Business Unit/Area: N/A. Protocol No.: COR-3S10-PR

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1 Page 1 Overview Purpose This Devon Energy Protocol establishes minimum safe work practices and electrical safety management requirements. Employees must comply with this protocol as well as all applicable local, state and federal regulations. Scope This protocol applies to all Devon operated equipment, facilities and all Devon employees. Contractors will have their own document that meets or exceeds Devon s. Table of Contents 1.0 RESPONSIBILITIES TERMS AND DEFINITIONS Electrical Safety Terms and Definitions General Terms and Definitions PROTOCOL Electrical Safety Requirements Portable Powered Hand Tools Extension Cords Overcurrent Protection and Circuit Breaker Safety Pull and Junction Box Requirements Bonding and Grounding Portable Generator Safety Work Clearances for Overhead High Voltage Power Lines Portable Powered Risk Assessment al Precautions and Procedures Contractor Participation Equipment Labeling Electrical Area Classification Requirements Housekeeping and Cleaning Electrical Review Procurement and Design RECORDKEEPING TRAINING REQUIREMENTS REFERENCES Appendix A Shock Risk Assessment Appendix B Approach Boundary Table Appendix C HRC Rated Clothing and Other PPE Appendix D PPE Inspection and Frequency Appendix E Electrical Glove Pre-Use Inspection Process Appendix F Electrical Safety Labeling Examples Attachment A Approval, Review, and Modification history Attachment B Physical Barrier Example for Electrical Lines (Goal Post) Attachment C Arc Flash Request Form Attachment D Electrical Safety Permit Attachment E Electrical Safety Analysis (ESA) Form Attachment F Electrical Safety Audit Form... 47

2 Page RESPONSIBILITIES Division/ Unit Leadership Reinforce adherence to this protocol and provide resources for application of the protocol. Ensure employees responsible for electrical duties receive required training. Line Know how this protocol applies to personnel in their area of responsibility. Ensure employees have training, skills, knowledge and understanding to comply with this protocol. Check periodically to ensure the requirements of this protocol are being met. Environmental, Health and Safety Monitor compliance through the audit process. Provide technical resources and tools for protocol application. Devon Employees Adhere to the requirements of this protocol. Identify and report gaps in this protocol. Complete required training. Contract Company Representative Comply with regulatory requirements and follow the Devon EHS protocol. 2.0 TERMS AND DEFINITIONS 2.1 Electrical Safety Terms and Definitions: Approved any equipment, procedures, or PPE that meets or exceeds recognized industry standards. Arc Flash Risk Assessment A study investigating a worker s potential exposure to arc flash energy, conducted for the purpose of injury prevention and the determination of safe work practices, arc flash boundary, and the appropriate levels of personal protective equipment. Arc Rating the maximum energy resistance demonstrated by a material (or layered system of materials) prior to breaking open or at the onset of a second-degree skin burn. Arc rating is normally expressed in cal/cm2. Barricade a physical obstruction that is intended to prevent contact with equipment, live parts, or to prevent unauthorized access to a work area. Bonding or Bonded the permanent joining of metallic parts to form an electrically conductive path that ensures electrical continuity and the capacity to conduct safely any current likely to be imposed. The permanent joining can be accomplished by the normal devices to fasten clean, non-corroded parts together. Machine screws, bolts, brackets, or retainers necessary to allow equipment to function properly. Boundary, Limited Approach - An approach limit at a distance from an exposed energized electrical conductor or circuit part within which a shock hazard exists. Boundary, Restricted Approach - An approach limit at a distance from an exposed energized electrical conductor or circuit part within which there is an increased likelihood of electric shock. Circuit Breaker (CB) a device designed to open and close a circuit by non-automatic means and to open the circuit automatically on a predetermined over-current without damage to itself when properly applied within its range.

3 Page 3 Class I area an area where flammable gases or vapors are, or may be, present in the air in quantities sufficient to produce explosive or ignitable mixtures. Class I, Division 1 area A location in which ignitable concentrations of flammable gases or vapors are expected to exist under normal operating conditions or where faulty operation of equipment or processes might simultaneously release flammable gases or vapors and also cause failure of electrical equipment. Class I, Division 2 area An area in which flammable gases or vapors may be present, but normally are confined within closed systems: are prevented from accumulating by adequate ventilation, or the location is adjacent to a Division 1 location form which ignitable concentrations might occasionally be communicated. Class II area an area that is hazardous because of the presence of combustible dust. Class III area an area that is hazardous because of the presence of ignitable fibers. Conductive capable of carrying electric current. De-energized free from any electrical connection to a source of potential difference and from electrical charge, not having a potential different from that of the earth. Double Insulated an electric tool with insulated internal wiring and an insulated outer casing. Electrical Hazard a dangerous condition in which contact or equipment failure can result in electric shock, arc flash burn, thermal burn, or blast. Electrically Safe Work Condition a state in which an electrical conductor or circuit part has been disconnected from energized parts, locked/tagged in accordance with established standards, tested to ensure the absence of voltage and grounded if determined necessary. Enclosed surrounded by a case, housing, fence, or wall(s) that prevents persons from accidentally contacting energized parts. Energized electrically connected to or having a source of voltage. Energized Equipment or Parts a voltage is present in equipment or parts that can cause a current, so there is a possibility of electrical shock. Other safety related work practices shall be used to protect personnel who may be exposed to the electrical hazards involved. Explosion-Proof Equipment a piece of electrical equipment (conduit, junction box, motor, etc.) enclosed in a case that is capable of withstanding an explosion of a specified gas or vapor which may occur within it and preventing the ignition of a specified gas or vapor surrounding the enclosure by sparks, flashes or explosion of the gas or vapor within which operates at such an external temperature that it will not ignite a surrounding flammable atmosphere. Fault a defect or electrical breakdown of any component, spacing, or insulation that causes excessive current to flow and possible equipment failure. Flame-Resistant (FR) the property of a material whereby combustion is prevented, terminated, or inhibited following the application of a flaming or non-flaming source of ignition, with or without subsequent removal of the ignition source. Flash Hazard - a dangerous condition associated with the release of energy caused by an electric arc. Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) a device whose function is to interrupt the electric circuit (breaker, receptacle, or portable cord set) to the load when a fault current to ground exceeds some predetermined value that is less than that required to operate the overcurrent protective device of the supply circuit. Grounded Connected (connecting) to ground or to a conductive body that extends the ground connection.

4 Page 4 Intrinsically Safe Equipment - a safe piece of equipment and associated wiring by design of its physical and electrical characteristics, which will not produce an arc or spark with sufficient energy, or develop sufficient temperatures, to allow ignition of a specified gas or vapor. Isolation a disconnection and separation of electrical equipment from all source(s) of supply in a way that the disconnection and separation is complete and secure. Ohm - The unit of measure for electrical resistance or impedance, one ohm equals one volt per one ampere. Qualified a person who has been trained to avoid electrical hazards when working on or near exposed energized parts. This classification of qualified personnel are responsible for developing and implementing safe electrical work procedures, preparing energized electrical work permits, approving energized electrical work permits, approving the selection and use of Electrical Safety Work equipment and clothing, and verifying electrical safety equipment chosen for specific tasks is adequate for the abatement of the live electrical hazard. Raceway - is an enclosed conduit that forms a physical pathway for electrical wiring. Service - a conductor and equipment for delivering energy for the electricity supply system to wiring system of the premised served. Shock Risk Assessment - Shock hazard analysis shall determine the voltage to which personnel will be exposed, boundary requirements, and the PPE necessary to minimize the possibility of electric shock to personnel. Underwriters Laboratory/Underwriters Laboratory of Canada (UL/ULC) - An organization that is a global independent safety science company that certifies, validates, tests, inspects, audits, and advises governmental agencies on creating standards. Unqualified a person who has little or no training regarding electrical hazards and may not be exposed to energized parts. The Unqualified must be familiar with any electrical related safety practice that is necessary for their safety. Voltage, High voltage as 600 v. and greater Voltage, Low - Circuits with a nominal voltage of less than or equal to 50 volts, in which this program does not apply. Voltage, Nominal - A nominal value assigned to a circuit or system for the purpose of conveniently designating its voltage class (e.g., 120/240 volts, 480/277 volts, 600 volts). The actual voltage that a circuit operates can vary from the nominal within a range that permits satisfactory operation of equipment. 2.2 General Terms and Definitions Appropriate Leader the level of management necessary to approve documents, changes to documents and deviation for a given Division and/or Functional Group. Approval Date date when a document has been finalized and approved by EHS VP or appropriate leader via electronic signature on Attachment A. Area individual operating fields or components that collectively comprise a Region, Areas normally include an area office. Area Office a field office with assigned employees that support an area. (e.g., Bridgeport, Riverton, etc.). Unit individual components that collectively comprise a Division. Units may also be referred to as Basins. Contract Company Representative a contractor who is assigned responsibilities and oversight for a specific task that requires adherence to Devon EHS Procedures. Division the division operations of Devon are Canada,, Marketing & Midstream and U.S. Field EHS a titled position that provides EHS guidance and support within a Division.

