Survey of Family, Income and Employment Dynamics (Wave 2) September 2004

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Survey of Family, Income and Employment Dynamics (Wave 2) September 2004"

Transcription

1 Embargoed until 10:45 am 04 November 2005 Survey of Family, Income and Employment Dynamics (Wave 2) September 2004 Highlights There were 578,600 people in a one parent with child(ren) family at some stage during their first two years in the survey. Of those people, 64.0 percent were in a one parent with child(ren) family for the whole two years. Four out of every 10 (40.5 percent) people aged 15 years and over had credit card debt, while 31.2 percent had mortgage debt. There were 235,400 people who spent some time not employed but seeking work in their first two years in the survey. Of those people, 61.7 percent spent less than 26 weeks not employed but seeking work in those two years Out of all people aged 15 years and over, 98.1 percent owned household items, 81.8 percent owned vehicle(s) and leisure equipment, and 75.8 percent had a bank account in credit. Brian Pink 4 November 2005 Government Statistician Cat Set 05/06 070

2 Commentary Introduction This release presents results from the Survey of Family, Income and Employment (SoFIE). SoFIE is New Zealand's first ever national survey designed to study income, family type and employment and how these change over time. SoFIE is a 'longitudinal' survey, which means that the same respondents are visited over a number of years to measure how their individual and family circumstances change over time. In this respect SoFIE differs from cross-sectional surveys that typically measure an individual's circumstances at the time of a single interview. This release contains analysis of data collected in the first two waves (or interview cycles) of the survey. Wave one of SoFIE was conducted from 1 October 2002 to 30 September 2003, and wave two from 1 October 2003 to 30 September At each interview respondents were asked to recall information about a specific annual reference period, which was the 12 months prior to the month of interview. This means that SoFIE data published in this release relates to a two-year period for each respondent that falls somewhere between 1 October 2001 and 30 September Cross-sectional information on net worth, assets and liabilities collected from respondents in the second wave of the survey is also included in this release. Rather than provide an exhaustive set of all the analysis that is possible from SoFIE data, this release is intended to illustrate types of analysis that can be done. A more detailed analysis of results from wave one and wave two of SoFIE will be available at a later date. Changes in family and household types At each interview survey participants were asked about the family members they lived with at different times in the previous year. This provides data on changes in an individual's family circumstances over time. In this release a family is defined as two or more people living in the same household who comprise either a couple, with or without children, or one parent and their children. A child in a family can be of any age, but must not have a partner or children of their own living in the same household. This definition of family excludes parents and children who live in different households. Changes in family type This section provides information on the type of family individuals were living in at the end of wave one and at the end of wave two. Note that this data compares two points in time only. For example, a person who was in a couple with children family at the end of their first year in the survey who was also in a couple with children family one year later, may have had a period of time in a one parent with children family between these two dates. Of those people with an identified family type, 89.6 percent were in the same type of family at the end of their first year in the survey and a year later. 2

3 Nine out of 10 people (92.2 percent) who were in a couple with child(ren) family at the end of their first year in the survey were in the same type of family a year later. Of the 148,900 people who were no longer in this type of family a year later, 41.0 percent were in a one parent with child(ren) family. Of the 465,800 people who were in a one parent with child(ren) family at the end of their first year in the survey, 7.7 percent were in a couple with child(ren) family a year later, while 5.8 percent were no longer in a family nucleus. The majority (85.6 percent) of people in a one parent family at the end of their first year in the survey were also in a one parent family a year later. The number of people not in a family nucleus increased between wave one and wave two. At wave one 13.4 percent of the population were not in a family nucleus. At wave two 15.6 percent of the population were not in a family nucleus. Time spent in a family type This section provides data on the total length of time an individual was in a particular type of family over the first two years (104 weeks) of the survey. All adults and children in the longitudinal population are included (3,718,400 individuals). Four out of five people (79.1 percent) were in one type of family for the whole two-year period. Those who were in a couple with child(ren) family at some stage over the two-year period were the most likely to be in the same type of family for the whole time (80.1 percent). Of those who were in a one parent with child(ren) family at some stage over the two-year period, 64.0 percent were in this type of family for the whole two years. People who were not in a family nucleus tended to spend shorter periods of time in this type of situation than those in other types of families. Of those who were not in a family nucleus for at least part of the two-year period, 36.2 percent were in this situation for the whole two years, while 33.9 percent spent less than one year not in a family nucleus. 3

4 Changes in household type A household is defined as either one person who usually lives alone, or two or more people who usually live together and share facilities, such as eating or cooking facilities. The types of households collected in SoFIE are one family households, two or more family households, other multiperson households (ie a household with no family nucleus such as a flat), and one person households. This section provides information on the type of household individuals were living in at their first interview and a year later. This data compares two points in time only. A person who was in the same type of household at their first interview and a year later may have been in a different household type at some time in between the two interviews. The number of people living alone increased between wave one and wave two. At wave one, 297,000 people (8.0 percent) were living alone. At wave two, 349,800 people (9.4 percent) were living in a one person household. Nine out of 10 people (90.8 percent) were in the same type of household at their first interview and a year later. Most people (93.8 percent) who were in a one family household when they were interviewed in the first year were in the same type of household a year later. Of those who were in a one family household when interviewed in the first year and were no longer in this type of household a year later, 42.1 percent had moved into a multiperson household (ie a household with no family nucleus, such as a flat). Of those people in a two or more family household at wave one, 58.9 percent were in the same type of household a year later, while 38.3 percent were in a one family household. Income SoFIE collects detailed information about personal income and sources of income. This release provides information on changes in personal annual income and changes in weekly employee earnings for those people who worked as paid employees at some stage over the first two waves of the survey. Changes in personal annual income At each interview, respondents aged 15 years and over were asked about income they received over the previous year. Personal annual income is the total gross (before tax) income received from all sources. For ease of comparison between years, data is presented in quintiles. Income quintiles divide the population into five groups by ranking people in order by the amount of income they receive. The bottom quintile (quintile 1) is the lowest 20 percent of the population in terms of income, while the top quintile (quintile 5) is the highest 20 percent of the population. Note that the wave one and wave two quintile boundaries are different because average personal annual income increased over the survey period. For example, those in the lowest quintile in wave one had a personal annual income of less than $7,448, while those in the lowest quintile in wave two had a personal annual income of less than $8,854. Changes in personal annual income for all individuals aged 15 and over for the first two waves of SoFIE are summarised below. 4

