Des Moines Area Community College

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1 Des Moines Area Community College AQIP Systems Portfolio With Item Appraisal Feedback 2010 Submitted to the Academic Quality Improvement Program Higher Learning Commission November 1, 2010 Robert J. Denson President (Questions for each criterion and HLC Feedback have been added to this document for internal use. The official submitted document did not contain each question according to document requirements set by the Higher Learning Commission. Formatting and page numbers are different than the official document)

2 Table of Contents Institutional Overview... 1 Criterion 1- Helping Students Learn Processes (P) Results (R) Improvement (I) Criterion 2- Accomplishing Other Distinct Objectives Processes (P) Results (R) Improvement (I) Criterion 3- Understanding Student and Stakeholders Needs Processes (P) Results (R) Improvement (I) Criterion 4- Valuing People Processes (P) Results (R) Improvement (I) Criterion 5- Leading and Communicating Processes (P) Results (R) Improvement (I) Criterion 6- Supporting Organizational Operations Processes (P) Results (R) Improvement (I) Criterion 7- Measuring Effectiveness Processes (P) Results (R) Improvement (I) Criterion 8- Planning Continuous Improvement Processes (P) Results (R) Improvement (I) Criterion 9- Building Collaborative Relationships Processes (P) Results (R) Improvement (I) Index to Evidence

3 Overview: Des Moines Area Community College (DMACC) is a publicly supported institution with the Carnegie Classification: Undergraduate Instruction at the Associate s Level. DMACC was officially established on March 18, 1966, as a comprehensive community college. Its purpose included general education courses to prepare students for transfer, career/technical programs to prepare students for entrance into the workforce, continuing education, adult literacy, and GED services. In 1984, the Iowa New Jobs Training Program legislation was enacted, and economic development became an additional and significant responsibility for DMACC and the other Iowa community colleges. Today, the college is comprised of six campuses and two centers in an 11-county district. The college district encompasses 6,550 square miles; roughly 25% of Iowa s population resides within the DMACC service area. The campuses are in Ankeny, downtown Des Moines, West Des Moines, Carroll, Boone, and Newton. The DMACC Success Center is located on the south side of Des Moines, and the DMACC Career Academy, Hunziker Center is located in Ames. DMACC s mission, vision, brand, purposes, strategic goals and values are outlined below and are also displayed on the DMACC web site. MISSION: DMACC provides quality, affordable, student-centered education and training to empower Iowans of all ages and backgrounds to pursue life s opportunities and achieve their career dreams. VISION: DMACC is dedicated to helping students achieve lifelong fulfillment by providing a quality, innovative and responsive learning environment. LIFE'S CALLING: Life s Calling is the essence of Des Moines Area Community College. By evoking opportunity and empowerment, Life s Calling is designed to inspire, energize and encourage students to achieve their career dreams and life s aspirations right here at DMACC. PURPOSES: 1. Prepare students to succeed in earning a baccalaureate degree by offering transferable higher education courses. 2. Prepare students to succeed by offering higher education courses in technical and occupational areas that lead to an associate's degree, certification, or diploma. 3. Through collaboration and cooperation with business and labor, prepare individuals for success in the work force by anticipating and responding to work place training and education needs. 4. Provide opportunities for high school students that include alternative high school completion programs, college-level academic and technical courses, and courses not currently available at their high schools. 5. Provide support services for students that are under prepared or have other challenges that might prevent them from being successful in higher education programs. 6. Meet the needs of our diverse population, develop partnerships with educational institutions, businesses, governmental agencies, and communities. 7. For students, faculty, staff, and community, continuously improve access to and make optimal use of current and emerging technology. 8. Provide opportunities for students and members of the community to pursue avocational interests and personal development. 9. Provide professional development opportunities for faculty and staff to create and maintain a campus climate conducive to collaboration and cooperation, responsible and innovative use of resources, and a process of continuous improvement. 10. Provide opportunities for adults to complete their high school diploma. FIRSTS GOALS FIRST in Quality A true cornerstone of our past and present and future success is the quality of the education and services we provide for our students and our district. FIRST in Service Every person in our service area has the right to a DMACC education. FIRST in Affordability We are committed to making a quality DMACC education as affordable as possible VALUES: Responsiveness - Reach out actively to serve our communities. Excellence - Ensure accountability, quality, and responsibility in every endeavor. Community - Exchange and communicate ideas and information openly, through collaboration and shared decision-making. Overview 1

4 Learning - Create a student-centered environment to foster lifelong, accessible and relevant learning leading to career success. Cultural Understanding and Mutual Respect - Value individual rights, privacy and diversity. Innovation - Embrace change and anticipate emerging issues. Professional Integrity - Maintain a high standard of ethics and honesty in professional activities and performance of duties. Overview 1- What are your goals for student learning and shaping an academic climate? What are your key credit and non-credit instructional programs, and educational systems, services, and technologies that directly support them? DMACC has developed a curriculum structure that clearly states common learning competencies for all students, and program and course specific competencies. DMACC s common learning objectives were created by faculty and administration and were last formally reviewed in 2006 to assure continued alignment with the mission and goals of the college. This structure and its processes continue to support an academic climate based on open and clearly defined learning objectives developed with input from stakeholders, with accountability processes and measures in place to assure DMACC s continued ability to meet the needs of business, industry and educational partners. Career and Technical programs, including their learning expectations, are approved by the Iowa Department of Education and are published in the college catalog, program information briefs, and on the DMACC web site. All course competencies are published on the DMACC web site. DMACC has identified six learning competencies all students are expected to achieve. DMACC s common learning objectives for students are outlined in Table 0.1. These goals are published in the college catalog, student handbook and the DMACC web site. Table 0.1- DMACC General Education Goals Competency Description 1. Understand and demonstrate effective a. Write organized, clear and grammatically correct English, appropriate to purpose and audience. communication b. Read a document and demonstrate an understanding of its content, such as by drawing inferences and distinguishing between major ideas and supporting detail and between fact and opinion. c. Present an organized oral message, appropriate to purpose and audience, using correctly spoken English. d. Listen attentively, respectfully and sensitively to a message and demonstrate an understanding of the message. e. Work collaboratively. f. Use technical communication effectively. 2. Understand and demonstrate logical and critical thinking 3. Develop an understanding of fundamental scientific principles and their application 4. Develop an understanding of fundamental mathematical principles and their application 5. Develop an understanding of human society and cross-cultural variation and perspective a. Develop reasoned and thorough arguments. b. Analyze the arguments of others, distinguishing fact from opinion and identifying assumptions and inferences. c. Recognize and value the existence of different points of view. d. Analyze the conditions of a given problem and design solutions to it. e. Develop research techniques and acquire knowledge of bibliographic citation. a. Demonstrate an understanding of basic scientific principles. b. Apply scientific principles to analyze and solve problems in nature, culture and society. c. Make informed decisions, as citizens, on matters of public policy related to science. a. Obtain correct mathematical results with or without technological assistance. b. Develop logical thinking skills that permit the selection of models appropriate to problems. c. Express models numerically, graphically and symbolically. d. Identify, interpret and manipulate relevant data. a. Demonstrate an understanding of social and behavioral sciences and their application to the study of cultural diversity. b. Demonstrate an understanding of social and behavioral sciences and their application to the study of global cultures. 6. Develop knowledge / a. Demonstrate a fundamental knowledge of history, philosophy, literature Overview 2

5 Competency Description appreciation for the or the arts. human condition as expressed in works of b. Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of human expression on culture and of culture on human expression. imagination and thought c. Recognize the significance of historical context to culture/ expression. Community members find many educational opportunities at DMACC designed to help meet their goals. DMACC s key credit and non-credit instructional programs are shown in Table 0.2. Table 0.2- DMACC Key Credit and Non-credit Instructional Programs Instructional Program Description Arts and Sciences General education, paraprofessional and pre-professional curriculum designed for students transferring to a 4-year institution or entering the workforce. Career and Technical Vocational/Technical programs designed to teach the essential knowledge and skills Education needed to fulfill the employment needs of the community. Continuing Education Continuing Education designed for career training, professional advancement, or personal enrichment for those for whom academic credit is not required. Pre-college Education College preparatory courses designed to aid students whose educational background requires strengthening to achieve success in regular college-level courses. Programs include ABE, GED and ESL. DMACC offers many instructional and non-instructional services for students. DMACC s key instructional and non-instructional services for students are identified in Table 0.3. Table 0.3- DMACC s Key Instructional Services for Students Service Description Academic Achievement Resource for students to receive extra help with assignments or additional Centers instruction to supplement course work. Academic Advising Creating an educational plan to meet their goals and academic abilities including program and course selection and service referral. Academic Placement and COMPASS and other testing used to inform students about their cognitive Testing Services skill and recommend appropriate course work. Community Educational Program aimed at providing access for students with low socioeconomic Outreach status or underrepresented populations. Disability Services Helps students access the necessary physical and learning accommodations according to their disability. Financial Aid Recurring available financial resources for students to meet their needs. Library Services Provides online and physical information sources for students. Tutoring Services Provides free individualized or group tutoring services to students to meet their academic needs. DMACC s current technologies and their supporting role to the instructional process are provided in Table 0.4. Table 0.4- DMACC Technologies Supporting Instruction Technology Role in Supporting Instruction Blackboard and Web CT Stable and rich online instructional environment. course delivery software DMACC s Web Information Students may apply, register, view schedules and grades and pay their bill System online. Instructional and Simulation Examples of this software are EMT simulations, math lab software, and auto Software instructional software. MyLab Virtual Desktop Allows student to access instructional software and other DMACC technological services. SharePoint portal services Virtual collaboration space for student groups to share information and work and Team sites collaboratively. Overview 2- What key organizational services, other than instructional programs, do you provide for your students and other external stakeholders? What programs do you operate to achieve them? DMACC s organizational services and the programs that support them are listed in Table 0.5. Overview 3

6 Table 0.5- Non-instructional Organizational Services Serving Students and External Stakeholders Organizational Program Program Description Service Student Life Alumni Association Provides event and networking opportunities for graduates and alumni. Athletics Men s and women s sports teams are available in the Boone Campus. Bookstore Providing various educational resources for students at the lowest cost including used textbooks and textbook rental. Career Counseling Career assessment and advising program available to all students. Child Care Child care services are available on the Urban and Ankeny campuses. Counseling Services Personal counseling services are available at each campus. Foundation Providing resources for various student programs, projects and scholarships. Housing College owned student housing is available on the Boone campus. Ombudsperson Ombudsperson services are available to mediate disputes. Services Student Health Registered Nurse, Nurse Practitioner, and dental hygiene services are available on the Ankeny campus for all students. Student Assistance Program for students needing help with family, relationship, work, Program substance abuse and other issues (all campuses). Student Activities/ Opportunities for involvement and leadership at all campuses. Government Student Wellness Facilities and programming to support physical fitness on all campuses. Study Abroad Provides opportunities for students to study abroad. Program Veteran services Provides services and programming for recently deployed and returning veterans. Workforce Central Iowa Works DMACC s workforce initiative to map training to workforce needs in Development central Iowa. Evelyn Davis A partnership program between DMACC, community based Workforce Center organizations and business and industry to provide education, (2011) training and on-the-job training in one location in urban Des Moines. Iowa Employment Solutions DMACC Business Resources Workforce Training Academy YouthBuild A partnership between DMACC and The Iowa Department of Workforce Development to provide workforce training and placement services in central Iowa. Administers state workforce initiatives (260E, 260F) to provide training for new and existing jobs in central Iowa. Provides tuition funding and student support services for continuing education certificate training in high demand, high growth fields. Combines construction trades programming with educational services to high school dropouts. Overview 3- What are the short- and long-term requirements and expectations of the current student and other key stakeholder groups you serve? Who are your primary competitors in serving these groups? A broad long-term expectation for students is included in DMACC s mission statement. All students are expected to access all DMACC services available and partner with DMACC faculty and staff to achieve their career goals. Specific short-term student rights and responsibilities are established by educational service policies and are published on the DMACC web site and in the student handbook. DMACC students are expected to: Be aware of student conduct that is subject to sanctions as stated in the DMACC Student Handbook. Exhibit proper behavior at all times. Unacceptable behavior includes, but is not limited to, verbal abuse, profanity, public disturbance, fighting, destruction of property or interference with class, and computer misuse. Overview 4

7 Read course syllabi to determine attendance and grading policies. Act in a manner that does not cause concern for the health and safety of yourself or others. Complete academic work without cheating or committing plagiarism. Follow DMACC regulations regarding the possession or use of alcoholic beverages, tobacco and controlled substances. Follow motor vehicle safety and parking rules and regulations. Comply with reasonable and appropriate instructions and/or requests of college faculty and staff for the purpose of maintaining a safe educational environment. DMACC s long-term expectations for faculty and staff are also embodied in the mission, vision, purposes and values of the institution. Specific employee rights and responsibilities are published in several locations. DMACC s ethics statement lists DMACC s professional expectations and includes provisions for commitment to students, the public and the profession. All other expectations for DMACC employees are published in the college policies and human resource procedures for the college and are included in all employee orientations. Competition for students comes from several colleges and universities in central Iowa, from online universities, and from in-house education and training programs in business and industry. Institutions that compete with DMACC for students include: Three private residential colleges/universities in the greater Des Moines area: Drake University, Grandview College, and Simpson College. Although DMACC and the three local colleges share information and students through a consortium, the declining population of traditional age college students has resulted in greater competition for the same pool of students. Six profit or not-for-profit colleges in central Iowa offer career/technical programs that compete with those offered at DMACC. These colleges are Phoenix, Kaplan, Mercy College of Health Sciences, ITT Tech, American Institution of Business and Vatterott College. Iowa State University in Ames, one of the three Regent universities in Iowa, is in the center of DMACC s district. Many businesses are now starting their own learning colleges to provide training and education to their employees, a service that DMACC has traditionally provided through Business Resources and Continuing Education. The Des Moines Public School System has an extensive community education division that competes with DMACC s Continuing Education division. Overview 4 What are your administrative, faculty, and staff human resources? What key factors determine how you organize and use them? DMACC has a total of 1,349 regular full and part-time employees and 1,067 adjunct faculty. For all regular employees, 346 (26%) are faculty members, 603 (45%) are professional and technical staff, 483 (36%) are support and service employees, and 14 (1%) are administrators as defined by the State of Iowa. Over the past five years, the total number of regular employees has decreased by 207 positions or 13%. During this same period, the number of full-time faculty has increased by 35 positions or 11%. Recent economic conditions and declining state support have caused DMACC to reduce its total workforce but the institution has done so while maintaining its commitment to fulltime faculty. Workforce reductions have been accomplished entirely through attrition. DMACC s use of adjunct faculty has also risen by 279 positions (35%) for the same time period. While DMACC has been able to maintain its commitment to full-time faculty, additional adjunct faculty members have been necessary to offset extraordinary enrollment increases in recent years. The largest age group of employees is those over 55 years old. Currently there are 709 or 31% of all employees in this category, with the percent of the total employees in this category rising from 26% in Of the total number of administrators and instructors, 66% have a Masters Degree or above which is up from 63% in DMACC continues to attract and retain a well educated faculty and administration. For all employees, 55% are women and 8% are minority with both of these percentages remaining steady over the past five years. Overview 5

8 Many factors drive how faculty and staff are organized and used within the institution. Primarily, employees are hired because they have the education, skills and experience to meet an existing need in the college as determined by faculty and administration. All new hires are reviewed by Cabinet to assure that they will make a significant contribution to the overall mission of the college. Once hired, employees are given the opportunity to assume leadership positions in the college and seek continued education and professional development. Employees are encouraged to seek new positions and new levels of responsibility to match their skills and abilities. The organizational structure of the college is determined by common goals, populations served, administrative function, efficiency and geography of the 11 county service area. Organization of the college is also affected by adoption of new projects and responsibilities that support the institution s mission. Adjustment to the organizational structure are made to accommodate these new changes only to the extent that it meets current need and minimizes impact on existing high performing areas of the college. Overview 5- What strategies align your leadership, decision-making, and communication processes with your mission and values, the policies and requirements of your oversight entities, and your legal, ethical, and social responsibilities? DMACC ensures that the practices of its leadership team at all levels in the institution align with the policies and views of the Board through extensive communication systems, collaborative partnerships and open dialogue in all of its initiatives. Board decisions are driven by the college mission and goals, and the strategic plan flows from those goals. Decisions by the leadership team are made within the parameters of the policies and procedures of the college which govern legal, ethical and social responsibilities. Planning decisions throughout the institution are made within the framework of the 2016 FIRSTS Goals. The college operates as one district that supports individual campuses and centers. District functions provide central services and consistency in operations, procedures, and processes. Individual campuses assume responsibility for day-to-day operations consistent with district policy and operation procedures. Campus Provosts and academic Deans have autonomy to make campus specific decisions that meet the guidelines and policies of the college. The system strives to provide a framework to achieve the objective of operating as a single institution while preserving autonomy and decision-making authority at each campus and site. DMACC makes extensive use of outside advisory committees charged to oversee the development, continuance and monitoring of its programs and departments. Each career/technical program has an advisory committee; members include former students, both union and nonunion workers and business and professional leaders. All advisory committees are appointed by the Board of Directors based on recommendations of Program Chairpersons, Deans, Vice Presidents and the President. DMACC employs a traditional higher education organization and leadership structure to lead, manage and provide accountability for achieving its goals and mission. The college is governed by a ninemember board responsible for overall policy and fiscal oversight of the college and for the direct supervision of the President. DMACC s President serves as the Chief Executive Office and is responsible for the operation of the college. The President has a nine member Cabinet that meets weekly and serves as his chief advisory body. Each instructional and non-instructional program for the district has representation on this group. Provosts and Deans are responsible for carrying out the goals and mission of the college on each campus and within each curricular area. In addition to the official organizational chain of command, DMACC has committees, commissions and workgroups organized to address functions or initiatives vital to the overall mission of the college. Staff and faculty contribute to the administrative and decision-making processes of DMACC through involvement in these committees, commissions and workgroups. Ad hoc committees are formed to solicit input from internal and external stakeholders regarding short-term issues. Overview 6

9 Overview 6- What strategies align your key administrative support goals with your mission and values? What services, facilities, and equipment do you provide to achieve them? DMACC s 2016 FIRSTS Goals of first in quality, service and affordability are a driving factor for determining administrative support needs within the college and were designed so that all instructional and administrative support functions of the college have a role to play in meeting these goals. Administrative support functions affect students ability to access services and technologies, interact with quality faculty and staff, feel safe and welcome on campus, meet their fiscal responsibilities to the institution, and secure resources necessary to continue their education. All of these factors contribute to student retention and persistence under the 2016 FIRSTS Goals. Administrative support services staff are represented on the President s Cabinet to ensure their commitment and contribution to the strategic goals of the institution. Administrators for Human Resources, Foundation, Marketing and Institutional Effectiveness serve on the President s Cabinet as well as the Vice Presidents for Information Technology, Business and Physical Plant Services and Community and Workforce Partnerships. The Executive Vice President and Vice Presidents of Information Technology, Business Services, and the Controller serve on the finance sub-committee responsible for leading, managing and securing financial resources for the college. DMACC currently has in place a 10 year property tax levy to support equipment and technological needs of the college. These funds are used to proved administrative support services with the equipment necessary to be effective. Often this involves upgrading and replacing old equipment to capitalize on faster and more efficient technology. New technological solutions are adopted when they can improve efficiency and have a favorable return on investment for the college. DMACC contracts for outside services when necessary to maintain effectiveness in meeting the needs of students and stakeholders. These services must be able to do the work more efficiently and at a lower cost than internal resources, or as necessary to help during peak student enrollment times. DMACC has expanded its facilities at five of its six campuses during the past seven years. Each expansion has increased space for both instructional and administrative services including office space, food services, bookstore and student service areas. Overview 7- What determines the data and information you collect and distribute? What information resources and technologies govern how you manage and use data? Data and information needs are driven by the 2016 FIRSTS Goals of the college. These goals provide 20 indicators to measure and track progress toward being first in quality, service and affordability. Data and information directly related to these indicators are collected at both formative and summative time intervals. Progress toward these goals also encourages additional data analysis regarding ancillary processes and programs that are undertaken to promote the strategic goals of the institution. All faculty and staff have access to DMACC s data warehouse and are encouraged to make additional data and analysis requests to the Office of Institutional Effectiveness. DMACC s primary technology for data collection is the SCT Banner System and its Oracle Database. DMACC also utilizes Qualtrics survey software to gather information from both internal and external stakeholders. In addition to the maintenance of the production Banner system and database, DMACC maintains a reporting instance of the database. Production data are copied nightly to the reporting database and provides access to current data without competing with production systems. All institutional data are available to the Institutional Effectiveness and Information Technology staff to be used to support the data needs of faculty and staff. Data access is secured according to password protocols and defined roles at the institution. DMACC supports the SAS Business Intelligence (BI) Platform to make performance data available to faculty staff on a self-serve 24/7 basis. The BI platform provides user access to college data systems and ensures additional security by not being accessible outside the DMACC network. Data Overview 7

10 systems at DMACC are supported by seven network engineers and two database administrators. The BI system is maintained by Institutional Effectiveness staff. Overview 8- What are the key commitments, constraints, challenges, and opportunities with which you must align your organization s short- and long-term plans and strategies? DMACC s key commitments are contained in the mission, vision, goals and values of the institution listed previously. Recent enrollment increases have been both an opportunity and a challenge for the college. Table 0.6 shows DMACC s credit enrollment since In this 5-year period, DMACC s enrollment has increased by almost 50%. During this same period, state funding for community colleges has decreased. Table 0.7 shows the state aid per student since State funding per pupil in 2010 was lower than the state funding per pupil in While increased enrollment has provided the necessary financial resources to buffer the effects of lowered state aid, it has also been a challenge to find the facilities and staff necessary to meet increased student needs. Many of the processes and programs discussed in this portfolio have been affected by recent enrollment and financial trends. Though enrollment has risen by ~50% and state support has been reduced to 2005 levels, DMACC s tuition has only risen 21% from the to the academic years. Though DMACC has been managed very successfully during these lean years, funding continues to be a constraint for the institution. Table 0.6- DMACC Credit Enrollment Fall Spring Summer Unduplicated Headcount Credit Hour Enrollment HEADCOUNT Increase from 2006 % Increase from 2006 CREDIT HOURS Increase % Increase from 2006 from 2006 Fall , , Fall , ,822 1, % 10, % Fall , ,547 1, % 17, % Fall , ,179 5, % 50, % Fall , ,828 7, % 67, % Spring , , Spring , ,554 1, % 9, % Spring , ,942 2, % 17, % Spring , ,530 3, % 30, % Spring , ,378 6, % 56, % Summer ,679 42, Summer ,716 42, % % Summer ,412 48, % 5, % Summer ,302 54,354 1, % 11, % Summer ,702 64,945 3, % 22, % Table 0.7- Funding per Student for Iowa Community Colleges Year Amount per Student FY2005 $2,055 FY2006 $2,188 FY2007 $2,269 FY2008 $2,399 FY2009 $2,486 FY2010 (est.) $2,053 DMACC s strong partnerships with area school districts and Iowa s colleges continue to be an opportunity for the institution and the citizens of Central Iowa. DMACC is uniquely positioned to improve high school students expectations and preparation for college, serve them for their first two years of college, and ease their transition either into the workforce or into another college or university. DMACC has become an integral partner in workforce development in its service area. DMACC is the official Iowa Workforce service provider in central Iowa and has developed a recognized best practice workforce development model. Central Iowa Works supports Sector Boards in information technology, financial services, construction, advanced manufacturing, health care and energy. These Boards involve business and industry leaders in identifying the skills and knowledge needed in the workforce and communicate these needs to educational partners. A large percentage of DMACC s faculty and staff are 55 years old or older. Significant numbers of retirements in future years may result in a sudden and significant amount of talent and knowledge leaving the institution. Two recent factors have buffered the effects of this retirement bubble. DMACC employees are postponing retirement due to recent economic conditions and its effect on retirement resources. Also, recent economic conditions have made more talent available in the potential pool of applicants. Overview 8

11 Overview 9- What key partnerships and collaborations, external and internal, contribute to your organization s effectiveness? Des Moines Area Community College plays a vital role in the communities it serves. Through its structure of six campuses and two centers, students and customers are able to access college services within a short distance of their homes or businesses. DMACC has established positive working relationships with area businesses, high schools, public/private colleges and universities, governmental agencies, non-profit organizations, and professional organizations. Although the complete list of partnerships is too lengthy for this document, the following is a summary of those that are most essential and unique: 28E shared program agreements with over 60 local school districts to provide college level credit courses to high achieving juniors and seniors in high school, and career assessments and transition services from high school to college. Iowa State University, with which DMACC has an Application Partnership Program, is the primary destination for its transfer students. University of Northern Iowa offers both a 2+2 program at the Ankeny, Boone and Carroll Campuses and a joint admissions program for all students. University of Iowa, which offers an articulated Bachelors of Applied Science Degree to DMACC AAS and AS graduates, is also a destination for transfer students. DMACC is a part of the Des Moines Higher Education Consortium, working with three local private colleges (Drake University, Simpson College, and Grandview College) to provide collaborative programs and services that benefit students. DMACC is a member of the Liaison Advisory Committee on Transfer Students (LACTS). This committee coordinates course and program offerings in the state and makes recommendations to the Iowa Department of Education regarding program approval. Accelerated Career Education (ACE) agreements with companies in central Iowa to provide educational programs to students in specific career fields. Apprenticeship programs to provide apprentice training to several hundred individuals each year. Local non-profits and governmental agencies through the Community and Workforce Partnerships Division. The Iowa Workforce Development Center to administer the regional Workforce Investment Act (WIA) funds and services for central Iowa. Also, DMACC has established partnerships through membership in local Chambers of Commerce, city and county economic development groups, and several cultural organizations. Overview 9