5 Page 5 Enterprise Classification Structure part of Devon s strategic plan for managing information assets. The ECS is the published list of all records classes, the period of time for retaining each and their designated disposition. Facility a collection of structures, piping, valves, vessels, tanks, compression, and processing equipment located in close geographic proximity, that are involved directly in the development, production, processing or delivery of oil and gas to market (e.g., a tank battery, drill site, well-site, compressor station, pipeline, and gas plant). Facilities/Pipeline an organization within Devon responsible managing projects (e.g., capital projects, renovation, expansion, etc.). This includes managing the energy distribution portion of the electrical installation and completion of arc flash studies. Line a titled position that has assigned authority and responsibility for financials, production, maintenance, projects and personnel for a defined area. In Devon, this could be any, Superintendent, Foreman or Assistant Foreman. In Charge (PIC) a person that has been authorized by Devon to perform specific tasks to comply with Devon EHS Protocols and/or regulatory requirements related to EHS. The PIC is defined in all procedures in the second column of the protocol section. Region / District individual components that collectively comprise a Division. Standard an Environmental Health (EHS) and Safety Managements System document that defines what information corporate and division EHS procedures must include for compliance with applicable regulation. 3.0 PROTOCOL 3.1 Electrical Safety Requirements Step In Charge (PIC) Action Line Assign only Qualified (s) to work on or near exposed energized parts of electrical equipment that operate at voltage of 50 volts or more to ground Line Lock buildings, rooms and enclosures that contain equipment of 600 volts or greater Employee Report all electrical hazards to the PIC Employee Ensure all portable ladders used in electrical service will have non-conductive side rails (e.g., fiberglass) and non-slip feet. No metal ladders will be used around electrical equipment Employee Do not render interlocks inoperative by removal, modification or destruction, except by a Qualified during repair or maintenance Employee Avoid contact with electrical power lines, including downed power lines Employee Avoid being near switch boxes, pumping units, electric motors or other electrically operated equipment during an electrical storm Employee Never use water on an electrical equipment fires. When possible, electrical equipment must be de-energized before fighting a fire Employee Never work on energized equipment in standing water without additional precautions Employee Stand to the side, use an open hand and turn head away when operating or closing a disconnect switch Employee Ensure adequate lighting is provided for all electrical work. nel shall not reach blindly into areas which may contain energized parts, or where an obstruction precludes observation of the work to be performed.

6 Page Portable Electric Tools and Equipment Step In Charge (PIC) Action Employee Use portable electric tools with a GFCI when working in: Wet or damp locations Confined space work Employee Follow the Devon Hot Work Protocol when using portable electric tools on tanks, lines, vessels, in compressor stations or other areas where flammable gases and vapors may be present, or within an electrically classified area Employee Use portable electric tools and equipment that are Underwriter Laboratory (UL)/ Underwriters Laboratories Canadian (ULC) listed, double insulated or grounded through a third wire Employee Visually inspect all electric tools and equipment before each use for external defects and evidence if possible internal damage (deterioration or inadequate insulation, defective cords, etc.) Employee Remove from service and tag damaged electric tools and equipment until repaired or replaced. Note: Taped splices in electric cords are not considered properly repaired and must be removed Employee Disconnect the power supply source before performing any repairs or maintenance on the equipment Employee Handle all portable electric tools and equipment in a manner that does not cause harm to personnel or damage the equipment. Do not carry energized equipment with fingers placed on the trigger. Do not raise or lower by the power cord Employee Follow the requirements listed below when connecting attachment plugs: 3.3 Extension Cords Step In Charge (PIC) Ensure hands are dry when plugging and unplugging portable equipment. Handle energized plug and receptacle connections with insulating protective equipment if the condition of the connection could provide a conducting path to the worker s hand (for example, a cord connector is wet from being immersed in water). Action Employee Use extension cords to provide temporary power only. Surge protectors and power strips are NOT considered extension cords and may not be connected in series or used in place of extension cords Employee Use extension cords that are Underwriters Laboratory/Underwriters Laboratory of Canada (UL/ULC) approved and suitable for conditions of use and location Employee Inspect visually before use for external defects and evidence of possible internal damage. Remove from service if there is evidence of damage to the cord, until the cord is repaired and tested Employee Do not use extension cords for raising or lowering equipment Employee Do not fasten extension cords with staples or hang in a manner that could damage the outer jacket/insulation.

7 Page Employee Protect cords from damage (e.g., rubber covers, tape, etc.) when in use where cords can be pinched or severed Employee Temporary electrical cords will not be used as permanent installations Employee Do not remove the ground plug or alter extension cords. Removing the ground grounding prong prevents proper grounding with the circuit Employee Cover extension cords by a cord protector or taped to the floor when they extend into a walkway Employee Reeling, coiling or otherwise gathering of extension cords while energized is not allowed. 3.4 Overcurrent Protective Devices Step In Charge (PIC) Action Employee Do not reset tripped breakers more than once per day when trained as an unqualified employee. A qualified electrician must be contacted to investigate the origin of the overcurrent if the problem continues Qualified Qualified Fuse and Circuit Breaker Safety Step In Charge (PIC) Qualified Determine what caused the breaker to trip, which includes examining the equipment, before re-energizing the circuit by examining both the equipment and the circuit before making any appropriate repairs. Examine the connected equipment if the operation of the device was the cause of the fault condition. Action Provide overload protection (fuses or circuit breakers) to protect the circuit s maximum current carrying capacity (e.g., a 30 amp fuse must not be used on a 20 amp circuit) Qualified Use insulated fuse puller rated for the voltage to remove or install fuses. Note: Fuses equal to or greater than 50 volts will be changed by qualified personnel Employee Communicate feeder and branch circuit breaker trips to the line supervisor. 3.5 Pull and Junction Box Safety Requirements Step In Charge (PIC) Line / Employee Qualified Qualified Action Design and maintain the area around electric panels so personnel are not required to stand in water while operating switches. Mark equipment and circuit disconnects legibly to indicate the equipment or circuit to which it applies. Additionally, ON and OFF shall be clearly distinguishable. Ensure that electrical box covers and bolts have been replaced and tightened upon completion of work.

8 Page Bonding and Grounding Line Line Verify proper bonding and grounding for equipment, raceways, cable trays, and enclosures are maintained to ensure electrical continuity. Note: The grounding rod to stationary equipment will ensure that 25 ohms of resistance or less is achieved. Ensure all stranded metal and metal equipment on location is bonded together and grounded to a single continuous system unless otherwise specified Line Ensure bonding clamps will be UL/ULC approved Line Verify all metal objects on fiberglass tanks are bonded together. The fiberglass tank will be grounded or bonded to the adjacent steel tank Line Ensure an in-tank static drain to each fiberglass tank likely to contain a flammable mixture to bleed off static charge. Bonding and Grounding of Portable Tanks, Trucks, etc Line Ensure bonding cable is attached prior to loading tank truck with flammable material Line All metal and nonconductive containers (e.g., barrels, totes, cans, etc.) will be bonded to the filling system when filled with flammable material Line Ground all portable frac tanks prior to filling with flammable material. 3.7 Portable Generator Grounding Step In Charge (PIC) Qualified Action Install grounding rods to portable generators. Note: Portable generators on vehicles need not be grounded. Light plants or generators with only generator mounted equipment (e.g. lights) and / or plug/cord connected devices (such as tools) also do not need to be grounded. 3.8 Work and Travel Clearances for Overhead High Voltage Power Lines Step In Charge (PIC) Line Line Action Locate, identify, and communicate existing overhead electrical hazards during pretask tailgate safety meetings. While in transit, maintain a minimum 4 foot clearance with vehicles, equipment and loads of material traveling under power lines. Specific to drilling, complete a route survey and detailed route assessment. Assessment should identify obstructions and hazards to normal and oversized loads, such as overhead power lines, bridges, overpasses and cattle guards for each route (see Devon Rig Move Hazard Mitigation Procedure for additional details). If proper clearance cannot be maintained, the line must be de-energized and/or raised by a qualified, licensed electrician, or an alternate route must be identified and used. If the line cannot be raised or de-energized, and an alternate route is not available; a risk assessment with written approval from the responsible Devon Operations Manager and notification to the Operations Vice President and EHS Manager is required prior to proceeding.

9 Page Qualified Note: only qualified electrical employees may use tools such as hot sticks to move or de-energize overhead electrical lines. While operating on site, de-energize overhead electrical lines when any equipment with a boom, mast or rotating arm is planned to come within 10 feet of electrical lines up to 50 kv (voltages exceeding 50kV see chart below). If the line cannot be deenergized a risk assessment with written approval from the responsible Devon Operations Manager and notification to the Operations Vice President and EHS Manager is required prior to proceeding. The PIC must be on site when individuals are working within 10 feet of energized overhead power lines. Note: For overhead power lines greater than 50kv the distance chart below must be followed: 50kV to 200kV 15ft (4.6m) Clearance 200kV to 350kV 20ft (6.1m) Clearance 350kV to 500kV 25ft (7.6m) Clearance 500kV to 750kV 35ft (10.7m) Clearance 750kV to 1000kV- 45ft (13.7m) Clearance 1000kV - the minimum clearance distance must be established by the utility owner/operator or registered professional engineer who is a qualified person with respect to electrical power transmission and distribution Line Do not park temporary equipment or store material underneath or within 15 feet of energized power lines Line Ensure cones, goal posts (see Attachment B) or other warning markers are installed 15 feet from the energized electric lines running across or parallel to the work site Employee Use non-conductive tag lines to guide and position suspended loads. Tag lines must be of sufficient length to keep workers out of fall path Employee Stop work if unsafe conditions are present. 3.9 Risk Assessment Step In Charge (PIC) Arc Flash Risk Assessment Line Line Facilities/ Pipeline Action Ensure that the location has a completed risk assessment (Arc Flash and Shock Risk Assessment) for 480 volts and above. If a risk assessment has not been completed within the last five years, complete the Request for Arc Flash Services Form (Attachment C). Complete a comprehensive electrical Arc Flash Risk Assessment from all power sources rated 480 volts or greater that may include one or more of the following: Fault Current / Short Circuit Study Protective Device Evaluation Study Protective Device Coordination Study

