate leadership and oversight are provided in the fulfillment of the mandate of the Corporation and the priorities of the Government of Canada. 18. DCC supports government policies and practices. CORPORATE INITIATIVES 1. Performance measurement and reporting 2. Enterprise resource planning system upgrade 3. Business practice optimization 4. Service delivery optimization 5. Support DND/CF infrastructure and environment portfolio 6. Industry innovation initiatives 7. Lessons learned framework 8. program 9. A principles-based decision-making culture 10. Social media 11. Launch of its revised mission, vision and values statements 12. Performance management audit recommendations 13. Delegation of authority audit recommendations 14. Training framework 15. Corporate social responsibility framework 16. Fiscal restraint measures 17. Support for DND fiscal restraint measures 18. Increase external awareness of DCC KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS Operational results and performance measures, such as cost of service delivery, utilization rate and direct personnel expense multiplier Financial results Service delivery rating Industry feedback and consultations DCC involvement in industry activities Contractor performance evaluation results Investment in training and development Innovation results Employee wellness Employee retention rate Employment equity rating Results of social media strategy measures Management reporting Timeliness of submissions reporting Overall business performance results Achievement of corporate initiatives DCC Code of Business Conduct results DCC Procurement Code of Conduct results Success in meeting government requirements, including deficit reduction Environmental, safety and security results Internal and external audit results, and Office of the Auditor General Special Examination results Success in responding to government requests

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11 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Efficiency and cost effectiveness have been at the forefront of DCC s commitment to service since its inception in 1951; however, in the to planning period, these attributes will be more important than ever. Although Canada s economy is strong in comparison to those of other countries, government-led fiscal restraint initiatives are greatly affecting DCC s business strategy. It is a time of change for the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Forces (DND/CF). They are transitioning to a lower pace of operations following the end of the combat mission to Afghanistan and are looking toward new priorities, such as maintaining an appropriate presence in and surveillance of the Arctic. In the midst of this, in the first half of , DCC s performance remained consistent and the Corporation remained flexible in supporting its Client-Partners. THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT DCC s mandate is to provide infrastructure service and full lifecycle support for Canada s defence requirements. It has two Client-Partners: one is the infrastructure and environment group at the Department of National Defence; the other is the Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC). In its role as a support organization for larger defence and security organizations, DCC works in a global planning context that mirrors that of its Client-Partners. The same factors and conditions that affect Canada and Canada s defence and security organizations could have a direct impact on DCC s long-term ability to achieve its mission. Many societies are experiencing changes, shifts and impacts related to economic, environmental, geopolitical, societal and technological factors. The world has become increasingly interconnected and interdependent, and Canada cannot isolate itself from these global risks. Issues such as climate change, energy supply, terrorism, cyber threats and religious extremism, to name a few, all have the potential to make an impact on Canada s defence and security partners over the long term. At home, Canada s deficit-reduction activities are an important part of the country s fiscal strategy. They are designed to help Canada maintain its long-term economic prosperity. Canada s construction industry is becoming larger and much more complex with an increase in the number of projects in the $1-billion range. Additionally, there are fewer construction firms and more foreign ownership, as well as a forecasted shortage of skilled labour, and all owners must keep up with new project management and delivery methodologies. 9

12 DEFENCE CONSTRUCTION CANADA CORPORATE PLAN TO DCC S PLANNING STRATEGY DCC organizes its business planning strategy under five planning themes that reflect the nature of its business. They are Business Management, Service Delivery, People, Strategic Management and Leadership, and Corporate Governance and Stakeholder Relationships. The goal of DCC s strategic planning is to enable the Corporation to fulfill its mission of providing timely, effective and efficient project delivery and full lifecycle support for infrastructure and environmental assets required for the defence of Canada. Each of the planning themes has a strategic objective and strategic outcomes that are aligned with this goal. The objectives and their strategic outcomes are designed to be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and timely, and are expected to remain constant during the to planning period. Each year in its annual planning session, DCC reviews the results of the performance indicators for each of the strategic objectives and determines how well it is meeting the strategic outcomes. It also takes into account input from its Client-Partners, Board of Directors and industry partners in its environmental analysis. If there is a new need or an opportunity for improvement, then an initiative is created to address this situation. This is a service-centred strategy, which DCC has honed well over the past 60 years. This strategy has positioned the Corporation as a knowledgeable and innovative leader and as an employer of choice. STRATEGIC INITIATIVES All of DCC s strategic initiatives are multi-year initiatives. As work progresses on them, they will affect the Corporation throughout the to planning period. Some of the initiatives are carry-overs from past years and are progressing to the next phase of their development. Many of them relate to improving or optimizing existing technology infrastructure or business management systems. One of the new initiatives is a review of the DCC mission, vision and values statements. Given the wide scope of changes to DCC s business over the past several years, and since the majority of DCC employees have been with the Corporation for less than five years, a review of the mission, vision and values was warranted. The statements were updated in fall They will be launched in the next fiscal year, and there will be an ongoing awareness and engagement campaign around these key corporate messages. Other new initiatives relate to training and development, social media, corporate social responsibility, and external communications. Given the scope of these initiatives and the fact that they relate to people and behavioural changes, this work will unfold throughout the coming planning period and beyond. 10

