SYLLABUS Cultural Psychology: Black Psychology Department of Psychology

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1 Grayman-Simpson Course Description SYLLABUS Cultural Psychology: Black Psychology Department of Psychology Cultural psychology is a subfield within the areas of social psychology and cultural anthropology. It involves the study of the interconnections between and among intergenerationally transmitted behaviors, meanings, and symbols, and psychological processes such as cognition, affect, personality structure, and behavior. This course offers a foundation to the field through a case study of Black Psychology. Specifically, we will examine the cultural psychological experiences of people of African descent, primarily African Americans, and Black Psychology as a specialty with important implications for human and social science conceptual paradigms, theory, knowledge production methods, and intervention. Course Objectives: (1) Develop an understanding of deep culture, national and transnational cultural identities, cultural enclaves, and subcultural/counter-cultural identities. (2) Gain insight into self and others as cultural beings. (3) Gain an understanding of ethical research practices within the field of cultural psychology. Highly Recommended Pre-Course Reading David, J. (1992). Growing up Black: From slave days to the present 25 African- Americans reveal the trials and triumphs of their childhoods. New York: Avon Books. Required Texts 1. Garrod, A., Ward, J. V., Robinson, T. L., & Kilkenny, R. (1999). Souls looking back: Life stories of growing up Black. New York: Routledge. 2. Jones, R. L. (2004). Black psychology, 4 th Edition. Hampton, VA: Cobb & Henry Publishers. 3. Neville, H. A., Tynes, B. M., & Utsey, S. O. (2009). Handbook of African American psychology. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 4. Thompson, B., & Tyagi, S. (1996). Names we call home: Autobiography on racial identity. New York: Routledge.

2 5. Course Packet of Readings (Available at College Bookstore) (* = Available online): * Myers, L. J., & Speight, S. L. (2010). Reframing mental health and psychological well-being among persons of African descent: Africana/Black Psychology meeting the challenges of fractured social and cultural realities. Journal of Pan African Studies, 3(8), Dawson, M. C. (2001). Visions of a Black nation: Black nationalism and African- American political thought. In Black visions: The roots of contemporary African- American political ideologies (pp ). Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press. Clark, C. (1972). Black studies or the study of Black people? In R. L. Jones (Ed.), Black psychology, (pp. 3 17). New York: Harper & Row Publishers. Guthrie, R. V. (1980). The psychology of Black Americans: An historical perspective. In R. L. Jones (Ed.), Black psychology, 2 nd Edition, (pp ). New York: Harper & Row Publishers. Williams, R. L. (1980). The death of White research in the Black community. In R. L. Jones (Ed.), Black psychology, 2 nd Edition, (pp ). New York: Harper & Row Publishers. Bowman, P. J. (1991). Race, class, and ethics in research: Belmont principles to functional relevance. In R. L. Jones (Ed.), Black psychology, 3 rd Edition, (pp ). Hampton, VA: Cobb & Henry Publishers. * Lyons, H. Z., Bike, D. H., Johnson, A., & Bethea, A. (2011). Culturally competent qualitative research with people of African descent. Journal of Black Psychology, 38(2), Poston, W. S. C. (1990). The biracial identity development model: A needed addition. Journal of Counseling & Development, 69, Gillem, A. R., Cohn, L. R., & Throne, C. (2001). Black identity in biracial Black/White people: A comparison of Jacqueline who refuses to be exclusively Black and Adolphus who wishes he were. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 7(2), Barnes, E. J. (1972). The Black community as the source of positive self-concept for Black children: A theoretical perspective. In R. L. Jones (Ed.), Black psychology, (pp ). New York: Harper & Row Publishers. * Grayman, N. (2009). We who are dark : The Black community according to Black adults in America: An exploratory content analysis. Journal of Black Psychology, 34(4), (download from googlescholar.com)