10 Page Facilities/ Pipeline Line Line Line 3.10 nel Precautions and Procedures Step In Charge (PIC) Qualified Qualified Qualified Troubleshooting Qualified Qualified Conduct Shock Risk Assessment for the electrical distribution system from all power sources rated 480 volts or greater (see Appendix A). Note: The Arc Flash and Shock Risk Assessment will provide product data to be used for system studies with computer software programs based on NFPA 70E protection boundary equations to calculate the necessary flash protection boundary distances and incident energy to determine the minimum PPE requirements. Note: Until the Arc Flash Risk Assessment can be completed the location will follow the most current Approach Boundary Table issued by NFPA 70E-2015 Table (D)(a) (see Appendix B). Ensure all personnel follow Appendix C for PPE requirements when working within the limited approach boundary. Ensure all personnel follow the Approach Boundary Table issued by NFPA 70E-2015 Table (D)(a) for voltages less than 480 when the Arc Flash Risk Assessment is completed for 480 volts or greater. Update the risk assessment following renovations, expansions, and replacements for systems 480 voltages and greater. Action Note: All electrical assessments will be updated every five years. Ensure the following are done before performing any electrical work: Visually inspect the grounding Visually inspect the equipment for damage Check for burnt odors Listen for unusual noise Use UL/ULC rated contact voltage tester to verify zero state (e.g. Fluke, etc.). Remove all conductive articles of jewelry and clothing such as watch bands, bracelets, necklaces, rings, key chains, metalized aprons, cloth with conductive thread, metal eyewear, or metal headgear if they could contact exposed energized parts. Determine whether the electrical work is live electrical work or troubleshooting. (e.g., troubleshooting includes, but not limited to; the use of standard testing instruments on energized circuits to determine voltage, amperage, wattage, etc.): Note: Troubleshooting of an energized system does NOT require an Energized Electrical Work Permit, but PPE is required to be worn, as described, before the employee enters the Flash Protection Boundary and a completed Electrical Safety Analysis (ESA) prior to the task being performed. Develop an ESA prior to beginning troubleshooting activities in the field (see Attachment E).

11 Page Qualified Qualified Qualified Qualified Live Electrical Work Line Qualified Qualified Qualified Note: Qualified personnel performing the tasks will discuss the electrical activities any special precautions that need to be taken, equipment affected, and the personal protective equipment required in the area. Barricade around the work area during troubleshooting activities to ensure nonqualified persons remain outside the limited approach boundary. Note: Tools and other portable tripping objects will need to be placed outside the limited approach boundary. Never perform live electrical work when troubleshooting. Follow lockout/tagout protocols or if live electrical work is necessary, notify the to complete the required Live Electrical Permit (see Attachment B). Prior to performing any electrical troubleshooting tasks, conduct a pre-task tailgate with employees and/or contractors before the job to ensure all safety practices identified are communicated. Determine if the activity to be performed is live electrical work (e.g., removing a live bus, installing a circuit breaker into a live panel, performing a live electrical tie-in, overhead utility line tie-in, etc.), or troubleshooting. A permit is required for live electrical work. Ensure qualified persons only work on energized electrical systems when one or more of the following criteria are met: De-energizing introduces additional or increased hazards, or, De-energizing is infeasible due to equipment design or operational limitations Note: If work must take place on energized circuits, Devon locations must consider first the use of engineering controls as the preferred electrical hazard risk control technique. Where they are not feasible or are not in place, complete a Live Electrical Work Permit (see Attachment B). Conduct a documented Electrical Safety Analysis (ESA) prior to beginning the activity to identify hazards and develop specific procedures to eliminate/control the hazards. Note: Qualified personnel performing the tasks will discuss the electrical activities any special precautions that need to be taken, equipment affected, and the personal protective equipment required in the area. Obtain a Live Electrical Work Permit. Ensure the permit is completed by at least two qualified personnel prior to starting the activity. The permit shall be completed prior to initiating a live electrical work task and will be reviewed during the Pre-task tailgate process. The permit and the completed ESA must be posted in a visible location where the live electrical work is taking place for the duration of the activity task. Provisions shall be made to ensure the continuity of electrical hazard protection during shift or personnel changes. The permit shall be signed by the qualified individuals performing the work, the contractor s qualified supervisor, and a Devon Superintendent within the BU. Barricade around the work area during live electrical work activities to ensure nonqualified persons remain outside the limited approach boundary. Note: Tools and other potential tripping objects will need to be placed outside the limited approach boundary.

12 Page Qualified Qualified Line Qualified Qualified Qualified Qualified Qualified Qualified Qualified Qualified Enclosed Work Environment Conduct a pre-task tailgate with employees and/or contractors before the job to ensure all safety practices are identified. Ensure work on energized circuits with 277 volts or greater is never conducted alone. At a minimum, the project must be carried out by two qualified personnel who are current in CPR and First-aid. Notify emergency medical assistance and local utilities immediately if an individual has made contact with energized wiring. Note: Only perform first-aid and CPR when the person is no longer in contact with energized wiring. Use protective shields, barriers, or insulating materials as necessary to avoid accidental contact with energized parts. Follow the Hot Work Protocol when opening an energized electrical equipment enclosure in a classified location. Keep doors, panels and covers of electrical equipment enclosures closed according to manufacturer s specifications except while Taking readings Making repairs Troubleshooting Brace door open in a safe manner while working on the enclosure. Note: Doors must be capable of being opened at least 90 degrees. Use energy isolation when working on electrical equipment to prevent unexpected start-up or energization of the equipment. Procedures must include the following steps: Identify all possible electrical supply sources feeding the equipment and isolation points. Isolate all electrical supplies by interrupting the load current. Apply locks and tags to each isolation point and verify de-energization. Note: A lock and tag shall be placed on each energy isolation point to deenergize circuits and equipment where work is to be performed. Parts of electric equipment that have been de-energized but have not been locked or tagged out shall be treated as energized parts. (Refer to the Energy Isolation Protocol (COR-3S3-PR) for additional guidance on lockout/tagout.) PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE) Wear the appropriate PPE based on the information provided on the Approach Boundary Table (Table (D)(a)) (see Appendix B) and/or label posted on the electrical equipment prior to opening the cabinet to perform troubleshooting or live electrical work. Inspect and test electrical personal protective equipment as required to ensure that it is maintained in a safe and reliable condition. (see Appendix D). Remove personal protective equipment that is damaged or equipment failed to pass test requirements until repaired or permanently discarded/destroyed.

13 Page Qualified Qualified Qualified Qualified Qualified Qualified Qualified Qualified Wear the appropriate Hazard Rated Category (HRC) PPE that meets the 70E requirements for the job. Note: See garment label for ASTM F1506 standard. Wear Class E Hard Hat, full or partial brim that meets ANSI Z89.1. Wear nonconductive protective equipment for the face, neck, and chin whenever there is a danger of injury from exposure to electric arcs, or flashes. Eye and face protection equipment will conform to ANSI Z87.1. Wear safety shoes having a rating of dielectric footwear as per ASTM F2413 (formerly ANSI Z41) and/or CAN/CSA Z195 and Z Wear hand Insulating rubber gloves that are properly rated and tested prior to coming into contact with energized parts. Note: Where rubber gloves are used for shock protection, outer leather protectors and inner cloth liners will be provided and worn under the rubber gloves. Use electrical blankets and/or insulated mats whenever applicable, while working on electrical equipment. Use hot sticks in accordance with the manufacturer s recommendations for working with energized electrical systems. Use insulated tools and equipment when working in proximity to energized or potentially energized conductors and/or exposed electrical components. Insulated tools must display the international double triangle or double square symbol (see diagrams below) Contractor Participation Line Designate a qualified individual as a representative when arrangements have been made to have a contractor perform live electrical work. The person will assign the following required coordination and informational functions: Provide the contractor with a copy of this protocol and ensure the contractor understands that the contractor s electrical program must meet or exceed the requirements of this procedure. Inform the contractor of the known hazards of the electrical equipment and any precautions that have been implemented in or near the systems that will be accessed by the contractor s employees.

14 Page Line Line Review and approve the contractor s ESA developed for the task(s) to be performed. The contractor s ESA must meet or exceed the provided example (see Attachment E) in this protocol. Note: The contractor will need to be prepared to share the completed ESA with a Devon representative. The contractor s supervisor and participating employees have signed the completed ESA. Ensure an approved Live Electrical Work Permit and ESA is developed and approved by contract supervision for work that cannot be de-energized and must be done live. A Devon representative must sign the Live Electrical Permit prior to the activity being performed. Note: The Devon signature is acknowledgement that there has been verification that there is a plan in place and not to the accuracy of the plan Equipment Labeling All labels and markings will be of sufficient durability to withstand the environment in which are placed. Metal-enclosed switchgear, unit substations, transformers, connection boxes, and other similar associated equipment will be marked with appropriate caution signs. Step In Charge (PIC) Line Line Line Line Line Line Action Ensure electrical equipment is equipped with the manufacturer s name, trademark or other descriptive marking by which the organization responsible for the product may be identified. Ensure electrical disconnects (e.g., fuse box, breaker panel, switch enclosure, etc.) are labeled to identify what equipment/location they serve. Ensure equipment that starts automatically is properly labeled with a sign that reads, Danger: Equipment Starts Automatically. Ensure personnel are adequately warned about electrical hazards using safety signs and symbols. Accident prevention tags shall be used where necessary. Mark entrances to rooms and other guarded locations containing exposed energized parts with warning signs forbidding unqualified person to enter (Example: Danger, Do Not Enter, Authorized nel Only, Qualified s Only). Ensure electrical equipment that may be serviced while energized is field marked with a label containing all the following information for equipment with 50 volts or greater (see Appendix F): Highest Hazard/Risk Category (HRC) for the equipment - Nominal system voltage - Arc flash boundary At least one of the following: - Available incident energy and the corresponding working distance - Minimum arc rating of clothing - Required level of PPE Note: Electrical equipment includes switchboards, panel boards, industrial control panels, meter socket enclosures, and motor control centers, etc.