13 DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE Like the budgets for all Government of Canada organizations, the budget for the Department of National Defence (DND) portfolio has been reduced. The reductions are designed to restrain growth, with a focus on administrative efficiency in areas that do not directly contribute to operational readiness. On a transactionby-transaction basis, DCC advises DND on areas where the Department can achieve cost efficiencies. The DND infrastructure and environment (IE) capital expenditure programs are forecasted to have a budget of between $1.1 and 1.2 billion at the end of It is estimated that the DND capital expenditure program will decrease slightly in the next fiscal year, then stabilize over the following several years. In the first half of , DND s operations and maintenance budget (O&M) was reduced in Quebec and Ontario. It is anticipated that by the end of this fiscal year, the total O&M budget will have been reduced by $327 million. Chapter 5 of the Report of the Auditor General of Canada, delivered to the House of Commons in fall 2012, focused on DND s real property management. It recommended that DND complete a strategy for managing its real property. It also recommended that DND implement cyclical and semi-annual review controls over DCC, as discussed in the 2008 memorandum of understanding. For both situations, DCC is well prepared and stands ready to support its Client-Partner. It is anticipated that DCC will support DND/CF with its implementation of the Canada First Defence Strategy. This could include, for example, infrastructure support requirements arising out of announcements pursuant to the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy (NSPS). The NSPS includes the Royal Canadian Navy s Arctic Patrol Ships. DCC s biggest current challenge is to maintain its flexibility to respond to DND s changing needs. DCC has its own cost-reduction commitments to meet, but it also needs to help DND meet its cost-reduction commitments without compromising its infrastructure. All Government of Canada spending is being reviewed to ensure efficiency and effectiveness. INFRASTRUCTURE AND ENVIRONMENT PROJECTS The scope of DCC s infrastructure and environment project portfolio ranges from innovative projects to traditional ones, from control towers to dockyards, from hangars to tank maintenance facilities, from community centres to accommodation facilities, and from roads to sewer and water systems. Throughout the planning period, DCC will be supporting several major construction programs and projects for DND/CF. The Fleet Maintenance Facility (Cape Breton) project is a five-phase initiative to consolidate and modernize the DND ship maintenance facilities at Her Majesty s Canadian Dockyard Esquimalt. DCC is also supporting numerous infrastructure projects at 8 Wing/CFB Trenton. These include construction of a new maintenance hangar, construction of a new building to house the Canadian Forces Land Advanced Warfare Centre, and upgrades to National Air Force Museum, the Air Mobility Training Centre and the Military Family Resource Centre. 11

14 DEFENCE CONSTRUCTION CANADA CORPORATE PLAN TO At CFB Petawawa, DCC is supporting the construction of a new light armoured vehicle III (LAV III) facility, a new hangar, medium-to-heavy lift helicopter training accommodations and the Equipment Fielding Coordination Centre. The Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) Infrastructure Renewal Project is a new research and development complex comprising offices, laboratories and support spaces to be built on the DRDC Valcartier grounds. It is due for completion in This project also calls for the renovation of viable existing buildings and the demolition of obsolete buildings. COMMUNICATIONS SECURITY ESTABLISHMENT CANADA In addition to DND/CF, the Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC) is DCC s other Client- Partner. CSEC, Canada s national cryptologic agency, is a stand-alone agency reporting directly to the Minister of National Defence. As the contracting authority for DND, DCC is working with CSEC on its long-term accommodation project (LTAP) in Ottawa. This building will be a state-of-the-art, high-security facility housing the largest repository of top secret information in Canada. Built using a public-private partnership (P3), the building will span more than 72,000 net square metres. The associated design-build-finance and maintain contract includes unique security, infrastructure and financing arrangements. Working with officials from CSEC and other outside advisors, DCC staffers played a critical role in developing the P3 model under which the LTAP was procured. FINANCIAL FORECAST DCC is forecasting services revenue of approximately $116 million for the current year ending March 31, 2013, an increase of approximately 4% from the previous fiscal year. During the same period, staff strength, expressed on a full-time-equivalent basis, is expected to rise to 1,059 employees, an increase of approximately 6% from the previous fiscal year. The predicted rise is directly related to the increase in work volume in DND s capital construction program and environmental remediation program. DCC s utilization rate for the first half of this fiscal year is the same as it was for the same time period last year at 74.7% and is slightly lower than the rate of 75.8% for the 12-month period ended March 31, DEFICIT REDUCTION ACTION PLAN Through the Minister of Public Works and Government Services, the Government of Canada requested that DCC undertake a review to support the government s Deficit Reduction Action Plan (DRAP), announced in the 2011 Budget. The DRAP initiative is intended to achieve cost savings over three fiscal years: , and The Corporation identified and discussed several areas of potential savings in the Corporate Plan for to in the areas of corporate services, corporate-wide initiatives, and salaries and benefits. It also committed to reducing the cost of DCC services to DND, by freezing billing rates for the next three fiscal years, and identified a number of actions designed to generate a 5% cost saving on services rendered to DND. 12