3 Stovall, A. J. (2005). Why Black culture centers? The philosophical bases for Black culture centers. In F. L. Hord (Ed.), Black culture centers: Politics of survival and identity, (pp ). Chicago, IL: Third World Press. Grayman-Simpson, N. (2012). Black community involvement and subjective well-being. Journal of Pan African Studies, 5(3), * Akom, A. A. (2009). Critical hip hop pedagogy as a form of liberatory praxis. Equity & Excellence in Education, 42(1), * Carrasco, M. (2004). African American outreach resource manual. National Alliance of the Mentally Ill. (download from google.com) General Course Requirements Attendance You are expected to attend all classes on time and to arrive prepared. If you find yourself missing more than two classes (excused or unexcused), you need to seriously consider withdrawing from this course, as staying on pace with the class will likely prove too difficult. Death in the family, participation in religious holidays, involvement in school-sponsored activities, and illnesses requiring medical attention are some examples of excused absences. Absence due to illness must be substantiated in writing by the treating professional in order to be considered excused. No exceptions. Unexcused absences will have a negative impact on your grade. Work missed due to unexcused absences will not be accepted and will not receive any credit. Participation You are expected to actively participate once here. Active participation includes: constructive engagement in class discussions and activities, completion of all outside class work as assigned, pursuit of academic support from the professor and/or ACE as needed, taking responsibility and being self-accountable for your academic work, and engagement in mutually respectful relationships with the professor and peers. Guidelines for all writing assignments, including reading questions, can be found at the end of the syllabus. Reading responses should be typed directly onto the page, printed, and turned in at the beginning of class for review. All written work must be typed. Late assignments will not be accepted and will not receive any credit. At the end of the semester, you will be asked to reflect upon your participation, evaluate it and justify your evaluation using a guideline provided by me. I, in turn will review your evaluations and justifications and either agree or disagree with your self-assessment based on my subjective perceptions of the quality of your participation. My disagreement with your self-evaluation may call for either a higher or lower rating of your participation. In instances of disagreement, I will provide you with a written counter-justification. Grading Philosophy (Maximum Points = 150) In my courses, points are earned. Everyone starts with a zero and earns his/her own grade based on demonstrated mastery of the material. You do not start with a 150 and lose points based on incompetence. The following article, published in Forbes, accurately represents my grading philosophy and perceived role as your professor.

4 Art Carden, Contributor Dear Student: I Don't Lie Awake At Night Thinking of Ways to Ruin Your Life When I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child: but when I became a man, I put away childish things. 1 Corinthians 13:11 (KJV) One of the popular myths of higher education is that professors are sadists who live to inflict psychological trauma on undergraduates. Perhaps you believe that we pick students at random and then schedule all our assignments in such a way as to make those students lives as difficult as possible. The older I get and the longer I do this, the more I recognize that we (the professors) need to be more transparent about our philosophies of evaluation. How does this work? Let s clarify a few things. First, I do not take off points. You earn them. The difference is not merely rhetorical, nor is it trivial. In other words, you start with zero points and earn your way to a grade. You earn a grade in (say) Econ 100 for demonstrating that you have gained a degree of competence in economics ranging from being able to articulate the basic principles (enough to earn a C) to mastery and the ability to apply these principles to day-to-day affairs (which will earn an A). I ve hurt my own grades before by confusing my own incompetence with competence and my own (bare) competence with mastery, so trust me: I ve been there, and I understand. Second, this means that the burden of proof is on you to demonstrate that you have mastered the material. It is not on me to demonstrate that you have not. My assumption at the beginning of each class is that you know somewhere between nothing and very little about basic economics unless you were lucky enough to have an exceptional high school economics course. Otherwise, why are you here? You might say that the course is a prerequisite for other things you want to do, but if that it is the case and you know the material, you re more than welcome to simply show up for the exams, ace them, and be on your way. In this light, consider this: the fact that you don t understand why you didn t earn full points for a particular question might itself help explain why you didn t earn full points. Don t take this personally or interpret it as a sneer. See it as a learning opportunity. If you understood the material and do note that there is a large difference between really understanding the material and being able to reproduce a graph or definition you might remember from class you would have answered the question flawlessly. I recommend (as I have recommended to many others) that you go back, take another crack at it, and see if you can find where you have gone wrong. Then bring it by my office, and we will talk. Finally, I m here to be a mentor and instructor. This means that our relationship differs from the relationships that you have with your friends and family. Please don t infer from this that I don t care about you, because I do. A lot. I want to see you make good choices. I want to see you understand basic economics because I hope it will rock your world as it continues to rock mine and because the human consequences of lousy economic policy are enormous. That said, you should never take grades personally. I don t think you re stupid because you tank an exam, an assignment, or even an entire course. Economics is hard. A D or an F on an economics exam does not diminish your value in God s eyes (or in mine) or indicate that economics just isn t for you. It probably means you need to work smarter, and I m here to help you with that. Dear student, I once thought as you do. I once carried about the same misconceptions, the same litany of cognitive biases, and the same adolescent desire to blame others for my errors. I was (and remain) very poorly served by my