5 Almost two-thirds (65.2 percent) of people were in the same personal annual income quintile in their first and second year in the survey. This does not necessarily mean that their personal annual income remained the same. However, it does mean that their income relative to the income of other people remained the same. Of those who were not in the same quintile in their first and second years in the survey, one-half (50.3 percent) moved down to a lower quintile, and one-half (49.7 percent) moved up to a higher quintile. Over three-quarters (77.5 percent) of people who were in the top quintile in their first year in the survey were also in the top quintile in their second year. Those in the middle quintile (quintile 3) in their first year were the least likely to be in the same personal annual income quintile in their second year in the survey. Just over half (54.3 percent) remained in this middle quintile, while 19.8 percent moved to a higher quintile, and 25.8 percent moved downwards into either quintile one or two. Weekly employee earnings This section summarises changes in the level of weekly gross employee earnings for people who worked as paid employees at some stage over the two waves of the survey. For ease of comparison between years, data is presented in quintiles. Each quintile contains 20 percent of paid employees, ranked in order of the average weekly employee earnings received over the weeks in which they were employed during the year. Note that the wave one and wave two employee earnings quintile boundaries are different. This is due to movement in average employee earnings between wave one and wave two. For example, in wave one of the survey, the top quintile received average employee earnings of $922 and over per week. In wave two, the top quintile received average employee earnings of $960 and over per week. Of those people who received employee earnings in both years they were in the survey, 69.9 percent remained in the same quintile in both years. This means that although their actual earnings may have changed, their relative position compared with other paid employees remained the same. Of those individuals who were in the top quintile in their first year in the survey, 83.6 percent were also in the top quintile in their second year. A relatively large number of people (229,400) moved up one quintile between years. This trend was most obvious for those people whose average weekly earnings placed them in quintiles 2 or 3 in their first year in the survey. One out of five (21.0 percent) people who were in quintile 2 in their first year moved into quintile 3 in their second year, while one out of five (18.9 percent) of those in quintile 3 in their first year had moved into quintile 4 in their second year in the survey. Labour force involvement At each interview, respondents were asked to report on their involvement in the labour force over the previous year. They were asked the start and end dates of periods of employment, of being not employed but seeking work, and of being not employed and not seeking work (eg being retired, studying, providing childcare, etc). This timeline information has been collected from respondents for two-years, providing a two-year (104-week) picture of labour force involvement. Note that the category 'not employed but seeking work' is not the same as the official measure of unemployment derived from the Household Labour Force Survey, due to the difficulty 5

6 respondents may have in remembering details of their job search activity and availability to start a new job for dates up to a year ago. Changes in labour force involvement This section presents information on labour force involvement at the end of wave one and at the end of wave two, for those aged 15 years and over. Note that this data compares two points in time only. For example, a person who was not working and seeking work at the end of their first year in the survey, and who was also not working and seeking work one year later, may have had one or more periods of employment between those two dates. At the end of wave one of SoFIE, 62.7 percent of people aged 15 years and over were employed. One year later, the number of people employed had increased by 69,700, with 65.2 percent of people aged 15 years and over in employment. Most people (93.2 percent) who were employed at the end of their first year in the survey were also employed a year later. Of those who were employed when interviewed at wave one, 5.6 percent had moved out of the workforce and were not looking for work a year later (ie they had retired, were studying or providing childcare etc). A further 19,700 people (1.1 percent) who were employed at the end of their first year in the survey were no longer employed a year later and were seeking work. Of those who were not employed but seeking work at the end of their first year in the survey, less than one-quarter (23.2 percent) were not employed but seeking work a year later. Almost half (44.6 percent) of those who were not employed but seeking work at the end of their first year in the survey were employed a year later, while 31.9 percent were not employed and not seeking work. A total of 192,000 people who were not employed at the end of their first year in the survey were employed a year later. Most of these people (148,300) were not seeking work when first interviewed. Number of labour force involvement time-spells This section provides data on the number of time-spells that an individual was in a particular type of labour force involvement over the first two waves of SoFIE. All people aged 15 years and over in the longitudinal population are included (2,874,800 people). A time-spell can be from one week to 104 weeks (ie the total number of weeks in the survey). Note that having one time-spell in a particular labour force involvement type does not exclude an individual from also having a time-spell in another labour force type. For example, a person could have one time-spell employed, then later in the survey period spend time overseas, and on arrival back in the country spend a time-spell not employed but seeking work. Over the first two years of the survey, 73.2 percent of all people aged 15 years and over spent at least part of the time employed. Of those people, 86.5 percent had one time-spell employed and 13.5 percent had two or more time-spells of employment. For people aged 15 years and over, 8.2 percent had a period of time during their first two years in the survey where they were not employed and were seeking work. 6

7 Time spent in a labour force state This section provides information on the total length of time people spent involved in different labour force states over the first two years (104 weeks) of the survey. Of those who were employed for at least some of the two-year period, 67.2 percent were employed for the whole time. Of those people who spent some time not employed but seeking work during the two-year period, almost two-thirds (61.7 percent) spent less than 26 weeks not employed but seeking work over the two-year period, while 23.3 percent spent between six months and a year not employed but seeking work. Net worth In the second wave of SoFIE, respondents were asked to provide details about the type and amount of assets and liabilities they had at the household interview date. Information on assets and liabilities will be collected every second wave of SoFIE, that is years two, four, six and eight. Net worth is calculated from this information by subtracting the total value of all liabilities from the total value of all assets. Data in this release is based on information collected from people aged 15 years and over who were interviewed at wave two. This includes people who are not part of the longitudinal population, that is those who were not originally selected to be part of SoFIE, but who were interviewed in the second wave because they were living with a longitudinal respondent. Net worth The population aged 15 years and over was divided into quintiles to examine the distribution of net worth. Net worth quintiles divide the population into five groups by ranking people in order of their net worth. The bottom quintile (quintile 1) is the lowest 20 percent of the population in terms of net worth, while the top quintile (quintile 5) is the highest 20 percent of the population. The median net worth for individuals aged 15 years and older was $69,800. Median net worth increased with age, peaking at $155,800 for individuals in the 45- to 64-year age group, then declining slightly to $149,500 for individuals aged 65 years and over. Two out of three people (67.1 percent) aged 15 to 24 were in the lowest quintile, with a net worth of less than $6,010. Two out of three people (65.9 percent ) aged 65 years and older were in the top two quintiles (quintiles 4 and 5). The median net worth of men of all ages was $70,900, compared with $68,500 for women. The largest difference in median net worth between men and women was in the 45- to 64- year age group. Men in this age group had a median net worth of $167,300, compared with $146,100 for women. 7

8 Assets This section provides information on the number of people aged 15 years and over with assets, the types of assets they own, and the value of those assets. Almost all people (99.5 percent) aged 15 years and over owned assets. For people who had assets, the median value of those assets was $107,000. The three most common assets held by individuals were household items, vehicles and leisure equipment, and bank accounts. Of all people aged 15 years and over, 98.1 percent owned household items, 81.8 percent owned vehicle(s) and leisure equipment, and 75.8 percent had a bank account in credit. In terms of value, residential property made up the largest proportion of total asset value (44.3 percent). The next largest type of asset in terms of value was businesses (18.0 percent ). For those people in the 15- to 24-year age group with assets, the median value of those assets was $5,300. People in the 45- to 64-year age group with assets had the highest median value of assets ($188,700). Liabilities This section provides information on the number of people aged 15 years and over with liabilities, the types of liabilities they have, and the value of those liabilities. Two-thirds (67.3 percent) of all people aged 15 years and over had liabilities. For people with liabilities, the median value of those liabilities was $15,500. The most common liabilities were credit card debt and mortgages. Four out of 10 people (40.5 percent) aged 15 years and over had credit card debt, and three out of 10 (31.2 percent) had mortgage debt. In terms of value, mortgage debt accounted for 78.8 percent of total debt. The next largest type of debt in terms of value was bank account debt (ie overdrafts, revolving credit other than mortgages), at 11.5 percent of total debt. 8

9 For people with liabilities, the median value of liabilities was highest for the 25- to 44- year age group ($31,300) and lowest for those in the 65 and over age group ($700). One-quarter (25.8 percent) of all individuals aged 15 to 24 years had a student loan. The median value of those student loans was $10,000. For technical information contact: Roberta Loretto or Karin Henshaw Wellington