12 Processes (P) 1P1- How do you determine which common or shared objectives for learning and development you should hold for all students pursuing degrees at a particular level? Whom do you involve in setting these objectives? DMACC s processes for determining common learning objectives continue to be strengths of the institution as concluded in the 2006 Systems Appraisal Feedback Report. In summary, common learning objectives are created at the institutional, program and course levels with input from many stakeholder groups including faculty, administration, advisory committee members (programs), peer institutions, the Iowa Department of Education and the Higher Learning Commission. The processes outlined in DMACC s previous systems portfolio continue as a foundation for how DMACC helps students learn. O Although common learning objectives are created at the institutional, program and course levels with input from many stakeholder groups, it is not clear if a systematic process exists to determine common learning objectives. 1P2- How do you determine your specific program learning objectives? Whom do you involve in setting these objectives? Specific learning objectives for each program are developed by veteran faculty with input from stakeholders including advisory committees, partnering agencies, relevant business and community members and with support from district administration. Objectives are created according to the following considerations; a) are the learning objectives consistent with the overall mission and goals of the college, b) do they meet the needs identified by stakeholders, c) are the objectives consistent with national standards available in the field, d) do they meet articulation needs either to sequenced DMACC courses and/or courses at transfer institutions, and e) do they meet state and national accreditation requirements? Programs are encouraged to evaluate and adopt standards set by professional organizations if and when possible. When no viable national standards exist, DMACC depends largely on input from program advisory committees and from faculty research with input from administration. S Faculty work with program advisory committees, business and industry, partnering agencies, community members, and district administration to craft specific program learning objectives that meet stakeholder needs, articulation needs, state and national standards or accreditation requirements, and are consistent with the College s mission and goals. 1P3- How do you design new programs and courses that facilitate student learning and are competitive with those offered by other organizations? DMACC s processes for designing new programs and courses that facilitate student learning continue to be strengths of the institution as concluded in the 2006 Systems Appraisal Feedback Report. These processes include; a) use of faculty Curriculum Commission to support the development of new courses and programs to ensure institutional standards have been met, b) input from advisory committees including business and industry professionals to assure that new and modified programs/courses meet industry needs, c) comprehensive study required by Iowa Administrative Code 281 Chapter 21 (IAC 281) which includes program description and purpose, student interest data, employment opportunities, local board approval, advisory committee information and minutes, defined program content and competencies, equipment and facilities needs, student support services available, program evaluation and student assessment methodologies, strategies for student success, and budget information, and d) development of individual course competencies to assure that program objectives are properly represented and sequenced throughout the program. After determining that there is need for a program that may be offered by other institutions, several steps are followed to assure that new programs are competitive. New programs and courses are evaluated for market competitiveness through reviewing industry standards, workforce and community needs, adopting identified best practices, evaluating competing programs, evaluating expense to earnings ratios for students, and articulation with four year colleges and Regents Criterion 1 10

13 institutions. Liberal Arts courses are designed to ensure academic rigor and transferability to four year colleges and universities. If applicable, new program certification pass rates are monitored and compared to other institutions annually to assure that DMACC graduates are performing at expected levels. Program Chairs also meet regularly with business and industry as well as program advisory boards to ensure that recently hired graduates are meeting workforce needs. S The Faculty Curriculum Commission oversees the design of new courses and programs to ensure that institutional standards are met. The institution is required by the State of Iowa to complete a comprehensive study when designing new programs. These courses and programs are also assessed to determine whether they will be competitive and new program certification pass rates are monitored. 1P4- How do you design responsive academic programming that balances and integrates learning goals, students career needs, and the realities of the employment market? Learning outcomes for programs are established by identifying the outcomes required by either the businesses or industries hiring DMACC graduates, or transfer institutions accepting students. For students entering the workforce upon graduation, faculty and advisory groups are charged with assuring that the learning outcomes have value to students and employers and reviewing employment projection data to assure there will be jobs available for students upon completion. Individual courses are then grouped and sequenced to make sure all program learning objectives are achieved. For students transferring to other institutions, DMACC maintains articulation agreements with Iowa s Regents Universities and many private colleges in the state. These articulation agreements align DMACC course competencies with college and university expectations upon transfer. O Programs are designed to balance and integrate learning goals, students career needs, and the employment market. Although the institution monitors employment trends, it is unclear how information is collected from businesses that hire its graduates, other institutions that enroll its students, or from its graduates. Without this process, it may be difficult to ensure that programs meet the changing needs and requirements of students and other stakeholders. 1P5- How do you determine the preparation required of students for the specific curricula, programs, courses, and learning they will pursue? DMACC s processes for determining required preparation for students continue to be strengths of the institution as concluded in the 2006 Systems Appraisal Feedback Report. These processes include; a) primary input from faculty trained as experts in their respective fields, b) determination of necessary course pre- and co-requisites for creating relevant course competencies, and c) adherence to external requirements including accrediting agencies/boards, d) significant input from business and industry gained from advisory committees, regional workforce groups, and employer surveys, and e) competency based curriculum allowing for sequential skill building through a sequence of courses or throughout a program. In addition, all curricula must adhere to the requirements set forth by the Curriculum Commission which ensures uniform academic rigor in programs and courses across the institution. S Several criteria are described that are considered in determining required preparation, including course pre- and co-requisites, faculty and advisory committee input, and external accreditation requirements, 1P6- How do you communicate to current and prospective students the required preparation and learning and development objectives for specific programs, courses, and degrees or credentials? How do admissions, student support, and registration services aid in this process? DMACC s processes for communicating preparation and learning objectives to current and potential students continues to be strengths of the institution as concluded in the 2006 Systems Appraisal Feedback Report. These processes include; a) sufficient student services staff to meet the needs of Criterion 1 11

14 students, b) paper and web resources created and distributed detailing objectives and expectations, c) orientation and advising services, d) common syllabi requirements and uniform course competencies, and e) improved college expectations for high school students through DMACC s dual credit programming. DMACC s recent accreditation for dual credit high school programming through the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships (NACEP) has revealed that dual credit programming is an effective method for communicating learning and teaching expectations to students while still in high school. Surveys conducted with students, teachers, counselors, and administrators indicate that dual credit programming helps students have more realistic expectations of college level work. S a variety of approaches are used to systematically communicate expectations regarding student preparation requirements and student learning objectives to prospective students. Current students receive information through web resources, orientation and advising services. Dual credit programs provide an effective means to communicate required and learning expectations to high school students. O Although there are a variety of approaches used to communicate required preparation and learning for specific programs of study to traditional-age students, it is not clear how these expectations are communicated to potential non-traditional students such as veterans or displaced workers. 1P7- How do you help students select programs of study that match their needs, interests, and abilities? DMACC s processes for helping students select appropriate programs of study continue to be strengths of the institution as concluded in the 2006 Systems Appraisal Feedback Report. These processes include; a) identification of career interests and aptitudes through the use of Kuder and Choices career interest inventories, b) identification of academic skills through ACT and COMPASS assessments, and c) counseling and advising services to help students match academic ability and career interests and aptitudes with DMACC programs. Informal faculty advising occurs to match programs with student needs, interests and abilities. S Kuder and Choices career interest inventories assist students in selecting appropriate programs of study. ACT, COMPASS assessment, counseling and advising services are used to identify academic skills. 1P8- How do you deal with students who are underprepared for the academic programs and courses you offer? DMACC provides academic support services to underprepared students using many strategies aimed at meeting an individual s academic and personal needs. Developmental coursework is provided in the areas of math, reading and English for students needing more in-depth focus on specific skills. Learning communities often include a developmental course paired with a foundations course to provide an integrated approach to the coursework and build communities of support. Counselors lead classroom discussions and provide information about and encourage use of available support services to students who would otherwise not seek this support. In addition, free academic tutoring services are provided to students who require one-on-one attention surrounding a specific collegelevel course or courses. Fully staffed academic achievement centers on all campuses are available during the day and evening hours on a drop-in or scheduled basis for students that need assistance. Web-based academic tutoring assistance is available 24/7 to students through Smartthinking webbased tutoring services, and an on-line advisor supports students who work off-site. Writing workshops, seminars and labs are offered throughout each semester to provide students additional help in this area. With the feedback received from both the 2006 Systems Appraisal Feedback Report and Strategy Forum discussions, DMACC developed action projects that focused on bridge courses in Math and English for students able to do college-level work, but who need more instructional time to develop their skills. Math 110- Math for Liberal Arts was created to fulfill college math requirements for students who need more business and/or consumer math skills. An additional college level English Criterion 1 12

15 course (ENG 104) was developed for students capable of college level work but requiring additional instruction prior to enrolling in a traditional college writing course. The Action Project: Math Placement Pilot Project was initiated to gain further insight into the preparedness and resulting success of students who enroll in Calculus 1 and Algebra 2 coursework. This project includes additional placement testing and advising. DMACC has increased late start offerings for students who enroll after the term has begun or who have enrolled in a course that exceeds their level of preparation. During the first two weeks of each term, faculty members work with students that are struggling and may need to switch to another course that is more appropriate for their level of preparation. This may include informal faculty advising of students or department developed skills assessments. Students may adjust their schedule with no penalty during this two-week period. S DMACC offers many services and resources for underprepared students, including, developmental coursework, learning communities, counseling, tutoring, web-based tutoring, online advising, academic achievement centers, writing workshops and labs. SS Bridge courses in math and English target students who are capable of college-level coursework and need more instructional time to be successful. The institution has increased late start offerings for students who enroll after the term has begun or who have enrolled in a course that exceeds their level of preparation. During the first two weeks of each term, students who are struggling in a course may adjust their schedule with no penalty. 1P9- How do you detect and address differences in students learning styles? In 2004, DMACC trained faculty and counselors to both administer and teach others to administer the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). Training included examples of how to modify teaching practices to better match student learning preference. The MBTI is provided to students as part of the student advising/counseling process. DMACC offers the August Academy faculty workshops attended by more than 230 full-time and adjunct faculty member each year where training is available for how to use learning styles information in the classroom. The Colors Learning Styles training is offered each fall for full-time faculty and adjuncts. In addition to identifying student learning styles, faculty are also using learning styles information in the classroom to improve student learning. Faculty use of the book What the Best College Teachers Do by Ken Bain is promoting the use of learning styles as part of a comprehensive process for improving learning and teaching. DMACC offers a wide variety of teaching methods to match various student learning styles including auditory, visual and kinesthetic styles. In addition to traditional text and verbal instruction, DMACC uses portfolios, synchronous and asynchronous video, study abroad programs, experiential and service learning opportunities, and many hands-on labs to teach and reinforce skill development. S DMACC s approach for improving learning and teaching includes faculty participation in Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and The Colors Learning Styles workshops to understand different learning styles. The August Academy also provides an opportunity to learn about student learning styles. O Although the institution provides regularly-scheduled training regarding student learning styles, it is not clear how students are being matched to methods that best suit them and how this training is evaluated regarding its impact on improved student learning. 1P10- How do you address the special needs of student subgroups (e.g. handicapped students, seniors, commuters)? DMACC provides special programs to assist students who are learning English as a second language, international students, students with disabilities, students who need vocational rehabilitation services, and veterans. In addition to these programs, DMACC has resources available for students who need assistance with transportation, child care, employment assistance and career counseling and dental and health services. Criterion 1 13

16 DMACC s disability policies and services are included both in the student handbook and on the DMACC web site. These policies describe the processes for how students access these services and their role in assuring that their accommodations are met by the institution. Accommodations listed in these policies serve as a sample list of common services available to students. All reasonable accommodation requests are met by the institution. Services provided by DMACC include but are not limited to the following; a) taped/scanned textbooks, b) testing accommodations, c) readers and scribers of classroom materials, d) voice recognition, screen reading, page enlarging and other software, e) lab assistants, f) sign language interpreters, g) alternate format materials including Braille, large print and closed captioning, h) note takers, i) digital recorders and assistive listening devices, j) service animal accommodations, and k) adaptive campus tours. DMACC meets or exceeds all requirements set forth in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Section 504. DMACC has been recognized by the US Department of Veteran Affairs as a Service Members Opportunity College (SOC) or military-friendly school. As part of this designation, DMACC staffs an Office of Veteran Services to assist both recently deployed and returning veterans in knowing their rights and protections as veterans, accessing veteran and other services, and helping them access academic programming and student services at DMACC. Although DMACC has limited on-campus housing, the vast majority of students commute to campus. To meet the needs of these students, many evening and weekend courses are offered with extended student service and security hours. In addition, all campuses provide ample safe and well lighted parking for students. Dental hygiene services are provided at no or little cost through the dental clinic, and basic health services are provided by our campus nurse and other outside health related partners. A messaging system including text, and voice has been instituted to quickly communicate campus closings due to weather and other emergency information to students, faculty and staff. This reduces the chance that students make unnecessary commutes during bad weather or become injured in a campus emergency. S DMACC provides special programs to assist students who are learning English as a second language, international students, students with disabilities, students who need vocational rehabilitation services, and veterans as well as those who need assistance with transportation, childcare, employment assistance, career counseling, and dental and health services. Additionally, DMACC has been recognized by the US Department of Veteran Affairs as a Service Members Opportunity College (SOC) or military-friendly school. 1P11- How do you define, document, and communicate across your organization your expectations for effective teaching and learning? DMACC s processes for defining, documenting and communicating expectations for effective teaching and learning continue to be strengths of the institution as concluded in the 2006 Systems Appraisal Feedback Report. These processes include; a) assessment of student learning processes described in 1P11 of the previous systems portfolio and 1P18 of this document, b) tracking of student success at the course, program and institutional level, c) reviewing annual pass rates for programs with licensure exams, d) student evaluations of each course and instructor, e) graduate and employer surveys conducted as part of the program evaluation process, e) community based advisory boards, f) aligning the faculty development process with expectations of effective teaching and learning, g) numerous staff development opportunities, and h) extensive orientation process for new faculty. Beginning with the academic year, two additional faculty in-service days have been added to the academic calendar for a total of four faculty in-service days per year. These days allow faculty time to review student assessment data collectively and make appropriate curricular changes, discuss other student and curricular needs, and plan future improvements. Prior to the start of each fall term, the August Academy provides training opportunities for full-time and adjunct faculty. Faculty choose from various sessions including training and workshops regarding assessment of student learning, incorporating learning style into the teaching process, institutional requirements and standards, college services for students, and best practices for teaching. Online Criterion 1 14

17 instructors also receive extensive training on content development and DMACC s online learning management system. DMACC s Quality Faculty Plan (QFP) provides for orientation for new faculty, establishes seven minimum instructional competencies for faculty, and requires a minimum number of teacher improvement (TI) units to be earned. TI units are approved by the Dean or Provost and Human Resources and must address at least one of the seven instructional competencies. Adjunct faculty members are not included in the requirements of the QFP, but are encouraged and compensated for their participation in any approved TI activities. Adjunct faculty members are assigned a faculty mentor to help communicate DMACC s expectations and provide assistance. DMACC has recently begun a strategic planning process aimed at defining specific strategies to advance DMACC s 2016 FIRST Goals as described in the context portion of this document. This process is being led by Deans, Provosts, department directors, and administration. This process has four workgroups tasked to develop processes and strategies that will affect the 2016 FIRSTS Goals indicators. The four workgroups are; 1) develop and revise strategies for student placement to improve student success, 2) more closely align the Quality Faculty Plan around the indicators of the FIRSTS Goals, 3) develop a career cluster model and align curriculum between K12 school districts and the college, and 4) identify effective teaching best practices. S The institution uses a variety of approaches to define, document and communicate expectations for effective teaching and learning. These include programs that assess student learning processes and track student success at the course, program and institutional level. DMACC has established a Quality Faculty Plan (QFP) which provides orientation for new faculty, establishes seven minimum instructional competencies for faculty, and requires a minimum number of teacher improvement (TI) units which must address at least one of the seven instructional competencies. O The institution compensates adjunct faculty for participation in QFP activities, but they are not required to participate in this process. Although Adjunct Faculty outnumber full-time faculty 3 to 1, there does not appear to be a training requirement. 1P12- How do you build an effective and efficient course delivery system that addresses both students needs and your organization s requirements? DMACC employs various delivery methods designed to meet the needs of students while ensuring mastery of course competencies. Course delivery systems are determined by faculty within a discipline with input from Deans, Provosts, student services staff, advisory committee members and students. DMACC instructional delivery methods include traditional face-to-face instruction, face-toface instruction supplemented with online resources, partial online instruction with both face-to-face and online instruction, and entirely online instruction. In addition, TV courses are offered in partnership with local public television station, and courses are also offered through the Iowa Communication Network (ICN) which allows synchronous instruction to multiple sites. Offerings through TV and the ICN have significantly declined in recent years in lieu of online offerings. To ensure quality instruction, several measures are monitored to track student performance and satisfaction for all courses. These measures include; a) student course evaluations reviewed each term by instructors and Deans/Provosts to address opportunities for improvement, b) course success, pass and retention rates are reviewed annually to identify trends and issues, and c) course assessment of student learning results are reviewed to assure that learning is occurring at acceptable levels. The Office of Distance Education and the Office of Institutional Effectiveness also review these measures aggregated by delivery method to identify trends and potential issues. DMACC uses multiple strategies to decide which delivery methods best meet the learning needs of students as defined by course competencies. These decisions are based on matching course content with appropriate delivery methods. All course delivery methods provide student access to faculty for instruction, questions and assistance. However, courses with competencies that are more experiential based and require hands-on examples and assessments are offered in delivery methods Criterion 1 15

18 that provide sufficient face-to-face instruction. Courses that rely on more auditory and visual instruction are more appropriate for both face-to-face and online delivery methods. The processes and guidelines for deciding upon appropriate delivery methods for a course are; a) new courses are approved by program or district chairs, b) faculty decide which delivery methods are appropriate according to the competencies of the course and/or the needs of the program, c) courses and their delivery method are approved by the Curriculum Commission, and d) courses are reviewed by the Office of Institutional Effectiveness to assure all legal and accreditation requirements have been met. Online courses and courses that blend online and face-to-face instruction have become an important delivery method at DMACC, increasing 118% for entirely online courses and 322% for partial online courses since These increases have helped DMACC meet increased demand but have required additional processes and resources to be put in place to assure quality. Many of these processes were described in section 1P7 of the previous Systems Portfolio and are still current. In addition, an Online Oversight Committee was established with broad representation to provide guidance as to which delivery methods best fit various course offerings, to address student and faculty issues, and to identify and provide necessary training to assure quality instruction and course delivery. DMACC currently uses a combination of methods to assure the identity of online students throughout the course. Individual user IDs and passwords are assigned to each student to allow access to course content. DMACC has approved proctoring test sites for faculty to use to verify student identity for tests and assessments. Faculty also monitor discussion and work progress to assure student work and assessments are consistent with each student s abilities. Current processes and procedures meet Higher Learning Commission requirements for identity management for distance education courses, but the Office of Distance Education is monitoring and pursuing best practices in this area. DMACC has invested in staff to assist faculty in the development and monitoring of alternative delivery methods. Veteran online instructors are given release time to work with other faculty interested in developing new online offerings. Four instructional designers have been hired to train faculty on the WebCT and Blackboard systems and directly assist faculty to use best practices in developing course content. DMACC has also invested in new technology by currently moving from WebCT software to BlackBoard 9 for online course delivery and has established Signature Series courses to assure institutional quality standards have been met. This will give all courses a similar look and feel and give students a more uniform online experience. Faculty receive the technology and training necessary for lecture capture, graphics animation, and synchronous communication with students to facilitate various learning styles of students. S There appears to be a variety of course delivery systems designed to meet the needs of students while ensuring mastery of course competencies. The Online Oversight Committee provide guidance as to which delivery methods best fit various course offerings to address student and faculty issues, and to identify and provide necessary training to assure quality instruction and course delivery. A threepronged approach to ensure the identity of distance learning students is used: user IDs and passwords, proctoring test sites, and faculty monitoring of students discussions and work. Experienced online instructors received release time to help develop new online offerings, four instructional designers have been hired, and signature series courses have been established to provide a more uniform online student experience. O Although the institution has in place many key components that contribute to an effective coursedelivery system, it is not clear how the components are aligned and integrated with improved teaching and learning. 1P13- How do you ensure that your programs and courses are up-to-date and effective? DMACC s processes for ensuring that programs and courses are up-to-date and effective continue to be strengths of the institution as concluded in the 2006 Systems Appraisal Feedback Report. These processes include; a) use of learning assessment data to identify and address curricular needs, b) comprehensive faculty and advisory committee review of course competencies on an annual basis, c) completion of a program evaluation every five years for each DMACC program, including graduate Criterion 1 16

19 and employer surveys, c) regular meetings of program advisory committees at least twice per academic year, d) maintenance and annual review of articulation agreements with transfer institutions, and e) monthly district and program chair meetings to address curricular issues. S DMACC utilizes a variety of processes to ensure that programs are up-todate and effective. A faculty and advisory committee reviews learning assessment data, course competencies and articulation agreements. The formal Program Review conducted every five years contributes to identification of new program and responsive programming requirements. 1P14- How do you change or discontinue programs and courses? The decision to modify or discontinue a course or program is done collaboratively with input from faculty, Deans/Provosts, District and Program Chairs, advisory committee members and administration. All new, modified or discontinued courses and programs are approved through the Curriculum Commission. Program modifications are reviewed by the Office of Institutional Effectiveness to assure compliance with state and accreditation requirements. Data used to support these decisions include, but are not limited to, the following; program enrollment trends, licensure pass rates (if applicable), occupational projection data, advisory committee comments, and employer and graduate survey data. O Although programs are to be reviewed every five years, it is not apparent that this requirement is applied to all programs with the same level of rigor and consistency. Further, there is no systematic approach to evaluating courses to ensure that they are current with the changing needs and requirements of students and other stakeholders. Consequently, when programs are modified or eliminated it may not be based on a systematic approach, and when courses are modified or eliminated it is not apparent that these decisions are ever made systematically. As a result, DMACC may not modify or eliminate programs and/or courses based on sound analysis, in a timely fashion, or be able to recognize when such action is appropriate. 1P15- How do you determine and address the learning support needs (tutoring, advising, placement, library, laboratories, etc.) of your students and faculty in your student learning, development, and assessment processes? DMACC s processes for determining and addressing student support needs continue to be strengths of the institution as concluded in the 2006 Systems Appraisal Feedback Report. DMACC continues to monitor usage and needs of existing learning support services including libraries, academic achievement centers, tutoring, counseling, advising, and online support services. Staffing and other resource needs are identified through monthly district-wide student support services staff meetings attended by the Executive Dean of Student Services. If identified needs exceed existing student service resources, the Executive Dean, as a member of the President s Cabinet, can request additional resources. DMACC is currently in the process of implementing a student service tracking and case management process called DMACC Track. This tool is a modification of the SCT Banner student information system and allows student services staff to track individual student contacts. The process will track basic student information, time served, contact type information, and staff comments. Contacts will be categorized into the following contact types; career information, degree attainment, registration, course add/drop, student withdrawal, course substitution, cross program enrollment, academic and financial holds, and other miscellaneous information. These data will be analyzed to determine appropriate staffing levels needed year-round and at peak enrollment periods, student service staff training needs, and general effectiveness of student services. Incorporating this service into the student information system will allow multiple, authorized users to see what contacts and services the student has previously received and provide a greater continuity of service to students. Similar to the DMACC Track process, DMACC has also created an additional process to support student services and the Community and Workforce Partnerships division. This process called SuccessNet is similar to DMACC Track, but incorporates referral information for community and public services and student academic and non-academic outcomes. For authorized users, Criterion 1 17

20 information from both DMACC Track and SuccessNet will be accessible across the college. Analyses as described previously will also be conducted to measure programming effectiveness and capacity. In addition, a three-year rotation of student, faculty and staff surveys has been implemented to assess institutional performance and identify strengths and opportunities within the college. The ACT Student Opinions Survey continues as the primary instrument for assessing student satisfaction and utilization of various services within the college. The AQIP Examiner survey was adopted in 2007 to provide information about how well the institution supports continuous improvement. In 2008, the Personal Assessment of the College Environment (PACE) was adopted to indicate how well faculty believe their positions contribute to an environment conducive to learning. Trend data for the ACT student opinion survey has been compiled as it has been used in 2003, 2006 and AQIP Examiner and the PACE Survey have been given once and will be given again in Appropriate sampling techniques are employed for all surveys to ensure representation of the entire college. These data are reviewed by Cabinet and district leadership and have proven invaluable to DMACC s planning processes. The ACT Student Opinion Survey asks students to assess their use of and satisfaction with various services of the college. Specific learning support services included in the survey are; a) academic advising, b) personal counseling, c) vocational advising, d) financial aid, e) library/learning resources, f) tutoring, g) college orientation, h) veterans services, and i) parking. The AQIP Examiner data are organized around the nine AQIP criteria. Though all questions ultimately provide insight into how students learn, specific questions have been identified that address the institution s support for learning. Results from specific questions have been identified and are analyzed for trends, strengths and opportunities for the college. The questions identified as insightful regarding learning support needs are; a) Criterion 1: placing students in courses for which they are appropriately prepared, 2) Criterion 1: ensuring that faculty members have the skills and resources they need to teach well., c) Criterion 3: listening to the specific needs and requirements of those groups served, d) Criterion 3: identifying and responding to the changing needs of those groups served, e) Criterion 6: identifying the needs of students for support services, f) Criterion 6: providing and managing support services that meet the needs of students, g) Criterion 6: identifying the support service needs of faculty, staff, and administrators, h) Criterion 6: providing and managing support services that meet the needs of faculty, staff, administrators, and i) Criterion 6: regularly evaluating how well student and administrative support services work. The PACE survey contains 12 questions assessing how well DMACC maintains focus on students. Specific content for these questions includes how well the entire institution, faculty, and student services focus on student needs. In addition, these questions address DMACC s ability to provide for the learning, social, and career needs of the student. S The institution utilizes a variety of processes to determine and address students learning support needs. These include DMACC Track, which tracks and categorizes individual student contacts to forecast needed staffing levels; SuccessNet, which enhances the data from DMACC Track with community referral information and outcomes to measure program effectiveness; and multiple survey administration, which offer results in student satisfaction, faculty/staff satisfaction and perceived contributions to learning, and support for quality improvement. O ACT, PACE, and AQIP Examiner surveys are used to monitor the learning support needs of faculty. A three-year cycle may not allow DMACC to keep pace with the ever-changing needs of faculty. 1P16- How do you align your co-curricular development goals with your curricular learning objectives? DMACC s processes for aligning co-curricular development goals with curricular learning continue to be strengths of the institution as concluded in the 2006 Systems Appraisal Feedback Report. It is the goal of co- and extra-curricular activities to support the mission of the college by providing students with skills applicable to future careers including leadership experience and team-building, goal setting, communication, and budget and time management. These processes include; a) Very active Criterion 1 18