5 immaturity. As shocking as it may seem, I still cling to a lot of it, even after four years of college, five years of graduate school, and now five-and-a-half years as a professor. Economics is hard, but becoming a responsible member of a free society is very, very, very hard. I m still learning to put aside childish things. I hope you will do the same. Start now. The effort is daunting, but the rewards are substantial. This article was inspired by periodic discussions of evaluation in the academy that crop up on the website of the Chronicle of Higher Education and on InsideHigherEd.com. A former colleague used to quote the verse above at the top of his Economics 101 syllabus. I thank Rachel Smith for comments and suggestions. This article is available online at: Grading Rubric (Total Possible Points = 150) % (A) 86 89% (B+) 76 79% (C+) 66 69% (D+) 90 94% (A-) 83 85% (B) 73 75% (C) 63 65% (D) 80 82% (B-) 70 72% (C-) 60 62% (D-) 59% (F) Course Schedule Date Topic Homework Class 1 Introductions Elements of Deep Culture Complete Schedule Conflict Form for next class museum tour if needed A. Read Myers & Speight s article [1] Class 2 Class 3 Reserve tickets through Goucher for Dr. James Jones talk in the ATH on 2/28 National Great Blacks in Wax Museum Tour 11:00 1:00 Meet at Museum 1601 East North Avenue #3 Baltimore, MD Blacks in Wax Tour Discussion in context of Myers & Speight s article ABPsi Lecture Series Dr. Linda James Myers A. National Great Blacks in Wax Tour Reflection. [2][3][4][5][6][7] A. Read Dawson s chapter and complete essay response. [8][9][10][11][12][13] Class 4 Class 5 Acculturation Discussion of Dawson s chapter in the context of acculturation Ways of Knowing Discussion of Clark s chapter in the context of TRAILS of knowledge A. Read Clark s chapter and complete reading questions. [14][15][16][17][18][19][20] A. Read Guthrie s chapter and complete reading questions. [21][22][23][24][25]

6 Class 6 Class 7 Class 8 Class 9 Early Black Psychology, Establishment of ABPsi, and Intellectual Traditions within Black Psychology Discussion of Guthrie s chapter in the context of TRAILS of knowledge Discussion of Dr. Joe White s interview in the context of Dawson s chapter, TRAILS of knowledge, and hegemonic control Intergenerational interview share Discussion of documentary, scientific racism, and ethical research within the Black community Recommended Future Reading: Medical Apartheid ABPsi Lecture Series Dr. Robert L. Williams Inaugural Black Heritage Month Black Psychology Lecture: Dr. James M. Jones 7:00 Athenaeum [46] No Daytime Class A. Watch ABPsi Lecture Series Dr. Joseph White h?v=4pfpbbv5k6o[26] B. Complete intergenerational interview [27][28][29][30][31] A. Watch The Deadly Deception (documentary on the Tuskegee Experiments) [32] h?v=hcydi2b_9vs B. Read Williams chapter and Bowman s chapter and complete reading questions. [33][34][35][36][37][38][39][40] C. Read Lyons et al. article. [41] A. Read Names we call home Writing in search of a home: Geography, culture, and language in the creation of racial identity [42] B. Read Names we call home Wandering between two worlds, one dead, the other powerless to be born [43] C. Read Names we call home Eating Salt [44] D. Read Names we call home A hyphenated identity [45] A. Read Names we call home When we are capable of stopping, we begin to see: Being white, seeing whiteness [47] B. Read Names we call home Red and Black in White America: Discovering crossborder identities and other subversive activities [48] C. Read Names we call home Time traveling and border crossing: Reflections on White identity [49] D. Read Names we call home Jews in the US: The rising cost of whiteness [50] E. Complete racial identity autobiography [51][52][53][54][55][56][57][58] [59][60] Class 10 Dr. Jones Lecture Discussion A. Read Marks chapter and complete reading questions.