15 Page Line Ensure high voltage hazards in service areas with 600 volts or greater, are adequately warned with labels stating Danger High Voltage. For example, 600 volt equipment would be labeled with Danger High Voltage 600 Volts Electrical Area Classification Requirements Step In Charge (PIC) Line Line Line Action 3.14 Housekeeping and Cleaning Step In Charge (PIC) Ensure hazardous areas are classified by their hazard class, division, and group using existing facility drawings, engineering, and API RP 500 & NEC, Article 500. All electrical equipment installed in an area that handles flammable gasses or liquids shall be evaluated for hazardous classification requirements. Ensure electrical equipment, lighting and wiring methods in hazardous classified area meet NEC Article 500 for such installations. Note: Equipment rated for Division 1 areas may be installed in Division 2 areas of the same class and group. Ensure classified area seals are installed to block the migration of flammable vapors through electrical conduit. Paint seal caps red to signify that pouring has been completed. Action Employee Do not perform housekeeping duties within the limited approach boundaries of live electrical parts that present an electrical contact hazard Employee De-energize control panels and other electrical parts before external cleaning Qualified Follow manufacturer s guidelines when performing internal cleaning of electrical equipment Employee Never store trash and other combustibles in Motor Control Centers (MCC) or electrical substations Employee Maintain 36 inch clearance from of all electrical cabinets/breakers and never store material on top of cabinets Electrical Review Step In Action Charge (PIC) EHS Ensure the protocol is reviewed every three years to verify compliance with the most Line current version of NFPA 70E. Review a representative sample of field activities to verify the electrical safety protocol is being followed (see Attachment F). Note: Any corrective actions identified must be corrected at the time of the observation.

16 Page Procurement and Design Step In Charge (PIC) Line Line Line 4.0 RECORDKEEPING Step In Charge (PIC) 4.1 Qualified 4.2 Qualified 4.3 Line Record Action Ensure switches, controllers and circuit breakers are able to be mechanically locked out in the off position for lockout/tagout purposes. Ensure that electrical cabinet doors rated for 600 volts or greater AC or DC have either lock or interlocks. Ensure and verify equipment is in accordance with the National Electric Code specification. Note: Local, regional or state requirement must also be followed. Action Live Electrical Permits File completed electrical field reviews. File completed Electrical Protocol Review. File the records as noted below: File Location & Number See Field Office File Directory Retention Period CY + 3 years (CY = Current Year) EH45 Enterprise Classification Structure Code Field Review See Field Office File Directory CY + 3 years (CY = Current Year) EH45 Electrical Safety Protocol Review See Field Office File Directory CY + 3 years (CY = Current Year) EH45 Risk Assessments (Arc Flash Study/Hazard Risk Assessment) See Field Office File Directory CY + 5 years (CY = Current Year) EH45

17 Page Training Requirement Step In Charge (PIC) 5.1 Non-qualified Operational 5.2 Qualified Action Devon employees will need to be trained in the following areas: The dangers of live electricity Authorization to enter MCC Rooms, Electrical Substations to conduct inspections, maintain proper housekeeping, perform LOTO functions, etc. The need to ensure that all electrical equipment can be accessed at all times (36 clearance). Employees will receive additional training on how to reset heaters/breakers and shut off equipment at the electrical disconnect. Are not to use damaged extension cords, power hand tools, and are to report all damaged electrical equipment to their immediate (e.g., exposed wiring, open and/or damaged junction or breaker boxes, etc.). Understand how to review and audit ESA/Live Electrical Permit Note: They will NOT be allowed to assist or pass the barricade set at the limited approach boundary during live electrical work activities. Understand the difference within each Hazard Rating Classification (HRC1-4) Training Frequency: Annual Devon employees responsible for performing troubleshooting and/or live electrical work will be required to complete qualified training from an outsourced contractor which addresses the following elements: Discuss training objectives Employees will receive both classroom and practical training on live electrical work. Classroom: The Dangers of Live Electricity Electrical Accidents in E&P Facilities Review NFPA 70E & protocol. All NFPA 70E is discussed: o Definitions, assessing hazards, hazard risk categories, lockout/tagout, work boundaries, PPE requirements, permits & safety assessments, etc. o Where and how to use an appropriately classified multimeter safely, how to confirm electrical apparatus is de-energized, as well as functional metering uses such as testing phase to phase, phase to ground voltage, resistance, continuity, etc. o Review Electrical PPE requirements Inspection/Testing o How to perform a Risk Assessment in an effort to complete an Electrical ESA and Permit o Proper emergency support (CPR/first-aid trained separately) Field Exercise Complete ESA/permit for electrical as a group Use of a multi-meter Don PPE & arc flash protection Establish safe work boundaries Review proper stance & method for opening & closing breakers & disconnects

18 Page 18 Open a cabinet and simulate the testing of live voltages Review electrical hazards as they pertain to oilfield apparatus 6.0 REFERENCES Training Frequency: Annual NEC 2014 Working Clearances NEC 2014 Guarding of live parts OSHA Lockout/Tagout Regulation OSHA DIRECTIVE NUMBER: CPL , 2/11/08 Devon Lockout/Tagout Protocol Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace 70E 2015 Standard for the Installation of Lightning Protection Systems NFPA 780 North American Independent Laboratories (NAIL)

19 Page 19 Appendix A Shock Risk Assessment A.1 Risk Assessment This informative guidance regarding a qualitative approach for risk assessment, including risk estimation and risk evaluation, which can be helpful in determining the protective measures that are required to reduce the probability of harm occurring in the circumstances under consideration. Hazard identification and risk assessment are analytical processes consisting of a number of discrete steps intended to ensure that hazards are properly identified and analyzed with regard to their severity and the probability of their occurrence. Appropriate protective measures can then be implemented and evaluated in order to determine if adequate risk reduction has been achieved. Hazard identification and risk assessment include a comprehensive review of the hazards, the associated foreseeable tasks, and the protective measures that are required in order to maintain a tolerable level of risk, including the following: (1) Identifying and analyzing electrical hazards (2) Identifying tasks to be performed (3) Documenting hazards associated with each task (4) Estimating the risk for each hazard/task pair (5) Determining the appropriate protective measures needed to adequately reduce the level of risk using the Risk Assessment Flow Chart A.1.2 Parameters Used in Risk Estimation. These parameters should be based on worst-case considerations for the electrical system. The risk estimation stage is the only one at which hazards can be eliminated, thus avoiding the need for additional protective measures, such as safeguarding or complementary protective measures. A 1.3 Severity of the Possible Harm (Se). Severity of injuries or damage to health can be estimated by taking into account reversible injuries, irreversible injuries, and death. Typically, the types of hazards to be considered include, but are not limited to, shock and electrocution, burns, and impact. A 1.4 Probability of Occurrence of Harm. Each of the three parameters of probability of occurrence of harm (that is, Fr, Pr, and Av) should be estimated independently of each other. A worst-case assumption needs to be used for each parameter to ensure that the protective measures, determined during risk evaluation, will provide adequate risk reduction. Generally, the use of a form of hazard/task based evaluation is strongly recommended to ensure that proper consideration is given to the estimation of the probability of occurrence of harm. A Frequency and Duration of Exposure (Fr). The following aspects should be considered to determine the level of exposure: (1) Need for access to the hazard zone based on all modes of use; for example, normal operation and maintenance (2) Nature of access; for example, examination, repair, and trouble shooting

20 Page 20 It should then be possible to estimate the average interval between exposures and, therefore, the average frequency of access. This factor does not include consideration of the failure of the short-circuit interruption device(s) or the failure to use the appropriate personal protective equipment. Select the appropriate row for frequency and duration of exposure (Fr) from Table Insert the appropriate number under the Fr column in Table. A Probability of Occurrence of a Hazardous Event (Pr). The occurrence of a hazardous event influences the probability of the occurrence of harm. The probability of the hazardous event occurring should describe the likelihood of the event materializing during the use or foreseeable misuse, or both, of the electrical system or process. Subjectivity may have a substantial impact on the result of the risk assessment. The use of subjective information should be minimized as far as reasonably practicable. The probability of occurrence of the hazardous event should be estimated independently of other related parameters(fr an d Av) and will typically be based on the results of the completed study of the arc flash potential. The worst-case scenario should be used for this parameter to ensure that short-circuit interruption device(s) have, where practicable, been properly selected and installed and will provide adequate protection. Elements of the electrical system that are intended to ensure an intrinsically safe design shall be taken into consideration in the determination of the probability of the hazardous event(s) These can include, but are not limited to, the mechanical structure, electrical devices, and electronic controls integral to the system or process, or both, at the time of the analysis. Types of components that could contribute to an inherently safe design could include, but are not limited to, current-limiting devices or, ground-fault circuit interrupters. This parameter can be estimated by taking into account the factors that follow. (1) The predictability of the performance of component parts of the electrical system relevant to the hazard in different modes of use (e.g., normal operation, maintenance, fault finding). At this point in the risk assessment process, the protective effect of any personal protective equipment and other protective measure should not be taken into account. This is necessary in order to estimate the amount of risk that will be present if the personal protective equipment and other protective measures are not in place at the time of the exposure. In general terms, it must be considered whether the electrical system being assessed