10 Technical notes Introduction The Survey of Family, Income and Employment Dynamics (SoFIE) began in October 2002 and is the largest longitudinal survey ever run in New Zealand. The primary focus of SoFIE is to look at the changes in individual, family and household income, and the factors that influence these changes, such as involvement in the labour force, and family composition. The survey reinterviews the same group of individuals over eight years (or 'waves') in order to build a picture of how their circumstances and lifestyles change over time. The statistics presented in the attached tables present selected information from the first two waves of SoFIE, from October 2002 through to September Survey scope The target population for SoFIE is the usually resident population of New Zealand living in private dwellings. This means the survey excludes overseas visitors who intend to stay in New Zealand for less than 12 months, non-new Zealand diplomats and diplomatic staff and their dependents, members of non-new Zealand armed forces stationed in New Zealand and their dependents, and people living in institutions or in establishments such as boarding houses, hotels, motels and hostels. For practical reasons, the population surveyed is restricted to people whose usual residence at the time of sample selection is a permanent private dwelling on the North Island, South Island or Waiheke Island. Survey methodology At wave one, a total of about 15,000 randomly-selected households were approached to take part in SoFIE. Approximately 11,500 households agreed to be interviewed, and data was collected from over 22,000 eligible individuals aged 15 and over. All adults responding at wave one, and children aged less than 15 for which data was collected in wave one, are known as Original Sample Members (OSMs). The intention is to re-interview all OSMs aged 15 years and over in subsequent years, regardless of changes in their place of residence. OSM children will not be interviewed directly until they turn 15. From the second interview onwards, other members of an OSM's household who are not OSMs ('cohabitants') are also interviewed while they remain living with an OSM. Cohabitants will be asked a reduced set of questions and will not be followed up if they leave the OSM's household. Collection method SoFIE is conducted using computer-assisted interviewing. Interviewers use laptop computers to administer the questionnaire face to face with the respondent in the respondent's home. There are two separate questionnaires used to collect information for SoFIE. The Household Questionnaire is answered by one person in each household and collects household characteristics. A Personal Questionnaire is completed with every OSM in the household aged 15 years and over. A slightly shorter version of the Personal Questionnaire is completed with any adult cohabitating with an OSM adult from wave two onwards. Children aged less than 15 years are not interviewed; 10

11 instead, a nominated parent/other adult is asked questions about them. The household questionnaire contains two sets or 'modules' of questions: 1. Household 2. Standard of living. The personal questionnaire contains eight standard modules: 1. Demographics 2. Child (if the respondent is a nominated adult answering about a child) 3. Labour market history 4. Education 5. Family 6. Labour market 7. Income 8. Contact. The SoFIE questionnaires collect both point-in-time data and spell data. Point-in-time data relates to a single date, usually the interview date (eg the respondent s educational qualifications as at the interview date). Spell data relates to a period of time or time-spell with a defined start and end date reported by the respondent (eg the period of time a respondent lived with a family member, or the length of time a person worked for a particular employer). The analysis in this release includes uncompleted spells, that is spells that were ongoing at the time of the second interview. Over the eight waves of the survey, different modules will be added to gather a more complete picture of the influences on individual and household circumstances. In waves two, four, six and eight a net worth module will be included, and in waves three, five and seven a health module will be included. The net worth module collects information on the type and value of assets and liabilities. Survey period Wave one of SoFIE was conducted from 1 October 2002 to 30 September 2003, and wave two from 1 October 2003 to 30 September The original sample was spread out over the 12 months in the first wave so that interviewing was continuous over the year. The interview for each subsequent wave will always be in roughly the same month as the interview of wave one. At each interview the respondent is asked to recall information about a specific annual reference period. The annual reference period is the 12 months prior to the month of interview. This means that SoFIE data published in this release relates to a two-year period for each respondent that falls somewhere between 1 October 2001 and 30 September Response rate In a longitudinal survey the response rate for the survey will decline over time as individuals are unable to be located, leave the country, or die. Minimising attrition (loss of respondents) is very important, because of the cumulative effect of non-response over time. Statistics New Zealand is putting considerable effort into maintaining contact with respondents in order to be able to interview them in subsequent years, thus maintaining a high response rate for SoFIE. 11

12 Despite this, Statistics New Zealand has been unable to collect valid data from all selected eligible individuals. The most common reasons for this were that a respondent was unable to be contacted, or that a respondent was not able to provide all the relevant information asked for. For wave one, approximately 77 percent of eligible households responded. In the second year of the survey, 87 percent of all respondents from wave one responded again. Assets and liabilities Tables included in this release provide asset and liability data collected in wave two of SoFIE, and net worth information, calculated from asset and liability data. Methodological difference between the Household Savings Survey (HSS) and SoFIE mean that these two surveys are not necessarily directly comparable. The main differences between the surveys are: SoFIE collects asset and liability types and amounts for each individual in the survey. People who have joint assets are asked to report their own share of any assets and liabilities jointly owned. In contrast, the HSS did not collect individual share of assets for survey respondents who were part of a couple, and no attempt was made in the HSS to separate out jointly owned assets. SoFIE collects the value of household items, whereas the HSS did not. The SoFIE population includes individuals aged 15 and over, whereas the HSS population was people 18 years and over. Estimation A basic survey weight is attached to each record to indicate the probability of that unit being included in the sample. Two types of adjustment are then applied to the basic survey weights to improve the reliability of the survey estimates. The basic weights are first inflated to adjust for non-response, and are then further adjusted to ensure that estimates of relevant population characteristics match known population totals. The population totals used for SoFIE are derived from population estimates produced by Statistics New Zealand's Demography Division for counts for different age-sex groups. Imputation Some respondents are unable to provide complete information. In these cases, missing values are imputed for all key fields. The key fields for SoFIE are age, ethnicity, income and pay details. Where possible, information is imputed deterministically, using other information reported by the respondent to provide a likely estimate for the missing value. When deterministic imputation is not possible, a 'hot deck' imputation method is used. This method involves selecting another respondent with similar characteristics to become the 'donor' and provide the imputed value. Reliability of survey estimates The initial SoFIE sample comprised approximately 11,500 responding private households, and 22,000 adults sampled within them, on a statistically representative basis from rural and urban areas throughout New Zealand. Information is collected from each member (including children) of a sampled household that falls within the scope of the survey and meets survey coverage rules. In wave two there were just under 20,000 responding OSM adults. 12

13 Two types of error are possible in estimates based on a sample survey: sampling error and nonsampling error. Sampling error is a measure of the variability that occurs by chance because a sample rather than an entire population is surveyed. All sampling errors for SoFIE are measured at the 95 percent confidence interval. The estimates in the tables have had specific sampling errors calculated for them that are available on request. Non-sampling errors include errors arising from biases in the patterns of response and nonresponse, inaccuracies in reporting by respondents, and errors in the recording and coding of data. Statistics New Zealand endeavours to minimise the impact of these errors through the application of best-practice survey methods and monitoring known indicators (eg non-response). Rounding Due to rounding procedures, table totals may differ from the sum of individual cells. All counts and values in the tables have been rounded to the nearest hundred. Definitions A full set of definitions is available from Statistics New Zealand. The definitions listed refer only to terms used in the Hot Off the Press commentary. Annual reference period Annual data is data in which one value is collected for a 12-month period. The 12-month period is defined by the respondent's start of annual period date and end of annual period date. An example of annual data is the amount of income the respondent received from interest over an annual reference period. Assets Assets are defined as major assets held by the respondent when they are interviewed. Every second wave (ie waves two, four, six and eight) SoFIE collects information about the following types of assets: residential property; household effects; sporting, leisure or hobby equipment; motor vehicles (other than for business); money deposited with banks; life insurance and superannuation schemes the respondent is contributing to; investments with other financial institutions; business ownership and investments; and any other assets End of annual period date (EAPD) EAPD refers to the date which marks the end of the annual reference period for the respondent. Family The definition of the family is based on the concept of a family nucleus. A family nucleus is a couple, with or without child(ren), or one parent and their child(ren) where the children do not have partners or children of their own living in the same household. Note that the children can be of any age. 13