15 The Corporation has included its DRAP savings commitments in the to financial projections presented in this Corporate Plan. These projections are based on certain assumptions and expectations regarding the DND/CF infrastructure program, and the resulting nature and scope of infrastructure support services that DCC will be asked to deliver. Direct expenditures associated with increased demands for services will increase operating expenses in certain areas. Based on current results to date for fiscal and DCC s projections for the remainder of the fiscal year, the Corporation expects to achieve the savings outlined in its DRAP submissions for fiscal VALUE FOR MONEY By design, DCC s business model ensures value for money and technically strong service delivery for its Client- Partners. As a Crown corporation, it has flexibility in its business management, in times of both expansion and restraint. Its legislated mandate allows it to provide the full range of infrastructure services and lifecycle management for the defence of Canada. Sixty-two years of military construction experience from bases and wings across Canada, to sites in the far North, across Europe and in Afghanistan position DCC as the consistent corporate memory for defence infrastructure in Canada. The Corporation has the same goal that its Client- Partners have: it wants to deliver projects on time, effectively and efficiently, wherever DND needs them. Operating on a not-for-profit basis, DCC s entire team is dedicated to resolving challenges at a moment s notice. DCC can leverage its connections with industry and ensure that businesses have fair and equal access to the millions of dollars worth of contracts issued regularly. DCC will be attentive to the conclusions of the Charbonneau Inquiry, which is looking into corruption and collusion in the Quebec construction industry. Through a fair and transparent contracting process, DCC protects the Crown s interests and those of its service partners. In the coming planning period, it will be more important than ever for DCC to exercise its added-value capability, as DND moves through a transition period. PEOPLE People are at the core of DCC s business, and the Corporation prides itself on being able to place the right people in the right job at the right time. Over 68% of employees have been at DCC for five years or less, and 48% have been there for three years or less. That demographic factor, combined with changes in the business, led DCC s senior management to review the mission, vision and values statements to ensure that they still reflect the business and are still meaningful to both external partners and DCC s employees. Continuous learning, collaboration, innovation and employee performance management remain high on DCC s agenda for the planning period, and the Corporation has corporate initiatives in all of these areas. DCC also acknowledges that the workplace is changing and that not only does the Government of Canada encourage social media use, but employees also expect to use them. Finally, the Canadian Construction Association forecasts that industry will need 319,000 new workers by 2020, just to replace those who have retired. Given these conditions, DCC is keenly aware that it must be recognized as an employer of choice so that it can recruit and retain the best employees. 13

16 DEFENCE CONSTRUCTION CANADA CORPORATE PLAN TO GOVERNANCE AND MANAGEMENT STRUCTURE The position of Vice-President, Operations Procurement was filled in the first half of The Contract Services Division, which had been on a path of decentralization for the past several years, completed its reorganization in the first half of this fiscal year. After DCC made some staff reductions at Head Office in Ottawa, a core group of contract services staffers were absorbed into the National Capital Region (NCR). The DCC-DGME (Director General Military Engineering) joint program management office will be reorganized to focus on joint business management initiatives. The capital program will be coordinated centrally in Ottawa and implemented at the site level. The joint office will receive the authority to plan and coordinate delivery of projects for DND worth over $5 million. DCC s Procurement Code of Conduct (PCC) was completed this year and the Corporation will take steps toward communicating it to DCC s industry partners in the second half of Any supplier that is bidding on or has been awarded a contract must abide by the obligations of the PCC, because these obligations form part of the contract. DCC s internal auditors, Interis Consulting Inc., completed two internal audits in the first half of : an audit of delegated authority and an audit of performance management. The audit of delegated authority concluded that DCC has a robust system for managing the authorities that have been delegated to its employees. The audit on performance management reaffirmed that performance information drives decision-making throughout DCC, from the President and Vice-Presidents, through service lines and regions, down to the site level, and that there is room for improvement. DCC has two strategic initiatives in this plan to address the recommendations arising from these two audits. 14