21 Page 21 has the propensity to act in an unexpected manner. The electrical system performance will vary from very predictable to not predictable. Unexpected events cannot be discounted until it can be clearly demonstrated that the electrical system will perform as expected. Informational note: Predictability is often linked to the complexity of the electrical system and the characteristics of the energy supply. (2) The specified or foreseeable characteristics of human behavior with regard to interaction with the component parts of the machine relevant to the hazard, which can be characterized by one or both of the following: a. Stress (for example, due to time constraints, work task, perceived damage limitation) b. Lack of awareness of information relevant to the hazard Human behavior will be influenced by factors such as skills, training, experience, and complexity of the machine process. These attributes are not usually directly under the influence of the electrical system designer, but a task analysis will reveal activities where total awareness of all issues, including unexpected outcomes, cannot be reasonably assumed. Very high probability of occurrence of a hazardous event should be selected to reflect normal workplace constraints and worst case considerations. Positive reasons (for example, well defined application and a high level of user competence) are required for any lower values to be used. Any required or assumed skills, knowledge, and so forth, should be stated in the information for use. Select the appropriate row for probability of occurrence of a hazardous event (Pr) from Table A Table A Indicate the appropriate risk level under the Pr column. A Probability of Avoiding or Limiting Harm (Av). This parameter can be estimated by taking into account aspects of the electrical system design and its intended application that can help to avoid or limit the harm from a hazard, including the examples that follow. (1) Sudden fast or slow speed of appearance of the hazardous event; for example, an explosion caused by high fault values under short-circuit conditions. (2) Spatial possibility to withdraw from the hazard. (3) Nature of the component or system; for example, the use of touch-safe components can reduce the probability of contact with energized parts. Working in close proximity to high voltage can increase the probability of personnel being exposed to hazards due to approach to live parts. (4) Possibility of recognition of a hazard; for example, an electrical hazard: a copper bar does not change its appearance, whether or not it is under voltage. To recognize the presence of the hazard, one needs an instrument to establish whether or not electrical equipment is energized; thus, both inadvertent and advertent contact need to be considered. Select the appropriate row for probability of avoiding or limiting harm (Av) from Table F Insert the appropriate risk level under the Av column in Table F.1.4.3

22 Page 22 A1.4.4 Risk Level and Probability of Harm. Once the parameters for each hazard under consideration have been entered in Table F.2.5, the information can be used in the first step of the risk assessment process as outlined in Figure F.1(a). A 2 Risk Reduction. A 2.1 Protective Measures. Once the risk prior to the application of protective measures has been estimated, all practicable efforts must be made to reduce the risk of harm. Careful consideration of failure modes is an important part of risk reduction. Care should be taken to ensure that both technical and behavioral failures, which could result in ineffective risk reduction, are taken into account during the risk reduction stage of the risk assessment. Situations where hazard elimination cannot be attained typically require a balanced approach in order to reduce the probability of harm. For example, the effective control of access to an electrical system requires the use of barriers, awareness placards, safe operating instructions, qualification and training, and personnel protective equipment as required by this standard, as well as initial and refresher or periodic training for all affected personnel in the area. Engineering controls alone are not sufficient in reducing the remaining risk to a tolerable level. Typically, all five areas of risk reduction must be implemented in order to achieve the desired result. Consideration of all five of the items that follow is required to establish an adequate risk reduction strategy. A2.1.1 Engineering Controls. Engineering controls have the potential to have a substantial impact on risk. They should, where practicable, be considered and analyzed. Typically, engineering controls take the form of barriers and other safeguarding devices as described in NFPA 70, National Electrical Code, IEC ed 5.1 Consol. With am 1, Safety of Machinery Electrical Equipment of Machines Part 1: General Requirements, 2009 or NFPA 79, Electrical Standard for Industrial Machinery, or a combination thereof. A2.1.2 Awareness Devices. Awareness means can be used to complement the effects of engineering controls with regard to risk reduction. They should be chosen based on the design configuration for each specific application and their potential effectiveness during foreseen interaction. Each design and configuration could require unique awareness devices in order to have the desired impact on risk. Typically, awareness means take the form of signs, visual alarms, audible alarms, and so forth. A2.1.3 Procedures. Procedures and instructions that are required for the individual(s) to safely interact with the electrical system should be identified. The procedures and instructions should include descriptions of the hazards, the possible hazardous events, hazardous situations, and the protective measures that need to be implemented. The procedures and instructions should also be used to communicate any foreseeable misuse of the system that could contribute to an increased level of risk. Typically, formal procedures should be provided in written form; however, in some cases, verbal instruction can be provided. Care should be taken in the latter case to ensure that the verbal instructions will have the desired impact on risk.

23 Page 23 A2.1.4 Training. Training, with regard to the proper interaction and for foreseeable inappropriate interaction with the electrical system, must be completed. The intent of the training is to ensure that all affected personnel are able to understand when and how hazardous situations could arise and how to best reduce the risk associated with those situations. Typically, training for those interacting with electrical systems will include technical information regarding hazards or hazardous situations, or both, as well as information related to potential failure modes that could impact risk. This type of training generally will be provided by a trainer who has an in-depth understanding of electrical system design, as well as experience in the field of adult education. Less technical training content could be appropriate in situations where only awareness of electrical hazards is needed in order to ensure that unqualified personnel do not interact with the electrical system. A2.1.5 al Protective Equipment (PPE). The electrical system must be analyzed in order to determine the appropriate category of personal protective equipment (PPE). Once the appropriate PPE has been determined, personnel are required to maintain and use it as required in order to ensure that residual risk remains at the desired level. A3 Risk Evaluation. A3.1 Risk Evaluation. Once the appropriate protective measures described in F.3.1 have been applied, the impact of those measures on the elements of risk (see Figure F.2.1) should be taken into account. Each type of protective measure could impact one or more of the elements that contribute to risk. The effects on risk, or the impacts on the individual elements of risk, should be considered in the final risk estimation. The cumulative effect of the final combination of protective measures can then be used to estimate the residual risk. Paragraphs F through F provide a general non exhaustive outline that can be used as a guide to the final estimation of risk. A3.1.1 Design Elimination or Substitution by Design. (a) Elimination of the hazard impacts both severity of harm and likelihood of harm Failure mode(s) examples: (1) Component(s) failure (2) Application of an incorrect construction or manufacturing specification (3) Incorrect calculation (that is, potential energy, toxicity, strength, durability) (4) Inadequate procurement control (5) Incorrect or insufficient maintenance, or both (b) Substitution may affect severity of harm, frequency of exposure to the hazard under consideration, or the possibility of avoiding or limiting harm, depending on which method of substitution is applied, or a combination thereof. Failure mode(s) examples: (1) Unexpected or unanticipated interaction (2) Excessive production pressure (3) Inadequate procurement control A3.1.2 Design Use of Engineering Controls. (a) Greatest impact on the probability of a hazardous event(s) under certain circumstances (b) No impact on severity of harm failure mode(s) examples: (1) Incorrect application of construction or manufacturing specification (2) Unanticipated tasks (3) Incentive to circumvent or reduce effectiveness (4) Excessive production pressure (5) Protective system failure A3.1.3 Use of Systems that Increase Awareness of Potential Hazards. (a) Potential impact on avoiding or limiting harm (b) Potential impact on inadvertent exposure

24 Page 24 (c) Minimal or no impact on severity of harm Failure mode(s) examples: (1) Too many warning signs (2) Depreciation of effect over time (3) Lack of understanding A3.1.4 Organization and Application of a Safe System of Work. A nel training. (a) Greatest impact on avoiding or limiting harm (b) Minimal, if any, impact on severity of harm (c) Possible impact on the probability of a hazardous event(s) under certain circumstances Failure mode(s) examples: (1) Training not understood (2) Identified hazards not clearly communicated (3) Depreciation of effect over time (4) Training material not current (5) Training not consistent with instructions (6) Training material not inclusive of detail regarding how to perform work A Access restrictions. (a) Greatest impact on exposure (b) No impact on severity of harm Failure mode(s) examples: (1) Work permit system does not exist (2) Competency complacency (3) Insufficient monitoring, control, or corrective actions, or combination thereof A Safe work procedures. (a) Greatest impact on avoiding or limiting harm (b) Minimal, if any, impact on severity of harm Possible impact on the probability of a hazardous event(s) under certain circumstances Failure mode(s) examples: (1) Inconsistent with the current culture (2) Procedures not current or accessible (3) Does not consider all task, hazards, or hazardous situations, or combination thereof (4) Insufficient monitoring, control, or corrective actions, or combination thereof (5) Instructions not consistent with training content (6) Content too general (for example, Don t touch the live parts, be careful. ) A Policies and instructions. (a) Greatest impact on exposure (b) Possible impact on the probability of a hazardous event(s) under certain circumstances (c) Minimal or no impact on severity of harm Failure mode(s) examples: (1) Policies and instructions inconsistent (2) Instructions not clearly communicated or accessible (3) Insufficient monitoring, control, or corrective actions, or combination thereof (4) Allows personnel to make the decision to work live without adequate justification A3.1.5 al Protective Equipment (PPE). (a) Greatest impact on avoiding or limiting harm

25 Page 25 (b) Potential impact on inadvertent exposure (c) Minimal impact on severity of harm (d) No impact on the probability of a hazardous event(s) Failure mode(s) examples: (1) Reason for use not understood (2) Creates barriers to effective completion of the work (3) PPE specification inappropriate for the considered hazards (4) Production pressure does not afford time to use or maintain (5) Worker forgets to use when needed (6) Excessive discomfort (7) Perceived invulnerability (8) Insufficient monitoring, control, or corrective actions, or combination thereof A 4 Risk Reduction Verification. A4.1 Verification. Once the assessment has been completed and protective measures have been determined, it is imperative to ensure that the protective measures are implemented prior to initiating the electrical work. While this procedure might not result in a reduction of the PPE required, it could improve the understanding of the properties of the hazards associated with a task to a greater extent and thus allow for improvement in the implementation of the protective measures that have been selected. A4.2 Auditing. For each activity that has been assessed, it could be necessary to audit the risk reduction strategy that is applicable. If an audit is required, the auditing process should take place prior to commencing work on electrical systems. An example of a non-exhaustive audit is shown in Figure F.5.2. Each audit process may need to be specific to the properties of the electrical system or the task to be performed, or both.