21 student activities councils at each campus, b) use of pre-professional, recreational and service clubs for students, c) award winning and active Phi Theta Kappa Chapters, d) special interest organizations, e) intramural athletics, and f) a full-time district-wide Coordinator of Student Activities who provides leadership to the Student Activities Councils (SAC) on each campus and serves as a centralized communication resource for each of the individual campus SAC coordinators. O Co-curricular initiatives support the mission of the College through student skill-building in leadership, team building, goal setting, communication, budget, and time management. It is not clear if a process exists to align these activities with the curriculum. 1P17- How do you determine that students to whom you award degrees and certificates have met your learning and development expectations? DMACC s processes for determining whether award earners meet learning and development objectives continue to be strengths of the institution as concluded in the 2006 Systems Appraisal Feedback Report. For programs requiring licensure exams, exam scores and pass rates remain a primary indicator of how well students meet institutional objectives and personal goals. An annual graduate follow-up survey report continues to be a primary process for determining student success after graduation. This survey has a 70% response rate and provides data on students decisions to continue their education, or enter the workforce. All graduate performance data are reviewed by college leadership to identify trends, strengths and opportunities for improvement. A variety of methods are used by faculty to measure course, program and institutional learning objectives. Skills testing is conducted by many programs and courses to assess that students both know about the skill and can perform it. Portfolios of student work are created and maintained in various courses as evidence of their learning. Student projects are used to assure that students can successfully integrate their knowledge into a culminating project or event. The goal of these methods is to provide students with concrete evidence of their learning gains at DMACC. In response to a recent interpretation of FERPA regulations, transfer institutions no longer provide individual follow-up data for students who have transferred to their institutions. Though DMACC is beginning to receive aggregate data from some institutions, the college has developed new ways to determine how well students have met learning and developmental objectives. To offset the loss of follow up information from transfer schools, use of National Student Clearinghouse data has increased as a means for assessing the rate at which students transfer and whether or not they earn a BA or BS degree. DMACC has also entered into an agreement with the Iowa Department of Workforce Development to track the wages of students after graduation or leaving DMACC prior to graduation. This data supplements internal graduate follow up studies done annually and allows the college to look at earnings further out than the 3-6 month time frame of the graduate follow up survey. It also allows the effect of DMACC awards and/or programming on student earnings to be analyzed over time. Though not a direct measurement of institutional objectives, it measures indirectly the value of students education in the workforce. Beginning in 2008, the Action Project Developing linkage data for student learning was initiated to begin using the Collegiate Assessment of Academic Proficiency (CAAP) to assess general education goals of the college. In 2009, reading and critical thinking were assessed, with mathematics and science skills following in The CAAP assessments were chosen because of their ability to be correlated with the ACT COMPASS tests. This allows an analysis of improvements between the COMPASS tests taken upon entering DMACC and the CAAP assessments taken upon graduation. The CAAP was not administered to graduates directly, but was administered to course sections (with faculty approval and support) that are usually sequenced as the last course prior to graduation. This allowed for a sufficient sample necessary to be relevant and representative of the entire college. The comparisons of COMPASS to CAAP assessments allow improvements across time to be quantified. These assessments are on a three year cycle and will provide trend data in the future. Criterion 1 19

22 S DMACC employs a process to evaluate results from several sources to determine that students who have earned degrees or certificates have met learning and development expectations, including: licensure exam scores and pass rates, annual graduate survey data, National Student Clearinghouse transfer data, and Iowa Workforce Development salary data. A 2008 action project identified a gap and supplemented these sources through inclusion of CAAP assessment data for general education goals on a three-year cycle. 1P18- How do you design your processes for assessing student learning? DMACC s processes for designing processes for assessing student learning continue to be strengths of the institution as concluded in the 2006 Systems Appraisal Feedback Report. However, many areas described previously have matured and/or been expanded. District-wide assessment activities continue to be directed through an Assessment Leadership Team composed of faculty members representing each of the six campuses with support from key administration. This team provides direction and guidance for the district and peer mentoring according to the processes described in 1P11 of the previous Systems Portfolio. The process for maintaining course competencies has been changed to allow better mapping to general education competencies. Previously, course competencies were kept as text documents which did not allow for previous competencies to be maintained; currently course competencies are maintained in a database with changes entered as new data with a term code to identify when these changes took place. This allows more accurate competency mapping and allows course competencies to be retrieved at any point in time. In addition, funds have been provided for departmental assessment activities and two additional non-instructional days have been added to the academic calendar in part to allow faculty more time to analyze assessment results and design and revise assessment strategies. Assessment remains a faculty driven process, with support for assessment activities continuing to be a priority of the institution. The areas of institutional research, assessment of student learning, program evaluation and curriculum and program development have been merged into the Office of Institutional Effectiveness. This merger allows for better communication, sharing of expertise and improved efficiencies. Process improvements as a result of this merger include; a) loading of student learning data into a business intelligence platform, b) creation of an assessment database to improve tracking and reporting of assessment data, c) improved mapping of individual course competencies to general education goals, and d) providing additional training and assistance to faculty to help them understand and interpret their assessment results. S DMCC has developed a comprehensive approach to assessing student learning and development. The process includes designated funding for department assessment activities, additional in-service time devoted to teaching and learning, and merger of component services into the Office of Institutional Effectiveness. This merger resulted in the following process improvements: student data loaded into a business intelligence platform; the creation of an assessment database, improvement in the mapping of individual course competencies to general education goals, and additional training and assistance to faculty to help them understand and interpret their assessment results. Results (R) 1R1- What measures of your students learning and development do you collect and analyze regularly? DMACC has established many measures to demonstrate student learning and development. These measures can be categorized according to common learning objectives, course learning objectives, student performance data, individualized student performance data for faculty, program learning objectives, and learning process measurement. Current learning and development measures are summarized in Table 1.1 Table 1.1- Learning Objective Measurement Criterion 1 20

23 Reading Critical Thinking Mathematics Science Reading Critical Thinking Mathematics Science Scaled Score or Percent Below Des Moines Area Community College (internal copy) Common Learning Objectives Course Learning Objectives Student Performance Data Individualized Student Performance Data for Faculty Program Learning Objectives Learning Processes CAAP Assessment data for reading, critical thinking, science reasoning and mathematics Aggregate data resulting from course competency to general learning objective mapping Course competency assessment data Course retention, pass and success rates Fall-to-spring and fall-to-fall persistence rates Graduation rates Course retention comparisons Grade distribution comparisons Program pass rates Graduate follow-up data ACT Student Opinion data AQIP Examiner data Personal Assessment of the College Environment data S The institution has established measures to determine the degree of student learning and development. This includes, but is not limited to, retention rate, graduation rate, and program pass rate. In addition, new program certification pass rates are monitored and compared to other institutions annually to assure that graduates are performing at expected levels. O Performance results for specific programs appear to be limited to licensure exam pass rates for the College s nine large career programs. It is not clear what measures are used for programs that do not have associated licensure. 1R2- What are your performance results for your common student learning and development objectives? Figure 1.1 shows DMACC CAAP scores for reading, critical thinking, mathematics and science reasoning. These tests were selected because they address DMACC s common learning objectives and comparative data are available. The following represents a single administration of each test and does not provide trend line data for the institution. However, the CAAP assessments are on a three year cycle with the reading and critical thinking assessments scheduled for spring 2012 and the mathematics and science assessments schedules for spring The data below shows average scaled scores for all DMACC CAAP participants and DMACC freshman and sophomore participants along with the national average. The data also shows the average percent of students scoring below each score nationally, for all DMACC students, and for DMACC freshmen and sophomores. According to the CAAP assessments, DMACC students score at the national average on all tests. This data also shows that students improve their scores while at DMACC with freshmen scored below the 50 th percentile, and sophomores scoring above the 50 th percentile. Though there is room for improvement in these scores, CAAP Figure 1.1- DMACC CAAP Assessment Results data provides substantial evidence that 70 DMACC is helping student learn common learning objectives. 60 Figures 1.2 through 1.7 show the results for DMACC s common learning objectives by mapping individual course competencies to common learning objectives. Though DMACC is still refining this process to assure that the data it provides are valid and reliable measures of common learning objectives, the process is far enough along to analyze the data. The process DMACC Freshmen Sophomores National Criterion 1 CAAP Measurement 21

24 is not yet mature enough to rely on the data for planning purposes. Preliminary data indicates that common learning objectives 1, 2 and 4 appear to be improving as a result of processes supporting learning. No trend is observed for competencies 3, 5 and 6. The institution may be more knowledgeable in assessing student learning according to objectives 1 (communications), 2 (critical thinking), and 4 (mathematics). DMACC is still developing effective processes for assessing objectives 3 (scientific reasoning), 5 (understanding human society), and 6 (appreciating the human condition) across the curriculum. Figure 1.2- Competency 1: Understanding and demonstrating effective communication Figure 1.3- Competency 2: Understanding and demonstrating logical and critical thinking Figure 1.4- Competency 3: Developing an understanding of fundamental scientific principles and their application Figure 1.5- Competency 4: Developing and understanding of fundamental mathematical principles and their application Figure 1.6- Competency 5: Developing and understanding of human society and cross cultural variation and perspective Figure 1.7- Competency 6: Developing knowledge of and appreciation for the human condition from works of human imagination and thought Criterion 1 22

25 In addition to DMACC s common learning objectives, DMACC assesses course learning objectives to assure that students are learning the required information, skills and attitudes. In 2006 DMACC had 22 courses actively assessing course competencies. In 2009, 115 courses were actively assessing with another 18 in the process of developing competency measurements, or reviewing competencies. Course assessment of student learning continues to be a very successful, faculty driven process for improving student learning at DMACC. Faculty is supported by the Office of Institutional Effectiveness which processes course data and provides aggregate data for the course as well as individual faculty reports showing each faculty member s course results compared to the course as a whole. Aggregate course assessment data are loaded into the business intelligence platform and are available to all faculty and staff on a 24/7 basis. It is not practical to share all course assessment data in this report; however, Figure 1.8 is an example of the information available for each course. These data are available to faculty after each term. Figure 1.8- Course Competency Chart for ACC 131 This data are used by faculty in many ways, but seven most common uses have been identified by the Office of Institutional Effectiveness. The most common use is to validate and reaffirm current classroom instruction. These data are also used to change or eliminate competencies, often as a result of curricular changes necessary to meet new or changing workforce needs. Assessment instruments are often revised to more accurately reflect student learning. Classroom time is adjusted to spend less time on mastered competencies and devote more time to competencies where students continue to struggle. Additional assessments are created to address specific deficiencies identified in the course assessment data. Teaching strategies are discussed and modified using identified best practices. These data have also been used to strengthen the articulation of sequenced courses in the curriculum. Overall, these data demonstrate how DMACC is accountable for the results of its learning processes. Student retention, and pass and success rates are reviewed each term with course retention included as an item on the annual institutional scorecard. These data are provided on the business intelligence platform and are available to all faculty and staff on a 24/7 basis. Figures show most recent retention, pass and success rate information. Retention is the number of students who complete courses during a term. Pass rates are the percent receiving at least a passing grade, and success rates are the percent receiving a C grade or better. Overall these data have remained Criterion 1 23

26 very constant with a retention rate of over 80%, student pass rates of between 75-80% and student course success rates of around 70%. These data support DMACC s ability to help students learn, though the college strives to continually improve student success. Figure 1.9- DMACC Student Retention by Term Figure1.10- Student Course Pass Rate Information by Term Student persistence, both from fall-to-fall (F2F) and fall-to-spring (F2S), measures how well students persist and continue to work toward their goals. Figure 1.12 shows both F2F and F2S for full and part-time students. These trends have increased slightly for full-time students with fall 2009 being the first time F2S persistence has topped 80%. Persistence for part-time students has trended upwards since fall These numbers provide evidence that DMACC helps students learn. Benchmark data for these measures will be provided in 1R6. Faculty also has access to retention and grade distribution data comparing performance of their classes with all sections of that class. This information is available on a 24/7 basis and access is restricted so a faculty member can only see his or her information. Figures 1.13 and 1.14 are examples of this type of information. Faculty uses these data to validate, improve, or share what is working in their classrooms with other faculty. Input from faculty has been very favorable toward this type of comparative information. Figure Student Course Success Rate by Term Figure Student Fall-to-Spring and Fall-to-Fall Persistence Criterion 1 24

27 Figure Individual Faculty Member Retention Comparative Data Figure Individual faculty Member Grade Distribution Comparative Data S The persistence rates for full and part-time students are favorable; this trend has been established since CAAP scores show improvement between freshman and sophomore averages for reading, critical thinking, mathematics, and science. 1R3- What are your performance results for specific program learning objectives? Pass rates for licensure exams are valuable indicators of how well students have met program learning objectives and how well students have met the expectations of external stakeholder groups. Table 1.2 shows five years of pass rate information for nine of DMACC s largest programs. Programs that do not have licensure exams rely on aligning course competency assessment data with program competencies as evidence that students are meeting program learning objectives. DMACC is very proud of the effectiveness of its programs as evidenced by these data. Table 1.2- DMACC Program Licensure Pass Rates Program Accrediting Agency Licensure Exams Pass Rates Dietary Manager Dietary Manager Association ACT Dietary Manager Not Avail 60% 66% 50% 100% Dental Assistant Dental Hygiene Medical Assistant Med Lab Tech Nursing Commission on Dental Accreditation Commission on Dental Accreditation Commission of Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS) National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) ( approved by Iowa Board of Nursing ) Dental Assisting National Board (DANB) -Certified Dental Assistant Examination Iowa Board of Dental Examiners (IBODE) American Dental Association Central Regional Dental Testing Service American Assoc. of Medical Assistant (AAMA) Certified Medical Assistant Examination State of Iowa Limited Radiographer Examination American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) Board of Registry (BOR) for Medical Laboratory Technician (MLT) 98% 78% 86% 94% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 95% 95% 100% 95% 100% 79% 89% 79% 86% 90% 100% 93% 88% 100% Not Available 85% 82% 80% 100% Not Available 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% * YTD NCLEX-RN 88% 89% 75% 92% 95% * YTD Practical National League for NCLEX-PN 100% 93% 97% 99% 99% Criterion 1 25

28 Program Accrediting Agency Licensure Exams Pass Rates Nursing Nursing Accrediting * YTD Commission (NLNAC) ( approved by Iowa Board of Nursing) Respiratory Therapy 100% 100% 100% 95% 100% Veterinary Technician (new program 2006) Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Iowa Veterinary Medical Association (IVMA) National Board of Respiratory Care (NBRC) Certified respiratory Therapist Examination National Veterinary Technician Examination (NVTE) Iowa Veterinary Medical Association Examination 91% 38% 63% 57% 90% 82% 33% 52% 62% 71% S The trends for program licensure pass rates are favorable and have ranged between 79 and 100% over the last four years. This supports the institution s stated commitment to preparing students for entrance into the workforce. 1R4- What is your evidence that the students completing your programs, degrees, and certificates have acquired the knowledge and skills required by your stakeholders (i.e., other educational organizations and employers)? Graduate follow-up data are a valuable source of information to determine whether students have met the expectations of employers, transfer institutions and other stakeholders upon graduation. These data show what students are doing upon graduation, including additional education at another institution or entering the workforce. These data are collected each year by the DMACC Placement Office 3-6 months after graduation with a survey response rate of 84%. Table 1.3 shows the number of awards earned by program for A report of this information is made available on the DMACC web site and is distributed to internal and external stakeholders. Evidence of meeting stakeholder expectations is evidenced by a low percentage of students still seeking a job after graduation. Table 1.3- Graduate Follow-up Data for Class of 2009 Status Location Education Employed Job Seeking Other Iowa Out of Iowa Unknown N % N % N % N % N % N % N % Avg Salary PROGRAM ASEP-General Motors-AAS $31,373 ASSET-Ford-AAS $31,000 Accounting & Bookkeeping-DIPL Accounting Certificate I- CSP $29,252 Accounting Certificate II- CSP $29,000 Accounting Information Systems-AS Accounting Paraprofessional-AS $23,090 Accounting Specialist-AAS $24,945 Administrative Assistant- AAS $24,209 Adult Services-CSP $34,900 Aging Services Management-AS Agri-Business Agronomy- CSP $31,250 Criterion 1 26

29 Status Education Employed Location Job Seeking Other Iowa Out of Iowa Unknown N % N % N % N % N % N % N % Avg Salary Agri-Business Animal Science-CSP $33,625 Agri-Business Farm Management-CSP $33,167 Agri-Business Sales/Service-CSP $23,553 Agri-Business-AAS $27,076 Amer Sign Lang Interp Training-AA $35,360 Architectural Millwork-DIPL $18,000 Architectural Technologies-AAS $31,200 Architectural Technologies-DIPL Assoc. Degree Nursing - Adv St-AAS $41,479 Associate Degree Nursing- AAS $41,955 Associate General Studies- AGS $29,431 Auto Chassis & Power Train-DIPL Auto Collision Technology- AAS $22,880 Auto Collision Technology- DIPL $27,520 Auto Engines & Tune-Up- DIPL Auto Mechanics Technology-AAS $21,232 Biotechnology-AS $24,960 Blueprint Reading-CSP $25,636 Building Maintenance-CSP Building Trades-DIPL $20,103 Business Administration- AA $24,000 Business Administration- AS $25,002 Business Information Systems-AAS $40,140 CAP - Chrysler-AAS $18,720 Caterpillar Technology- AAS $32,240 Chemical Depend Counseling-CSP $28,480 Civil Engineering Technology-AAS $34,552 Com. Horticulture - Turf Maint-CSP $24,960 Commercial Horticulture- AAS $24,440 Computer Applications- CSP $24,940 Computer Languages-CSP Computer-Aided Design Technolo-AAS $28,080 Computer-Aided Design- DIPL Criminal Justice-AA Criminal Justice-AS $33,775 Culinary Arts-AAS $23,070 Culinary Arts-DIPL $19,760 Data Entry I-CSP $22,760 Criterion 1 27

30 Status Education Employed Location Job Seeking Other Iowa Out of Iowa Unknown N % N % N % N % N % N % N % Avg Salary Database Specialist-CSP Dental Assistant-DIPL $30,095 Dental Hygiene-AAS $52,258 Diemaking-DIPL Diesel Technology-AAS $25,116 Diesel Technology-DIPL Dietary Manager-CSP E-Commerce Design-CSP Early Childhood Education- AS $23,093 Early Childhood Education- DIPL $16,120 Electrical Construction Trades-DIPL $28,642 Electronic Sys Servicing Tech-AAS $36,400 Electronics, Robotics, & Autom-AAS $32,000 Entrepreneurship-CSP Entrepreneurship-DIPL Fashion / Design-AAS $24,960 Fashion / Design-DIPL Fire Science Technology- AS $38,023 Fire Specialist-CSP $58,000 Fitness & Sports Management-AS Gas Metal Arc Welding- CSP $24,856 Gas Tungsten Arc Welding-CSP $25,636 Gerontology Specialist- CSP Graphic Design-AAS $27,547 Graphic Technologies-AAS $37,000 Graphic Technologies-DIPL Greenhouse Production- CSP $24,960 Heating, AC, Refrigeration Tec-AAS $26,000 Heating, AC, Refrigeration Tec-DIPL $26,000 Hospitality Business-DIPL Hotel Restaurant Management-AAS $18,200 Human Resources Management-CSP Human Services-AS $23,420 Indus Electro-mech Oper Tech-AAS $28,747 Information Processing Support-CSP $26,000 Information Tech Network Adm-AAS $27,562 Interior Design Consultant-CSP Interp & Transl - Generalist-CSP $30,036 Interp & Transl - Judiciary- CSP Interp and Transl - Healthcare-CSP Criterion 1 28

31 Status Education Employed Location Job Seeking Other Iowa Out of Iowa Unknown N % N % N % N % N % N % N % Avg Salary Interpretation and Translation-AS Land Surveying-AAS $30,748 Landscape Design-CSP $26,960 Legal Assistant-AS $19,968 Legal Assistant-CSP $37,000 Liberal Arts - AA-AA $25,527 Liberal Arts - AS-AS $28,292 Long-Term Care Administrator-CSP $28,000 Machinist Technology-DIPL $20,800 Management Information Systems-AS Management-AAS $29,333 Management-CSP $37,000 Manufacturing Technology-AAS Marketing-AAS $25,060 Medical Administrative Assista-AAS $31,200 Medical Assistant-DIPL $27,345 Medical Insurance and Coding-CSP $17,500 Medical Laboratory Technology-AAS $34,019 Medical Office Specialist- AAS $21,743 Medical Office Specialist- DIPL $61,400 Medical Transcriptionist- CSP $33,633 Microcomputers-CSP $36,600 Mortuary Science-ASDPL $24,624 Network Security Manager-CSP Office Assistant-DIPL $24,434 Office Specialist-CSP $22,667 Oxy-Acetylene Welding- CSP $26,000 Phlebotomy-CSP $22,344 Photography-DIPL $26,000 Pipe Welding-CSP Practical Nursing-DIPL $37,358 Respiratory Therapy-AAS $34,643 Retailing-CSP Sales & Management-DIPL $21,073 Sales-CSP $37,000 Shielded Metal Arc Welding-CSP $25,515 Supervision-CSP $37,000 Surgical Technology-DIPL $28,800 Telecommunications Technology-AAS $33,825 Tool & Die making-aas $29,120 Veterinary Technology- AAS $23,783 Welding-DIPL $25,085 All , $30,431 Criterion 1 29

32 DMACC also uses National Student Clearinghouse data to supplement graduation data to get a more comprehensive accounting of what happens to students when they leave the institution. Figure 1.15 shows a stacked bar graph representing all DMACC graduates who could be matched with Clearinghouse data and their status three years after beginning their academic careers at DMACC by their initial status as a full or part-time student. These data are compiled for various groups including full or part-time status, student intent upon entering, gender, race, liberal arts or career/ technical student, placement test results, registration date, gateway course performance and other factors. Figure 1.15 is an example of the data used to determine if students meet stakeholder expectations. Figure 1.15 Figure Student Outcomes 3-Years After Beginning DMACC Academic Career by Initial Full or Part-time Status shows that students entering on a full-time basis transfer at a higher rate than those entering as part-time students. However, this difference diminishes when looking at completion, transfer and continuation rates collectively. O Graduate follow-up results are used to determine whether students have met expectations of employers, transfer institutions and other stakeholders upon graduation. While the results demonstrate whether graduates continued their education, gained employment, or are job seeking, they do not convey whether students were employed within their field of study or if their programs of study prepared them for these next steps. Also, no trend data were provided nor results demonstrating whether DMACC seeks input from employers regarding how well the college s graduates are prepared for the workplace and are meeting employer needs. 1R5- What are your performance results for learning support processes (advising, library and laboratory use, etc.)? DMACC relies on the ACT Student Opinion Survey to measure the performance of its learning support processes. This survey has been administered three times with the results shown in Figure The figure shows a comparison for each survey with the one before it and compares the most recent survey with national norms for that year. The final column shows those areas that are significantly different than the national norm. Some items are blank due to dropped items from the survey. Overall, students are less satisfied with parking and availability of student housing (indicated in red). In response to these data, DMACC has added additional housing at two of its six campuses. Additional parking has been added at DMACC s Urban and Ankeny campuses. DMACC satisfaction rate for 18 services and environmental factors of the college (indicated in green) are higher than the national norm. Criterion 1 30

33 Figure ACT Student Opinion Survey Analysis Category Survey Item ACT 2003 Value Academic Services Advising/Counseling Co-curricular Other Services Courses/ Instruction Facilities Faculty/ Staff Personal Growth Pre Enrollment Rules/Procedures ACT 2006 Value ACT 2010 Value vs National 2006 Norm Specific questions from the AQIP Examiner Survey are used to assess learning support processes at DMACC. Table 1.4 shows selected measures and results. DMACC was at or above the mean for all organizations on all but one of these measures. Student course placement has previously been identified as an issue to address internally. Appropriate action projects and processes were put in 2003 vs vs National Norm Significantly Different Than 2010 National Norm Credit by Examination Financial Aid * Honors Program Library Programs Tutorial Services Academic Advising Career Planning Job Placement Orientation Personal Counseling Student Employment Services Cultural Programs Recreational Programs Social Activities Computer Services Daycare Food Services Parking * Residence Halls Student Health Student insurance Class Size * Course Availability Course Variety Offered * Job Preparation Major Course Content * Program of Study Flexibility Quality of Instruction Athletic Facilities Book Store Classroom Facilities * Computer Availability Computer Labs Condition of Buildings and Grounds * Lab Facilities Student Center Study Areas Use of Activity Fees * Advisor Availability Concern for Individuals * Faculty Attitude Towards Students * Out of Class Instructor Availability * Staff Attitude Towards Students This College in General * Campus Media Opportunities for Personal Involvement Opportunities for Student Employment Racial Harmony Religious Activities Student Government Voice in College Policies Advisor Information Quality Availability of Student Housing * Financial Aid Info Availability * Pre-enrollment Info Accuracy * Academic Calendar * Academic Probation/ Suspension Rules Admission Procedures * Billing and Fee Payment Personal Safety Security * Registration Procedures * Residence Hall Rules Rules Governing Student Conduct * Testing/Grading System Criterion 1 31

34 place to address this issue. These processes and action plans were discussed previously in this document. Table 1.4- AQIP Examiner Questions and Results Regarding Learning Support Processes Des Moines Area Community College Other Organizations Criterion Measure Mean S.D. Mean S.D. 1 placing students in courses for which they are appropriately prepared. 1 ensuring that our faculty members have the skills and resources they need to teach well. 3 listening to the specific needs and requirements of those groups we serve. 3 identifying and responding to the changing needs of those groups we serve. 6 providing and managing support services that meet the needs of students. providing and managing support services that meet the needs of faculty, staff, administrators. 6 regularly evaluating how well our student and administrative support services work. Table 1.5 and Figure 1.17 show results from the PACE survey. The Student Focus section of the PACE survey was chosen as the performance indicators of the college s learning support processes. Table 1.5 shows the questions and mean scores by job type. Figure 1.17 shows how these scores place DMACC according to a continuum ranging from focusing on student needs through coercion, competition, consultation or collaboration. DMACC clearly operates as a consultative institution when addressing student needs, and in some areas operates collaboratively. According to PACE, DMACC is defined as a healthy campus environment with student focus receiving the highest scores on the survey. Table 1.5- Personal Assessment of the College Environment Institutional Focus on Students Data Figure PACE Student Focus Data by Employee Group S ACT Student Opinion, AQIP Examiner, and PACE survey indicate positive results for learning support services. The institution is at or above the mean for select items on the AQIP Examiner, and had 18 services and environmental factors greater than the national norms on the ACT Student Opinion Survey. PACE results portrayed DMACC with a consultative climate. O The ACT Survey of Student Opinion appears to provide limited results of learning support processes and the frequency in which DMACC conducts this survey may not provide the information necessary to make decisions. Criterion 1 32