14 Family type describes the type of family a person is living in, not who is in the family. Someone who is in a couple at the first interview of SoFIE, for example, may also be in a couple a year later however they may have changed partners during the course of the year. Household A household is either one person who usually resides alone, or two or more people who usually reside together and share facilities (such as eating facilities, cooking facilities, bathroom and toilet facilities, and a living area). Household type describes the type of household a person is living in, not who is in the household. Household enumeration date (HED) The household enumeration date is the date when all eligible members of a household have been identified and recorded in the Household Questionnaire. Income This release covers aspects of annual personal income and weekly employee earnings. Annual personal income This is the total income received from all sources by a person aged 15 years or over in the annual reference period. Personal income does not necessarily reflect an individual's circumstances, due to income sharing within a family or household. Weekly employee earnings These are the earnings reported by those people with at least one spell of employee earnings during the year. Weekly employee earnings include gross salary/wages, regular allowances, and commissions and bonuses received as usual pay from a spell of employment, divided by the duration of the spell (in weeks). Self-employment income is not included, and redundancy, holiday pay, back pay and other irregular payments are also excluded. Labour force involvement A respondent's labour force involvement is defined as being either employed, not employed but seeking work, or not employed and not seeking work. The definitions for involvement in the labour force are aligned with, but not identical to, the concepts and definitions used in the Household Labour Force Survey. Employed This definition includes all individuals in the working age population who worked for one hour or more, either as an employee or in self-employment; or worked without pay for one hour or more in work which contributed directly to the operation of a farm, business or practice owned or operated by a relative; or had a job but were not at work due to own illness or injury, personal or 14

15 family responsibilites, bad weather or mechanical breakdown, direct involvement in industrial dispute, or leave or holiday. Not employed but seeking work This definition includes all individuals in the working age population who were without a paid job and seeking work. Note that this is not the same as the official measure of unemployment derived from the Household Labour Force Survey, because of the difficulty respondents may have in remembering details of their job search activity and availability to start a new job for dates up to a year ago. Not employed and not seeking work This definition includes any person in the working age population who is neither employed nor seeking employment: for example, people who are retired, or have personal or family responsibilites; people attending educational institutions; people permanently unable to work due to disabilites; and people not actively seeking work. Liabilities Liabilities are defined as the prinicipal sum of money owed to government or private institutions, or other persons outside the household. It excludes interest on debt owed, as this is viewed as a service fee. Liabilities are collected every second wave, from wave two onwards. The following types of liabilities are collected: mortage debt; bank account debt; student loans; credit card debt; and hire purchase debt. Longitudinal respondent People responding in all waves of the survey are called longitudinal respondents. Those people who have responded in both wave one and wave two of SoFIE are the current longitudinal responding individuals. Median The median is the value at which half of the units in the population have lower values and half have higher values when all values have been ordered from highest to lowest. The median is less sensitive to extreme values than the mean. This makes it a more robust measure of the centre of a distribution for highly skewed distributions. If the mean is higher than the median, it could indicate the distribution is skewed towards the top end of the sample or that the distribution is bimodal (ie it has two 'peaks') Net worth Net worth is calculated by subtracting the total value of all liabilities from the total value of all assets. 15

16 Spell A spell is a period of time (ie a time-spell) reported by a respondent. For example, the period of time a respondent is in paid employment is referred to as an employment 'spell'. Wave In a longitudinal survey, interviews are conducted with the same people repeatedly over time. SoFIE is thus made up of cycles, or 'waves', of interviewing. The wave length (ie the time between each wave) for SoFIE is one year, which means that respondents are interviewed annually. The first time respondents were visited was known as wave one, the second time as wave two, and so on. Quintile Income quintiles divide the population into five groups by ranking people in order by the amount of income they receive. The bottom quintile (quintile 1) is the lowest 20 percent of the population in terms of income, while the top quintile (quintile 5) is the highest 20 percent of the population. Net worth quintiles divide the population into five groups by ranking people in order of their net worth. The bottom quintile (quintile 1) is the lowest 20 percent of the population in terms of net worth, while the top quintile (quintile 5) is the highest 20 percent of the population. Quintile boundary The quintile boundary is the dollar value at which the quintile falls. Given that the bottom quintile for annual personal income is income less than $8,854, the quintile boundary between quintiles 1 and 2 is $8,854. Copyright Information obtained from Statistics NZ may be freely used, reproduced, or quoted unless otherwise specified. In all cases Statistics NZ must be acknowledged as the source. Liability While care has been used in processing, analysing and extracting information, Statistics NZ gives no warranty that the information supplied is free from error. Statistics NZ shall not be liable for any loss suffered through the use, directly or indirectly, of any information, product or service. Timing Timed statistical releases are delivered using postal and electronic services provided by third parties. Delivery of these releases may be delayed by circumstances outside the control of Statistics NZ. Statistics NZ accepts no responsibility for any such delays. 16

17 Next release... Survey of Family, Income and Employment Dynamics (Wave Three): Up to September 2005 will be released in December

18 Tables The following tables can be downloaded from the Statistics New Zealand website in Excel 97 format. If you do not have access to Excel 97 or higher, you may use the Excel file viewer to view, print and export the contents of the file. List of tables 1. Family type for individuals, change between wave one and two 2. Total duration of family-type spells for individuals, over 24 months 3. Household type for individuals, change between wave one and two 4. Personal annual income for individuals, change between wave one and two 5. Weekly employee earnings for individuals,change between wave one and two 6. Labour force involvement status for individuals, change between wave one and two 7. Number of labour force involvement spells for individuals, over 24 months 8. Total duration of labour force involvement spells for individuals, over 24 months 9. Net worth for individuals, by age group and sex 10. Individuals with assets and liabilities, by age group 11. Individuals with assets and liabilities: median dollar value, by age group 12. Individuals with assets and liabilities: dollar value, by age group 18

Family Net Worth in New Zealand

Family Net Worth in New Zealand Reproduction of material Material in this report may be reproduced and published, provided that it does not purport to be published under government authority and that acknowledgement is made of this source.

More information

Quarterly Employment Survey: September 2008 quarter

Quarterly Employment Survey: September 2008 quarter Image description. Hot Off The Press. End of image description. Embargoed until 10:45am 3 November 2008 Quarterly Employment Survey: September 2008 quarter Highlights For the September 2008 year: Full-time

More information

Business Operations Survey

Business Operations Survey Image description. Hot Off The Press. End of image description. Embargoed until 10:45am 27 April 2007 Business Operations Survey 2006 Highlights Ninety-one percent of businesses use the Internet. Seventy-seven

More information

Internet Service Provider Survey September 2005

Internet Service Provider Survey September 2005 Image description. Hot Off The Press. End of image description. Embargoed until 10:45am 29 March 2006 Internet Service Provider Survey September 2005 Highlights At 30 September 2005 There were 66 Internet

More information

Quarterly Employment Survey: September 2011 quarter

Quarterly Employment Survey: September 2011 quarter Quarterly Employment Survey: September 2011 quarter Embargoed until 10:45am 01 November 2011 Key facts This is the first quarter in which the Quarterly Employment Survey has seasonally adjusted employment

More information

Student Loans and Allowances: 2007

Student Loans and Allowances: 2007 Image description. Hot Off The Press. End of image description. Embargoed until 10:45am 18 December 2008 Student Loans and Allowances: 2007 Highlights There were 173,766 borrowers in 2007 (60 percent females