17 GLOBAL PLANNING CONTEXT AND STRATEGIC ISSUES DCC s mandate is to provide infrastructure services and full lifecycle support for Canada s defence requirements. It has two primary Client-Partners: one is the infrastructure and environment (IE) group at the Department of National Defence; the other is the Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC). In its role as a support organization for these large defence and public security organizations, DCC works in a global planning context that mirrors that of its Client-Partners. The same factors and conditions that affect Canada and Canada s defence and security organizations have a direct impact on the demand for DCC support of infrastructure and environment projects for the defence of Canada. EXTERNAL FACTORS This section outlines some of the broader external environmental factors that drive the demand for infrastructure support from DCC. At the strategic planning session in September 2012, with input from DCC s Board of Directors, DCC s senior management considered the global planning context and the strategic issues facing Canada, and how these could impact DCC in meeting its five strategic objectives successfully. Recently, the World Economic Forum issued its Global Risks 2012 Seventh Edition report, which discussed current global risks in terms of their likelihood and impact. During its strategic planning session, DCC reviewed the findings of this report and considered them in developing its business strategy for the next five to 10 years. 15

18 DEFENCE CONSTRUCTION CANADA CORPORATE PLAN TO The report indicated that the world has become increasingly interconnected and interdependent. Today, no society or country is immune to changes, shifts and impacts from economic, environmental, geopolitical, societal and technological factors. Canada cannot isolate itself from these global risks, and this global context will have an impact on Canada s defence and security partners over the long term. The definition of the term security is evolving and the concept is becoming more complicated. It can refer to cybersecurity, energy security, economic security or political security all elements that relate to societies and people. DCC reflected on the state of the world in relation to these risk factors and the degree to which they are relevant. In addition, DCC reviewed the state of the construction industry, in consultation with the Canadian Construction Association. The following section discusses DCC s planning environment and the factors that could have an impact on DCC s strategic direction. THE ENVIRONMENT Climate change and extreme weather conditions are having significant economic and societal impacts, with the potential to lead to increased infrastructive investment, changing building standards and political changes over the 10-year planning horizon. Greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) are rising and the global community is not meeting its GHG reduction targets. Arctic ice in the northern passage is melting, and the route is now navigable in the winter. Many nations will see an economic advantage to using this new passage as an expedited shipping route, and several major powers may want to establish a foothold there. Defending Arctic sovereignty is a key priority of the Government of Canada, and DCC would stand ready to support any infrastructure or environment project arising from Canada s Northern Strategy. In other vulnerable areas, there is increasing threat to populated areas from geophysical events and flooding. Their impact often overwhelms existing response measures which could prompt DND/CF to provide humanitarian assistance and disaster relief (HADR). DCC would be ready to support accordingly. LAND AND WATER RESOURCES In all parts of the world, proper management of land and water resources is an issue. The risks can be attributed to unsustainable land use practices, competition for available water, the negative impact of industrial food production and climate change. Adverse or extreme weather can ruin several agricultural seasons. The need could arise for Canada to protect such resources and DCC may be called upon to support DND in its sustainable land and water management efforts. ENERGY Canada is rich in natural resources and a net exporter of oil. It is currently performing well economically in comparison to other G8 countries. However, there is volatility in energy prices, related to current worldwide geopolitical circumstances. Efforts have been made over the past 30 years to develop feasible renewable forms of energy, such as wind power, electric vehicles, fuel cells and cellulosic ethanol. However, technology risks associated with these alternatives will remain until these energy sources are proven to work on a large scale. 16