7 Class 11 Class 12 Class 13 Class 14 Class 15 Class 16 Small group Racial Autobiography share and large group Process[61] US Census Racial Classification Activity[62] Racial Identity Measures: Psychometric Properties, Administration, Scoring, and Interpretation Sankofa film discussion Small group Sankofa racial identity conceptualization discussion and large group process[77] Discussion of Souls Looking Back: Black college students racial narratives in the context of Black racial identity models Biracial Identity Who is Black?: CNN Black in America Discussion of Souls Looking Back: Biracial college students racial narratives in the context of Biracial racial identity models Counseling mixed raced persons clinical DVD Ecological Context of Human Development Discussion of Barnes and Stovall chapters in the context of Stevenson s racial socialization chapter Discussion of racial majority students attitudes toward existence of Umoja student group at Goucher, and racial majority students attitudes toward Black Heritage month programming within the context of the Barnes, Stovall and Grayman readings Peace Studies students presentation on organizing difficult community dialogues [63][64][65][66][67][68][69] A. Watch film, Sankofa. [70] B. Complete Sankofa reflection assignment [71][72][73][74][75][76] A. Read Souls looking Back Black college students racial narratives [78] B. What common themes emerge from the stories? Who s story caused the strongest reaction in you and why? [79] A. Read Stevenson s chapter and complete reading questions. [80][81][82][83][84][85][86][87] [88] A. Read Souls looking Back Biracial college students racial narratives [89] B. Read Poston s article [90] C. Read Gillem s article [91] D. What common themes emerge from the stories? Who s story caused the strongest reaction in you and why? [92] A. Read Barnes chapter, Stovall s chapter, and complete reading questions [93][94][95][96][97][98][99] [100] B. Read Grayman article we who are dark [101] A. Read Jackson-Lowman s chapter and complete reading questions[102][103][104][105] [106][107][108][109]

8 Class 17 Class 18 Class 19 Class 20 Class 21 on campus ABPsi Lecture Series Dr. Na im Akbar Discussion of Jackson-Lowman s chapter Counseling African Americans clinical DVD Final Project Work Day Meet in Library Discussion of Hip Hop as Black liberation psychology within the context of Thompson s chapter Hip Hop Psychology Conference Rhyming as Release Final Project Work Day Meet in Library Final Project Work Day Meet in Library A. Read Speight s chapter, Caldwell-Coldbert chapter, and complete reading questions[110][111][112][113] [114][115][116] B. Read Grayman-Simpson article, Black community involvement [117] A. Read Thompson chapter, Mattis chapter, and complete reading questions. [118][119][120][121][122][123][ 124][125][126][127] B. Watch Something from Nothing: The Art of Rap [128] C. Read Akom s article[129] A. Read National Alliance for Mental Illness (NAMI) African American Outreach Resource Manual ContentGroups/Multicultural_S upport1/fact_sheets1/outreac h_manuals/a_a_resource_man ual.pdf Class 22 Class 23 Class 24 NAMI Project: Culturally Mapping Baltimore[130] NAMI In Our Own Voices: African American Survivors of Mental Illness Guest Lecture Final Project Work Day Meet in Library A. Complete Final Project [131][132][133][134][135][136] [137][138][139][140] Class 25 Final Project Presentations A. Complete Final Reflection Paper [141][142][143][144][145][146] Class 26 Panel: Area Graduate Programs with a Black Psychology Focus [147][148][149][150] Class 27 Final Class Share a portion of your final reflection (one minute in length) Complete Self Evaluation

9 Complete Course Evaluation

10 National Great Blacks in Wax Museum Field Trip Reflection Name: Date: 1 page, single-spaced Q1. What personal feelings and thoughts were triggered by this tour? Q2. What visual images from the tour will likely stay with you? Q3. Why did I require the class to take this tour at the beginning of a course titled, Black Psychology? What is it that I want you to take away from this tour experience?