More information

Internet Service Provider Survey March 2005

Internet Service Provider Survey March 2005 Image description. Hot Off The Press. End of image description. Embargoed until 10:45am 26 August 2005 Internet Service Provider Survey March 2005 Highlights For the six months ended 31 March 2005, there

More information

Internet Service Providers Survey: March 2008

Internet Service Providers Survey: March 2008 Image description. Hot Off The Press. End of image description. Embargoed until 10:45am 1 August 2008 Internet Service Providers Survey: March 2008 Highlights In the six months ended 31 March 2008: The

More information

Student Loans and Allowances: 2010

Student Loans and Allowances: 2010 Student Loans and Allowances: 2010 Embargoed until 10:45am 02 December 2011 Key facts In 2010: 212,469 students borrowed from the student loan scheme, an increase of 13,746 students (6.9 percent) compared

More information

Business Practices Survey 2001

Business Practices Survey 2001 Image description. Hot Off The Press. End of image description. Business Practices Survey 2001 Highlights Embargoed until 3:00pm 30 January 2002 Thirty-six percent of New Zealand businesses have a website.

More information

Internet Service Provider Survey: September 2007

Internet Service Provider Survey: September 2007 Image description. Hot Off The Press. End of image description. Embargoed until 10:45am 6 March 2008 Internet Service Provider Survey: September 2007 Highlights In the six months ended 30 September 2007:

More information

Business Operations Survey: 2010

Business Operations Survey: 2010 Operations Survey: 2010 Embargoed until 10:45am 08 April 2011 Highlights Of businesses surveyed in 2010: 51 percent had conducted, or planned to conduct, price reviews due to the GST rise in October 2010,

More information

Student Loans and Allowances: 2012

Student Loans and Allowances: 2012 Student Loans and Allowances: 2012 Embargoed until 10:45am 04 December 2013 Key facts In 2012, compared with 2011: Tertiary enrolments decreased to 421,764 down from 430,392. 201,180 tertiary students

More information

Chapter 3: Property Wealth, Wealth in Great Britain 2010-12

Chapter 3: Property Wealth, Wealth in Great Britain 2010-12 Chapter 3: Property Wealth, Wealth in Great Britain 2010-12 Coverage: GB Date: 15 May 2014 Geographical Area: GB Theme: Economy Key Points Aggregate net property wealth for all private households in Great

More information

Main Report: The Burden of Property Debt in Great Britain, 2006/08 & 2008/10

Main Report: The Burden of Property Debt in Great Britain, 2006/08 & 2008/10 Main Report: The Burden of Property Debt in Great Britain, 2006/08 & 2008/10 Coverage: England and Wales Date: 13 May 2013 Geographical Area: Region Theme: Economy Key Points This release focuses on the

More information

The Burden of Financial and Property Debt, Great Britain, 2010 to 2012

The Burden of Financial and Property Debt, Great Britain, 2010 to 2012 The Burden of Financial and Property Debt, Great Britain, 2010 to 2012 Coverage: GB Date: 27 July 2015 Geographical Area: Region Theme: Economy Theme: People and Places Foreword Using the Wealth and Assets

More information

Labour Cost Index (All Labour Costs): June 2015 quarter

Labour Cost Index (All Labour Costs): June 2015 quarter Labour Cost Index (All Labour Costs): June 2015 quarter Embargoed until 10:45am 21 October 2015 Key facts From the June 2014 quarter to the June 2015 quarter: Labour costs increased 1.5 percent. Non-wage

More information

Household Economic Survey (Income): Year ended June 2014

Household Economic Survey (Income): Year ended June 2014 Household Economic Survey (Income): Year ended June 2014 Embargoed until 10:45am 27 November 2014 Key facts Household income: Between the two years ending 30 June 2012 and 30 June 2014, average annual

More information

Census of International Trade in Services and Royalties: Year ended June 2005

Census of International Trade in Services and Royalties: Year ended June 2005 Embargoed until 10:45 AM - Wednesday, October 26, 2005 Census of International Trade in Services and Royalties: Year ended June 2005 Highlights Major exports of commercial services were: communication,

More information

Innovation in New Zealand: 2011

Innovation in New Zealand: 2011 Innovation in New Zealand: 2011 Crown copyright This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand licence. You are free to copy, distribute, and adapt the work, as long as you

More information

Labour Market Statistics: December 2014 quarter

Labour Market Statistics: December 2014 quarter Labour Market Statistics: December 2014 quarter Embargoed until 10:45am 04 February 2015 Key facts Employment at a glance Unemployment rate rises to 5.7 percent as labour force grows. Employment growth

More information

Abortion Statistics: Year ended December 2012

Abortion Statistics: Year ended December 2012 Abortion Statistics: Year ended December 2012 Embargoed until 10:45am 19 June 2013 Key facts In the year ended December 2012: 14,745 abortions were performed in New Zealand, the lowest number since 1995

More information

New Zealand Energy Statistics December 2005 quarter

New Zealand Energy Statistics December 2005 quarter Image description. Hot Off The Press. End of image description. Embargoed until 10:45am 8 March 2006 New Zealand Energy Statistics December 2005 quarter Highlights In the December 2005 quarter: Hydro and

More information

Electronic Card Transactions: November 2015

Electronic Card Transactions: November 2015 Electronic Card Transactions: November 2015 Embargoed until 10:45am 10 December 2015 Key facts Changes in the seasonally adjusted value of transactions for November 2015 (compared with October 2015) were:

More information

Electronic Card Transactions: January 2014

Electronic Card Transactions: January 2014 Electronic Card Transactions: January 2014 Embargoed until 10:45am 12 February 2014 Key facts Changes in the seasonally adjusted value of transactions (compared with December 2013) were: total electronic

More information

#ReachingMyGoals #StartsToday

#ReachingMyGoals #StartsToday About this report The purpose of this report is to provide you a framework for assessing your financial health and, where relevant, trigger further action on your part. We also include insights and practical

More information

Electronic Card Transactions: January 2016

Electronic Card Transactions: January 2016 Electronic Card Transactions: January 2016 Embargoed until 10:45am 10 February 2016 Key facts Changes in the seasonally adjusted value of transactions for January 2016 (compared with December 2015) were:

More information

Access to meaningful, rewarding and safe employment is available to all.

Access to meaningful, rewarding and safe employment is available to all. Home Previous Reports Links Downloads Contacts The Social Report 2002 te purongo oranga tangata 2002 Introduction Health Knowledge and Skills Safety and Security Paid Work Human Rights Culture and Identity

More information

ON LABOUR AND INCOME. JUNE 2002 Vol. 3, No. 6 HOUSING: AN INCOME ISSUE PENSIONS: IMMIGRANTS AND VISIBLE MINORITIES.