35 1R6- How do your results for the performance of your processes in Helping Students Learn compare with the results of other higher education organizations and, where appropriate, with results of organizations outside of higher education? ACT data shown previously are benchmarked against national norms established by ACT and are included in Figure AQIP Examiner data shown in Table 1.4 are benchmarked against all other institutions administering the survey. DMACC Scorecard data are benchmarked against all Iowa community colleges and against a national cohort of similar institutions. All benchmark data comes from either the National Community College Benchmark Project (NCCBP) or the National Center for Educational Statistics. The national cohort includes; Austin CC (TX), Collin County CC (TX), Illinois Central CC (IL), Kirkwood CC (IA), Erie CC (NY), Johnson County CC (KS), Monroe CC (NY), Maricopa CC (AZ), Metropolitan CC (NE), and Cuyahoga (OH). Cohort members were chosen based on geography, student population, multiple campus colleges and participation in the NCCBP. Benchmark data are presented as a current ranking among benchmark schools for the current and past years and a goal ranking for each subsequent year up to The entire scorecard and supporting data will be included in Criterion 8. Figure 1.18 shows the scorecard and performance each year since initiating the 2016 FIRSTS Goals. Figures show DMACC s performance regarding within term course retention, fall-to-spring student persistence, fall-to-fall student persistence, and graduation rate. Data for FY09 are the most current available. Overall, DMACC has experienced the most significant improvement in the FIRSTS goal of affordability with moderate success in other areas. DMACC has made significant progress but still have much work to do to meet these goals by DMACC s strategic initiatives outlined in 1P11 are designed to improve trend line data and advance the 2016 FIRSTS Goals at a faster rate than DMACC s peer institutions. Figure DMACC FIRSTS Goals Performance Scorecard for FY09 The measures below are examples of the measures included with the FIRSTS Goals scorecard. Each measure shows DMACC trend line data, benchmark data with other Iowa community colleges, and benchmark data for DMACC s national cohort. Benchmark data for each measure are presented as a ranking with DMACC s past performance in dark blue and future goals set by the light blue bars. Criterion 1 33

36 Though originally identified as part of the scorecard, benchmarking Iowa with other community colleges in the state has not yielded useful information. Kirkwood Community College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa is the only school that is included in both the Iowa and national benchmark cohorts. The rest of the Iowa schools are not similar enough in size and complexity to DMACC to provide useful benchmarks. DMACC is currently ranked first in within term course retention and has seen consistent improvement in fall-to-spring persistence but is still lagging the national cohort. DMACC s ranking for both fall-to-fall persistence and graduation rate declined in Figure FIRSTS Goals Scorecard Data for Within Term Course Retention Figure FIRSTS Goals Scorecard Data for Fall-to-Spring Student Persistence Figure FIRSTS Goals Scorecard Data for Fall-to-Fall Student Persistence Figure FIRSTS Goals Scorecard Data for Graduation Rate Criterion 1 34

37 PACE data are benchmarked against approximately 65 climate studies from other 2- and 4-year institutions. Though the data are normed only at the category and not question level, DMACC s institutional structure and student focus areas score higher than the PACE norms as shown in Table 1.6. O Although the College uses the ACT Student Opinion Survey to compare its results of student support services to other institutions, there is no additional comparative data available to demonstrate how the College s effectiveness in Helping Students Learn compares with other higher education organizations or those outside of higher education. Criterion 1 35

38 Improvement (I) Table 1.6- DMACC PACE Scores and National Norms 1I1- What recent improvements have you made in this category? How systematic and comprehensive are your processes and performance results for Helping Students Learn? DMACC s processes and performance results are both systematic and comprehensive across the entire institution. Though there is always room for improvement and DMACC will continue to refine these processes, DMACC believes they indicate a robust, healthy, student focused environment that helps students learn. These processes and performance results allow the college to identify strengths and opportunities for improvement and address all aspects of the learning process. DMACC has made many improvements since its previous systems portfolio, ranging from improving instruction and learning in the classroom to supporting students learning needs. DMACC has expanded the number of courses participating in assessment activities and has improved support for faculty to use these data to improve instruction. The number of courses actively assessing has increased from 21 in 2006, to over 110 in During this same period, faculty has been provided with quicker turnaround in processing data and more meaningful tables and charts about their data in accordance with their feedback. The dramatic increase in course assessment of student learning is evidence that faculty understand its value in helping students be successful. Course assessment of student learning has become part of DMACC s culture and is a primary process for improving learning. The CAAP assessment has been an important improvement in allowing DMACC to measure common student learning objectives. The value of this process will be fully realized when longitudinal data are available that will indicate improvements over time and allow the college to measure process effectiveness. DMACC s dual credit programming is accredited by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships (NACEP), and ensures that processes and accountability measures are in place to meet the needs of area high school students. DMACC is the first NACEP accredited community college in Iowa. DMACC s efforts to implement meaningful student course placement continues with the development of bridge courses in Math and English. These courses are designed to provide college level instruction but allow either more time for students to practice skills, as in the case of DMACC s ENG 104 course, or focus learning as practical application of math concepts, as in DMACC s Math for Liberal Arts course. The adoption of the AQIP Examiner and PACE Surveys and the continuation of the ACT Student Opinion Survey have expanded the college s ability to measure institutional stakeholder satisfaction and identify opportunities for improvement. The creation of the DMACC Track and SuccessNet systems will allow advisors and counselors to more effectively serve more students by adopting a case management approach to student services. S The College has increased the number of courses used in assessment by over 500% and this information is disseminated to instructors. The new CAAP assessment provides a common measure of student learning objectives. The College uses the AQIP Examiner, PACE Surveys, and the ACT Student Survey as key data sources. Student case management is also conducted utilizing DMACC Track and SuccessNet. 1I2- How do your culture and infrastructure help you to select specific processes to improve and to set targets for improved performance results in Helping Students Learn? Criterion 1 36

39 DMACC s 2016 FIRSTS Goals have been in place for four years and have focused the quality improvement processes for the institution. It has been crucial that these goals have remained a priority for Senior Administration and the Board of Directors. Assured that the Board and Administration are resolute in obtaining these goals, DMACC has had the time and resources to create the processes and infrastructure necessary to achieve these goals. O The 2016 FIRSTS Goals have become a priority for the administration and the Board of Directors, but it is unclear how this information is used to set targets and select processes to improve. Criterion 1 37

40 Processes (P) 2P1- How do you design and operate the key non-instructional processes (e.g., athletics, research, community enrichment, economic development, alumni affairs, etc.) through which you serve significant stakeholder groups? Non-instructional processes either exist or are created to support the mission and goals of the college by meeting non-instructional needs of students, communities, and the workforce. These needs are identified from many sources including Iowa Code, student organizations, internal and external survey data, advisory committees, business and industry contacts, and community organizations. Once needs are identified, additional input is solicited from faculty, staff and other stakeholders to determine the value of each process to the college and its fit with the mission of the institution. Decisions to pursue new processes are made by district administration with input from the Board of Directors, if appropriate. Key non-instructional processes are also designed in compliance with state mandates, federal responsibilities, and accreditation standards. All key non-instructional programs report to a Vice President or other senior administrator and have representation on the President s Cabinet. This assures that the institution is involved in the decision-making process, that non-instructional objectives continue to align with the mission and goals of the college, and that the resource needs are identified and addressed. These processes are directed by formal Boards as in the case of the DMACC Foundation, or less formal steering committees made up of external stakeholders and DMACC employees vested in the interests of the program. Funding is provided through general operating funds, grant funds, or shared funds when partnering with other agencies or organizations. S DMACC has identified the following non-instructional processes: workforce development; accreditation; and training for industry. Although it is not clear if there is a formal design process to define how to carry out these work activities, the institution understand who their stakeholders are, and is focused on producing value. These processes appear to have matured over time with informal methods used to refine how they operate. 2P2- How do you determine your organization s major non-instructional objectives for your external stakeholders, and whom do you involve in setting these objectives? Most non-instructional objectives are determined as a collaborative effort between external stakeholder groups (i.e.- community organizations, state agencies, foundations, etc.), DMACC administration, staff, faculty, and the Board of Directors. DMACC s Vice President for Community and Workforce Partnerships is responsible for monitoring community and workforce needs and formulating possible strategies to address these needs. In addition, Provosts, Deans and district administration are also expected to be involved in their respective communities and identify local needs and possible opportunities for DMACC involvement. Some non-instructional objectives are set by district administration and/or the Board of Directors if identified as part of the 2016 FIRSTS Goals or otherwise identified as a strategic interest of the college. Once a potential non-instructional objective is identified, the college must decide whether it is a strategic interest of the college according to its mission and goals, and its capacity and ability to meet this need. This decision may be made at the Provost/Dean level or may be made by district administration and the Board of Directors, if appropriate, depending on the scope of the noninstructional goal and its adherence to existing policy and procedure. The decision making process includes determining to what extent the identified need supports the mission of the college, examining current programming to determine if processes already exist to meet identified needs, conversations with external stakeholders regarding DMACC s role and potential partnerships, relevant data describing need, and possible funding, staffing and other resource needs. To move forward, all non-instructional projects must have assigned oversight by either a formal board or steering committee involving participation from all stakeholder groups, have secured necessary resources to assure that efforts can be sustained, have guiding missions and goals to focus their efforts, and have identified measures to determine success or failure of the project and its impact on the mission and goals of the project. Criterion 2 38

41 O The institution provides only anecdotal information to describe its processes for determining noninstructional objectives. DMACC does not appear to have a process design method to guide process owners and design teams on how to design or redesign their processes. As a result, non-instructional processes have not benefited from such a review and analysis, thereby increasing the risk that key objectives have not been established or linked to the needs and expectations of stakeholders. 2P3- How do you communicate your expectations regarding these objectives? Communication within non-instructional programs occurs initially as part of the process for determining objectives described in 2P2. Stakeholder oversight groups ensure that expectations are reviewed, refined and communicated within the program. Each program supporting noninstructional objectives reports to a Vice President or other senior administrator and has representation on Cabinet. This assures that expectations are communicated to Cabinet and continued alignment with the college s mission and vision. Information is shared by Cabinet members to other areas of the college through Provost/Dean, faculty leadership and departmental meetings, including union leadership where appropriate. Communication of expectations to external stakeholders relies primarily on the stakeholder oversight group responsible for each program supporting non-instructional objectives. These groups are created with broad stakeholder representation with the expectation that each member will solicit additional input and communicate current operations. Additional communication occurs through posting of meeting minutes on the DMACC website, distribution of annual reports, speaking opportunities at local service organizations, web sites, and events. DMACC s Director of Marketing reports directly to the President to assure that external communications occur appropriately and quickly. Some non-instructional expectations are communicated annually in the 2010 FIRSTS Goals Scorecard. Continuing education, foundation, and alumni are included in this scorecard. O It is not apparent that the operation of the non-instructional processes includes methods to systematically communicate expectations regarding the objectives that have been established internally or to the external stakeholders of these processes. Consequently, non-instructional process owners may be missing opportunities to demonstrate high performance standards to their external stakeholders to help build stronger relationships and greater engagement. 2P4- How do you assess and review the appropriateness and value of these objectives, and whom do you involve in these reviews? Review of appropriateness and value of non-instructional objectives occurs as an extension of the communication process described in 2P3. Primary responsibility for assessing and reviewing objectives is given to the stakeholder oversight group responsible for each program. Operational objectives are evaluated annually to assure their effectiveness and continued alignment with the strategic mission and objectives created for each program. DMACC administrators assigned to support each non-instructional area communicate program objectives and solicit feedback from the DMACC Cabinet and other departments. Though this process allows broad input from both DMACC and external stakeholders, it assures that review of current objectives and adoption of future ones occurs at the level most responsible for program success. Financial program review is included in the regular budgeting, approval and auditing procedures of the college. For programming supported by grant funding, additional oversight and reporting occurs by the DMACC grants and business offices to assure compliance. Non-instructional objectives included in the 2016 FIRSTS Goals Scorecard are assessed and evaluated by the Office of Institutional Effectiveness and reviewed by college leadership. All scorecard indicators are presented annually to the DMACC Board of Directors and publicized throughout the college. Non-instructional goals included in the President s evaluation rubric are assessed annually by the Board of Directors. Criterion 2 39

42 S Data are collected relative to non-instructional process objectives and reviews of the appropriateness and value of these objectives are conducted systematically. Data is publicized and shared through the use of the 2016 FIRSTS Goals Scorecard. 2P5- How do you determine faculty and staff needs relative to these objectives and operations? Determining faculty and staff needs is also an extension of the communication process described in 2P3 and is part of the review process described in 2P4. Faculty and staff needs are included in the review process to assure that non-instructional projects and departments are properly staffed, equipped, and supported to assure success. If there is a disparity between objectives and resources necessary for success, the stakeholder oversight group, with assistance from DMACC administration, must either prioritize programming scope and/or secure additional resources. For non-instructional programming staffed by DMACC employees, the employee evaluation process includes identification of faculty/staff needs and includes solutions for meeting these needs if possible. For those non-instructional objectives included in the President s evaluation or part of the 2016 FIRSTS Goals Scorecard, Cabinet is responsible for working with departments across the college to identify resource needs and prioritize them within the college budget and/or involve the grants office. As a result of the 2006 Systems Portfolio Feedback Report, DMACC has begun administering the Personal Assessment of the College Environment (PACE) Survey and the AQIP Examiner Survey to all employees as a means of supplementing existing processes for identifying faculty and staff needs as described previously. These surveys are each given every three years to accumulate trend data and identify institutional trends regarding faculty and staff needs. The results of both the PACE and AQIP examiner surveys are reviewed in tandem. The AQIP Examiner survey is a global assessment of DMACC s capacity and ability for continuous improvement according to the AQIP criteria. The PACE survey asks employees to assess institutional strengths and opportunities as they pertain to their position in the institution. O It is not clear how faculty and staff needs are determined, what steps are taken for this assessment, or how needs are used to prioritize objectives and make needed adjustments to the processes that support them. 2P6- How do you incorporate information on faculty and staff needs in readjusting these objectives or the processes that support them? Faculty and staff needs identified in the processes described previously are incorporated into the processes for setting and reassessing non-instructional objectives. Often there are more needs than resources. When faculty and staff needs cannot be met with current resources, all stakeholders are responsible for revising goals and expectations to match available resources. O It is unclear if there is a process for incorporating feedback from faculty and staff regard to noninstructional objectives. The institution appears to have an opportunity to establish a more systematic approach to align and integrate faculty and staff needs into the distinctive objectives design and improvement processes. Results (R) 2R1- What measures of accomplishing your major non-instructional objectives and activities do you collect and analyze regularly? Table 2.1 lists regularly collected and analyzed measures of effectiveness of ability to meet noninstructional objectives. Table 2.1- Regularly Collected and Analyzed Data Regarding Non-instructional Objectives Non-instructional Area Measurement Continuing Education Unduplicated headcount Criterion 2 40

43 Non-instructional Area Adult Basic Education (ABE)/ General Education Diploma (GED)/ English as a Second Language (ESL) Continuing Education Industry Training Community and Workforce Partnerships Diversity Resource Development Processes for Achieving Other Distinct Objectives Measurement Contact hours Percent of non-credit students returning for training ABE course enrollment GED course enrollment ESL non-credit enrollment ESL credit enrollment ABE/GED state comparative data Annual headcount and contact hours 260E New Job Training enrollment 260F Existing Job training enrollment Number of clients served by service type Number of visits per service type Minority/gender credit student enrollment Minority/ gender non-credit student enrollment Minority/gender faculty staff demographics Endowment fund balance Institutional scholarship dollars awarded Number of institutional scholarships Total foundation assets Alumni Association membership and contributions AQIP Examiner results for Criterion 2 S DMACC collects data from a variety of sources to determine the effectiveness of non-instructional processes. The institution tracks resource development results and continuing education measures, including headcount and contact hours. 2R2- What are your performance results in accomplishing your other distinctive objectives? ABE/GED/ESL DMACC offers Adult Basic Education (ABE), General Education Diploma (GED), and English as a Second Language (ESL) programs to adults seeking additional basic skills training or credentials. DMACC monitors enrollment numbers in these programs on a term and annual basis with comparative participation data available for ABE and GED programming from the State of Iowa. Table 2.2 shows DMACC s historical headcount and contact hour enrollments for each area. Table 2.3 shows the number of basic education credentials awarded by DMACC compared to other community colleges in the state. DMACC s enrollment in basic education courses remains strong. DMACC is the largest granter of basic education credentials in the state as shown in Table 2.3. Table 2.2- ABE/GED/ESL Students and Contact Hours by Year Table 2.3- Basic Education Credentials Awards by Type and Community College for 2009 Criterion 2 41

44 Continuing Education Table 2.4 shows the number of students served and the total contact hours by type of training and year. Continuing education enrollment has dipped in recent years as a result of changes in the definition of eligible training by the Iowa Department of Education and recent economic conditions. Testing services has continued to show growth over the five year period with court mandated and leisure training also remaining strong. These data are reported annually for purposes of this report, but are also reviewed throughout the year to adjust resource and personnel allocations. Figure 2.1 is taken from the institutional scorecard and shows market penetration for non-credit programming. These data show a similar trend to the data in Table 2.4 with slight declines in recent years due to the reasons listed previously. Benchmark data for this measure are provided in 2R3. Table 2.4- Continuing Education Enrollment and Contact Hours by Year and Type of Training Figure 2.1- DMACC Non-credit Market Penetration by Year Business and Industry Training (260E, F) Enrollment in Iowa s state-sponsored workforce training programs is shown in Table 2.5. The 260E program is for new jobs training and the 260F program is for retraining current workforce. Though training dipped in 2009 along with the economy, the 2010 numbers have rebounded as the economy improves. Table 2.5- State Sponsored Business and Industry Training Enrollments by Year Program FY10 FY09 FY08 FY07 260E- Iowa Industrial New Jobs training Program 1, ,331 2,884 Criterion 2 42

45 260F- Iowa Jobs Training Program Community and Workforce Partnerships Beginning in fall 2007, DMACC s Community and Workforce Partnership Division began using a coordinated case management application developed on the SCT Banner Platform called SuccessNet. This tool allows authorized counselors and advisors to see all DMACC services a student receives to better plan next steps toward education or entering the workforce. Table 2.6 shows the number of clients and visits by term and type of visit. Table 2.6- Community and Workforce Partnership Clients and Visits by Term Diversity DMACC collects and analyzes racial, ethnic and gender breakdowns for credit and non-credit students and for DMACC employees as shown in Tables DMACC continues to experience significant enrollment increases for Black and Hispanic students in credit and non-credit programming. Criterion 2 43

46 Table 2.7- Number and Percent of DMACC Credit Students by Year, Race and Gender Table 2.8- Number and Percent of DMACC Noncredit Students by Year, Race and Gender Table 2.9- Number and Percent of DMACC Employees by Year, Race and Gender Resource Development Figures are taken from the institutional scorecard and show trends in endowment, scholarship dollars awarded, number of scholarships awarded, total foundation assets and alumni membership and contributions. DMACC s endowment and total assets dropped in FY2009 due to recent economic conditions. However, both the number and amount of scholarships awarded has maintained an upward trend. Both Alumni membership and total contributions continue to increase. Criterion 2 44

47 Figure 2.2- DMACC Foundation Endowment by Year Figure 2.3- Foundation Scholarship Dollars Awarded by Year Figure 2.4- Number of Foundation Scholarships Awarded by Year Figure 2.5- Total DMACC Foundation Assets Figure 2.6- DMACC Alumni Membership and Contributions An indirect measure of DMACC s ability to meet other institutional objectives is the results of the AQIP Examiner survey for this criterion. Figure 2.7 shows DMACC s scores and the mean score for all other institutions on the questions under accomplishing other distinct objectives. DMACC s scores are higher than the mean for other institutions on all questions. S DMACC is the largest grantor of the basic education credential in the state of Iowa, and there is a general upward trend in the number of students needing those services. S Results for Foundation development show favorable trends. Foundation scholarship dollars awarded by year (Figure 2.3) has steadily improved since FY 2006, despite drops in endowment and foundation assets over time. Alumni membership and contribution (Figure 2.6) show positive performance. S Non-credit enrollment for Black and Hispanic students has increased and other student ethnic groups were stable or increased slightly. O Market penetration for non-credit programming has declined since FY 2005 (Figure 2.1), and enrollment in workforce programs has declined. O Trends are not favorable for results of the number and percent of employees by race (Table 2.9). Employment of minorities has declined slightly. Figure 2.7- DMACC s AQIP Examiner Results for Criterion 2 Accomplishing Other Distinct Objectives 45

48 2R3- How do your results for the performance of these processes compare with the performance results of other higher education organizations and, if appropriate, of organizations outside of higher education? Many of the performance measures for accomplishing other distinct objectives are benchmarked either against other Iowa community colleges or, when possible, against a national cohort. Benchmarking is a key element of the 2016 FIRSTS Goals. ABE and GED awards are compared to the other Iowa community colleges and are shown in Table 2.3. Non-credit market penetration is benchmarked against both other Iowa community colleges and the national cohort group defined in section 1R6 of this document. Figure 2.7 shows trend line data with performance against benchmark groups. Blue bars on the benchmark charts indicate DMACC s current and past rankings with the light blue bars indicating goals up to and including Figure 2.7- FIRSTS Goals Scorecard Data for Non-credit Market Penetration Diversity information for credit programming is benchmarked according to both the Iowa and national cohorts. According to 2010 data from the National Community College Benchmark Project, DMACC is ranked 2 nd out of 11 in the national cohort and 6 th out of the nine Iowa colleges reporting. Three of the five measures for resource development are benchmarked according to Iowa and national cohorts and are part of the institutional scorecard. Figures show trend line and benchmark data for Foundation endowment fund balance, scholarship dollars awarded, and total Foundation assets. Figure 2.8- FIRSTS Goals Scorecard Data for Foundation Endowment Fund Balance Figure 2.9- FIRSTS Goals Scorecard Data for Scholarship Dollars Awarded Criterion 2 46

49 Figure FIRSTS Goals Scorecard Data for Total Foundation Assets AQIP Examiner data are benchmarked against all other institutions using the survey. Data and benchmarks are given in Figure 2.7. S Performance measures for Adult Education are benchmarked against other Iowa community colleges and a national cohort via the National Community College Benchmarking Project (NCCBP). DMACC exceeded both state and national benchmarks in the number of Basic Literacy credentials (ABE) and High School Equivalency (GED) awards. O Three of five measures for resource development are benchmarked according to an Iowa and a national cohort, and are part of the institutional scorecard. DMACC met or exceeded state and national benchmarks in the Foundation Endowment Fund Balance measure, but performed inconsistently when compared with both state and national benchmarks in the other two resource development scorecard measures (Scholarship Dollars Awarded; Total Foundation Assets) over the three year period from R4- How do your performance results of your processes for Accomplishing Other Distinctive Objectives strengthen your overall organization? How do they enhance your relationships with the communities and regions you serve? Timely, accurate and reliable accountability measures for other distinct objectives have strengthened the institution by clearly stating objectives and by providing a means to know when goals have been accomplished. Having clear and measurable objectives creates an environment where faculty and staff are not only allowed to try different strategies, but the effects of the strategic objectives can be observed immediately. With this information, the college is able to be flexible in identifying new strategies and discarding old ones proven not to have the desired effect. DMACC prides itself on having accurate data that it uses in planning and decision making processes, and the college is very open to share its strengths and opportunities with all stakeholders. Sharing performance results with stakeholders has built the institution s reputation as an ambitious, effective, student and service oriented institution that is often sought by other agencies, colleges and organizations as a partner. The performance measures and data provide evidence to stakeholders and communities that DMACC is committed to continuous improvement. O Although the institution indicates that measures for other distinct objectives have strengthened the institution by providing a means to know when goals have been accomplished, it is unclear how the institution defines a goal as having been accomplished. DMACC appears to lack performance results Criterion 2 47

50 to demonstrate other distinct objectives enhance its relationship with the community to strengthen the organization. Improvement (I) 2I1- What recent improvements have you made in this category? How systematic and comprehensive are your processes and performance results for Accomplishing Other Distinctive Objectives? DMACC has made great strides in recent years in its ability to collect, use and report data necessary for achieving non-instructional goals of the institution. The DMACC Track and SuccessNet tracking systems are a great improvement in how the college integrates services and measures the effectiveness of programs and initiatives to improve student and stakeholder focus. In 2008, DMACC won the Greater Des Moines Partnership s prestigious Diversity Award. The award recognizes companies that create a diverse workforce as well as promote an environment of inclusion in the Greater Des Moines Area. This was the ninth year for the Diversity Award, and the first time the award was given to an educational institution. DMACC is proud of the recognition it received for its diversity efforts. These efforts continue to be a priority for the institution. DMACC Foundation has also seen significant improvement in its performance. DMACC s available endowment dollars for scholarships increased 15% in A priority of the college is to give as many scholarships as possible to meet the growing need caused by the recent recession. DMCC s Alumni Association continues to grow in numbers, contributions and visibility in DMACC s communities. S DMACC acquired the Track and SuccessNet tracking systems to improve how the College integrates services and measures the effectiveness of programs and initiatives to improve student and stakeholder focus. DMACC has also won the Greater Des Moines Partnerships Diversity Award to recognize its diverse workforce. The College s foundation has increased its scholarships 15% in 2009, and their alumni association continues to grow in numbers, contributions, and visibility. O While the College has made several improvements in this category; there is an opportunity to further develop systematic and comprehensive processes and performance results for accomplishing other distinctive objectives. 2I2- How do your culture and infrastructure help you to select specific processes to improve and to set targets for improved performance results in Accomplishing Other Distinctive Objectives? All levels of the institution are involved in the processes for improving and setting targets for accomplishing other distinct objectives. It is an expectation of DMACC faculty and staff that they can and will be involved in determining objectives for the college as well as contribute time and expertise in meeting these objectives. These processes rely on continued and consistent communication throughout the institution. Many of DMACC s processes and infrastructure focus on gathering and using stakeholder input and sharing information with local business and industry, nonprofit organizations and communities. DMACC s culture continues to provide a voice for all faculty and staff while providing the leadership necessary to make decisions and meet emerging needs. S DMACC has a culture of broad stakeholder input to determine and participate in distinctive objectives. Gathering and using stakeholder input and sharing information with local business and industry, communities and non-profit organizations builds the infrastructure for continuous improvement. Criterion 2 48