11 Reading Questions Name: Reading Title(s): Michael C. Dawson Visions of a Black nation: Black nationalism and African-American political thought. Date: Q1. I submit that the academy is a contested political space. Further, I propose that Black Psychology reflects a Black nationalist political ideological standpoint within this contested political space. Michael Dawson explicates the varied nature of Black nationalist ideology in this chapter. Describe Black cultural nationalism, Black revolutionary nationalism, and Black community nationalism, highlighting common and distinctive ideological elements. What motivates the adoption of a Black nationalist ideology among African Americans? And, why has this particular political ideology remained most popular among African Americans over the centuries (relative to liberalism and integrationism)? 1 ½ - 2 page single-spaced essay response. Criteria Description Explanation Analysis Excellent/ Exceeding/ Exemplary(4) Student masterfully describes the perspective(s) under study using cogent examples clearly connected to the point. Demonstrates relatively complete breadth and depth of understanding. Student masterfully explains primary causes and/or contextual factors contributing to the perspective(s) under study. Student analyzes differences between perspective(s) using methods and terminology appropriate to the discipline. Good/ Meeting/ Accomplished(3) Student accurately describes the perspective(s) under study using relevant examples. Demonstrates much breadth and depth of understanding. Student accurately explains primary causes and/or contextual factors contributing to the perspective(s) under study. Student identifies differences between perspectives using methods and terminology appropriate to the discipline. Satisfactory/ Approaching/ Developing(2) Student somewhat describes the perspective(s) under study using weak examples. Demonstrates some breadth and depth of understanding. Student somewhat explains primary causes and/or contextual factors contributing to the perspective(s) under study. Student articulated some distinction between perspectives, but makes little use of methods or terminology appropriate to the discipline. Poor/ Not Meeting/ Beginning(1) Student provides little or no description of a perspective(s) under study and provides no examples. Student provides little or no explanation of primary causes and/or contextual factors contributing to the perspective(s) under study. Student makes no clear distinction between perspectives. No use of methods or terminology appropriate to the discipline. Score

12 Reading Questions Name: Reading Title(s): Cedric Clark Black Studies or the Study of Black people? Date: Define the following terms: Weltanschauung - Zeitgeist - Epistemology - Q1. What distinguishes Black Studies from the Study of Black People? Q2. What is the chief aim of Black Psychology, according to Clark? Q3. Clark suggests that science is limited in what it can do, and limited in what it should do with respect to understanding human experience. Do you agree? Explain. Q4. Why are Newtonian conceptions of absolute time and space problematic to Black Psychology, according to Clark? Q5. What is the Cartesian duality of mind and matter? And, why is it important for Black Psychology to question this duality? Q6. According to Clark, which of our five senses has been emphasized in the study of psychology? Which sense does he suggest dominates Black people s way of knowing? Offer one potential implication of this discrepancy in sensory perception to the study of Black people.

13 Reading Questions Name: Reading Title(s): Robert V. Guthrie The psychology of Black Americans: An historical perspective. Date: Define the following concepts: circular validation/circular reasoning - rhetorical syllogism/syllogistic logic - Q1. What four problems make the exact quantification of human psychology challenging, according to Guthrie? Q2. Answer Guthrie s question, What are the intellectual predispositions that must be understood in order to clear the way for a psychology of African Americans? Specifically, what about Freud s thinking do we need to understand? What about Darwin s thinking do we need to understand? What about Galton s thinking do we need to understand? What about McDougall s thinking do we need to understand? And, what about Mendelian thinking do we need to understand?

14 Intergenerational Interview Questions Name: Date: Intergenerational dialogue is critical to the retention of cultural memory; and the retention of cultural memory is critical to the persistence of a peoplehood. Using the questions below as prompts, you are to conduct an interview with an elder (someone who is at least 60 years old) who self-identifies as Black in order to develop an appreciation for the ways in which the experience of being Black in America has changed and stayed the same through the generations. Q1. What messages did your family and society give you about being Black growing up? Q2. Did you have any Black role models growing up? Q3. If you have/had children, what did you try to teach them about being Black? Q4. How are expectations and roles for Black Americans today similar and different from the expectations and roles that you had growing up? Q5. If you could choose, would you prefer to grow up Black now, or during the time that you did?