ON LABOUR AND INCOME. JUNE 2002 Vol. 3, No. 6 HOUSING: AN INCOME ISSUE PENSIONS: IMMIGRANTS AND VISIBLE MINORITIES. Catalogue no. 75-001-XIE ON LABOUR AND INCOME JUNE 2002 Vol. 3, No. 6 HOUSING: AN INCOME ISSUE PENSIONS: IMMIGRANTS AND VISIBLE MINORITIES Statistics Canada Statistique Canada Sophie Lefebvre HOUSING IS

More information

Health Status, Health Insurance, and Medical Services Utilization: 2010 Household Economic Studies

Health Status, Health Insurance, and Medical Services Utilization: 2010 Household Economic Studies Health Status, Health Insurance, and Medical Services Utilization: 2010 Household Economic Studies Current Population Reports By Brett O Hara and Kyle Caswell Issued July 2013 P70-133RV INTRODUCTION The

More information

Article: Main results from the Wealth and Assets Survey: July 2012 to June 2014

Article: Main results from the Wealth and Assets Survey: July 2012 to June 2014 Article: Main results from the Wealth and Assets Survey: July 2012 to June 2014 Coverage: GB Date: 18 December 2015 Geographical Area: Region Theme: Economy Main points In July 2012 to June 2014: aggregate

More information

AMERICA'S YOUNG ADULTS AT 27: LABOR MARKET ACTIVITY, EDUCATION, AND HOUSEHOLD COMPOSITION: RESULTS FROM A LONGITUDINAL SURVEY

AMERICA'S YOUNG ADULTS AT 27: LABOR MARKET ACTIVITY, EDUCATION, AND HOUSEHOLD COMPOSITION: RESULTS FROM A LONGITUDINAL SURVEY For release 10:00 a.m. (EDT) Wednesday, March 26, 2014 USDL-14-0491 Technical information: (202) 691-7410 nls_info@bls.gov www.bls.gov/nls Media contact: (202) 691-5902 PressOffice@bls.gov AMERICA'S YOUNG

More information

Contents... 2. Executive Summary... 5. Key Findings... 5. Use of Credit... 5. Debt and savings... 6. Financial difficulty... 7. Background...

Contents... 2. Executive Summary... 5. Key Findings... 5. Use of Credit... 5. Debt and savings... 6. Financial difficulty... 7. Background... CREDIT, DEBT AND FINANCIAL DIFFICULTY IN BRITAIN, A report using data from the YouGov DebtTrack survey JUNE 2013 Contents Contents... 2 Executive Summary... 5 Key Findings... 5 Use of Credit... 5 Debt

More information

CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE CBO. The Distribution of Household Income and Federal Taxes, 2008 and 2009

CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE CBO. The Distribution of Household Income and Federal Taxes, 2008 and 2009 CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE Percent 70 The Distribution of Household Income and Federal Taxes, 2008 and 2009 60 50 Before-Tax Income Federal Taxes Top 1 Percent 40 30 20 81st

More information

The Pensioners Incomes Series

The Pensioners Incomes Series The Pensioners Incomes Series United Kingdom, 2012/13 July 2014 Contents List of tables... iii List of figures... v Chapter 1: Introduction and Summary of Main Results... 1 Definitions and conventions

More information

Employment-Based Health Insurance: 2010

Employment-Based Health Insurance: 2010 Employment-Based Health Insurance: 2010 Household Economic Studies Hubert Janicki Issued February 2013 P70-134 INTRODUCTION More than half of the U.S. population (55.1 percent) had employment-based health

More information

Nukunonu atoll profile: 2011 Tokelau Census of Population and Dwellings

Nukunonu atoll profile: 2011 Tokelau Census of Population and Dwellings Nukunonu atoll profile: 2011 Tokelau Census of Population and Dwellings Crown copyright This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand licence. You are free to copy, distribute,

More information

Adult Physical Activity

Adult Physical Activity NOO data factsheet Adult Physical Activity November 2012 Key points According to the Health Survey for England (self-reported data), 39% of men and 29% of women met the government s physical activity recommendations

More information

Impact of the recession

Impact of the recession Regional Trends 43 21/11 Impact of the recession By Cecilia Campos, Alistair Dent, Robert Fry and Alice Reid, Office for National Statistics Abstract This report looks at the impact that the most recent

More information

Household Debt in the U.S.: 2000 to 2011

Household Debt in the U.S.: 2000 to 2011 Household Debt in the U.S.: 2000 to 2011 By Marina Vornovytskyy, Alfred Gottschalck, and Adam Smith Debt is an important financial tool used by U.S. households to finance their purchases. Households often

More information

Wholesale Trade Survey: December 2014 quarter

Wholesale Trade Survey: December 2014 quarter Wholesale Trade Survey: December 2014 quarter Embargoed until 10:45am 06 March 2015 Key facts For the December 2014 quarter, compared with the September 2014 quarter (on a seasonally adjusted basis): Total

More information

Business Operations Survey: 2014

Business Operations Survey: 2014 Business Operations Survey: 2014 Embargoed until 10:45am 20 March 2015 Key facts In 2014: Almost one-quarter of businesses used a fibre-optic Internet connection. 84 percent of businesses provided training

More information

New Zealand Energy Statistics: September 2007 quarter Revised 14 January 2008 See attached Erratum

New Zealand Energy Statistics: September 2007 quarter Revised 14 January 2008 See attached Erratum Image description. Hot Off The Press. End of image description. Embargoed until 3:00pm 14 January 2008 New Zealand Energy Statistics: September 2007 quarter Revised 14 January 2008 See attached Erratum

More information

Household Trends in U.S. Life Insurance Ownership

Household Trends in U.S. Life Insurance Ownership Household Trends in U.S. Life Insurance Ownership Full Report Cheryl D. Retzloff, LLIF, ACS Markets Research 860-285-7738 cretzloff@limra.com Maximize the Value of LIMRA Research The value of LIMRA research

More information

4 Distribution of Income, Earnings and Wealth

4 Distribution of Income, Earnings and Wealth 4 Distribution of Income, Earnings and Wealth Indicator 4.1 Indicator 4.2a Indicator 4.2b Indicator 4.3a Indicator 4.3b Indicator 4.4 Indicator 4.5a Indicator 4.5b Indicator 4.6 Indicator 4.7 Income per

More information

For Immediate Release

For Immediate Release Household Income Trends May 2015 Issued July 2015 Gordon Green and John Coder Sentier Research, LLC For Immediate Release 1 Household Income Trends May 2015 Note This report on median household income

More information

Household Income Trends July 2016. Issued September 2016. Gordon Green and John Coder Sentier Research, LLC

Household Income Trends July 2016. Issued September 2016. Gordon Green and John Coder Sentier Research, LLC Household Income Trends July 2016 Issued September 2016 Gordon Green and John Coder Sentier Research, LLC 1 Household Income Trends July 2016 Source This report on median household income for July 2016

More information

Household Energy Expenditure: Measures es off Hardship & Changes in Income

Household Energy Expenditure: Measures es off Hardship & Changes in Income : Measures es off Hardship & Changes in Income By Professor or Sue Richardson Associate Professor or Peter Travers The National Institute of Labour Studies February, 2004 4 Table of Contents HOUSEHOLD

More information

Distribution of Household Wealth in the U.S.: 2000 to 2011

Distribution of Household Wealth in the U.S.: 2000 to 2011 Distribution of Household Wealth in the U.S.: By Marina Vornovitsky, Alfred Gottschalck, and Adam Smith Household net worth, or wealth, is an important indicar of economic well-being in the United States.

More information

Client Needs Analysis

Client Needs Analysis Date: YOUR DETAILS: Client Needs Analysis Full name (Client 1): Full name (Client 2): If Company and/or Trust: Company/Trust name: ABN/ACN: Registered address: Business address (if different from above):

More information

QuickStats About Auckland Region

QuickStats About Auckland Region QuickStats About Population/ Dwellings Number of people counted Total population 1,303,068 people usually live in. This is an increase of 144,177 people, or 12.4 percent, since the 2001 Census. Its population

More information

Danny R. Childers and Howard Hogan, Bureau of the,census

Danny R. Childers and Howard Hogan, Bureau of the,census MATCHING IRS RECORDS TO CENSUS RECORDS: SOME PROBLEMS AND RESULTS Danny R. Childers and Howard Hogan, Bureau of the,census A. INTRODUCTION This project has two principal aims: to investigate the feasibility

More information

Equity release consumers: who are they and why do they use the products?