26 Page 26

27 Page 27 Task: Equipment: Issued by: Date: Electrical Task Hazard Analysis A Frequency and Duration of Exposure (Fr). Document no.: Part of: Pre risk assessment Intermediate risk assessment Follow-up risk assessment RED Area = Safety Measures Required Grey Area = Safety Measures Recommended Frequency Probability Class (CL) (Fr) (Pr) Severity 3 5 Common (SE) Daily 5 Avoidance (Av) Consequences 5 Irreversible trauma, death 4 Weekly 4 Likely 4 Permanent, thirddegree burn 3 Monthly 3 Possible 3 Impossible 5 Reversible, seconddegree burn 2 Yearly 2 Rarely 2 Possible 3 Reversible, first aid 1 Less 1 Negligible 1 Likely 1 Job Step Hazard SE Fr Pr Av CL Controls 0 A 1.3 Severity of the possible 0 Harm (Se). 0 A Probability of A Probability of Avoiding or Limiting Harm 0 Occurrence of a Hazardous (Av). 0 Event (Pr)

28 Page 28 APPENDIX B APPROACH BOUNDARY TABLE NFPA 70E 2015 Table 130.4(D)(a) Approach Boundaries to Energized Electrical Conductors or Circuit Parts for Shock Protection for Alternating-Current Systems (All dimensions are distance from energized electrical conductor or circuit part to employee.) (1) (2) (3) (4) Limited Approach Boundary b Exposed Movable Exposed Fixed Conductor c Circuit Part Nominal System Voltage Range, Phase to Phase a Restricted Approach Boundary b ; Includes Inadvertent Movement Adder <50 V Not specified Not specified Not specified 50 V-150 V d 3.0 m (10 ft 0 in.) 1.0 m (3 ft 6 in.) Avoid contact 151 V-750 V 3.0 m (10 ft 0 in.) 1.0 m (3 ft 6 in.) 0.3 m (1 ft 0 in.) 751 V-15 kv 3.0 m (10 ft 0 in.) 1.5 m (5 ft 0 in.) 0.7 m (2 ft 2 in.) 15.1 kv-36 kv 3.0 m (10 ft 0 in.) 1.8 m (6 ft 0 in.) 0.8 m (2 ft 7 in.) 36.1 kv-46 kv 3.0 m (10 ft 0 in.) 2.5 m (8 ft 0 in.) 0.8 m (2 ft 9 in.) 46.1 kv-72.5 kv 3.0 m (10 ft 0 in.) 2.5 m (8 ft 0 in.) 1.0 m (3 ft 3 in.) 72.6 kv-121 kv 3.3 m (10 ft 8 in.) 2.5 m (8 ft 0 in.) 1.0 m (3 ft 4 in.) 138 kv-145 kv 3.4 m (11 ft 0 in.) 3.0 m (10 ft 0 in.) 1.2 m (3 ft 10 in.) 161 kv-169 kv 3.6 m (11 ft 8 in.) 3.6 m (11 ft 8 in.) 1.3 m (4 ft 3 in.) 230 kv-242 kv 4.0 m (13 ft 0 in.) 4.0 m (13 ft 0 in.) 1.7 m (5 ft 8 in.) 345 kv-362 kv 4.7 m (15 ft 4 in.) 4.7 m (15 ft 4 in.) 2.8 m (9 ft 2 in.) 500 kv-550 kv 5.8 m (19 ft 0 in.) 5.8 m (19 ft 0 in.) 3.6 m (11 ft 10 in.) 765 kv-800 kv 7.2 m (23 ft 9 in.) 7.2 m (23 ft 9 in.) 4.9 m (15 ft 11 in.) Note (1): For arc flash boundary, see 130.5(A). Note (2): All dimensions are distance from exposed energized electrical conductors or circuit part to employee. a For single-phase system above 250V, select the range that is equal to the system s maximum phase-to-ground voltage multiplied by b See definition in Article 100 and text in 130.4(D)(2) and Informative Annex C for elaboration. c Exposed movable conductors describes a condition in which the distance between the conductor and a person is not under the control of the person. The term is normally applied to overhead line conductors supported by poles. d This includes circuits where the exposure does not exceed 120V.

29 Page 29 Table 130.7(C)(15)(A)(B) Arc-Flash Hazard PPE Categories for Alternating Current (ac) Systems Equipment Arc Flash PPE Category Arc-Flash Boundary Panelboards or other equipment rated 240 V and below Parameters: Maximum of 25 ka short-circuit current available; maximum of 0.03 sec (2 cycles) fault clearing time; working distance 455 mm (18 in.) Panelboards or other equipment rated >240 V and up to 600 V Parameters: Maximum of 25 ka short-circuit current available; maximum of 0.03 sec (2 cycles) fault clearing time; working distance 455 mm (18 in.) 600- V class motor control centers (MCCs) Parameters: Maximum of 65 ka short-circuit current available; maximum of 0.03 sec (2 cycles) fault clearing time; working distance 455 mm (18 in.) 600- V class motor control centers (MCCs) Parameters: Maximum of 42 ka short-circuit current available; maximum of 0.33 sec (20 cycles) fault clearing time; working distance 455 mm (18 in.) 600-V class switchgear (with power circuit breakers or fused switches) and 600 V class switchboards mm (19 in.) 900 mm (3 ft) 1.5 m (5 ft) 4.3 m (14 ft) 6 m Parameters: Maximum of 35 ka short-circuit current available; maximum of up to 0.5 sec (30 cycles) fault clearing time; working distance 455 mm (18 in.) Other 600- V class (277 V through 600 V, nominal) equipment Parameters: Maximum of 65 ka short circuit current available; maximum of 0.03 sec (2 cycles) fault clearing time; working distance 455 mm (18 in.) NEMA E2 (fused contractor) motor starters, 2.3 kv through 7.2 kv Parameters: Maximum of 35 ka short-circuit current available; maximum of up to 0.24 sec (15 cycles) fault clearing time; working distance 910 mm (36 in.) Metal-clad switchgear, 1 kv through 15 kv Parameters: Maximum of 35 ka short-circuit current available; maximum of up to 0.24 sec (15 cycles) fault clearing time; working distance 910 mm (36 in.) Arc-resistant switchgear Type 1 or 2 [for clearing times of <0.5 sec (30 cycles) with a perspective fault current not to exceed the arcresistant rating of the equipment], and metal-enclosed interrupter switchgear, fused or unfused of arc-resistant-type construction, tested in accordance with IEEE C , 1 kv through 15 kv Parameters: Maximum of 35 ka short-circuit current available; maximum of up to 0.24 sec (15 cycles) fault clearing time; working distance 910 mm (36 in.) (doors closed) 4 (doors open) (20 ft) 1.5 m (5 ft) 12 m (40 ft) 12 m (40 ft) (doors closed) 12 m (40 ft) Other equipment 1 kv through 15 kv 12 m Parameters: Maximum of 35 ka short-circuit current available; 4 maximum of up to 0.24 sec (15 cycles) fault clearing time; working (40 ft) distance 910 mm (36 in.) Note: For equipment rated 600 volts and below, and protected by upstream current-limiting fuses or current-limiting circuit breakers sized by 200 amperes or less, the arch flash PPE category can be reduced by one number but not below arc flash PPE category 1.

30 Page 30 Table 130.7(C)(15)(B) Arc-Flash Hazard PPE Categories for Direct Current (dc) Systems Equipment Arc Flash PPE Category Arc-Flash Boundary Storage batteries, dc switchboards, and other dc supply sources 100 V > Voltage < 250 V Parameters: Voltage: 250 V Maximum arc duration and working distance: mm (18 in.) Short-circuit current < 4 ka mm 4 ka < short-circuit current < 7 ka m 7 ka < short-circuit current < 15 ka m (3 ft) (4 ft) Storage batteries, dc switchboards, and other dc supply sources (6 ft) 250 V < Voltage < 600 V Parameters: Voltage: 600 V Maximum arc duration and working distance: mm (18 in.) Short-circuit current 1.5 ka mm 1.5 ka < short-circuit current < 3 ka m 3 ka < short-circuit current < 7 ka m 7 ka < short-circuit current < 10 ka m Note: Apparel that can be expected to be exposed to electrolyte must meet both of the following conditions: (1)Be evaluated for electrolyte protection in accordance with ASTM F1296. Standard Guide for Evaluating Chemical Protective Clothing (2) Be arc-rated in accordance (3 ft) (4 ft) (6 ft.) (8 ft)