15 Reading Questions Name: Reading Title(s): Robert L. Williams The death of White research in the Black community; Philip J. Bowman Race, class and ethics in research: Belmont principles to functional relevance. Date: Q1. Summarize the practice of scientific racism as illustrated in the case of the Tuskegee Experiment. Q2. Williams claims that the majority of Black community issues researched by White academics are iatrogenic, a red (black, white) herring. What does he mean? Q3. Williams was also skeptical about the 1967 APA ethical standards ability to protect Black would-be clients or research subjects. What are his critiques? Look up the current version of the APA ethical standards. What, if anything, has changed about Principles 13, 14, 15, and 16? Q4. What is a Black Veto Group, and how does Williams believe it can help to protect Black people from exploitative researchers? Q5. Describe the four main strategies used to respond to Black community resistance to academic research participation. Q6. What are the critiques of the responsive strategies as summarized by Bowman? Q7. Williams also suggested that to curtail exploitation through research, researchers of Black people should hold a Black perspective. What does Williams mean by a Black perspective? Q8. Summarize what the principal investigators of the 1979/1980 National Survey of African Americans did to implement a collaborative/participatory research enterprise with respect to planning, conceptualization, questionnaire development, data collection, and analysis. Would you say that these principal investigators held a Black perspective?

16 Racial Identity Autobiography Assignment This assignment is designed to assist you in the exploration of your own racial identity, and to help you learn more about racial identity in general, as it is socially constructed within an American context. Expounding on the prompts given below, write a five page, single spaced narrative about your sense of self as a racial being. Select a one page excerpt that you will share with the class. An evaluation rubric for this assignment is included on the next two pages. Q1. Discuss when and how you first became aware of your race. Q2. Discuss the messages/lessons that you received over the years about your skin color, your hair texture, hair length and hair color, your eye color, and facial features such as facial hair, the shape of your eyes, nose, and lips from your parents and other adult members of your family. Q3. Discuss the messages/lessons that you received about your skin color, your hair texture, hair length and hair color, your eye color, and facial features such as facial hair, the shape of your eyes, nose, and lips during preschool, elementary school, middle school, high school, and college from teachers/professors, other school personnel, other students, and friends. Q4. Discuss the messages/lessons that you received over the years about your skin color, your hair texture, hair length and hair color, your eye color, and facial features such as facial hair, the shape of your eyes, nose, and lips from popular culture, including books, toys and games, youth and adult movies, youth and adult television shows, youth and adult music, advertisements, and news. Q5. Discuss personal experiences with racism, racial microaggressions, racial harassment, or racism-based trauma in preschool, elementary school, middle school, high school, and college, and lessons you learned about the world and your place within it as a consequence. Q6. How have all of these messages/lessons influenced the centrality (importance) of your racial group membership to your overall identity or sense of self? Q7. How have all of these messages/lessons influenced the personal regard you hold for your racial group?