Equity release consumers: who are they and why do they use the products? Briefings No 02 May 2013 Work Stream 3: Equity release consumers BRIEFINGS Equity release consumers: who are they and why do they use the products? Equity release products have been available in the UK

More information

Chapter 5: Financial Wealth, Wealth in Great Britain 2010-12

Chapter 5: Financial Wealth, Wealth in Great Britain 2010-12 Chapter 5: Financial Wealth, Wealth in Great Britain 201012 Coverage: GB Date: 15 May 2014 Geographical Area: Region Theme: Economy Key points Aggregate net financial wealth for all private households

More information

Special Needs Grant International Custody Dispute Payment

Special Needs Grant International Custody Dispute Payment Special Needs Grant International Custody Dispute Payment CLIENT NUMBER If you need help with this form call us on % 0800 559 009. Who can get this payment If you need help filling in this form, please

More information

New Zealanders aged 50 years plus. Expectations for and experiences of retirement

New Zealanders aged 50 years plus. Expectations for and experiences of retirement New Zealanders aged 50 years plus 2015 Expectations for and experiences of retirement 1 Table of contents Introduction and methodology 3 Sample profiles 4 Summary 5 Retirement reality and expectations

More information

Funeral Grant application

Funeral Grant application Funeral Grant application A Funeral Grant may help with some of the funeral costs for a person who has died. Funeral Grants are asset and income tested. Other conditions also apply. For more information:

More information

Construction of variables from CE

Construction of variables from CE Online Appendix for Has Consumption Inequality Mirrored Income Inequality? by Mark Aguiar and Mark Bils In this appendix we describe construction of the variables in our data set and the impact of sample

More information

Household Finance and Consumption Survey

Household Finance and Consumption Survey An Phríomh-Oifig Staidrimh Central Statistics Office Household Finance and Consumption Survey 2013 Published by the Stationery Office, Dublin, Ireland. Available from: Central Statistics Office, Information

More information

For the 10-year aggregate period 2003 12, domestic violence

For the 10-year aggregate period 2003 12, domestic violence U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs Bureau of Justice Statistics Special Report APRIL 2014 NCJ 244697 Nonfatal Domestic Violence, 2003 2012 Jennifer L. Truman, Ph.D., and Rachel E. Morgan,

More information

Product Options Summary

Product Options Summary Product Options Summary A summary of the options available on your National Mutual Life Association policy or plan. This document is for your reference only. No action is required. Product Options Summary

More information

Key Findings ASIC Report 419. Australian Financial Attitudes and Behaviour Tracker Wave 1: March August 2014

Key Findings ASIC Report 419. Australian Financial Attitudes and Behaviour Tracker Wave 1: March August 2014 ASIC Report 419 Wave 1: March August 2014 Australian Securities and Investments Commission December 2014 Contents INTRODUCTION 3 KEY FINDINGS 9 Financial attitudes 10 Keeping track of finances 11 Planning

More information

Patterns of Pay: Estimates from the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings, UK, 1997 to 2013

Patterns of Pay: Estimates from the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings, UK, 1997 to 2013 Patterns of Pay: Estimates from the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings, UK, 1997 to 2013 Author Name(s): David Bovill, Office for National Statistics Abstract Patterns of Pay describes trends in UK earnings.

More information

ICI RESEARCH PERSPECTIVE

ICI RESEARCH PERSPECTIVE ICI RESEARCH PERSPECTIVE 0 H STREET, NW, SUITE 00 WASHINGTON, DC 000 0-6-800 WWW.ICI.ORG OCTOBER 0 VOL. 0, NO. 7 WHAT S INSIDE Introduction Decline in the Share of Workers Covered by Private-Sector DB

More information

Approximately 16.6 million persons or 7%

Approximately 16.6 million persons or 7% U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs Bureau of Justice Statistics December 2013, NCJ 243779 Victims of Identity Theft, 2012 Erika Harrell, Ph.D. and Lynn Langton, Ph.D., BJS Statisticians

More information

SOCIETY OF ACTUARIES THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ACTUARIES RETIREMENT PLAN PREFERENCES SURVEY REPORT OF FINDINGS. January 2004

SOCIETY OF ACTUARIES THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ACTUARIES RETIREMENT PLAN PREFERENCES SURVEY REPORT OF FINDINGS. January 2004 SOCIETY OF ACTUARIES THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ACTUARIES RETIREMENT PLAN PREFERENCES SURVEY REPORT OF FINDINGS January 2004 Mathew Greenwald & Associates, Inc. TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION... 1 SETTING

More information

KEY GUIDE. Financial protection for you and your family

KEY GUIDE. Financial protection for you and your family KEY GUIDE Financial protection for you and your family Protecting what matters most Life and health insurance protection underpins most good financial planning. These types of insurance can ensure that

More information

Client Needs Analysis

Client Needs Analysis YOUR DETAILS: Full name (Client 1): Date: Client Needs Analysis / / Full name (Client 2): If company and/or Trust: Company/Trust name: ABN/ACN Registered address: Business address (If different from above)

More information

An estimated 17.6 million persons, or 7% of all

An estimated 17.6 million persons, or 7% of all U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs Bureau of Justice Statistics September 2015, NCJ 248991 Victims of Identity Theft, 2014 Erika Harrell, Ph.D., BJS Statistician An estimated 17.6 million

More information

Home Computers and Internet Use in the United States: August 2000

Home Computers and Internet Use in the United States: August 2000 Home Computers and Internet Use in the United States: August 2000 Special Studies Issued September 2001 P23-207 Defining computer and Internet access All individuals living in a household in which the

More information

Client Needs Analysis

Client Needs Analysis Date: YOUR DETAILS: Client Needs Analysis Full name (Client 1): Full name (Client 2): If Company and/or Trust: Company/Trust name: ABN/ACN: Registered address: Business address (if different from above):

More information

2012 Protection Gap Study - Singapore

2012 Protection Gap Study - Singapore Life Insurance Association Singapore 2012 Protection Gap Study - Singapore End of 2011 Protection Gap 28 August 2012 Life Insurance Association Singapore i Table of Contents Section 1 : Executive Summary...1

More information

USUAL WEEKLY EARNINGS OF WAGE AND SALARY WORKERS FIRST QUARTER 2015

USUAL WEEKLY EARNINGS OF WAGE AND SALARY WORKERS FIRST QUARTER 2015 For release 10:00 a.m. (EDT) Tuesday, April 21, USDL-15-0688 Technical information: (202) 691-6378 cpsinfo@bls.gov www.bls.gov/cps Media contact: (202) 691-5902 PressOffice@bls.gov USUAL WEEKLY EARNINGS

More information

Statistical Bulletin. Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings, 2014 Provisional Results. Key points

Statistical Bulletin. Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings, 2014 Provisional Results. Key points Statistical Bulletin Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings, 2014 Provisional Results Coverage: UK Date: 19 November 2014 Geographical Areas: Country, European (NUTS), Local Authority and County, Parliamentary

More information

How to calculate your taxable profits

How to calculate your taxable profits Helpsheet 222 Tax year 6 April 2013 to 5 April 2014 How to calculate your taxable profits A Contacts Please phone: the number printed on page TR 1 of your tax return the SA Helpline on 0300 200 3310 the

More information

Product Options Guide

Product Options Guide Product Options Guide A comprehensive guide to the options available on National Mutual Life Association (NMLA) Whole of Life, Endowment, Pure Endowment, Goldline, Flexipol and Link-Save policies and plans.