19 Defence departments in many jurisdictions have been exploring self-sustaining energy sources and sustainable buildings that would allow them to generate energy and thereby lessen the impact of a global energy crisis. Potentially, demand for renewable energy could outstrip supply. DCC would need to develop further expertise in energy-related sustainable development in order to provide support to DND/CF as appropriate. ECONOMICS Canada s financial system remains strong in comparison to those in many other jurisdictions; however, to maintain the strength of Canada s financial system, the fiscal policy of the Government of Canada is focused on expenditure restraint for the next three years. The Deficit Reduction Action Plan is intended to generate cost savings over three fiscal years: , and and beyond. Federal funding for DND and its related programs has been reduced. In addition to reducing its own costs, DCC is focused on optimizing its business processes while helping DND to find efficiencies in its day-to-day infrastructure operations. GOVERNANCE SYSTEMS DCC works steadily to maintain a robust and transparent governance structure. Performance management, based on sound and precise business data management and systems, is key to helping the Corporation demonstrate its value to Canadian taxpayers and reveal any potential compromise to internal systems. The Charbonneau Inquiry, which is looking into corruption and collusion in the Quebec construction industry, may reach conclusions that could affect the national construction industry as a whole. In this vein, DCC has introduced a Procurement Code of Conduct for industry to decrease the potential for this type of corruption. TECHNOLOGY New technology is advancing at a rapid rate and so, too, is the potential for threats to high-tech or critical infrastructure. A growing number of large-scale cyber-attacks could pose a threat to national and global security. DCC needs to protect its business accordingly in order to be ready to support its Client-Partners as required. As new technology emerges, so do the positive opportunities. It is important for DCC to keep up to date with technology innovations in the construction industry, such as building information modeling (BIM) and electronic procurement so that it can best support its Client-Partners. THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY The Canadian construction industry is becoming larger and much more complex, with fewer construction firms, more foreign ownership, more service-integrated firms, quicker adaption of technology and greater private sector involvement in traditional business owner activities. The Global Construction 2020 report produced by Oxford Economics revealed several factors relevant to DCC s business. Relative to other countries, Canada is experiencing a construction boom. Some observers rate Canada as the fifth-largest construction market in the world. Investment in this industry could reach $300 billion by The typical size of Canadian construction projects is increasing: there are 30 in Canada valued at $1 billion or more, and 61 valued at $500 million to $1 billion. This trend has continued in the past three years. There is also more global foreign competition in the Canadian construction market, particularly from European firms. 17

20 DEFENCE CONSTRUCTION CANADA CORPORATE PLAN TO According to the Canadian Construction Association, the Canadian market faces workforce challenges. It is forecasted that the industry will need 319,000 new workers by 2020, just to replace those who have retired, to meet demand. A lot of large construction projects are occurring in remote areas, where younger generations are less likely to relocate. Mergers and acquisitions are happening among small and medium-sized enterprises. Further, governments at the federal, provincial and municipal levels are all facing challenging fiscal realities related to aging infrastructure. Public-private partnerships (P3) are increasingly seen as an economical and efficient way to navigate these challenges. Innovation is happening in the construction industry due to increased and changing client demands, the pressure of global competition, and reduced human resources capacity. Procurement and project delivery methods are evolving and clients are relying on the private sector to provide more deliverables. For example, the Government of Canada is considering lifecycle cost procurement strategies. Over the course of its 60-year history, DCC has been accustomed to working in this buoyant construction industry. DCC will support recruitment and retention strategies to ensure that a skilled and available workforce is in place. It will continue to develop innovative procurement and contract management strategies to attract qualified contractors for defence projects, ensuring quality work at competitive prices. It will also continue to deal fairly with industry partners in the work they undertake. INTERNAL FACTORS This section outlines some of the internal environmental factors that DCC has to consider in its planning process. DCC is an independent organization that is responsible for its own operating plan, financial management and business processes. It follows all applicable federal government regulations and adheres to government guidelines. DCC relies on its revenue, earned through time-based billing on a fee-for-service basis. It is non-appropriated, has no line of credit facility or other borrowing capacity, and is responsible for sustaining its business on an ongoing basis. Revenue is generated subject to demand for services from its Client-Partners. It is their decision ultimately as to the extent and timing by which DCC s services are utilized. DCC s Client-Partners also do not provide a clear infrastructure program forecast that DCC can base its resource and expense planning on. DCC develops its own annual five-year forecast of the expected infrastructure program based on input from all Client-Partner groups it deals with, from headquarters to regional representatives. DCC analyzes all data obtained and develops a forecast based on our experience in delivering the program over many years. Due to the volatility in actual program numbers, DCC has to manage two challenging situations: first, maintaining the right number of resources to meet all of the program requirements in the year to support DND s IE needs and approved budgets; second, maintaining the flexibility and responsiveness to adjust resources as necessary in order to avoid a loss situation if program numbers are dramatically reduced. 18

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