51 Processes (P) 3P1- How do you identify the changing needs of your student groups? How do you analyze and select a course of action regarding these needs? DMACC s processes for identifying the changing needs of student groups continue to be strengths of the institution as concluded in the 2006 Systems Appraisal Feedback Report. Processes include; a) encouraging and supporting very active student organizations including student representation on district committees and commissions, b) meetings between student groups and college leadership each term to share information and discuss student needs, c) regular administration of the ACT Student Opinion Survey, d) marketing surveys aimed at identifying community needs, e) conducting graduate, employer and advisory committee surveys as part of the program evaluation process, and f) district-wide enrollment management planning. The ACT Student Opinion Survey has been administered three times (2003, 2006 and 2010) and continues to provide valuable insight into what services students use and find valuable, and how satisfied they are with their college experience. The data allow trends to be identified for areas that are improving and areas that provide opportunities for improvement. DMACC is committed to using the ACT survey every three years. A three year cycle was chosen to allow enough time between surveys to implement and refine necessary improvements prior to resurveying. In addition, the DMACC Marketing and Enrollment Management departments have begun using virtual media outlets such as Facebook and Twitter to improve communication with students and gain instant feedback regarding college events and services. A vendor has been hired to monitor all social media outlets and report trends and findings to the Cabinet every three months. All of the sources of data identified previously are shared with Cabinet, Provosts/Deans and other departments of the college. Cabinet reviews all data sources to identify strengths and opportunities for improvement and to determine next steps. If necessary, actions may include further analysis of the data, meetings with relevant departments for clarification, and feedback and review of existing processes to identify potential causes and solutions. If actions require a significant amount of leadership, coordination and input, they can be referred to the AQIP Steering Committee for development of action plans. Campuses and departments are encouraged to review student need data from their programs, disciplines or areas and implement improvements. These efforts are supported by district administration whose role is to coordinate efforts and facilitate communication across the college. S The institution appears to have a sound understanding of the importance of identifying the changing needs of its student groups and has developed a wide variety of methods to accomplish this critical task. These include multiple student surveys, employer surveys, ACT Opinion Surveys, and advisory groups. Data collected from these methods provide an opportunity for the institution to modify services and create greater value for students. 3P2- How do you build and maintain a relationship with your students? DMACC s processes for building and maintaining relationships with students continue to be strengths of the institution as concluded in the 2006 Systems Appraisal Feedback Report. These processes include; a) regular student contact through counseling, advising, alumni activities, events and training, b) student clubs, organizations and activities, c) dual credit courses and academic advising offered to local high schools students, d) partnerships with community and workforce agencies, and e) instructional strategies to promote instructor-student and student-student interaction including group work and learning communities. DMACC provides several special programs aimed at improving performance of at-risk and underrepresented student populations. DMACC s TRIO and Student Support Services programs are two examples of federal grant funded programs designed to work closely with students to eliminate barriers for continuation in college. These services include continual student contact to monitor progress, encourage continuation, and identify college and community services to help students stay Criterion 3 49

52 in school. Other grant supported programs designed to build effective relationships with students include academic boot camp, Youth Build and Gateway to College programming for high school drop outs aimed at earning a GED and transitioning to DMACC s credit programming, college prep outreach, Upward Bound and the Workforce Training Academy. Information for these programs and others are located on the DMACC Web Site. Though DMACC has had an alumni association for much of its existence, it has recently become a higher priority within the institution. The DMACC Foundation Office hired a full-time Alumni Association Director to increase membership and improve services for alumni. The goal of the Alumni Office is to make lifetime connections with DMACC students. Alumni membership is included as an indicator under the 2016 FIRSTS Goals. DMACC created an evening Call Center to extend the reach of the advising office. Calls are directed to target groups of students who are at risk of failing based on admission, registration and attendance patterns. Recruitment calls are initiated as a result of potential students requesting or initiating interest in DMACC. The Call Center is staffed with people knowledgeable about DMACC procedures and can often provide immediate assistance to students during the phone conversation. If referrals to other departments are necessary, the Call Center follows up with both parties to make sure that the student has been served promptly and effectively. Students can also ask questions in real time to DMACC staff through the DMACC web site. The Ask a Question feature located on DMACC s home page has been used heavily and reduces frustration for students looking for answers, but don t know who to call or where to look on the web site. DMACC is currently using social media as a means for cultivating relationships with students. Regular posts are made to both DMACC s Facebook page and Twitter accounts. Posts to these sites include invitations or notices regarding events at each campus, requests for feedback about processes or services offered by the college, or general information about the college. Currently there are over 1,900 followers on Facebook and 640 followers on Twitter. Enrollment Management and Marketing departments are responsible for posting content and following up with students as necessary. A daily is sent to all students informing them of campus happenings, upcoming deadlines, and other student related information. S DMACC appears to have several integrated processes for building and maintaining relationships with students. These processes have recently been evaluated and improved through the strengthening of alumni membership, development of a call center to target at-risk students groups, and inclusion of social media to showcase events and invite feedback. SS The institution uses a variety of approaches for building and maintaining relationships with students. These include regular student contact, student clubs, organizations and activities, dual-credit courses and academic advising to high school students, partnerships with community and workforce agencies, and instructional strategies to promote interaction. 3P3- How do you analyze the changing needs of your key stakeholder groups and select courses of action regarding these needs? Data regarding student and other stakeholder needs comes from a variety of sources. Surveys are conducted regularly including the ACT Student Opinion Survey, AQIP Examiner, Personal Assessment of the College Environment (PACE), as well as marketing, graduate, employer and advisory committee surveys. Additional data are gathered through meetings with advisory committees, faculty and staff bargaining units, student activities councils, Phi Theta Kappa Chapters, DMACC departments, workforce development organizations, business and industry leaders, transfer institutions, community organizations and others. Survey data are collected and analyzed by the Office of Institutional Effectiveness (OIE). Initial findings and analyses are shared with Cabinet and across the college. Campuses and departments review these findings and combine these data with information gathered from regular stakeholder contact to determine if and what courses of action need to occur. Specific activities to address the Criterion 3 50

53 needs of DMACC s stakeholders are encouraged to occur at the level most appropriate to achieve positive results. Faculty and staff needs are continually assessed and addressed through regular meetings between DMACC administration and faculty and staff collective bargaining leadership, campus forums with the President and Executive Vice President held at each campus each semester, maintenance of opendoor policies to provide faculty and staff access to college leadership, and inclusion of faculty and staff in committees, commissions, and work groups to promote shared governance of the college. Common courses of action include reviewing relevant data to identify issues and formulate strategies for improvement, conducting additional studies to gather more information, delegating issues to departmental leadership, or involving the AQIP Leadership Team for possible creation of AQIP action projects. All DMACC programs are required by the Iowa Department of Education to conduct a comprehensive program evaluation every five years to assure that programming is meeting the needs of students, employers, faculty and other stakeholder groups. This evaluation includes student enrollment and performance data as well as survey data from stakeholder groups. These evaluations are presented to the AQIP Leadership Team by Program Chairs and their Provost/Dean to discuss, share and get feedback about their programs. The AQIP Leadership Team prepares a summary of each evaluation including recommendations resulting from these discussions. This summary with recommendations is reviewed by the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs who works with the Program Chair and Dean to determine necessary follow-up actions. S DMACC collects data from a variety of sources to determine stakeholder needs. Tools used include ACT, PACE, and AQIP Examiner standardized surveys as well as institution-specific graduate and employer surveys. These are used to assess stakeholder satisfaction and identify preferences and changing needs. O DMACC conducts a comprehensive program evaluation every five years. It is unclear if the five-year cycle allows the institution to keep pace with changing requirements and yield information that ensures existing programs are meeting stakeholders needs 3P4- do you build and maintain relationships with your key stakeholders? DMACC uses a combination of formal, informal and technological methods for building and maintaining relationships with stakeholders. Often stakeholder relationships are established and maintained with contractual obligations on both sides. Collective bargaining agreements between faculty, staff and the district, and articulation, admissions and grant related agreements with local 4- year colleges and universities are primary examples of formal, contractual relationships. Shared programming between governmental entities is allowed under Section 28E of the Iowa Code. DMACC s dual credit programming with K12 school districts, workforce development efforts with the Iowa Departments of Workforce Development and Economic Development, and outreach efforts with publicly funded organizations are additional examples of these types of formal relationships. The DMACC Foundation Board and the Workforce Sector Boards are additional examples of formal types of relationships with stakeholders. Articulation agreements with transfer institutions, purchasing policies and procedures with vendors, and bargaining contracts are other examples of formal stakeholder relationships. Informal relationships are developed and maintained through a commitment to collaboration, service and communication. DMACC has many partnerships and collaborative efforts across the district as described in Criterion 9 of this document. These partnerships are created to add value to the DMACC mission, and college attempts to meet stakeholder needs. DMACC encourages and initiates opportunities to serve its communities. DMACC employees serve on various community boards and groups. This service is supported by the district as a means for building and maintaining relationships in the district. Communication with both internal and external stakeholders is a primary method for maintaining relationships and provides opportunities to quickly address emerging issues or opportunities. District leadership is very active in DMACC s communities and Criterion 3 51

54 represents the college at many external stakeholder meetings and events. DMACC leadership is often sought by external stakeholder groups to provide guidance in new initiatives and programs in Central Iowa because of DMACC s experience and expertise in many areas including education, community building, workforce development, leadership and strategic planning. Technology continues to grow as a means for building and maintaining relationships. In addition to traditional communication through web sites, distribution lists and , DMACC is beginning to integrate information systems as a means of sharing information and to improve efficiency for meeting stakeholder needs. Currently, processes have been implemented to integrate DMACC s student information system with bookstore systems to improve the process for using student financial aid to purchase text books and other necessary materials. DMACC s web site is being integrated with the DMACC student information system in new ways to help students register more quickly. DMACC has adopted a common student ID system to allow tracking of students from K12 systems into higher education. DMACC is partnering with the Iowa Department of Education to allow K12 school districts to send electronic transcripts to colleges. These systems not only improve service to students, but also build and maintain relationships with other organizations. S Numerous methods help build and maintain relationships with stakeholder groups. These include: contractual agreements; collective bargaining agreements; articulation, admissions and grant related agreements; dual credit programming with K12 school districts, workforce development efforts with the Iowa Departments of Workforce Development and Economic Development, and outreach efforts with publicly funded organizations. 3P5- How do you determine if you should target new student and stakeholder groups with your educational offerings and services? The responsibility for targeting groups for educational programming is coordinated by the Director of Enrollment Management with direction and oversight by the Enrollment Management Committee and Cabinet. The Enrollment Management Committee which includes Deans, Provosts, marketing and other department directors, and district administration, develops a detailed annual operational enrollment management plan for targeting new student and stakeholder groups. The Enrollment Management Committee evaluates various data sources to determine new populations that can benefit from DMACC services. These data sources include input from faculty who have identified a need or workforce trend through their advisory committee, Deans, Provosts and district administration involved in community and workforce preparation, local employers, business and industry partners, state and federal legislation, job projection data from the Iowa Department of Workforce Development, and input from recruiters working in educational, business, and industry settings. The final decision to pursue a new student or stakeholder group is based on the intensity of the need, DMACC s ability to meet this need with high quality programming, cost benefit analysis, facility availability, and alignment with mission and goals of the college. O Although an Enrollment Management Committee evaluates input from internal and external stakeholders and legislation, it is unclear if a process exists to determine when to target new student and stakeholder groups and which ones to choose. Without such an approach, DMACC may miss opportunities to increase enrollment and bring its services and programs to individuals and communities in need. 3P6- How do you collect complaint information from students and other stakeholders? How do you analyze this feedback and select courses of action? How do you communicate these actions to your students and stakeholders? The general complaint process for students is detailed in Educational Services Procedure 4640 located in the student handbook and on the DMACC web site. Complaints regarding discrimination including harassment based on sex, age, race, gender, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, Criterion 3 52

55 creed or disability are detailed in Educational Services Procedure 4645 located in the student handbook and on the DMACC web site. Each Provost maintains a log of all complaints for each campus to identify trends and problem areas that require attention. DMACC also maintains a centralized file of formal complaints for the district in the office of the Executive Dean of Student Affairs. This allows complaint data to be aggregated and analyzed by the Judicial Affairs Officer to identify general trends or specific areas of the college with a higher number of complaints than expected. The Judicial Affairs Officer reports identified trends in student behavior or in complaints to the attention of the Executive Dean of Student Services and the Executive VP for Academic Affairs. All student complaints are addressed according to Educational Services Procedure DMACC contracts with EthicsPoint web services to provide a confidential web-based hotline for complaints regarding policy violations including financial, risk or safety, or information technology matters. These reports are delivered anonymously to DMACC s President and Vice President for Business Services for investigation. A course of action may be taken by the VP or referred to other college officials to resolve. Investigative results and any action taken is reported anonymously back to the person making the complaint via the EthicsPoint software. S Complaints pertaining to financial, risk or safety, and information technology are supported by a webbased hotline. EthicsPoint allows for complaints to be collected anonymously. O Although early stage complaint management guidelines are established and there is a process for collecting complaints, it is unclear how complaint data are analyzed to identify when more widespread issues are developing. As a result, DMACC may be limited in its ability to recover from complaints and to use complaint data to identify changing needs and requirements Results (R) 3R1- How do you determine the satisfaction of your students and other stakeholders? What measures of student and other stakeholder satisfaction do you collect and analyze regularly? DMACC determines the satisfaction of students and other stakeholders through many formal and informal means. Valuable input and feedback is gained from the many meetings and conversations college leadership has with students, faculty and staff, and other stakeholders. College leadership meets regularly with students through the student activities councils and other student organizations at each campus and is always accessible to students as needed. A strong relationship exists between district administration and the faculty and support staff bargaining units and is supported through monthly meetings for planning and addressing emerging issues. Many departmental, Provost, Dean, committee and commission meetings are good sources of information on student and stakeholder satisfaction. District leadership is also significantly involved with DMACC s communities and its business, industry and communities leaders to assess how well DMACC is meeting their identified needs, and regularly solicits these leaders ideas for improved or additional services. In addition to these informal methods, Table 3.1 lists the formal surveys or processes used by DMACC to determine the satisfaction of students and other stakeholders. Table 3.1- DMACC Surveys and Processes Used to Determine Stakeholder Satisfaction Survey or Process Stakeholders ACT Survey of Student Opinions Students Program Surveys of Graduates Students Program Surveys of Advisory Committees Business and Industry Program Surveys of Employers Business and Industry Personal Assessment of the College Environment Faculty and Staff AQIP Examiner Faculty and Staff Credit Market Penetration Communities Criterion 3 53

56 S The College has a variety of informal and formal approaches to determining the satisfaction of students and other stakeholders. Including, but not limited to, a Student Satisfaction Survey, a Graduate Exit Survey and Employer Surveys. O Data collected pertaining to changing stakeholder needs appear to be limited in scope. Although there is emphasis on graduate and employer data gathering and analysis, interactions with other stakeholder groups, such as feeder schools and other postsecondary institutions, is more informal and does not appear to produce significant data for analysis purposes. As a result, DMACC may not always identify changing stakeholder needs in a timely manner. 3R2- What are your performance results for student satisfaction? DMACC continues to rely on the ACT Survey of Student Opinions to formally measure student satisfaction of DMACC s services and educational environment. Results and discussion of this survey are provided under 1R5 of this document. Overall, DMACC students continue to be very satisfied with DMACC and the services it offers. Areas that students are exceptionally satisfied with include financial aid, class size, course content, interactions with faculty and staff, pre-enrollment information and services, and rules and procedures. Availability of housing and parking were identified as opportunities for the college, and DMACC responded by adding additional housing at 2 campuses and parking at several of DMACC s campuses. DMACC also surveys recent program graduates to gather information about their current status and employment after graduation and to assess their satisfaction with the education received in their program. This information is compiled using Qualtrics survey software and is incorporated into the program evaluation process. All survey data are reviewed by the AQIP Leadership Team with program faculty and administrative leadership, and recommendations are forwarded to the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs if issues needing attention are identified. Questions 10-14, 21 and 22 of this survey address student satisfaction of the program and college services. Sharing all of the results from the surveys is not possible in this document; however Figures are examples of information from one program. Figure 3.1 shows results for limited response questions where students must choose from the answers provided. Responses shown in Figure 3.2 are from open ended questions. Criterion 3 54

57 Figure 3.1- Student Graduate Program Survey Results Example for Questions Criterion 3 55

58 Figure 3.2- Student Graduate Program Survey Results Example for Questions 21 and 22 Criterion 3 56

59 S Satisfaction with student services and the educational environment as determined by the ACT Survey has remained steady in the moderately high satisfaction range. Highly rated areas in 2010 include cocurricular activities, class size, condition of facilities and buildings, faculty attitudes towards students, library programs, and tutorial services. 3R3- What are your performance results for building relationships with your students? Many of the measures for building and maintaining relationships with students are included in the 2016 FIRSTS Goals Scorecard and are included in section 1R6 of this document. The increase in alumni membership and foundation contributions by alumni as shown in section 2R2 are positive indicators that DMACC continues to build life-long relationships with its students. Figure 1.19 in Criterion 1 shows that DMACC is ranked first in its national benchmark cohort for student retention. Figure 1.20 also in Criterion 1 shows continued progress toward its goal for fall-to-spring persistence. DMACC s dual credit programming has been an effective process for establishing relationships with students while still in high school. DMACC has initiated a survey of dual credit students and high school staff as part of its accreditation through the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships (NACEP). Table 3.2 shows survey results for dual credit students one year after graduating from high school. These results indicate a high percentage of students attending a 2- year college. This is significant evidence of the relationship students have with DMACC through dual credit programming. Table 3.3 shows the effect that dual credit programming has had on students as perceived by high school teachers, counselors and principals. The survey was completed by 93 teachers, guidance counselors and principals currently participating in dual credit programming. DMACC is building relationships with students that are influencing their perceptions, expectations and preparedness for college. Significant percentages of high school staff believe that dual credit programming has resulted in students considering college for the first time, and 90% or more of staff believe dual credit programming has helped students develop realistic expectations of college. Table 3.2- Number and Percent of Dual Credit Students by Attending School Type One Year After Graduating High School In 2008 and 2009 DMACC created a Call Center as an extension of the Student Services Division as described in 3P2. The effectiveness of the ability of this service to build and improve relationships with students is measured by comparing the credit hour yield for students served by the Call Center to credit hour yield of similar students who could not be contacted directly but for whom voice mail messages were left. The voice mail group is used as the comparison group to assure that student contact information was still correct. Table 3.4 shows that when compared to students Table 3.3- Percent of High School Staff by Agreement Level and Position who could not be contacted directly, students served by the Call Center increased within term course retention by 607 credits and improved fall-to-spring persistence by 81 students. Table 3.4 also shows that not only does the call center help build relationships with students and improve retention and persistence, the calls also have a significant return on investment for the college. This analysis has been conducted in both 2008 and 2010 with similar results. Criterion 3 57

60 Table 3.4- DMACC Call Center Performance Results: 2010 S Figure 1.19 shows that DMACC is ranked first in its national benchmark cohort for student retention. The results of the survey for dual credit students one year after graduating from high school indicate a high percentage of students attending a 2-year college. This is evidence of the relationship students have with DMACC through dual credit programming 3R4- What are your performance results for stakeholder satisfaction? All DMACC Career and Technical programs are required to maintain an advisory committee of professionals currently working in related fields. Advisory committee members are regularly surveyed as part of the program evaluation process. The results of these surveys are included in the formal program evaluation and are reviewed by the AQIP Leadership Team and program leadership who can make recommendations to the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs when results identify issues that need to be addressed. The results for all program evaluations are too lengthy for inclusion in this document; however, the information in Figure 3.3 serves as a typical example of these stakeholder satisfaction results. Figure 3.3- Advisory Committee Survey Results Example Criterion 3 58

61 Surveys of employers hiring DMACC students are collected and processed in a similar fashion. A typical example this type of stakeholder satisfaction data is shown in Figures Figure 3.4- Employer Survey Example 1 Figure 3.5- Employer Survey Example 2 Figure 3.6- Employer Survey Example 3 The Personal Assessment of the College Environment (PACE) survey was adopted on a three-year cycle as a primary means for measuring satisfaction of faculty and staff. This instrument has been administered two times, in 2001 and 2008, and is scheduled again in Overall results from the PACE survey are positive with improvements in each of the four categories over time. Figure 3.7 shows the results comparison between 2001 and DMACC has moved closer to being a truly collaborative environment and is described as having a healthy college environment. Figure 3.7- DMACC PACE Survey Results Comparison: Criterion 3 59

62 Figure 3.8 and Table 3.5 show PACE mean scores by job type regarding institutional structure. Though all of these questions reflect faculty and staff satisfaction, questions 15, 16, 22, 25, 38 and 41 are examined specifically as being the most valid indicators of faculty and staff satisfaction. Questions 15, 16, 22, 25 and 41 are all in the consultative category. Question 38 regarding opportunities for advancement continues to be an issue for DMACC and is being addressed according to the processes under Criterion 4 of this document. Figure 3.8- DMACC PACE Institutional Structure Results: 2008 Table 3.5- DMACC PACE Institutional Structure Results: 2008 Figure 3.9 and Table 3.6 show PACE results regarding Teamwork at DMACC. All questions in this category are considered indicators of faculty and staff satisfaction and also all fall within the consultative category. Teamwork is a strength for DMACC. Figure 3.9- DMACC PACE Teamwork Results: 2008 Table 3.6- DMACC PACE Teamwork Results: 2008 Criterion 3 60

63 The AQIP Examiner is used as an indirect measure of stakeholder satisfaction by assessing how well DMACC faculty and staff believe DMACC understands students and stakeholder needs. Table 3.7 shows AQIP Examiner results for Criterion 3: understanding student and stakeholder needs. DMACC consistently scored above the mean for other institutions. S Career and Technical programs are required to maintain an advisory committee of professionals currently working in related fields. Advisory committee members indicate high levels of satisfaction with the institution. O Although DMACC reports current levels of satisfaction from stakeholders, there are limited trend data. The lack of trend data may make it difficult for the institution to determine the extent of deployment with the delivery of programs and services to stakeholders. 3R5- What are your performance results for building relationships with your key stakeholders? Market penetration for credit programming continues to be a significant indicator of DMACC s ability to build relationships with external stakeholders. Figure 3.10 shows DMACC trend line data for market penetration. DMACC s market penetration has increased over ½ percentage point since This increase demonstrates that DMACC is viewed by external stakeholders as a primary destination to meet their education and training needs. Market penetration for non-credit programming is also an indicator of relationship building with external stakeholders. Non-credit market penetration data are included in section 2R2 of this document. Total scholarship dollars given to the DMACC Foundation is a measure of the institution s ability to build relationships and garner support for students. Figures 2.2 and 2.3 in section 2R2 of this document show increased scholarship dollars awarded during a year when investment income for scholarships decreased. This indicates additional giving for student scholarships by stakeholders even during a weak economic period. Table 3.7- AQIP Examiner Results for DMACC s Ability to Understand Stakeholder Needs Figure DMACC Credit Market Penetration by Year An indirect indicator of the strength of DMACC s relationships with stakeholders is the number of joint operations DMACC has developed with partnering institutions. Below are a few of the most recent examples of DMACC s ability to build collaborative partnerships. In May 2006 DMACC and 10 area school districts surrounding Ames, IA built the Story County Hunziker Center to offer a dual credit career academy for area high school students. In 2008, Iowa Health Hospitals and the Polk County Board of Supervisors each made significant contributions to build a new Health Sciences building on the Ankeny Campus. This building offers state-of-the-art facilities and equipment to train nurses and other health care professionals. In 2010, the Future Farmers of America (FFA) Enrichment Center was built on the DMACC Ankeny Campus jointly funded by DMACC and the FFA to house the DMACC agriculture, horticulture and vet tech programs and to serve as the FFA state headquarters and conference center. In 2010, DMACC contracted for additional space at minimal cost to the district to offer additional health care training at the recently vacated Mercy Capitol Hospital in downtown Des Moines. DMACC s stakeholders have partnered with DMACC to meet facility needs as a result of continued enrollment growth and demand for DMACC graduates. DMACC s most recent expansion is a program center in Perry, Iowa which is a collaborative project between the City of Perry and DMACC and is funded through a combination of DMACC, city and state resources. Criterion 3 61

64 S Results demonstrate the effectiveness of the processes and activities used to build relationships with stakeholders. For example, market penetration has increased steadily in recent years and has been above the institution s goal and the results in the number of foundation scholarship dollars and number of awards has improved. 3R6- How do your results for the performance of your processes for Understanding Students and Other Stakeholders Needs compare with the performance results of other higher education organizations and, if appropriate, of organizations outside of higher education? Many of the measures presented in this section are benchmarked either internally over time, to all Iowa community colleges, or to the national cohort. The ACT Student Opinions Survey is benchmarked against all other 2-year colleges using the survey and the results and benchmarks are given in section 1R5 of this document. The PACE survey data are internally benchmarked over time with benchmark results shown in Figure 3.7. PACE data are also benchmarked against national norms. The comparison of DMACC s score against the national norm for the Institutional Structure and Teamwork categories are given in Table 3.8. The AQIP Examiner survey is benchmarked against all other institutions using the survey with those results given in Table 3.7. Credit market penetration is included on the 2016 FIRSTS Goals Scorecard. Benchmark data are shown in Figure Table 3.8- DMACC PACE Scores and National Norms Norms by Category Overall, DMACC scored at or above its benchmark comparison groups for almost all measures. Though there is always room for improvement, these indicators and their benchmarks reinforce DMACC s standing as a quality institution. O Other than the PACE scores and Credit Market Penetration data, no sources of data are used to compare DMACC outcomes and the performance of student and stakeholder-related processes to those of other higher education institutions or organizations outside of higher education. Figure DMACC Credit Market Penetration Scorecard Data Improvement (I) 3I1- What recent improvements have you made in this category? How systematic and comprehensive are your processes and performance results for Understanding Students and Other Stakeholders Needs? DMACC s dual credit programming has grown tremendously in the past 10 years with the number of high school students served increasing from 1,000 in 2001 to over 10,000 in Nationally, dual credit programming can be controversial because it blurs the demarcation line between high school and college. Though DMACC has always known and has had evidence to show the effectiveness of this programming for students entering DMACC after graduation, the recent NACEP accreditation process has been a great benefit to the institution. The accreditation process requires that various processes be implemented to assure continued alignment between dual credit and traditional college programming. This process has improved the quantity and quality of the interaction between on- Criterion 3 62

65 campus DMACC faculty and those adjuncts teaching in the area high schools. It has also more closely aligned curriculum, course competencies, and assessment activities. New measures of student and high school staff satisfaction have been instituted to ensure that DMACC continues to meet the needs of these students and their schools. Strong connections between students and DMACC occur as a result of dual credit programming. Dual credit programming also produces graduates more capable of succeeding in college. The DMACC Call Center has been a very successful process for improving student retention, success and satisfaction with DMACC. The combination of creating a program that not only improves student outcomes but also generates a high return on investment is valuable for DMACC and other institutions. Other colleges have contacted DMACC to review planning and measurements in hopes of creating the same type of program. S DMACC s Call Center has been attributed to an increase in student retention and appears to have been good strategy for the institution. S The number of high school students served by dual credit programming increased from 1,000 in 2001 to over 10,000 in NACEP accreditation assures continued alignment between dual-credit and traditional college programming. 3I2- How do your culture and infrastructure help you to select specific processes to improve and to set targets for improved performance results in Understanding Students and Other Stakeholders Needs? DMACC s 2016 FIRSTS Goals clearly define the type of institution DMACC strives to become. The goal of First in Quality sets the standard for determining which processes to implement to meet student and stakeholder needs. Targets for improvement are set to be achievable by 2016 and must move the institution closer to that goal. The culture of the institution allows for new processes to be evaluated and adopted if they prove to yield better results than what is presently in place. O Targets for improvement are set to be achievable by 2016 and established to move the institution closer to a stated goal. It is not clear how these targets are established. As a result, DMACC may be limited in selecting process for improvement. Criterion 3 63