31 Page 31 Appendix C HRC Rated Clothing and Other PPE Table 130.7(C)(16) Protective Clothing and al Protective Equipment (PPE) Hazard al Protective Equipment Risk Category 1 Arc-Rated Clothing, Minimum Arc Rating of 4 cal./cm2 (See Note 3.) Arc-rated long-sleeve shirt and pants or arc-rated coverall Arc-rated face shield (see Note 2) or arc flash suit hood Arc-rated jacket, parka, rainwear, or hard hat liner (AN) Protective Equipment Hard hat Safety glasses or safety goggles (SR) Hearing protection (ear canal inserts) Heavy duty leather gloves (See Note 1.) Leather work boots 2 Arc-Rated Clothing, Minimum Arc Rating of 8 cal/cm2 (See Note 3.) Arc-rated long-sleeve shirt and pants or arc-rated coverall Arc-rated flash suit hood or arc-rated face shield (See Note 2) and arc-rated balaclava Arc-rated jacket, parka, rainwear, or hard hat liner (AN) Protective Equipment Hard hat Safety glasses or safety goggles (SR) Hearing protection (ear canal inserts) Heavy duty leather gloves (See Note 1.) Leather work shoes 3 Arc-Rated Clothing Selected so That the System Arc Rating Meets the Required Minimum Arc Rating of 25 cal/cm2 (See Note 3.) Arc-rated long-sleeve shirt (AR) Arc-rated pants (AR) Arc-rated coverall (AR) Arc-rated arc flash suit jacket (AR) Arc-rated arc flash suit pants (AR) Arc-rated arc flash suit hood Arc-rated gloves (See Note 1.) Arc-rated jacket, parka, rainwear, or hard hat liner (AN) Protective Equipment Hard hat Safety glasses or safety goggles (SR) Hearing protection (ear canal inserts) Leather work shoes Hazard al Protective Equipment Risk Category 4 Arc-Rated Clothing Selected so That the System Arc Rating Meets the Required Minimum Arc Rating of 40 cal/cm2 (See Note 3.) Arc-rated long-sleeve shirt (AR) Arc-rated pants (AR) Arc-rated coverall (AR) Arc-rated arc flash suit jacket (AR) Arc-rated arc flash suit pants (AR) Arc-rated arc flash suit hood Arc-rated gloves (See Note 1.) Arc-rated jacket, parka, rainwear, or hard hat liner (AN) Protective Equipment Hard hat Safety glasses or safety goggles (SR) Hearing protection (ear canal inserts) Leather work shoes Informational Note No. 1: Simplified approach to ensure adequate PPE for electrical workers within facilities with large and diverse electrical systems. Informational Note No. 2: The PPE requirements of this section are intended to protect a person from arc flash and shock hazards. While some situations could result in burns to the skin, even with the protection described in Table 130.7(C)(16), burn injury should be reduced and survivable. Due to the explosive effect of some arc events, physical trauma injuries could occur. The PPE requirements of this section do not address protection against physical trauma other than exposure to the thermal effects of an arc flash. Informational Note No. 3: The arc rating for a particular clothing system can be obtained from the arc-rated clothing manufacturer.

32 Page 32 APPENDIX D PPE, Inspection and Frequency al Protective Equipment (PPE) Electrical Gloves Blankets/Sleeves AR Frequency Pre-Use Inspection: Visual inspection to check for: Nicks, tears, rips, punctures follow Appendix D. To test gloves for pinholes and other damage, fill the glove with air. The use of a portable glove inflator is recommended. Or in lieu of a glove inflator, roll up the cuff of the glove to make a seal, and squeeze the glove. Then hold the inflated glove close to the face and ear to feel and listen for air escaping from holes (if any)(see Appendix E) Proper Storage: Gloves in service will be properly stored. Insulating rubber gloves and leather protectors may be properly stored. Gloves will not be folded, creased, or rolled while in storage. Gloves will be protected from heat, sunlight, and from contact with sharp articles or materials likely to damage gloves or cause deterioration of the rubber. Gloves shall not be stored in close proximity to any electrical sources. Clean gloves according to manufacturer s specifications. Do not use solvents, oils, or grease on rubber gloves. Electrical Tests: Every six months from service. Gloves may only be stored on the shelf for no more than 12 months. Pre-Use Inspection: Visual inspection to check for: Nicks, tears, rips, punctures Electrical Tests: Every 12 months from service. Pre-Use Inspection: Arc-rated apparel shall be inspected before each use. Work clothing or arc flash suits that are contaminated, or damaged to the extent that their protective qualities are impaired, shall not be used. Protective items that become contaminated with grease, oil, or flammable liquids or combustible materials shall not be used. Do not remove warning or rating tags. Conducted by Whom Employee Outside Service Employee Outside Service Employee Electrical Tests: Not Applicable

33 Page 33 al Protective Equipment (PPE) Frequency Conducted by Whom Flash Protection Overalls (e.g., 12 cal., 40 cal., 50 cal., etc.) Pre-Use Inspection: Arc-rated apparel shall be inspected before each use. Work clothing or arc flash suits that are contaminated, or damaged to the extent that their protective qualities are impaired, shall not be used. Protective items that become contaminated with grease, oil, or flammable liquids or combustible materials shall not be used. Hot Stick Hand Tools Do not remove warning or rating tags. Electrical Tests: Not Applicable Pre-Use Inspection: Conduct visual inspection for cracks, nicks, punctures, contaminants (e.g.; paint, grease, etc.) and wipe the stick down, removing any difficult to see contaminants. Electrical Test: Every two years of service. If any defect or contamination that could adversely affect the insulating qualities or mechanical integrity of the live-line tool is present after wiping, the tool shall be removed from service and examined and tested by an outside provider. Pre-Use Inspection: Conduct pre-use inspection to ensure the equipment is kept clean and dry. UL approved hand tools use two different color layers of insulation making damage to the insulation easy to recognize. Electrical Tests: Not Applicable Qualified Outside Service Qualified

34 Page 34 APPENDIX E Electrical Glove Pre Use Inspection

35 Page 35 APPENDIX F - Electrical Safety Labeling

36 Page 36 Attachment A Approval, Review and Modification History Revision Number Approved/Revised/Reviewed By Approval/Revision/ Review Date Description (Initial Approval, Revision or Review along with further details of revision if needed) 00 Richard Luedecke 01/08/15

37 Devon Energy Division: Page 37 Attachment B -

38 Page 38 Attachment C Arc Flash Request Form

39 Page 39

40 Page 40 Arc Flash Request form Tutorial Page This page will help you to identify the areas of your site where the information needed to complete the Arc Flash Request can be found. Step 1: Please check the box next to the reason the arc flash study is being requested. This could be because of a Process Hazard Analysis (PHA), an upcoming five year review, the site is a new facility, a recommendation was made by an authority, there are operational hazards present, or the site has or will soon be modified. Step 2: Fill out the name and location of the facility, as well as the project name, number, the business unit and requestor s name. Also, the estimated start date of the project and its target completion date. Note: If there are multiple sites that are equivalent, this form need only be filled out once. The number of identical sites and the alternate site names should be recorded on the following page. The requestor assumes all responsibility for the accuracy of the information presented in the Arc Flash Request Form. Please ask for assistance if there is a situation in which you are unable to find or do not know where to find the correct information. Step 3: Check the power sources from utility. Please indicate the Voltage, number of phase (single, 3), fuse rating and the frequency (Hz). To find this information: Contact the utility/check the recent bill. Look on the fuse rating located towards the top of the utility pole on the transformer bank (See figure). For Fuse rating please check the label fuses in the breaker panel(if qualified to do so). Step 4: Please indicate any high voltage motors (480V) the quantity (QTY) of each type, length of the conductor from the motor to the panel and their horsepower s (HP). This information can be found on the labels on the motor. c

41 Page 41 Step 5: for an Motor Control Center(MCC), please indicate the Voltage of the Motor (V), the Phase of the motor- single, 3-(phase), and the frequency it operates at (Hz) also please indicate if it is (WYE) or (delta) or if any other type please check [Other] and write in on the adjacent line. Please also indicate the fault current (amps) of the MCC. Next for the power coming into the MCC please indicate the current rating (A) for the bus duct and the size and type of the incoming cable. Also, indicate how many cables are incoming and what phase power will be sent. If there is Arc Resistant Construction please indicate if it is type 2B or write in what type it is. Please indicate the type of enclosure of this MCC either indoor or outdoor and any supporting NEMA information. This information can be found by: Manufacturer label, if there is more information than you think you need then the best option is to check the serial number and the manufacturer name and look it up for specification. Frequency (Hz) Voltage Power (HP/KW) Step 6: For any on-site transformers (not utility), please indicate their operating voltage, phase and frequency. As well as if they are WYE, DELTA or other. For the incoming power to the transformer please indicate the current rating (A) for the Bus Duct and the size and type of the incoming cable. Also, indicate how many cables are incoming and what phase power will be sent. This information can be found by: Manufacturer label, if there is more information than you think you need then the best option is to check the serial number and the manufacturer name and look it up for specification. Step 7: For any Switchgears: Please indicate the voltage, phase and frequency, as well as the rating for the main breaker current (A) and the short time interrupt rating (AIC). For the incoming power to the switchgear please indicate the current rating (A) for the bus duct and the size and type of the incoming cable. Also, indicate how many cables are incoming and what phase power will be sent. If there is arc resistant construction please indicate if it is type 2B or write in what type it is. Please indicate the type of enclosure of this switchgear either indoor or outdoor and any supporting NEMA information. This information can be found by: Manufacturer label, if there is more information than you think you need then the best option is to check the serial no. and the manufacturer name and look it up for specification. Step 8: For all compressors please indicate if they are gas or electric or neither. If they are electric: Please indicate their Voltage, phase and frequency. Also for the incoming power to the compressor please indicate the current rating (A) for the bus duct and the size and type of the incoming cable. Also, indicate how many cables are incoming and what phase power will be sent. This information can be found by: Manufacturer label, if there is more information than you think you need then the best option is to check the serial no. and the manufacturer name and look it up for specification. Step 9: Please indicate the name, voltage and load (amperes) capacity for any other equipment on the site. Any additional comments can be indicated at the bottom of the form.