17 Racial Identity Autobiography Evaluation Rubric Component Very Poor (F) Poor (D/65) Organization Paper is missing Paper is all three key missing one or organizational two key components organizational (Introduction, components Body, and and/or the Conclusion). organizational components are poorly structured. Headings are missing and/or formatting of headings according to APA style is very poor. Organization - Introduction Organization - Body Organization - Conclusion Paper is missing a recognizable thesis. Paper is missing premises. Paper is mission introduction of supporting narratives. Paper is missing supportive narratives. Paper is missing conclusion. Paper includes thesis, however thesis fails to address the main conclusion. Paper is missing premises. Paper is missing introduction of supporting narratives. Paper includes supporting narratives that are difficult to follow. Transitions between narratives are missing or are choppy. Paper conclusion is unrelated to the introduction and narratives, and does not answer questions (6) Satisfactory (C/75) Paper contains all three key organizational components. Components are delineated by headings, though the formatting of the headings according to APA style is poor. Structure of the Introduction, Body, and Conclusion is satisfactory, with considerable room for improvement. Paper thesis addresses the main conclusion, though it may not be clearly stated. Paper includes premises, though they may not be clearly stated. Includes introduction to supporting narratives, though introduction is neither clear nor brief. Paper includes supporting narratives that are inconsistent with respect to the ease that that they can be followed. Transitions between narratives are choppy. Paper conclusion is related to the introduction. Narratives are integrated, however, interpretation is missing. Conclusion Good (B/85) Paper contains all three key organizational components. Components are delineated by headings. formatting of headings reveals satisfactory beginning command of APA style. Structure of Introduction, Body, and Conclusion is of above average quality, with some room for improvement. Paper thesis addresses the main conclusion, and it is clearly stated. Paper includes premises, though there is inconsistency in their clarity. Includes introduction to supporting narratives that is either clear or brief, but not both. Paper includes well-organized supporting narratives that are easy to follow, however, contain choppy transitions. Paper conclusion includes interpretations of the narratives included in the body, and answers to questions (6) and (7) to Excellent (A/95) Paper includes exceptionally wellstructured Introduction, Body, and Conclusion. Organizational components are clearly delineated with headings. APA formatting of headings reveals strong command of style. Includes a clearly stated thesis that addresses the main conclusion of the paper. Includes consistently clearly stated premises, or reasons for believing your thesis. Includes clear and brief introduction of the supporting narratives that you used in the body of the paper to support your premises and ultimate conclusion. In other words, your introduction clearly states, What you believe, why you believe it, and how you will prove it. Paper includes well-organized supporting narratives that are easy to follow and include seamless transitions Paper conclusion includes sophisticated interpretations of the narratives included in the body, and comprehensive answers to questions (6) and

18 Content Quality Paper is missing narratives. Paper is incomprehensible. and (7). Narratives are impoverished. Paper includes a number of incomplete sentences. Paper includes poor use of grammar, syntax, lexicon, and spelling. Paper is conversational in tone. Paper fails to include the use of vocabulary expected of a college student. incorporates answers to questions (6) and (7). Considers new questions about one s racial identity yet to be answered, and may propose additional work required in order to answer new questions. Narratives include two of the following four elements: 1) captivating, (2) thick with description, (3) nuanced, and (4) easy to follow. Narratives within the body of the paper include reflections; however, they are not critical reflections. Sentences are complete. Paper includes satisfactory use of grammar, syntax, lexicon, and spelling. Paper is formal (rather than conversational) in tone. Paper includes collegelevel vocabulary. elaborate on the conclusion introduced at the start of the paper. New questions about one s racial identity yet to be answered are included. Proposes additional work required in order to answer new questions. Narratives include three of the following four elements: 1) captivating, (2) thick with description, (3) nuanced, and (4) easy to follow. Narratives within the body of the paper include some critical reflections. Sentences are complete. Paper includes above average use of grammar, syntax, lexicon, and spelling. Paper is formal (rather than conversational) in tone. Paper includes above average vocabulary. (7) to elaborate on the conclusion introduced at the start of the paper. Thoughtful new questions about one s racial identity yet to be answered are included. Proposes additional work required in order to answer new questions. Narratives within the body of the paper are: (1) captivating, (2) thick with description, (3) nuanced, and (4) easy to follow. Narratives within the body of the paper include reflections that are critical (they interrogate the meaning of the narratives). Sentences are complete. Paper includes excellent use of grammar, syntax, lexicon, and spelling. Paper is formal (rather than conversational) in tone. Paper includes sophisticated vocabulary (level typically found within professional psychological academic writings).