66 Processes (P) 4P1- How do you identify the specific credentials, skills, and values required for faculty, staff, and administrators? DMACC s processes for identifying appropriate qualifications for employees continue to be strengths of the institution as concluded in the 2006 Systems Appraisal Feedback Report. Processes include; a) minimum standards for faculty established by the Iowa Board of Educational Examiners with additional qualifications identified by faculty leadership, human resources and administration, b) establishment of minimum instructional competencies in the DMACC Quality Faculty Plan, and c) processes for reviewing and revising vacant staff position requirements including review by the Job Review (Hay) Committee to assure consistent job level placement across the institution. Administrator qualifications are determined by senior administration in according with the requirements of each position. The Board of Directors determines the qualifications for the President. S The institution ensures that job descriptions are developed to include specific credentials, skills, and knowledge required by faculty, staff, and administrators based upon input from supervisors across the institution and benchmarking initiatives with other organizations. 4P2- How do your hiring processes make certain that the people you employ possess the credentials, skills, and values you require? All positions are hired according to the DMACC Hiring Process Handbook. This process assures institutional, state and federal hiring responsibilities are met, yet provides flexibility to assure that DMACC hires the best candidates possible. All positions are posted on the DMACC web site with many posted in the Des Moines Register. Additional vacancy notices may be included in local, regional and national sources if necessary. All applications are reviewed by Human Resources staff to assure that minimum requirements included in the job description have been met. All candidates must be evaluated and ranked according to both required and desirable qualifications contained in the job description. Generally, this is done by a screening committee created to assist the supervisor in filling a position; however, screening committees are not required. The pool of interviewees is selected from the top scorers, and interviews are conducted by a hiring committee or by the supervisor. Human Resources assures compliance with all Equal Opportunity Employment practices and may suggest additional candidates to interview as part of Equal Opportunity Employment procedures. Criminal background checks are conducted on all potential DMACC employees prior to hiring. S Several processes are in place to maintain consistency in hiring. Human Resources provide the initial screening of applicants and the Hiring Process Handbook is utilized by hiring committees. The process supports institutional, state, and federal hiring requirements. O It is unclear how organizational values are integrated into recruiting and hiring. This clarification may help identify individuals who share those values and would be a good fit in the organizational culture so that the opportunity for success and long-term retention is enhanced. 4P3- How do you recruit, hire, and retain employees? DMACC s processes for recruiting and hiring employees continue to be strengths of the institution as concluded in the 2006 Systems Appraisal Feedback Report. Processes include; a) various methods for posting job openings including local, regional and national sources if needed, DMACC web site and campus postings, b) sharing of openings with university graduate colleges, c) standardized hiring process including affirmative action provisions, and d) monitoring and adoption of competitive salary and benefit structures. Employees are retained, in part, by DMACC s ability to provide a competitive and valuable work environment. Benefits above and beyond salary that influence employee retention include excellent health and dental plans, extensive wellness facilities and programming, retirement plans through TIAA-CREF or Iowa Public Employee Retirement System, life insurance for employees with option to purchase additional coverage for family members, long term disability coverage, hearing aid benefit, Criterion 4 64

67 and employee assistance programming. DMACC also provides generous leaves including days of paid vacation per year, 15 days of annual sick leave, 40 hours bereavement leave, and three personal days per year in addition to traditional holidays. DMACC s efforts to support each employee s professional development are also helpful in recruiting, hiring, and retaining employees. DMACC provides 60 hours per year of professional development leave for administrative/professional staff, and faculty earn sabbatical leave to pursue professional or academic interests. DMACC employees also have many opportunities to serve on various internal and external committees and professional organizations. Professional development opportunities including conference and workshop attendance are provided. Faculty also have the option to teach in the summer. S The College appears to have a well defined recruiting and hiring process designed to identify high performing individuals who possess the necessary skills to succeed as candidates for positions that come open. 4P4- How do you orient all employees to your organization s history, mission, and values? DMACC s processes for orienting all employees to DMACC s history, mission and values continue to be strengths of the institution as concluded in the 2006 Systems Appraisal Feedback Report. Processes include; a) human resources and benefits orientation for all new regular employees, b) on-the-job training for all new regular employees to be conducted during the first week of employment with their supervisor, c) technical orientation for all regular and non-regular employees covering student information systems, and other network services, d) year-long faculty orientation and mentoring for new hires, e) four faculty and staff in-service days per year, and e) day-long orientation for adjunct faculty. S The employee orientation program appears to be well developed. The process provides a broad understanding of the institution s benefits and student information systems, , and other network services. 4P5- How do you plan for changes in personnel? DMACC s recruitment, hiring, orientation and retention processes described previously contribute greatly to the ability to hire highly qualified people and thus minimize productivity lags or severe learning curves associated with changes in personnel. For many positions, applicable procedures, processes and work flows are documented in each department. If there are similar positions within the institution, job shadowing and mentoring provide training for new employees. For key positions, DMACC may solicit internal candidates to fill specific positions to minimize loss of productivity. DMACC examines data each term to identify high and low demand program areas. This information is used in conjunction with input from advisory committees and local workforce offices to determine workforce and enrollment trends. Changes in personnel are made to address these trends and may include reassignment of faculty or staff to high demand areas, or reassignment or elimination of positions experiencing significant decline. Planning for potential changes in faculty includes the maintenance of a comprehensive list of all qualified current, previous and potential instructors. This allows better coordination between campuses to share faculty members, especially in the greater Des Moines area. This also allows the college to contact retired faculty members who might be interested in teaching as an adjunct. DMACC maintains relationships with local universities to identify recent graduates who may choose to teach at a community college. Succession planning efforts also prepare current employees to assume leadership positions in the college. Succession planning processes will be discussed in 5P10. Criterion 4 65

68 O Although the College describes an approach to planning for potential changes in faculty, it is unclear how they determine other staffing capability and capacity requirements to ensure that the needed human resources are available to meet student and other stakeholder requirements. 4P6- How do you design your work processes and activities so they contribute both to organizational productivity and employee satisfaction? DMACC uses Workplace and Office LEAN training as a primary means for designing work processes and activities to maximize productivity, increase employee satisfaction and improve service to students and other stakeholders. A LEAN project includes all employees involved with a process, works with them to map out the current process from start to finish, evaluates the value each step adds to the process, and redesigns the process to eliminate those elements that bring little or no value to the process. The final process is again mapped, documented and implemented as necessary. Office LEAN facilitators work individually with employees to structure their personal work areas to improve organization and efficiency. In the three years since beginning this process, nearly all student service areas and many business office, human resources, and IT areas have been through the training, resulting in significant cost savings and process efficiencies. These results can be found in the Results section of this criterion. S Using LEAN training to design and maximize work processes, the College appears to have improved productivity, cost savings, and efficiencies in several areas, including student services, business office, human resources, and IT. OO Although the institution uses the LEAN workplace model to redesign work processes, it is not clear how new work processes are designed or these efforts increase employee satisfaction. The Portfolio does not mention how DMACC designs work processes to contribute to organizational productivity and employee satisfaction. 4P7- How do you ensure the ethical practices of all of your employees? The college provides clear guidelines for ensuring the ethical practices of all employees. Expectations of ethical practice by the Board of Directors and DMACC employees are formalized in College Policies and Procedures and are incorporated into employee orientation processes. Policies regarding employee ethical practices are: College Policies College Procedures 1004 Code of Ethics BS 1130 Acceptance of Gifts 2008 Acceptance of Gifts HR 3000 Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action 3001 Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action HR 3005 Harassment 3002 Harassment HR 3006 Consensual Relationships 3003 Consensual Relationships HR 3320 Employee Conduct, Appearance and Attendance 3005 Employment of Relatives HR 3325 Secondary Employment 3022 Secondary Employment HR 3330 Political Activity 3023 Restricted Use of College Resources HR 3335 Personal Use of College Property by Employees 3024 Political Activity HR 3515 Correction of a Pay Error 4000 Nondiscrimination Students 4003 Academic Freedom In addition, DMACC uses Ethics Point web services to provide a simple, risk-free way for employees and others to anonymously and confidentially report activities that may involve inappropriate behavior in violation of college policies. The Hotline will accept, via telephone or Internet, reports regarding financial, risk or safety, or informational technology issues. The Hotline does not replace or supersede existing reporting methods including formal complaint or grievance procedures. S The institution describes ethical practices in the College Policies and Procedures, which are a part of orientation, and uses Ethics Point web services for confidential and anonymous reporting of financial, risk, safety and IT issues. Criterion 4 66

69 4P8- How do you determine training needs? How do you align employee training with short and long-range organizational plans, and how does it strengthen your instructional and non-instructional programs and services? All employees receive common training when hired as part of the orientation processes described previously. Faculty training is developed through human resources, academic leadership, faculty members and administration. The Quality Faculty Plan (QFP) requires that all faculty complete a prescribed number of teacher improvement (TI) units each year. TI unit offerings are always a combination of recurring trainings vital to the institution and new training that is identified to address discipline specific needs. TI trainings are reviewed by district leadership each year to align offerings with DMACC s 2016 FIRSTS Goals. The Executive Director of Human Resources serves on Cabinet and attends Provost/Deans meetings to identify possible training options for TI units. Provosts, Deans and district administration may also recommend training to address needs identified through contact with faculty. Faculty members may also seek approval for training specific to their needs and areas. Staff training can also be developed and offered through human resources to address emerging issues or new initiatives of the college. Identified training needs are primarily addressed through the employee evaluation process. During the evaluation process, supervisors meet with staff members to identify needs including training for their current position. Often, identified training is incorporated into staff goals for the next evaluation period. Technology training needs are determined within the Information Technology (IT) Department with additional input from college leadership. Relationships between helpdesk, application support and training positions within IT assure that training is developed for new software and that training is created to meet employee needs identified through helpdesk assistance. Weekly IT staff meetings facilitate communication and planning regarding training. Assessment of student learning, effective teaching, Office LEAN, SCT Banner, Blackboard and sexual harassment training are examples of recurring training aimed at addressing long-range plans. Emergency response, identity theft, classroom management, and specialized software are examples of training aimed at addressing short-term needs. Training effectiveness is determined from feedback from training participants and through the AQIP Examiner Survey. S DMACC appears to have a lot of input that is gathered from different sections of the organization to determine training needs. The Quality Faculty Plan (QFP) requires all faculty complete a prescribed number of teacher improvement (TI) units each year, which consist of a combination of recurring trainings seen as vital to the institution and new training that is identified to address discipline specific needs. O Although there is a strong orientation program some learning and development opportunities are provided for faculty and staff, and HR maintained some training modules for self-development, an approach to identifying training needs to support overall organization requirements appears to be lacking. For example, learning and development requirements are not identified to support the 2016 FIRSTS Goals. 4P9- How do you train and develop all faculty, staff, and administrators to contribute fully and effectively throughout their careers with your organization? How do you reinforce this training? DMACC offers many professional development opportunities for all employees. Staff training is conducted in three areas; job specific, technical and general. Job specific training occurs on the job and is conducted by peers or supervisors to minimize productivity losses. Though the majority of this training occurs during the first few weeks and months in a new position, ongoing training regarding changes in procedures, LEAN techniques, and new or varied position expectations is provided. Technical training is conducted continually through the IT Department and the Training Coordinator positions. Many training opportunities are ongoing and cover basic technical systems including the SCT Banner Student Information System, Blackboard course delivery software and standard office software and applications. The Training Coordinators also develop short-term Criterion 4 67

70 training to address needs identified at the department level or unit level. General training consists of those training opportunities that are not job specific and not technical in nature. Popular training of this nature includes stress reduction, wellness related activities, and financial planning workshops. The processes for training and developing regular faculty are described in the Quality Faculty Plan and include a minimum number of teacher improvement (TI) units required each year. During the first three years of employment, faculty members must participate in 96 clock hours of TI events. After the third year faculty must participate in 100 clock hours of TI events every 5 contract years. Senior faculty members are encouraged to develop and conduct training for other faculty as part of their TI requirements. In addition, faculty have opportunities to advance on the salary schedule based on assuming leadership roles in the college and serving on various committees and commissions. Training and development of adjunct faculty is important for maintaining quality instruction for students. Specific procedures and programs are in place regarding training and development of adjunct faculty. Several human resource procedures address adjunct training and staff development specifically. Human resource procedure 3205 requires all new adjuncts to attend orientation and provides compensation for this orientation. DMACC s Quality Faculty Plan does not require a minimum level of staff development but encourages adjunct faculty to participate in trainings and staff development whenever possible. Adjunct faculty are invited to participate in the four professional development days each year and many attend regular faculty and departmental meetings. Adjunct faculty has a designated area in the DMACC web site containing resources specific to meet their needs. This web site includes the adjunct faculty handbook, orientation and staff development information. The Adjunct Advantage program was created as part of an AQIP action project to create development opportunities specifically for adjunct faculty about learning and teaching, as well as about DMACC policies and procedures. Adjunct Advantage includes a series of modules; Technology in the Classroom, The Art of Designing an Effective Syllabus, Understanding Student Mental Health Issues, Managing Student Behavior in the Classroom, Assessment and Grading, and Classroom Learning Styles. Participants receive $50 for each 2-hour module completed. Currently participation is limited to 20 participants per year, but efforts are being made to find additional resources to expand this program. In addition, adjunct instructors are invited to the August Academy in-service and are compensated for attending. Summer workshops have been implemented for adjunct faculty teaching dual-credit courses in the high school. Adjunct faculty are included in all campus-wide communications, including notifications about trainings and campus and college-wide events. S The institution provides multiple training opportunities for faculty. Training is conducted in three areas: job specific, technical and general. Training and development are described in the Quality Faculty Plan, which requires a specific number of hours within a certain length of time. O Adjunct faculty training is supported through the Adjunct Advantage program. The program is limited to 20 participants per year. With over 1,000 adjuncts, the institution does not appear to have sufficient development opportunities for adjunct faculty. 4P10- How do you design and use your personnel evaluation system? How do you align this system with your objectives for both instructional and non-instructional programs and services? DMACC s processes for designing and using its personnel evaluation system to align with instructional and non-instructional goals continue to be strengths of the institution as concluded in the 2006 Systems Appraisal Feedback Report. DMACC s employee evaluation system is outlined in human resource procedures 3210 for regular employees and 3230 for adjunct faculty. Processes for regular employees include an evaluation after the initial probationary period, and regular evaluations every three years. All first-time adjunct instructors are observed and evaluated by the end of their first semester. Criterion 4 68

71 Minimum instructional competencies have been identified in the Quality Faculty Plan and serve as the basis for faculty evaluation. Non-instructional objectives are included in the personnel evaluation process to assure that each employee s performance and goals contribute to the overall goals of the program and the college. O Though DMACC maintains a thorough evaluation process covering employees and adjunct faculty through associated HR policies, it is not clear how employee or adjunct faculty goals or objectives are aligned with instructional and non-instructional objectives of the institution. 4P11- How do you design your employee recognition, reward, compensation, and benefit systems to align with your objectives for both instructional and non-instructional programs and services? DMACC s processes for designing employee recognition, reward, compensation and benefits systems to align with institutional objectives continue to be strengths of the institution as concluded in the 2006 Systems Appraisal Feedback Report. Processes include; a) formal and informal recognition of exemplary work by district leadership and the Board of Directors, b) regular salary and benefit studies with peer institutions and adjoining states to assure competitive salary and benefit packages, and c) rich benefits system including; health, dental, life and disability insurance; ample leave for vacation, sick, bereavement and personal leave; retirement plans and flex spending accounts. O It is not apparent that DMACC has designed a broad-based reward and recognition program that is meaningful to the faculty and staff and aligns with organizational objectives in both instructional and non-instructional areas. As a result, faculty and staff may feel underappreciated and the College may miss opportunities to reinforce behaviors that contribute to achievement of high performance and attainment 2016 FIRSTS Goals. 4P12- How do you determine key issues related to the motivation of your faculty, staff, and administrators? How do you analyze these issues and select courses of action? Factors regarding an individual s motivation are monitored and addressed in part by the employee evaluation process. However, systematic processes have been established to monitor and identify key institutional issues regarding motivation. The Office of Institutional Effectiveness has responsibility for conducting, analyzing and reporting results of regular surveys of faculty and staff. Though the Personal Assessment of the College Environment (PACE) survey had been conducted in 2001, subsequent surveys were not conducted until The PACE survey is now scheduled to be given every three years (scheduled for spring 2011) in order to regularly monitor and address institutional factors regarding employee motivation and establish trend line data. The PACE survey addresses how well employees believe their efforts support the mission of the college and how valued they feel by the college. In addition to the PACE survey, DMACC has also begun regular use of the AQIP Examiner survey. Initially conducted in 2007, this survey is also scheduled to be administered every three years. The AQIP Examiner survey assesses DMACC s capacity for continuous improvement according to the nine AQIP criteria. It is the combination of the PACE and Examiner surveys that provides the institution with a clearer picture of not only whether employees feel valued and are motivated, but also how engaged the institution is in the process of continuous improvement. Initial analysis of the results for each survey is conducted by the Office of Institutional Effectiveness. Results are shared across the college through the DMACC web site and through presentations made to Cabinet, Provosts/Deans and other groups. These key leadership groups determine what, if any, courses of action need to be taken. Courses of action generally include requesting additional analyses to answer specific questions, creation of a task force to address issues, delegation to a specific department of the college, or involving the AQIP Leadership Team to formulate action plans and strategies. Criterion 4 69

72 O Although DMACC has instituted the use of two standardized surveys: PACE and the AQIP Examiner Survey, to help determine key issues related to motivation of faculty, staff, and administrators, the frequency with which it conducts these surveys does not allow the college to identify or respond to key issues regarding motivation of employees. A next step may be to institute employee engagement sessions around issues as they occur or conduct ad hoc surveys as issues arise. 4P13- How do you provide for and evaluate employee satisfaction, health and safety, and wellbeing? Employee satisfaction is evaluated according to the processes described in 4P12. An important aspect for evaluating employee satisfaction is the accumulation of trend data with the surveys described previously. This will allow the college to identify strengths and opportunities for improvement and monitor the effects of any changes on a regular basis. DMACC has hired a full-time safety officer to identify and address health and safety issues across the college. The safety officer has conducted surveys and focus group discussions to identify health and safety issues and concerns. Examples of the services provided to employees as a result of this data are additional lighting for parking areas, revised emergency management protocols including documentation and training, installation of defibrillators across the district, improved room locking procedures and equipment necessary to facilitate lock-down conditions, implementation of identity theft protocols, and the DMACC alert system to notify students and employees of severe weather or other emergency conditions. A wellness committee has been created with guidance and assistance from DMACC s health insurance provider to coordinate wellness activities across the district. This committee includes representation from all campuses and position types. Ankeny campus students have access to limited health services provided by a part-time campus nurse and nurse practitioner. All DMACC students have access to mental health services on each campus through the student assistance program. DMACC also provides an employee assistance program for all employees to assist in solving a variety of personal problems including relationship issues, mental health, substance abuse, financial and/or legal issues and others. S Through surveys and focus groups, the campus safety officer identified health and safety issues and concerns, that informed the development of services or resources, such as additional lighting, revised emergency management, theft, identity-theft and alert protocols. O DMACC recognizes the need to collect satisfaction data and establish trends and has begun to take steps to achieve that end. O Processes to evaluate employee health, safety, and well being are not described. Results (R) 4R1- What measures of valuing people do you collect and analyze regularly? DMACC s measures of valuing people are shown in Table 4.1. Table 4.1- Measures of Valuing People and Employee Productivity and Effectiveness Indicators of Valuing Faculty, Staff and Measures of Productivity and Effectiveness Administrators Employee Retention Rates Enrollment/Market Penetration Highest Degree Held by Faculty and Staff ACT Student Opinion Survey Results PACE Survey Results Student Retention and Persistence LEAN Improvements Percent of Sections Taught by Full-time Faculty Staff Development Units Taken Staff-to-Student Ratios AQIP Examiner Results Criterion 4 70

73 S DMACC collects and analyzes data related to valuing people through review of selected items on the PACE survey monitoring staff retention rates; and monitoring educational levels of faculty. O DMACC collects a variety of measures of institutional effectiveness. Additional information on the satisfaction and motivation of employees might be developed through a survey or study that is specifically aimed at exploring their thoughts and experiences. O Although the College measures Staff-to-Student Ratios, this measure does not demonstrate the College is meeting the requirements of the Valuing People Category. As an input measure, Staff-to- Student Ratios may be valuable when comparing its relationship to output measures, such as employee satisfaction. 4R2- What are your performance results in valuing Table 4.2- Mean Position Longevity people? by Employee Type and Year DMACC monitors the average length in a position for employees as shown in Table 4.2 as an indicator of how well DMACC retains employees. Though normal processes such as restructuring or early retirement incentives may affect this trend, a continued downward trend in position longevity is to be avoided. Retention data for faculty and staff remain healthy with longevity of staff experiencing a healthy, steady incline. Table 4.3 shows the highest degree held by regular credit faculty for the past five years. DMACC reviews these data to be assured high academic standards for faculty are maintained. DMACC continues to retain and hire a highly qualified faculty. These data also show that DMACC has hired full-time faculty to match recent enrollment growth. From 2005 to 2009, DMACC credit enrollment grew more than 25% annually. For this same time period, DMACC s number of regular faculty positions grew 23%. Table 4.3- Highest Degree Held by Regular Credit Faculty by Year The questions regarding supervisory relationships included in the PACE survey serve as indicators of how well DMACC values faculty, staff and administrators. Table 4.3 and Figure 4.1 show PACE results for supervisory relationships within the college. Figure 4.1 shows DMACC s supervisory relationships are primarily in the consultative category indicating a healthy campus environment with three of the responses from faculty in the collaborative range. Criterion 4 71

74 Table 4.3- DMACC Pace Results for Supervisory Relationships: 2008 Figure 4.1- DMACC PACE Results for Supervisory Relationships: 2008 Results for DMACC s LEAN Workplace efforts are compiled each year and are included in the Board s evaluation of the President. The results for these improvements are good indicators of valuing people because they not only rely on faculty and staff to refine and improve processes, but the efficiency and cost gains benefit them directly. In the past two years there have been 15 LEAN projects conducted throughout the college in areas including dual credit programming, admission, financial aid, bookstore, printing and mailing and others. A comprehensive list of results is not practical in this document but Figures show two examples from each of the past two years. These are typical projects with results indicating that valuing people is a priority for DMACC. Figure 4.2- LEAN Financial Aid Project Activities and Results: 2009 Figure 4.3- LEAN Payroll Project Activities and Results: 2009 Criterion 4 72

75 Figure 4.4- LEAN Business Office Activities and Results: 2008 Figure 4.5- LEAN Bookstore/Accounts Receivable Activities and Results: 2008 Table 4.4 shows the number of completed Table 4.4- Number of TI Units Earned by Faculty by faculty training opportunities aligned with Year and Instructional Competencies each instructional competency identified in the Quality Faculty Plan. These data show that faculty are seeking training and educational opportunities according to the Quality Faculty Plan and reflects the effects of DMACC s processes for valuing people. DMACC also monitors student-to-faculty and student-to-staff ratios for key areas of the college. These ratios indicate staffing level trends and help determine appropriate staffing levels when compared to national benchmark group. Table 4.5 shows DMACC s ratios and rankings according to the national cohort group for These data are updated each year as part of the National Community College Benchmark Project. Financial aid, counseling and advising, career services, and admissions/ registration rankings are artificially low due to DMACC s use of temporary part-time staff during peak times during the year. The NCCBP datum definition for this measure does not allow inclusion of these staff members. Though artificially low, these measures remain stable over time. Table 4.5- Student to Faculty and Staff Ratios for DMACC and National Cohort for 2009 Ratio DMACC National Cohort Rank Student/Faculty 17.65/1 3rd out of 11 reporting Testing/Assessment Staff 2.293/1 4 th out of 8 reporting Student Activities Staff 3,410/1 2 nd out of 7 reporting Financial Aid Staff 1,779/1 5 th out of 8 reporting Counseling and Advising Staff 853/1 6 th out of 8 reporting Career Services Staff 5,116/1 4 th out of 8 reporting Admissions/Registration Staff 2,046/1 7 th out of 8 reporting Criterion 4 73

76 An indirect measure of DMACC s Table 4.6- AQIP Examiner Results for Valuing People: 2007 performance regarding valuing people comes from the AQIP Examiner Survey. Table 4.6 shows DMACC s perceptions of how well the institution values people compared to other surveyed schools according to targeted questions from the AQIP Examiner. DMACC scores at or above the mean for other institutions on each question. DMACC faculty and staff believe DMACC s processes for valuing people are effective. S Employee retention rate is defined as the average length in a position for employees and is shown in Table 4.2. Retention of faculty and staff is steady. O LEAN Workplace efforts are reported. These activities may provide evidence of faculty and staff participation, but are not performance results of the Valuing People Category. Without results, the College may lack essential data and information that might determine if it is meeting the needs of its employees and contributing to the overall effectiveness of the organization. 4R3- What evidence indicates the productivity and effectiveness of your faculty, staff, and administrators in helping your achieve your goals? Many of the indicators to measure productivity and effectiveness of faculty, staff and administrators have been presented earlier in this document. Continued enrollment growth and increased market penetration are indicators of effectiveness for recruiting students and offering valuable and attractive programming for students. Enrollment growth is discussed in the institutional overview and market penetration results are given in Figures 3.10 and 3.11 in Criterion 3. ACT Student Opinion Survey Results show how effective DMACC is at valuing students in terms of student satisfaction with DMACC s services and educational environment. ACT Student Opinion results can be found in Figure 1.16 in Criterion 1. Student retention, persistence and graduation rates are indicators of how effective staff and faculty are in helping students achieve their goals. Results for retention, persistence and graduation rate can be found in Figures in Criterion 1. DMACC is committed to as many course sections taught by full-time faculty as possible. Though qualified adjuncts are critical and necessary to achieve the college s goals and are valued according to the processes described in this section, full-time faculty offer the most value to the institution in terms of quality instruction, staff development, committee work and other benefits to the college. Table 4.7 shows the number and percent of sections taught by full-time faculty. The percentage of sections taught by full-time faculty has declined in recent fall terms and increased in the spring due to rapid growth, reduced state funding, the limited availability of adjunct instructors, and the limited number of credit hours faculty are allowed to teach in a year according to Iowa Code. Many adjunct faculty teach their annual limit of courses in the fall term with full-time faculty load increased in the spring term to meet demand. DMACC faculty has been very effective in increasing productivity to meet recent enrollment needs with limited resources. Table 4.7- Percent of Sections Taught by Faculty Type and Term Criterion 4 74