42 Form # COR-3S3-PR Form Retention: EH45 CY+3 Attachment D WARNING! LIVE ELECTRICAL WORK IN PROGRESS LIVE ELECTRICAL WORK PERMIT MUST BE POSTED AT OR NEAR THE AREA OF WORK Date Start: Start Time: End Time: Issued to: Location Contact Number: Workstation Number (if applicable) Description of Work to be Done: Description of Circuit/Equipment: Justification for why equipment cannot be de-energized: Adds Additional Hazards Required for Testing/Troubleshooting Unfeasible to Shut Down Process Equipment Detailed Description of Justification: Transfer below the HRC, Voltage, Glove Class and Boundary Distances from existing Arc Flash label; otherwise, estimate HRC, Glove Class, Boundaries and PPE using the NFPA tables listed below. Hazard Risk Glove Class Category (HRC) Hazard VAC VDC (00 4) From AF Label Approach Boundaries (inches or feet / cm or meters) Limited Approach Restricted Approach Circle HRC 0 Injury not likely 1 Injury less likely 2 Potential for severe injury or death 3 4 Potential for severe injury or death is greater Potential for severe injury or death is greatest Consult Arc Flash Label on Equipment or NFPA Tables 130.7(C)(9) and 130.2(C) to determine highest incident energy, HRC and Approach Distances. Use ASTM Glove Chart to determine Glove Class for the maximum voltage of exposed energized circuits. Use PPE Matrix for all other PPE determinations. POWER SOURCE (Identify the source(s) supplying power to the circuit while energized) Power Supply Hi Pot Other Source(s) Explain: DESCRIPTION OF THE SAFE WORK PRACTICES TO BE EMPLOYED: Know Where to Turn power off Safety Watch "C" Fire Extinguisher nearby Notify affected workers Adequate lighting provided Radio/Cell Communication Communication

43 Form # COR-3S3-PR Form Retention: EH45 CY+3 HAZARD ANALYSIS (Continued) Job Briefing - Items to be done BEFORE starting work: 1. Review the Electrical Safety Analysis (ESA) Procedure with all, (either a Standard ESA Procedure, or a Custom Procedure) 2. All participants in agreement with the steps of the procedure. 3. Attach ESA Plan to this Permit. SHOCK HAZARD (Identify the energized components associated with the task Choose all that apply) Check Completed By: Exposed to power connections (Alligator, Banana Plugs) Open Panel Capacitor(s) Exposed Equipment (Circuit Cards, Components, Bus bars) Lugs (exposed bolts, nuts, connectors, etc.) Other Explain: KNOWNTICIPATED EXPOSED LIVE COMPONENTS (List) 1. Volts 2. Volts WORK RISK (Identify the at risk actions/events involved with the work to be conducted Choose all that apply) Tool Use on Circuits Meter Reading on Live Components Movement/Change of Power Leads Short Circuiting Polarity Reversal Other Explain: AC DC AC DC WORK CONTROLS (Verify that proper controls are in place): VISUAL WARNING Hazard Sign & Permit Posted (Electrical hazard sign must be posted during all live electrical work) (Initials) LIMITED/RESTRICTED BOUNDRY CONTROLS (identify method(s) used to establish boundaries) Barricades Barriers Lookout Danger Tape Other Explain: PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE) Glove Class (00 4): Gloves Inspected: Glove Tested date: Electrical Hazard Rated Shoes: (Non-conductive mats required if Electrical Hazard Rated Shoes not in use) (Initials) (Initials) Glove Expiration date: Glove Registration No.: Necessary personal protective equipment to safely perform the assign task (listed on the Arc-Flash Label if identified or using Hazard/Risk Category Classification by task, (See the NFPA 70E Compliance Guide on the back): AR Rated Clothing Balaclava Hood Ear Plugs Flash Suit Voltage Rated Tools Face Shield Glove Inserts Voltage Rate Shoes Category III Meter E Class Hard Hat Leather Gloves Insulated Blankets SafetyGlasses/Goggles 2 Layer Switching Hood Voltage Rated Gloves Non-conductive Bench-top Mat Non-conductive Floor Mat Insulated/rated tools and instruments All mats tools and instruments inspected for damage: (Initials) All instruments are rated for use with maximum voltage identified: Pre-work meter test completed: PERSONAL Remove or cover jewelry CPR/First-Aid Certified (Initials) Post-work meter test completed: (Initials) (if greater than 600V) (Initials) Use of non-conductive safety glasses/face shield Partner CPR/First-Aid Certified (277 volts or greater) Use of non-conductive clothing & underwear

44 Form # COR-3S3-PR Form Retention: EH45 CY+3 PERSONNEL ASSIGNED Qualified : (Print) (Signature) Date: Qualified : (Print) (Signature) Date: Other nel: APPROVALS : (Print) (Signature) Date: Devon Superintendent (Print) (Signature) Date Disclaimer: The Devon person signing the permit is acknowledging that the electrical safety process has been followed and is not signing to the accuracy of the ESA and Permit completion LIVE ELECTRICAL PERMIT CLOSURE When work is completed, return this Permit with the Standard/Custom ESA used to the Electrical Leader, or the Operating Department. In addition, any changes or enhancements requirement to be made to the Standard ESA Procedure need to be communicated to the Electrical Leader. : Time: Date: (Print) (Signature) RETURN A COPY OF THIS PERMIT TO EHS UPON COMPLETION

45 TITLE: PURPOSE: Attachment E Electrical Safety Analysis (ESA) Form Electrical Safety Analysis (ESA) Revision: Location: Effective Date: WRITTEN BY: Page: 1 of 1 POTENTIAL HAZARDS: PPE REQUIRED: PROCEDURE: * Remove All Jewelry * Basic Job Steps HRC Hazards Safe Work Practices 1 Evaluate equipment and determine Hazard Rating Category (HRC) by the Table 130.7(C)(15)(a) or the label posted on the cabinet. OR Follow Arc Flash study labeling located on the electrical cabinet or equipment 2 Communicate with affected personnel in the area of the work about to be performed. 3 Include this ESA with contractors Pre-Task Tailgate Meeting prior to performing electrical activity. 4 0 Inadequate PPE could result in arc burn Determine proper PPE, limited approach boundaries, etc. 0 Potential interference and exposure to live energized parts resulting in live electrical shock, burns, etc. while the guarded line side remains energized 0 Poor communication of the activities performed can lead to SIFs and/or injuries. Barricade using RED Barricade Tape at the limited approach boundary around the work area or assign a spotter to the job to ensure unqualified personnel stay clear of the work area. Conduct Pre-Task Tailgate meeting with all those involved in the activity using this ESA. 5 NOTE: It is the responsibility of the employee to immediately halt work and notify a if unsure of ability, scope of work, or pending safety issue, at any time in the workday. Preparer Print Name Date Preparer Signature Sign Name Date Participant Print Name Date Participant Sign Name Date Form # COR-3S3-PR Form Retention: EH45 CY+3

46 Electrical Safety Analysis (ESA) TITLE: Verify Electrical Motor Rotation WRITTEN BY: XXXX-XXXX PURPOSE: Troubleshooting Activity testing circuitry on 480 volt cabinet located at the south east corner of the pad are being tested to ensure proper rotation before and after equipment comes on line. POTENTIAL HAZARDS: Exposure to electrical voltages (480v.), Revision: Location: Effective Date: 08/28/14 Page: 1 of 1 PPE REQUIRED: Face Shield, balaclava hood, safety glasses, hearing protection, electrical gloves, FRC II, dielectric boots, E Class Hard Hat, leather gloves, glove liner. * Remove All Jewelry * PROCEDURE: Basic Job Steps HRC Hazards Safe Work Practices 1 Evaluate equipment and determine Hazard Rating Category (HRC) by the Table 130.7(C)(15)(a) or the label posted on the cabinet. OR Follow Arc Flash study labeling located on the electrical cabinet or equipment 2 Communicate with affected personnel in the area of the work about to be performed. 3 Include this ESA with contractor s pre-task tailgate meeting prior to performing electrical activity. 0 Inadequate PPE could result in arc burn Determine proper PPE, limited approach boundaries, etc. 0 Potential interference and exposure to live energized parts resulting in live electrical shock, burns, etc. while the guarded line side remains energized 0 Poor communication of the activities performed can lead to SIFs and/or injuries. 4 Ensure the cabinet is at zero state 2 Potential injury resulting from arc flash, electric shock, etc. 5 Check electrical rotation prior to energizing the motor 2 Potential injury resulting from arc flash, electric shock, etc. Barricade using RED Barricade Tape at the limited approach boundary around the work area or assign a spotter to the job to ensure unqualified personnel stay clear of the work area. Conduct pre-task tailgate meeting with all those involved in the activity using this ESA. Open the cabinet with the disconnect in the closed position standing on the right of the equipment and opening it with the left hand. Use a contact voltage meter (e.g., fluke) to test equipment and verify zero state. Connect the rotation meter leads on the bottom of the disconnect. Energize standing to the side with the door open. Check meter results then shut power to the disconnect off, removing meter and closing door. 6 Correct Rotation (if applicable) 0 Minimal Risk If rotation is incorrect shut power off and lock and tag disconnect. Confirm zero state, change leads and reenergize. 7 Remove Electrical PPE 0 Minimal Risk (zero state) NOTE: It is the responsibility of the employee to immediately halt work and notify a if unsure of ability, scope of work, or pending safety issue, at any time in the workday. Preparer Print Name Date Preparer Signature Sign Name Date Participant Print Name Date Participant Sign Name Date Form # COR-3S3-PR Form Retention: EH45 CY+3

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