19 US Census Racial Classification Experience How do you racially identify now? And, to what race would you have belonged at different points in time, according to the United States Census? You may only circle one choice until you get to (1790) 1. White; 2. Non-White (1810) 1. White; 2. Colored; 3. Non-naturalized Foreigner (1830) 1. White; 2. Colored; 3. Non-naturalized Foreigner; 4. Non-naturalized Foreign White (1850) 1. White; 2. Black; 3. Mulatto ( ½ Black and ½ White) (1870) 1. White; 2. Black; 3. Mulatto ( ½ Black and ½ White); 4. Chinese (including all East Asians); 5. Indian (American Indigenous) (1890) 1. White; 2. Black; 3. Mulatto ( ½ Black and ½ White); 4. Quadroon ( ¾ Black and ¼ White); 5. Octoroon (7/8 Black and 1/8 White); 6. Chinese; 7. Japanese; 8. Indian (American Indigenous) (1900) 1. White; 2. Black; 3. Chinese; 4. Japanese; 5. Indian (American Indigenous; required to include % of lineage that was White) (1910) 1. White; 2. Black; 3. Mulatto ( ½ Black and ½ White); 4. Chinese; 5. Japanese; 6. Indian (American Indigenous; required to include % of lineage that was White, Black and Indigenous); 7. Other Races (1920) 1. White; 2. Black; 3. Mulatto ( ½ Black and ½ White); 4. Chinese; 5. Japanese; 6. South Asia Indian (Hindu); 7. Korean; 8. Filipino; 9. Indian (American Indigenous); 10. Other Races (1930) 1. White; 2. Black; 3. Negro (any amount of Black and White ancestry; predominantly Black and some Indian ancestry); 4. Chinese; 5. Japanese; 6. South Asia Indian (Hindu); 7. Korean; 8. Filipino; 9. Indian (American Indigenous; predominantly Indigenous and some White ancestry); 10. Mexican (before and after this census, would be listed as White); 11. Other Races

20 (1940) 1. White; 2. Black; 3. Negro (any amount of Black and White ancestry; predominantly Black and some Indian ancestry); 4. Chinese; 5. Japanese; 6. South Asia Indian (Hindu); 7. Korean; 8. Filipino; 9. Indian (American Indigenous; predominantly Indigenous and some White ancestry); 10. Other Races (1950) 1. White; 2. Black; 3. Negro (any amount of Black and White ancestry; predominantly Black and some Indian ancestry); 4. Chinese; 5. Japanese; 6. Filipino; 7. Indian (American Indigenous; predominantly Indigenous and some White ancestry); 8. Other Races (1960) 1. White; 2. Black; 3. Negro (any amount of Black and White ancestry; predominantly Black and some Indian ancestry); 4. Chinese; 5. Japanese; 6. Filipino; 7. American Indian (American Indigenous; predominantly Indigenous and some White ancestry); 8. Hawaiian; 9. Part-Hawaiian; 10. Aleut; 11. Eskimo (1970) 1. White; 2. Black/Negro (Black; any amount of Black and White ancestry; predominantly Black and some Indian ancestry); 3. Chinese; 4. Japanese; 5. Korean; 6. Filipino; 7. American Indian (American Indigenous; predominantly Indigenous and some White ancestry); 8. Hawaiian; 9. Part-Hawaiian; 10. Aleut; 11. Eskimo; 12. Other Races (1980) 1. White; 2. Black/Negro (Black; any amount of Black and White ancestry; predominantly Black and some Indian ancestry); 3. Chinese; 4. Japanese; 5. Korean; 6. Filipino; 7. Vietnamese; 8. Indian (East); 9. Guamanian; 10. Samoan; 11. American Indian (American Indigenous; predominantly Indigenous and some White ancestry); 12. Hawaiian; 13. Part-Hawaiian; 14. Aleut; 15. Eskimo; 16. Other Races (1990) 1. White (ancestry within original peoples of Europe, Middle East, North Africa); 2. Black/African American (ancestry within any Black racial groups in Africa); 3. American Indian/Alaskan Native (ancestry within original peoples of North, Central, and South America); 4. Asian (ancestry within original peoples of Far East, Southeast Asia, or Indian subcontinent); 5. Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander (ancestry within original peoples of Pacific Islands); 6. Some Other Race; 6. Two or More Races (2000) 1. White (ancestry within original peoples of Europe, Middle East, North Africa); 2. Black/African American (ancestry within any Black racial groups in Africa); 3. American Indian/Alaskan Native (ancestry within original peoples of North, Central, and South America); 4. Asian (ancestry within original peoples of Far East, Southeast Asia, or Indian subcontinent); 5. Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander (ancestry within original peoples of Pacific Islands); 6. Some Other Race; 7. Two or More Races

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