77 S Continued enrollment growth and increased market penetration are presented as indicators of effectiveness for recruiting students. Figure 3.11 shows DMACC credit market penetration scorecard data. DMACC's dual credit programming has grown in the past 10 years with the number of students served increasing from 1000 in 2001 to 10,000 in O Measures to indicate the productivity and effectiveness of faculty, staff, and administrators in helping to achieve DMACC s 2016 FIRSTS Goals are not reported. 4R4- How do your results for the performance of your processes for Valuing People compare with the performance results of other higher education organizations and, if appropriate, of organizations outside of higher education? Six of the measures listed in this criterion are benchmarked either internally or against other institutions. PACE Survey data are benchmarked against national norms as shown in Table 4.8. DMACC s score for Supervisory Relationships is above the national norm. Student-to-faculty and staff-to-student ratios are benchmarked against DMACC s national benchmark cohort described in Criterion 1. These results are provided in Table 4.5. AQIP Examiner data regarding valuing people are benchmarked against all other institutions using the survey. The benchmark results are included in Table 4.6. Credit and non-credit market penetration results are benchmarked against all Iowa community colleges and DMACC s national cohort. Benchmark results for credit and non-credit market penetration are shown in Figure 3.10 and 3.11 in Criterion 3 of this document. ACT Student Opinion survey data are benchmarked against norms established by ACT and are shown in Figure 1.16 in Criterion 1. S PACE Survey data are benchmarked against norms in Table 4.8. DMACC's Supervisory Relationships, institutional Structure, Student Focus, and overall results are above the national norm. The teamwork results are below the norm. Table 4.8- DMACC PACE Scores and National Norms by Category Improvement (I) 4I1- What recent improvements have you made in this category? How systematic and comprehensive are your processes and performance results for Valuing People? DMACC s adoption of the workplace LEAN process has yielded significant productivity gains for the institution and has empowered faculty and staff to modify work flows and improve efficiency. LEAN improvements have allowed DMACC to effectively serve more students at a time when state support has decreased. Without LEAN improvements in the areas of student services and student accounts, DMACC could not have maintained its status as being one of the lowest tuition colleges in the state because additional staff would have been required to meet increased demand. DMACC has made a strong commitment to hiring full-time faculty to match recent enrollment growth. Though recent funding cuts have slowed this process in the past few years, DMACC has responded to a 25% annual enrollment increase in the past five years with a 23% increase in fulltime faculty positions. At a time when many colleges were required to reduce the number of fulltime faculty and replace them with adjuncts, DMACC has maintained its commitment to the value that full-time faculty bring to DMACC. Since 2006, 61 new full-time faculty positions have been added across the district. At the same time DMACC has acted on its commitment to full-time faculty, the college has also realized the necessity of and value that quality adjunct instructors bring to the college. DMACC invests in the Adjunct Advantage program to offer adjunct faculty formal staff development opportunities designed especially for them. In addition, DMACC has marketed and promoted all of its staff development opportunities to adjunct faculty, including the August Academy workshops and all trainings offered through the Quality Faculty Plan. Information for adjunct instructors has been Criterion 4 75

78 placed in one location on the DMACC web site to make it easier for them to find the information they need to be effective in the classroom. DMACC s recent NACEP accreditation has provided additional training and support of adjunct instructors teaching in area high schools along with more contact with college faculty. S Adoption of the workplace LEAN process has yielded significant productivity gains for the institution and encourages faculty and staff to modify work flows and improve efficiency. S DMACC has made a strong commitment to hiring full-time faculty to match recent enrollment growth. DMACC has responded to a 25% annual enrollment increase in the past five years with a 23% increase in full time faculty positions. Since 2006, 61 new faculty positions have been added across the district. S DMACC invests in the Adjunct Advantage Program to offer formal staff development opportunities for adjunct faculty. DMACC has also promoted all of its staff development opportunities to adjunct faculty. 4I2- How do your culture and infrastructure help you to select specific processes to improve and to set targets for improved performance results in Valuing People? DMACC s policies, procedures, processes and measures provide evidence that DMACC values its students, faculty and staff. Policies and procedures dictate the values and qualities DMACC seeks in its employees, while processes like the Quality Faculty Plan, Workplace LEAN, hiring process and others allow for input into the decision making process and empower DMACC employees to contribute to helping its students and communities. DMACC s monitoring of student, employer, advisory committee, and faculty and staff surveys assures that these policies, procedures and processes are working to maintain an environment where people are empowered, valued and are engaged in meeting the needs of students. O While the College maintains policies, procedures and processes that suggest valuing people, there is no discussion regarding how they select processes to improve, nor how they set target performance results to achieve. Criterion 4 76

79 Processes (P) 5P1- How are your organization's mission and values defined and reviewed? When and by whom? DMACC s mission and values are set by the Board of Directors with input from faculty, students, staff, business and industry leaders, external partners, and community members. Mission and values are reviewed each year by the Board of Directors at their annual planning retreat held in December. Revisions to these guiding principles are infrequent but can be initiated by the President with approval from the Board of Directors, or can be initiated directly by the Board. All mission and vision changes must be consistent with provisions in the Iowa Code regarding the community college system. O Revisions to DMACC s mission and values are initiated by the President or Board and must be consistent with provisions in the Iowa Code; they are then set and reviewed by the Board with input from stakeholders. The process and frequency for soliciting stakeholder input are not described and it is unclear how the mission and values are communicated, reviewed and reinforced with all faculty and staff. 5P2- How do your leaders set directions in alignment with your mission, vision, values, and commitment to high performance? The 2016 FIRSTS Goals established a direction for the college aligned with its mission, vision, values, and commitment to high performance as described in 5P1 the 2006 Systems Portfolio. This framework was established with input from all stakeholder groups and contains three main goals and 20 indicators. DMACC is committed to being a high performing institution, evidenced by its intention to be first in quality, service, and affordability compared to Iowa s 15 community college districts, and to a national benchmark group of similar institutions. Annual review of progress toward achieving the 2016 FIRST Goals is conducted by administration and the Board of Directors. These goals may be changed or altered to affect the direction of the college as part of the district s strategic planning process. Though the 2016 FIRSTS goals have not changed as a result of this process, strategies, projects, and short-term goals are created through this process to affect positive progress toward the FIRSTS Goals. Cabinet, Provosts and Deans are currently engaged in a 5-year strategic review of the 2016 FIRSTS Goals aimed at determining progress to date and developing strategic initiatives for the next five years. This process was described in section 1P11 of this document. S Leaders set direction in alignment with the mission, vision, and values through the 2016 FIRST Goals. All stakeholder groups were involved in this process and produced three main goals and 20 indicators. As a result, a new Vision statement was developed: DMACC is committed to being a high performance institution, evidenced by its intention to be first in quality, service, and affordability compared to Iowa s 15 community college districts, and to a national benchmark group of similar institutions. 5P3- How do these directions take into account the needs and expectations of current and potential students and key stakeholder groups? DMACC is committed to a continuous and open dialogue with students, faculty, staff and other stakeholders regarding the direction of the college. District Administration, Provosts and Deans, and Board members have regular contact with many internal and external stakeholder groups to share the direction of the college, gather feedback regarding this direction, and identify partnerships and strategies that can help DMACC meet its strategic goals. Stakeholder groups included in these regular discussions are K-12 school districts, other colleges and universities, business and industry leaders, legislators and lobbyist groups, employee unions, student activity groups, DMACC departments, workforce and economic development groups, and community service organizations. Advisory committee members are often relied upon to identify and address emerging student, program, and employer needs. Criterion 5 77

80 This input is processed through weekly Cabinet meetings, and monthly Board, Provosts/Deans, and District Chair meetings to assure continued alignment between stakeholder needs and the strategic direction of the college and identify, develop and implement new projects and strategies that improve DMACC s FIRST Goals performance. The annual Board retreat continues to be an important process for reviewing yearly activities and prioritizing future efforts. S DMACC s 2016 FIRST Goals performance relies on the input of internal and external groups. The institution takes into account the needs and expectations of current and potential students and key stakeholder groups through open dialogue, regular contact, and discussions. This input is processed through weekly Cabinet meetings and monthly Board, Provosts/Deans, and District Chair meetings to assure continued alignment between stakeholder needs and the strategic directions of the college. O It is not clear how regular input is received from key stakeholders. There does not appear to be a process to collect the needs and expectations of students and other stakeholders. Without this process, it may be difficult to anticipate any future changes in student and other stakeholder requirements. 5P4- How do your leaders guide your organization in seeking future opportunities while enhancing a strong focus on students and learning? Maintaining a balance between exploring and identifying future opportunities and focusing on students and learning can be difficult in a large, diverse institution like DMACC. The President s Cabinet and the Cabinet Finance Team were purposefully created to represent many stakeholder groups while maintaining focus on improving student learning. The Cabinet is made up of administrators responsible for academics, workforce and community partnerships, information technology, budget and finance, grants, human resources, foundation, marketing, institutional effectiveness, and student services. The President provides all Cabinet members an open forum to discuss projects and ideas, give and gather helpful feedback, and demonstrate how these ideas support the mission and goals of the institution. The Cabinet Finance Team has authority to provide funding for new or expanding projects and is made up of a smaller group including the President, budget and finance, information technology and academics. DMACC s Chief Academic Officer also serves as the Executive Vice President for the college. Many DMACC departments report to this position including all campus Provosts, Academic Deans, Grants, Institutional Effectiveness, Continuing Education, Student Services, Human Resources, and Program Development. This assures that these groups work together and coordinate programming, planning, and accountability measures to meet student learning needs while also being able to respond quickly to new or emerging strategic interests of the college. O Although the President s Cabinet and the Cabinet Finance Team were established to build and sustain a learning environment, it is unclear how relevant data is collected and analyzed to enhance a strong focus on student learning. 5P5- How do you make decisions in your organization? How do you use teams, task forces, groups, or committees to recommend or make decisions, and to carry them out? DMACC s processes for making decisions and using different groups to facilitate decision making continue to be strengths of the institution as concluded in the 2006 Systems Appraisal Feedback Report. Processes include; a) a flat organization encouraging decisions to be made at the level closest to the student or other stakeholders, b) the ability of the administrative team to focus on broader institutional decision making, c) Curriculum Commission authorized to review, evaluate and approve credit curricular offerings, d) Academic Standards Commission responsible for reviewing and recommending district-wide academic policies and regulations, e) Diversity Commission to provide leadership in all diversity initiatives, and f) various committees created to make decisions or recommend possible solutions to problems. DMACC relies on the professional judgment of its employees to make many decisions. Though many faculty and staff members are encouraged to make decisions at their respective levels, they are also encouraged to seek guidance for decisions, if needed. Those decisions that require supervisor and administrative approval are outlined in college policies and procedures. Department directors need Criterion 5 78

81 to be involved if funding will be required as a result of the decision. Department directors need to involve district administration if the decision potentially conflicts with policies and procedures, or when the scope of the decision is district-wide. Cabinet may often make decisions requiring significant funding that have implications for multiple departments of the college. The Board of Directors is involved in making decisions regarding Board policy issues. Program and District Chairs are empowered and relied upon to make many instructional decisions for the district including curriculum development, assessment of student learning, program evaluation, textbook adoption, and staff development. Though strategic decisions are made at the Board or administrative levels, committees, taskforces and commissions are formed to study strategic decisions to make recommendations or are empowered to make decisions directly. S The institution utilizes a flat organization encouraging decisions to be made at the level closest to the student or other stakeholders. DMACC s commission structure appears to provide a framework for gathering information, making decisions, and carrying out new policy. Decisions are divided between different levels and groups based on the type of decision, and involve the administrative team, Curriculum Commission, Academic Standards Commission, and Diversity Commission, as well as departmental directors. 5P6- How do you use data, information, and your own performance results in your decision making processes? Use of data in the decision-making process is expected of all departments across the institution. Relevant data are made available to faculty and staff through three primary processes; 1) all institutional data including the FIRSTS Goals Scorecard, CAAP assessment data, ACT Student Opinion Survey results, PACE and AQIP Examiner results and other data are distributed and made available to all staff and faculty via the web for use in department planning and decision-making, 2) DMACC provides a self-service business intelligence tool for all faculty and staff to create and run reports and analyses, and 3) requests for information are fulfilled through the IT and/or the Institutional Effectiveness departments. Student course evaluation data are collected for each course and term and shared with the Provost, Dean, and faculty member to facilitate discussion, evaluation, and decision-making. Faculty members also receive comparative assessment of student learning data for each of their courses compared to all sections of that course. Faculty members can retrieve comparative grade point and student retention data for their sections compared to all sections of a course as needed from the business intelligence platform. These data are provided to assist faculty members to make decisions to improve instruction and learning in their classrooms. The Executive Director of Institutional Effectiveness is responsible of maintaining and analyzing all sources of data and supports the use of these data in decision making across the college. The Executive Director also serves on Cabinet and regularly presents summary information including FIRSTS Goals Scorecard, assessment of student learning, benchmark, and survey data to Cabinet, Provosts, Deans, District Chairs, and the DMACC Board of Directors. The primary responsibility of this position is to support decision-making at all levels of the college and promote the training and analysis necessary to use the data for continuous improvement. The data are used to make policy, planning and programming decisions to support the strategic goals and interests of the college. The DMACC Board of Directors reviews the scorecard, surveys and other data on an annual basis to evaluate and establish annual performance goals for the President and the college. O Although the institution allows for empowerment and involvement of the workforce in making decisions, it is unclear how performance data and information is used to aid making decisions. As a result, DMACC may not be able to effectively make data-driven decisions on a consistent basis and may be limited in its ability to maximize use of its resources. 5P7- How does communication occur between and among the levels and units of your organization? Criterion 5 79

82 DMACC s processes for communicating within the institution continue to be strengths of the institution as concluded in the 2006 Systems Appraisal Feedback Report. Processes include; a) use of focus groups, informal discussions, phone, , and internal and external web sites, b) formal commissions and committees directing educational decisions and input into college governance, c) regular communication between administration and bargaining units, and d) many regular departmental and cross-departmental meetings. Each year, four days are set aside specifically for departmental, discipline and program faculty meetings. The college is closed on these days so that faculty and staff may focus on teaching and learning initiatives. In addition, committee and commission membership is carefully balanced to include representation from all levels and campuses across the college. Use of videoconferencing technology has increased dramatically to improve meeting participation across DMACC s six campuses. The AQIP Examiner and Personal Assessment of the College Environment (PACE) surveys have been implemented on a three-year cycle to measure the effectiveness of DMACC s processes for leading and communicating. Criterion 5 of the AQIP Examiner survey asks six specific questions regarding leading and communicating, and the entire institutional structure portion of the PACE survey contains questions regarding leadership and communication across the college. S a wide variety of methods appear to be in place to promote communications. The institution uses committee and commission structures at various levels of the organization. Focus groups, departmental and cross-departmental meetings, phone, , and website are also used. In addition, four days are set aside each year for department, discipline, and program faculty meetings. 5P8- How do your leaders communicate a shared mission, vision, and values that deepen and reinforce the characteristics of high performance organizations? DMACC s processes for communicating its shared mission, vision and values that reinforce DMACC as a high performance organization by college leadership continue to be strengths of the institution as concluded in the 2006 Systems Appraisal Feedback Report. Processes include; a) President and Executive Vice President s active engagement with stakeholder groups, b) publications and presentations regarding progress toward the 2016 FIRSTS Goals, c) President and Cabinet opendoor policy for all stakeholders, and d) regular participation by key leadership in departmental, committee and commission meetings. In addition, the number of campus forums held by the President and Executive Vice President has been increased to twice annually at each of the six campuses. These forums are great opportunities to seek input, share and discuss strategic planning and operational objectives across the college. The DMACC Alert System has also been implemented to communicate simultaneously via phone, , text, loudspeaker, and web during emergency situations. S Leadership communicates its shared mission, vision and values through interaction with stakeholder groups. These include publications and presentations of progress toward 2016 FIRSTS Goals and semi-annual forums at each campus with the President and Executive Vice-President. 5P9- How are leadership abilities encouraged, developed and strengthened among your faculty, staff, and administrators? How do you communicate and share leadership knowledge, skills, and best practices throughout your organization? DMACC s processes for developing and strengthening leadership abilities among employees continue to be strengths of the institution as concluded in the 2006 Systems Appraisal Feedback Report. Processes include; a) faculty leadership positions including District and Program Chairs and campus group leaders, b) encouragement of faculty to conduct training sessions for other faculty as part of the Quality Faculty Plan, c) participation in the Iowa State University Leadership Development programs, d) participation in the Leadership Iowa program and other community leadership initiatives, and e) professional leave available for leadership development and work toward advanced degrees. DMACC faculty and staff have many opportunities to develop their own leadership skills Criterion 5 80

83 and provide leadership to the college through service on college commissions, grant programs, or involvement with external partnerships. The processes regarding leadership development are measured via the AQIP Examiner and PACE surveys. Items in Criterion 4- Valuing People of the AQIP Examiner survey and the institutional structure portion of the PACE survey are used to evaluate the effectiveness of DMACC s processes for leadership development. O Leadership development initiatives do not appear to have been comprehensively established at the institution. It is unclear if there are formal leadership and management development programs or learning initiatives at the present time. Also, it does not appear that efforts to establish a succession planning approach for leadership positions have been fully developed. Without these important leadership processes in place, DMACC may risk creation of a leadership gap and inhibit the growth and opportunity provided to current employees. 5P10- How do your leaders and board members ensure that your organization maintains and preserves its mission, vision, values, and commitment to high performance during leadership succession? How do you develop and implement your leadership succession plans? The President has engaged the DMACC Board of Directors to assist in the development of a succession plan for senior administration. This plan includes contingency planning for filling three top leadership positions; President, Executive Vice President/CAO, and Vice President for Business Services. The President and Board have determined that these three positions provide the leadership necessary to preserve the mission, vision, values, and commitment to high performance of the institution. This planning process will involve engagement of consultants to evaluate current organizational structure and identify potential future needs, and visiting other high performing institutions to assess their succession planning processes. The outcomes identified for this process include effective search and hiring processes for a President/CEO, possible organizational structure changes to support recent growth and increased involvement in DMACC s service area, and identification of internal leadership that could be relied upon to assure a successful transition for new leadership. DMACC s President and Cabinet are also beginning the succession planning process for current employees by engaging past participants in the Iowa State University Community College Leadership Programs. This process includes activities, readings and discussions regarding current challenges facing community colleges, and DMACC s role moving forward. These activities are designed to increase the scope and perspective of DMACC s future leaders and position them to advance at DMACC and in Iowa s community college system. O Leadership development initiatives do not appear to have been comprehensively established at the institution. It is unclear if there are formal leadership and management development programs or learning initiatives at the present time. Also, it does not appear that efforts to establish a succession planning approach for leadership positions have been fully developed. Without these important leadership processes in place, DMACC may risk creation of a leadership gap and inhibit the growth and opportunity provided to current employees. Results (R) 5R1- What performance measures of Leading and Communicating do you collect and analyze regularly? The measures regarding leading and communicating that DMACC collects and analyzes regularly are shown in Table 5.1. Table 5.1- Measures for Leading and Communicating Measure AQIP Examiner- Criterion 5 AQIP Examiner- Criterion 4 Criterion 5 81

84 Measure PACE Survey-Institutional Structure and Selected Questions Board Evaluation of the President results S Performance measures for leading and communicating are presented in Table 5.1, and include AQIP Examiner Criteria 4 and 5; PACE Survey and Board Evaluation of the President results. 5R2- What are your results for leading and communicating processes and systems? The AQIP Examiner survey provides a direct measure of DMACC s ability to lead and communicate according to faculty and staff. Table 5.2 shows DMACC s scores on the survey s questions regarding leading and communicating. DMACC scored above the mean for other institutions on all questions. Criterion 4 of the AQIP Examiner includes one question identified to address DMACC s ability to develop leadership in its faculty and staff. The question asked respondents how well DMACC provides training and development opportunities. DMACC s mean of 3.4 is well above the average for other institutions (3.17). Results for all of Criterion 4 are shown in Table 4.6 under Criterion 4. Table 5.2- AQIP Examiner Results for Leading and Communicating Questions from two sections of the PACE Survey provide measurement results about DMACC s ability to lead and communicate. Table 5.3 shows the results for questions regarding institutional structure. Questions 1, 6, 10, 16 and 32 address leading and communicating specifically. Results for all relevant questions are in the consultative area except question 10, regarding institutional sharing of information. Follow up to this question by the Office of Institutional Effectiveness determined that faculty and staff wanted more opportunity for discussion with the President and Executive Vice President regarding current issues. In response to this question, campus forums for faculty and staff have been increased to once each semester on each campus. The effects of this change will be assessed in the next PACE survey scheduled for spring Table 5.3- DMACC PACE Survey Results: Institutional Structure 2008 Figure 5.1- DMACC PACE Survey Results: Institutional Structure: 2008 DMACC submits custom questions as part of the PACE survey regarding specific issues of the college. Table 5.4 and Figure 5.2 show the results for these questions. Questions address Criterion 5 82

85 encouragement of innovation, shared process for continuous improvement, and a shared sense of a unifying vision. DMACC scored in the consultative range on all three of these questions. Figure 5.2- DMACC PACE results: Table 5.4- DMACC PACE Results: Customized: 2008 Customized: 2008 The DMACC Board of Directors conducts an annual evaluation of the President including his ability to meet or exceed specified Board goals, as well as his character and leadership ability. These instruments indicate high standards regarding leadership and communication for the President by the Board of Directors. This process has been in place since 2006 with the President exceeding or far exceeding the Board s expectations each year. Figures 5.3 and 5.4 are examples of these instruments. Figure 5.3 outlines the Board s expectations for the President in Figure 5.3- Board of Director Evaluation Matrix for President: 2010 Criterion 5 83

86 Figure 5.4- Board of Director Tool for Evaluating President s Character and Leadership Ability O Technical and Administrative Support staff showed lower scores than those of administrators and faculty on nearly all PACE items. OO Measures are limited in determining the effectiveness of Leading and Communicating Category requirements and do not appear to have been developed. The institution does not provide trend data in response to this question. 5R3 How do your results for the performance of your processes for Leading and Communicating compare with the performance results of other higher education organizations and, if appropriate, of organizations outside of higher education? Results for the AQIP Examiner are compared to all institutions using this survey and are included in Table 5.2. DMACC s PACE survey data are compared to national norms. Though each question is not normed, Table 5.5 shows DMACC s scores regarding the entire institutional structure category against the national norm. DMACC s scores are in the consultative category and exceed the national norm. S DMACC scored above the mean for questions related to leading and communicating on the AQIP Examiner Survey compared to other institutions. The College scored at or above the national norm on all PACE Survey scales. PACE Survey data revealed that DMACC shows some strength in consultative climate. OO The College did not report comparative information. The PACE Survey does not provide national norms on an item-by-item basis, yet specific items are identified for this category. Comparative data from within and outside higher education may support innovation and decision making Improvement (I) Criterion 5 84

87 5I1- What recent improvements have you made in this category? How systematic and comprehensive are your processes and performance results for Leading and Communicating? DMACC has significantly increased its ability to produce, share and use data in its decision making processes. Regularly conducting various surveys including the ACT Student Opinion survey, AQIP Examiner and PACE surveys have given or will give DMACC trend line data regarding the effectiveness of DMACC s process for leading and communicating. DMACC has invested in the processes and technology necessary to leverage existing data in the decision Figure 5.5- DMACC PACE Scores and National Norms: 2008 making process. Availability of data and information at all levels of the institution has improved the timeliness and quality of decisions made. Communication is always a challenge for institutions like DMACC given its size, complexity and geography. Recent processes have improved the college s ability to communicate internally and externally. Increasing the number of campus forums with the President and Executive Vice President from one to twice a year has helped faculty and staff give feedback and have access to the information they need. In addition, DMACC s investment in video conferencing technology allows for greater participation from all locations and provides a more personal experience than teleconferencing alone. DMACC s Marketing Director has improved both the number and quality of publications, mailings, events and press releases sharing information with DMACC s communities. DMACC has also doubled the number of staff development days to allow disciplines, programs and departments more time for sharing, training and discussion regarding topics relevant to their positions. DMACC has begun formally leveraging the alumni of DMACC s leadership training opportunities by involving them in discussions surrounding current issues of interest to DMACC. This group is made up of faculty and staff from all levels of the college and provides opportunities for participants to share and practice their leadership skills. S The institution has enhanced the data it uses to lead the institution through the use of AQIP and PACE Survey data. The College has made an effort to have data available to its employees through the accessible business intelligence tool, and by posting survey results on the website. Communication of survey results and other information has been furthered by increasing the number of campus forums. 5I2- How do your culture and infrastructure help you to select specific processes to improve and to set targets for improved performance results in Leading and Communicating? DMACC is committed to providing many and varied communication strategies across the district evidenced by its processes to increase access to key college leadership, departmental and crossdepartmental meetings, and increased staff development days. Processes and people are in place to remain connected to the college s communities, and to address needs and develop new programs to meet these needs. DMACC employees are encouraged and given opportunities to assume leadership roles in the college. Senior leadership is actively engaged to solicit input from all stakeholders to meet their needs and improve learning for students and to meet the other objectives of the college. The DMACC Board of Directors sets high leadership standards for the President and sets the example for accountability at the highest level of the college. Criterion 5 85

88 O Little information is provided regarding how DMACC s culture and infrastructure assist in selecting specific processes to improve or setting targets for improved performance results in Leading and Communicating. For example, it is unclear if the approaches described in the portfolio will be applied consistently across the organization and used by all appropriate departments. Criterion 5 86