More information

Economic impacts of expanding the National Insurance Contributions holiday scheme Federation of Small Businesses policy paper

Economic impacts of expanding the National Insurance Contributions holiday scheme Federation of Small Businesses policy paper Economic impacts of expanding the National Insurance Contributions holiday scheme Federation of Small Businesses policy paper Overview This research paper sets out estimates for the economic and employment

More information

THE CAYMAN ISLANDS LABOUR FORCE SURVEY REPORT SPRING 2015

THE CAYMAN ISLANDS LABOUR FORCE SURVEY REPORT SPRING 2015 THE CAYMAN ISLANDS LABOUR FORCE SURVEY REPORT SPRING 2015 Published September 2015 Economics and Statistics Office i CONTENTS SUMMARY TABLE 1. KEY LABOUR FORCE INDICATORS BY STATUS... 1 SUMMARY TABLE 2.

More information

Saving with SSRSS and KiwiSaver

Saving with SSRSS and KiwiSaver Saving with SSRSS and This information is based on legislation current at 1 April 2013. Save with SSRSS Effective 1 October 2008 the SSRSS stopped accepting applications for membership. The SSRSS schemes

More information

Dynamics of Economic Well-Being: Poverty, 2009 2011

Dynamics of Economic Well-Being: Poverty, 2009 2011 Dynamics of Economic Well-Being: Poverty, 009 0 Household Economic Studies By Ashley N. Edwards Issued January 04 P70-37 INTRODUCTION This report presents data on poverty based on information collected

More information

Life and protection insurance explained

Life and protection insurance explained protection? Life and protection explained A guide to personal and family protection This guide explains the types of life and protection available and how they can offer you valuable peace of mind. If

More information

Every Mäori Counts. Ko Te Tatau i a Ngäi Mäori

Every Mäori Counts. Ko Te Tatau i a Ngäi Mäori TE IRA TANGATA L I F E Q U A L I T Y PÄRONGO F A C T S H E E T : 0 2 1 2 0 1 2 Ko Te Tatau i a Ngäi Every Counts Why do leave New Zealand and move to another country to live? Which countries do they settle

More information

MEASURING INCOME DYNAMICS: The Experience of Canada s Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics

MEASURING INCOME DYNAMICS: The Experience of Canada s Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics CANADA CANADA 2 MEASURING INCOME DYNAMICS: The Experience of Canada s Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics by Maryanne Webber Statistics Canada Canada for presentation at Seminar on Poverty Statistics

More information

The Lifewise / NATSEM Underinsurance Report

The Lifewise / NATSEM Underinsurance Report The Lifewise / NATSEM Underinsurance Report Understanding the social and economic cost of underinsurance Research Report PREPARED BY Dr Simon Kelly and Dr Vu Quoc Ngu PREPARED FOR Lifewise, an initiative

More information

KEY GUIDE. Investing for income when you retire

KEY GUIDE. Investing for income when you retire KEY GUIDE Investing for income when you retire Planning the longest holiday of your life There comes a time when you stop working for your money and put your money to work for you. For most people, that

More information

Negative Equity and House Price Risk in Australia

Negative Equity and House Price Risk in Australia Negative Equity and House Price Risk in Australia Wood, G. & Parkinson, S. February 5 th 2009 Gavin Wood & Sharon Parkinson AHURI RMIT Research Centre Bldg 15 Level 4, GPO Box 2476V, Melbourne, Vic 3001

More information

Includes Tips & Tricks that could save you substantial $$$ and help make sure your claims get paid.

Includes Tips & Tricks that could save you substantial $$$ and help make sure your claims get paid. Includes Tips & Tricks that could save you substantial $$$ and help make sure your claims get paid. WHAT IS INSURANCE? It s simply the transference of a risk from yourself to the Insurer. By paying the

More information

Survey of NZers aged 50 years and over. KiwiSaver in Money Week 2015. Expectations for and experiences of retirement

Survey of NZers aged 50 years and over. KiwiSaver in Money Week 2015. Expectations for and experiences of retirement Survey of NZers aged 50 years and over KiwiSaver in Money Week 2015 Expectations for and experiences of retirement 1 Introduction and methodology This survey looks at older New Zealanders expectations

More information

4. Work and retirement

4. Work and retirement 4. Work and retirement James Banks Institute for Fiscal Studies and University College London María Casanova Institute for Fiscal Studies and University College London Amongst other things, the analysis

More information

Producers Price Index: September 2010 quarter

Producers Price Index: September 2010 quarter Embargoed until 10:45am 18 November 2010 Producers Price Index: September 2010 quarter Highlights The producers price index (PPI) outputs index rose 1.2 percent. Output prices for livestock and cropping

More information

Statistical Bulletin. The Effects of Taxes and Benefits on Household Income, 2011/12. Key points

Statistical Bulletin. The Effects of Taxes and Benefits on Household Income, 2011/12. Key points Statistical Bulletin The Effects of Taxes and Benefits on Household Income, 2011/12 Coverage: UK Date: 10 July 2013 Geographical Area: UK and GB Theme: Economy Theme: People and Places Key points There

More information

Personal Questionnaire

Personal Questionnaire Reference number R TS/98/02 Person number Participation code Time Use Survey Personal Questionnaire In confidence............ Showcard 1 1. Which ethnic group, or groups, do you belong to? Interviewer:

More information

The path to retirement success

The path to retirement success The path to retirement success How important are your investment and spending strategies? In this VIEW, Towers Watson Australia managing director ANDREW BOAL reports on investing for retirement success

More information

REGISTERED NURSE: OCCUPATIONAL SKILL SHORTAGE ASSESSMENT

REGISTERED NURSE: OCCUPATIONAL SKILL SHORTAGE ASSESSMENT NOVEMBER 2005 REGISTERED NURSE: OCCUPATIONAL SKILL SHORTAGE ASSESSMENT Current Situation: Recruitment and retention difficulties Short-term Outlook: Recruitment and retention difficulties (improving) 1

More information

Personal debt ON LABOUR AND INCOME

Personal debt ON LABOUR AND INCOME ON LABOUR AND INCOME Personal debt Although the economy and population are almost times the size of s, the two countries show several similarities. Both have relatively high per-capita income and living

More information

On average, young retirees are not

On average, young retirees are not How Financially Secure Are Young Retirees and Older Workers? FIGURE 1 Financial Status of People Age 51 to 59, by Work Status THOUSS OF DOLLARS 14 1 8 6 $82 RETIREES WORKERS $99 4 $41 $24 MEDIAN MEDIAN

More information

Community Services Card Application

Community Services Card Application Community Services Card Application Who can get a Community Services Card? Mehemea he patai ou waea mai ki. Me e uianga taau e ringi mai ia matou, numero. Mo so o sau fesili, telefoni mai. If you have

More information

New Estimates Of Personal Taxes In Consumer Expenditure Survey

New Estimates Of Personal Taxes In Consumer Expenditure Survey APRIL 2015 New Estimates Of Personal Taxes In Consumer Expenditure Survey Aaron E. Cobet The Consumer Expenditure Survey provides information on the buying habits of American consumers, their income, and

More information

Q&A on tax relief for individuals & families

Q&A on tax relief for individuals & families Q&A on tax relief for individuals & families A. Tax cuts individuals What are the new tax rates? The table below shows the new tax rates being rolled out from 1 October 2008, 1 April 2010 and 1 April 2011,

More information