89 Processes (P) 6P1- How do you identify the support service needs of your students and other key stakeholder groups (e.g., oversight board, alumni, etc.)? DMACC s processes for identifying student and stakeholder support service needs continue to be strengths of the institution as concluded in the 2006 Systems Appraisal Feedback Report. Processes include; a) identification of learning support needs as described in 1P15 of this document, b) identification of changing needs of student groups as described in 3P1 of this document, c) identification and analysis of changing stakeholder needs as described in 3P3 of this document, d) adherence to requirements of the Iowa Department of Education and the Higher Learning Commission regarding specific student service, business office, human services, and facilities management requirements, and e) use of benchmarking data to monitor student-to-staff ratios for various student service positions. The Student Services department holds monthly district-wide meetings to discuss student needs and identify strategies to address these needs. Though most of the issues that arise are a result of direct contact with students, survey and institutional data are also used to identify student support needs. The Executive Dean for Student Services serves on the Cabinet to facilitate communication and acquire necessary resources regarding student support needs. The DMACC Alumni Association Director position was upgraded from part-time to full-time in The goal of this change was to improve both the quantity and quality of relationships with DMACC s alumni. A key strategy for attaining this goal is to create processes to assess and meet alumni needs and increase the value of belonging to the alumni association. The processes created include surveys and focus groups, increasing the activity and visibility of the Alumni Association, and increasing the number of sponsored alumni events as a service to existing association members and as a recruitment tool for new members. In addition, the Veteran Affairs Coordinator position was upgraded to full-time to assist newly deployed or returning veterans in accessing DMACC programming and exercising their rights as veterans (see 1P10). Support service needs for workforce are identified and supported through Iowa Employment Solutions, Central Iowa Works, and the Community and Workforce Partnerships Division of the college. Iowa Employment Solutions is a partnership between DMACC and the Iowa Department of Workforce Development and is a direct service provider for Iowans looking for work in Central Iowa. Central Iowa Works is an organization aimed at identifying current and future workforce needs and advising higher education institutions in Central Iowa regarding new or modified programming. The Community and Workforce Partnerships Division of DMACC develops collaborative programming with other workforce agencies in the area and specializes in serving economically disadvantaged and underrepresented populations. Support service needs of the Board of Directors are identified and addressed through weekly meetings with Board leadership and the college President. The President s Executive Assistant also serves as Board Secretary and the Vice President for Information Technology serves as the Board Treasurer. The annual Board retreat often addresses needed support services for the Board. S A variety of methods are used to identify the needs of students and support a learning environment. These include the ACT Opinion and Pace surveys, advising, and Student Services department meetings. In addition, workforce support service needs are identified and supported through Iowa Employment Solutions, Central Iowa Works, and the institution s Community and Workforce Partnership Division. O While DMACC lists methods it employs to gather information on support service needs, there does not appear to be formal and consistent methods to capture needs and preference information from their students. 6P2- How do you identify the administrative support service needs of your faculty, staff, and administrators? Criterion 6 87

90 DMACC relies on its faculty, staff, and administrators to identify administrative support needs. These needs are shared with administration through regular administrative and department meetings, the employee evaluation process, and the annual budgeting process. Often there are more needs identified than resources available to meet these needs. The President, Executive Vice President, Cabinet, and the Cabinet Finance Team review and prioritize these needs and address priorities as resources allow. Methods used to meet identified needs include investment in new technologies, reassignment of duties among employees, improving work process efficiency, or hiring additional staff. O DMACC reports that it relies on faculty, staff, and administrators to identify administrative support needs. However, it provides only anecdotal information to describe its processes for determining these needs. Further, it is not clear if the institution has established a formal data collection method to determine administrative support needs. This may limit the ability to identify changing needs in a proactive manner. 6P3- How do you design, maintain, and communicate the key support processes that contribute to everyone s physical safety and security? DMACC has hired a full-time safety officer to develop and implement safety and security protocols for the institution. Needs regarding safety and security are identified though surveys and meetings with students and stakeholders, and through identifying best practices nationwide. Proposed processes are presented to Cabinet for approval and funding, if required. Recent examples of processes and protocols implemented include crisis management protocols, public alert systems, distribution of portable defibrillators across the college, additional exterior lighting, identity theft protocols, increased communication and cooperation with local emergency services including drills conducted on DMACC campuses, and an improved building captain program to assist with fire or severe weather conditions. DMACC s Crisis Management Plan is a comprehensive protocol for responding to threatening circumstances on campuses and provides for the safely and security of students, employees and visitors. Primary provisions for this plan include distinct chain of command procedures to handle decision making, emergency procedures and communication. Contingency planning and training are conducted regularly to prepare for various emergencies including shooter on campus, severe weather, and other scenarios. DMACC s Judicial Officer is responsible for the College Judicial Hearing Board (CJHB) made up of students, faculty and staff nominated by campus Provosts. The role of the CJHB is to hear student disciplinary cases considered to be serious violations of the Student Code of Conduct. This Board maintains the individual rights of students accused of serious code violations while protecting the security and safety of other students and employees. Educational services policy 4630 directs the actions of this Board. Human resources policy 3235 contains provisions for discipline and discharge of employees found to be in violation of law, college policies or commonly accepted standards of behavior and safety. The goal of this policy is to protect the individual rights of those accused while maintaining the safety and security of students and employees. S There are a variety of approaches to ensuring the safety of their students and other stakeholders. There is a crisis management plan for responding to emergencies on campus. 6P4- How do you manage your key student, administrative and organizational support service processes on a day-to-day basis to ensure that they are addressing the needs you intended them to meet? DMACC s processes for the day-to-day management of support services continue to be strengths of the institution as concluded in the 2006 Systems Appraisal Feedback Report. Processes include; a) well structured and staffed organization to meet support service needs, b) well documented policies and procedures that guide practice, c) regular and ad hoc meetings across the college to maintain Criterion 6 88

91 communication and address emerging issues, d) regular meetings between student groups and senior administration to monitor satisfaction and identify needs, e) regular meetings between senior administration and the college s bargaining units to facilitate communication and address emerging issues, f) hiring of a Director of Enrollment Management to provide additional leadership and supervision in DMACC s Student Services department, and g) inclusion of all stakeholder groups on committees, commissions and advisory groups. O Although it states that managing key student, administrative, and organizational support processes were seen as strengths in it last Portfolio, the process by which this is accomplished is unclear. By articulating, implementing and evaluating a process, the College could assess whether it was truly meeting support service needs. 6P5- How do you document your support processes to encourage knowledge sharing, innovation, and empowerment? Workplace LEAN has proven to be an invaluable asset for motivating various departments to improve and document their processes. Since DMACC began using the Workplace LEAN model, over 20 areas of the college have used the process to improve workflow efficiencies. Workplace LEAN is a facilitator-lead process that focuses on learning the Workplace LEAN model, flowcharting current processes and procedures, identifying steps that add little or no value to the process, and creating the desired process. Department leadership leads the implementation of identified improvements. The primary benefits of this process include support from all stakeholders as a result of their involvement in the process and empowerment of employees as they learn tools to allow them to make necessary changes. Pressure to hire additional employees is reduced because of improvements in process efficiency. Information and knowledge is also shared through many departmental, faculty and administrative meetings and during staff development days. S Workplace LEAN is used to motivate various departments to improve and document their processes. Over 20 areas of the college have used the process to improve workflow efficiencies and to ensure consistent delivery of services and programs. Results (R) 6R1- What measures of student, administrative, and organizational support service processes do you collect and analyze regularly? DMACC collects many measures regarding student and administrative support service processes as indicated in Table 6.1. Table 6.1- Measures of Organizational Support Processes by Department Student Support Process Measures Departments ACT Student Opinion Survey Student Services, Physical Plant, IT Call Center Results Enrollment Management Transcript Processing Time Student Services Application Processing Time Student Services Tuition All Departments Foundation Scholarship Dollars Foundation Alumni Association Membership and Alumni Association Contributions Administrative Support Measures Student Purge for Non-payment Faculty TI Units Earned Point-in-Time Enrollment LEAN Reduction of Printing/Mailing Foundation Endowment/Assets Room Usage Helpdesk Ticket Tracking Departments Business Office Human Resources Enrollment Management Information Technology, Business Office Foundation Physical Plant Information Solutions Criterion 6 89

92 S Table 6.1 illustrates multiple measures of student and administrative support services covering processes within a variety of areas. Satisfaction surveys are used to obtain perception data from students and internal customers pertaining to student and administrative support service processes. In addition, some areas, such as Finance, Information Technology, and Human Resources have other measures established to help determine the effectiveness of their work. 6R2- What are your performance results for student support service processes? Student Services: Many of the measures for student support processes are included previously in this document. The ACT Student Opinion Survey results are shown in Figure 1.16 in Criterion 1. DMACC uses ACT student opinion data to look for long term trends in student satisfaction of services offered. Several student support services have been identified as most improved between the first ACT survey in 2003 and the most recent in The following student support services showed the most improvement; job placement, personal counseling, student employment, student activities, student health, and daycare. The bookstore and student center are the only two student support services that showed decline from 2003 to DMACC has contracted bookstore services with the Follett Company in the hope of improving bookstore services to students. The DMACC Call Center has proven to be a very successful strategy for improving student retention and success at DMACC. The Call Center not only yields improved course retention and student persistence, but generates a net revenue gain for the college. Results for the DMACC Call Center are shown in Table 3.4 in Criterion 3. As a result of the LEAN process at DMACC, additional student support service measures have been developed for application and transcript processing. Through the processes described in this section, DMACC discovered that students and staff were not satisfied with the length of time necessary to process applications for admission, and the time necessary to evaluate transfer student transcripts. The LEAN process was used to identify wasteful and unnecessary steps in both processes and redesign the process to improve efficiency. Figure 6.1 shows the number of applications processed each month (blue bars) and the mean processing time from submission to approval (green line). This figure shows that in the past it took an average of 40 days during peak times to admit a student. Recent 2010 data show that this process has not exceeded 28 days during peak times and most often takes less than two weeks. These measures include weekends, holidays, mail delivery times, and the time it takes students to supply necessary admissions information. During non-peak times, many students are admitted in 2 days or less. DMACC continues efforts to decrease application and transcript processing times. Figure 6.1- Number of Applications Processed and Mean Processing Time by Year and Month Criterion 6 90

93 Figure 6.2 shows similar data as figure 6.1 for evaluating transfer student transcripts. The blue bars represent the number of transcripts evaluated and the green line represented the mean processing time. In 2006 the mean time to evaluate a transcript was over three months. Currently at peak times, it may take as long as a month, but during off peak times it usually takes 2-3 weeks. Many transfer transcripts are easily processed, but international students or students from institutions that are unfamiliar to DMACC, take additional processing time. Processing time also includes weekends, holidays, mail delivery times, and response time from other institutions. Both Figures 6.1 and 6.2 show that the mean processing time for each service has declined while the volume of applications or transcripts has increased with no additional staff hired. Figure 6.2- Number of Transcripts Evaluated and Mean Processing Time by Year and Month Tuition: Though not a direct student support service, tuition is an important factor in students decisions to attend DMACC over other institutions. DMACC is committed to keeping tuition as low as possible while maintaining instructional quality. Tuition is a performance measure on the 2016 FIRSTS Goals Scorecard and DMACC s trend line data are show in Figure 6.3. DMACC s tuition has increased but is still ranked as third lowest in the state and is outperforming national cohort schools as revealed later in this section. DMACC Foundation Scholarships The DMACC Foundation helps hundreds of DMACC students through scholarship awards. Results for the DMACC Foundation s ability to assist students with scholarships are shown in Figures 2.3 and 2.9 in Criterion 2. The DMACC Foundation has been able to increase the amount of student scholarships at a time when endowment revenue declined due to recent economic conditions. Figure 6.3- DMACC Annual Tuition Cost for 15 Credit Hours by Year Alumni Association The DMACC Alumni Association s goal is to create life-long relationships with students and continue to provide services after leaving DMACC. These support services include activities and alumni events, networking opportunities, and communication with the college. Results data for this support service are shown in Figure 2.6 in Criterion 2 and show increases in alumni membership and contributions to the college. Criterion 6 91

94 S ACT Student Opinion survey results show increased satisfaction in all areas except the bookstore and student center. Implementation of the Call Center has been linked to improved course retention, student persistence, credit hour gain, and net revenue gain. S DMACC used the LEAN process to decrease the mean processing time for applications from 40 days to 28 days between 2002 and 2010 while the total number of applications increased during this time frame. Transcript processing time was over three months in 2006 (a peak year for this metric) and is currently two-four weeks, again while numbers evaluated have increased. No additional staff were hired. 6R3- What are your performance results for administrative support service processes? Business Office: Regardless of DMACC s low tuition, many DMACC students have difficulty paying for their education. The reasons vary and range from forgetfulness, to delayed financial aid applications, to changes in student life circumstances. The DMACC business office makes every attempt to work with students to prevent them from being dropped from their classes or purged for non-payment. However, students unable or unwilling to pay their tuition often need to be purged to make room for other students. Table 6.2 shows the gross number of students and credits dropped or purged and the percentage of students and credits purged normalized against census enrollment for that term. Normalization against census enrollment allows the numbers to be evaluated in light of enrollment growth. The data below show that improvements in the student purge process have resulted in lowered percentages of students and credits purged for non-payment. Table 6.2- Number of Students and Credits Purged for Non-payment by Term Human Resources: The number of faculty members receiving TI units according to DMACC s Quality Faculty Plan is an indicator of the Human Resources department s ability to promote and administer DMACC s Quality Faculty Plan. Results for staff development according to this plan are shown in table 4.4 in Criterion 4. Results show continued growth in faculty staff development in each of DMACC s instructional competencies. Enrollment Management: DMACC s Enrollment Management Department must be able to accurately forecast student enrollment for each term to offer enough classes, rooms, parking and other support services. This information is also important in forecasting tuition revenue. Enrollment Management monitors point-in-time enrollment comparisons starting when registration begins for each term. This information allows the college to identify enrollment trends compared to the same point-in time with the previous year. The data have proven very useful in being able to predict enrollment trends early and react when needed. This report is also a predictor of student course retention by continuing to compare enrollment throughout the term. Though the full report covers headcount and credit enrollment for all departments and course delivery methods, Figure 6.4 shows point-in-time headcount information for fall 2010 and Figure 6.5 shows point-in-time credit hours enrollment for fall Criterion 6 92

95 Figure 6.4- Point-in-Time Headcount Enrollment Data as of 10/15/10 Figure 6.5- Point-in-Time Credit Hour Enrollment Data as of 10/15/10 Printing and Mailing (LEAN): In 2009, a LEAN project was initiated with student services, human resources, and information technology to reduce the number of mailings to students and staff. Specifically, this project examined how and how often information is mailed to employees and students and to pursue more cost effective alternatives. Though this project continues, annual savings to date are summarized in Table 6.3. Table 6.3- LEAN Efficiency Gains for Students Services Printing and Mailing Project Annual Savings Eliminating mailing employee pay stubs and having them accessible $26,595 online only Allowing students to chose mail or notification in the admissions $16,916 process. 78% of students choose notification. ing student bills $28,000 ing student grade reports $20,000 Reduced the number of course catalogs printed in lieu of information $20,640 available in the web TOTAL $112,151 Foundation Endowment and Assets: The Foundation s endowment and total assets are valuable sources of income for student scholarships, facilities and equipment upgrades, faculty positions, and other administrative needs of the college. Results for Foundation endowment and total assets are given in Figures 2.2, 2.5, 2.8 and 2.10 in Criterion 2. Recent economic conditions caused a decline in Foundation endowment fund balance due to lower performing investments. Facilities: DMACC s Physical Plant department uses many information sources to track utilization and efficiency of DMACC buildings. The Physical Plant department has always invested in green technologies when available to improve efficiency and reduce cost. However, renewed efforts in this area were jump started by DMACC s participation in the American College and University President s Criterion 6 93

96 Climate Commitment organization. DMACC has aggressively pursued additional funding to implement technologies to reduce DMACC s carbon footprint and reduce utility costs. Table 6.4 shows grants received in the past two years to assist in lowering DMACC s carbon footprint. Many energy conservation projects are behind the scenes and include replacement of inefficient motors, energy recovery ventilators, energy metering, digital temperature controls and more efficient HVAC systems. Table 6.4- Recent Funding for DMACC Green Initiatives Project Grant Dollars Received DMACC Match Installation of a wind turbine on the Ankeny Campus $131,500 1 to 1 Grant to install 1,100 new lighting sensors $44,000 1 to 2 Ankeny energy conservation projects $186,844 1 to 1 All DMACC energy conservation projects $639,494 1 to 2 TOTAL $1,001,838 Facility usage information is important for district administration and physical plant staff for class and event scheduling and allocating Physical Plant services in high use areas. This information also drives many decisions about scheduling and building projects. These data have been useful in the decision to expand college facilities at four of DMACC s six campuses since All DMACC employees can assess room utilization data on the business intelligence platform. Users may enter a term and a building and get usage information for the past five years. An example of these data is shown in Figure 6.6. Users may also select aggregate usage by campus as shown in Figure 6.7. Figure 6.6- Room Usage Information by Building, Term and Time of Day Figure 6.7- Boone Campus Room Usage Information by Campus, Term and Time of Day Physical Plant staff review hourly maximum enrollment data each term to determine appropriate parking strategies. Table 6.5 shows the maximum hourly enrollment by campus, day of the week and hour. Information Solutions: The DMACC Information Solutions Department uses a Helpdesk Ticketing System to track IT related issues throughout the college. Users may either or call the helpdesk when needing assistance and a ticket is created and assigned to the appropriate personnel. As the ticket is addressed, notifications are sent from the system to the user to provide updates regarding the status of their issue. This information is tracked by the Supervisor of Technical Support to make sure that tickets are addressed in a timely manner. Summary information is used to monitor helpdesk traffic and the efficiency of handling customer issues. Figure 6.6 shows the administrative screen for the helpdesk ticket tracking system. It provides IT with the number of tickets for a give time period, the Table 6.5- Maximum Enrollment by Campus, Day of the Week and Hour as of 10/1/10 Criterion 6 94

97 number resolved and the number still Figure 6.6- Helpdesk Ticket Tracking Administrative outstanding. It also provides information for Screen each IT employee and the status of issues assigned to them. This system assures that technical issues are handled quickly and efficiently. O Although the ACT Student Satisfaction Survey is used, limited results of administrative support services are available to permit an understanding of the effectiveness of these processes. Having a well-designed and operating system to identify the effectiveness of support services may ensure that such services positively impact learning at DMACC. 6R4- How do your key student, administrative, and organizational support areas use information and results to improve their services? DMACC student and administrative support areas use a combination of formative and summative information to improve performance. Systems and processes are developed either through the SCT Banner Platform or the business intelligence platform to meet these information needs. Formative data needs are identified according to specific needs and the most useful time interval for those data. Much of the formative information is accessible on demand and is either real-time or updated each day. Examples of these formative uses include point-in-time enrollment reports, room usage information, helpdesk ticket tracking, student program wait list information, enrollment data, class lists, budget and expenditure information, and many others. Other data needs are identified as most useful on a monthly or term basis. Examples of this information includes application and transcript processing information, retention, persistence, class size, individualized faculty retention and grade distribution reports, and assessment of student learning data. Summative data for these areas are usually reported on an annual basis and are designed to show the cumulative efforts of a department or institutional process. Scorecard data for the 2016 FIRSTS Goals are examples of summative information for student and administrative support areas. This combination of formative and summative data, in combination with the processes discussed in this section to use this information, drives institutional improvement. O DMACC lists sources and uses of formative and summative information and provides examples of the different types available. However, it is not clear how the information is used by students, administrative and organizational support areas to improve their performance. 6R5- How do your results for the performance of your processes for Supporting Organizational Operations compare with the performance results of other higher education organizations and, if appropriate, of organizations outside of higher education? The ACT Student Opinion Survey is benchmarked against national norms established by ACT. Benchmark results for the student and administrative support measures within this survey are shown in Figure 1.16 in Criterion 1. Tuition is an indicator in the 2016 FIRSTS Goals Scorecard and is benchmarked against all Iowa community colleges and DMACC s national cohort. Though DMACC s tuition continues to rise and its ranking for lowest tuition in the state has dropped from tied for first to third, DMACC s ranking in the national cohort has improved considerably in the past two years. Figure 6.7 shows DMACC trend line tuition data and benchmark results. Criterion 6 95

98 Figure 6.7- DMACC Tuition and Benchmark Data Foundation endowment and total assets are indicators in the 2016 FRSTS Goals and are benchmarked against all Iowa community colleges and DMACC s national benchmark cohort. Benchmarks for these measures are provided in Figure in Criterion 2. O While comparative or competitive data available they appear to be limited to tuition making it difficult to demonstrate how DMACC s effectiveness in Supporting Institutional Operations compares with other higher education organizations or those outside of higher education. Regular data collection and trending, as well as more extensive benchmarking over time may help DMACC derive a clearer picture of its performance in this category and enhance its continuous improvement efforts. Improvement (I) 6I1- What recent improvements have you made in this category? How systematic and comprehensive are your processes and performance results for Supporting Organizational Operations? Many improvements in this area have been initiated in recent years. The utilization of Workplace LEAN at the college has improved support services as shown in Figures 6.1 and 6.2 and Table 6.3. This tool has proven very flexible for addressing efficiency issues across the college, with new applications for this process being identified each year. LEAN efforts for 2011 include revisiting each of the past LEAN projects to assess whether identified gains are being maintained. Utilization of the SAS Business Intelligence (BI) Platform has dramatically increased in recent years as the need for more formative data about DMACC s process effectiveness has increased. The combination of LEAN projects and the BI platform have been successful in developing measurable process improvements within the college. More relevant data are available to more faculty and staff than in any previous time. DMACC s green initiatives as described in this criterion have not only been important for cutting costs and providing additional resources for instruction, but have been integrated into DMACC s wind power and sustainability programs. DMACC has positioned itself to be a leader in the emerging green economy in Iowa and the Midwest. Recent enrollment growth has strained existing facilities. In response to these pressures, DMACC has built or acquired additional space which has helped, but the leadership also realizes that it needs to use existing facilities more efficiently. DMACC has recently purchased, and is in the process of installing and configuring, a scheduling software solution. Ad Astra software will allow DMACC to examine and analyze facility utilization more closely and maximize the use of existing resources. DMACC is currently reviewing identified best practices concerning facilities utilization, including standard terms, standard start and stop times and room ownership issues. DMACC expects to go live with this software in spring S Several process improvements have been made through the implementation of workplace LEAN, and through the inclusion of the SAS Business Intelligence platform. Planned improvements include the installation and implementation of scheduling software to apply toward enrollment trends, as well as continued use of baseline data to identify gaps, drive improvements, and review targets annually. Criterion 6 96

99 6I2- How do your culture and infrastructure help you to select specific processes to improve and to set targets for improved performance results in Supporting Organizational Operations? DMACC is engaged in the process of maximizing efficiency to support organizational operations. The Workplace LEAN process and the processes utilizing formative and summative process data have created a culture that believes in continuous improvement as a means of supporting the mission of the college. Formative targets are set by first analyzing existing performance and working to drive improvement in the identified metrics. From those efforts, summative targets are set and measured on an annual basis. Support area targets for improvement are identified according to the processes described in this section and are supported by administration. S Several process improvements have been made through the implementation of workplace LEAN, and through the inclusion of the SAS Business Intelligence platform. Planned improvements include the installation and implementation of scheduling software to apply toward enrollment trends, as well as continued use of baseline data to identify gaps, drive improvements, and review targets annually. Criterion 6 97

100 Processes (P) 7P1- How do you select, manage, and distribute data and performance information to support your instructional and non-instructional programs and services? DMACC s processes for selecting, managing and distributing performance information for instructional and non-instructional programs utilizes both formative and summative data for the institution, each department and individual employees. Performance measures are selected according to their ability to advance the 2016 FIRSTS Goals or other non-instructional goals of the institution, the availability of valid and reliable data, and the requests of faculty and staff. Depending on the measurement, every effort is made to provide information on as short a time interval as possible to improve services to students and other stakeholders. Some measures such as the ACT Student Opinion Survey, AQIP Examiner Survey and Personal Assessment of the College Environment (PACE) Survey are only available every third year according to a set schedule. Many measures are only available on an annual basis, such as completion, fall-to-fall persistence information, program certification exam results, and market penetration. Other data are available term-by-term such as course retention, success and pass rates, fall-to-spring persistence, faculty grade distribution and retention information, and student assessment of learning results. Some information is available on a daily or weekly basis, including enrollment, student retention information, admissions data, course enrollment data, foundation giving and investment earnings, and budget information. Regardless of the time interval, current and historical information is provided to demonstrate trends over time. DMACC uses a combination of push and pull strategies to distribute data. Some information is pushed to faculty and staff while other information is available at any time for them to pull from information systems. Information that is regularly distributed to various faculty and staff is either prepared manually and sent via , or is created and distributed as part of DMACC s business intelligence platform. All institutional performance data are maintained either in the SCT Banner system or the SAS Business Intelligence platforms. Specific programs and non-instructional departments gather and distribute data specific to their purpose and functions. These efforts are supported by both the IT and the Institutional Effectiveness departments. For programs receiving external accreditation or grant funding, DMACC adopts the measurements and timelines provided by the accrediting body or funding institution. S Processes for selecting, managing and distributing performance information for instructional and noninstructional processes are based on the 2016 FIRSTS Goals or other non-instructional goals of the institution. Measures include the ACT Student Opinion Survey, AQIP Examiner Survey and Personal Assessment of the College Environment (PACE) Survey. All institutional performance data are available in the SCT Banner System or SAS Business Intelligence platforms. Data are distributed through or the business intelligence platform using push and pull strategies O DMACC is engaged in many activities related to selecting, managing, and distributing data, but these efforts do not appear coordinated on a college-wide level into a systematic process. It is unclear how individual departments collect feedback from customers of their processes. 7P2- How do you select, manage, and distribute data and performance information to support your planning and improvement efforts? To a large extent DMACC s processes for selecting, managing, and distributing data and performance information to support planning and improvement efforts are similar to the processes described in 7P1 with a few differences related to scope and strategic planning. Benchmarking is a key process for using performance information to support planning and improvement efforts. DMACC realizes that to meet its strategic goals, it must not only improve, but improve at a faster pace than cohort institutions. The 2016 FIRSTS Goals scorecard measures indicate performance according to three levels; 1) DMACC s trend line for all indicators shows institutional improvement over time, 2) benchmark data for all Iowa community colleges, and 3) benchmark data against a national cohort. All benchmark data used on the institutional scorecard comes from the National Community College Benchmark Project (NCCBP) or the National Center for Criterion 7 98

101 Educational Statistics (NCES). DMACC has experienced slight improvements in trend line data yet finds that performance has actually improved significantly when framed against benchmark school performance. The DMACC Board of Directors has processes in place to evaluate performance data and make decisions regarding the institution. The annual scorecard is presented to the Board of Directors at the annual planning retreat each December. Additional program, financial and performance data are presented to the Board at their monthly meetings and at the annual retreat. The Board uses all of this performance information to develop a performance matrix for the President each year. This matrix is developed in cooperation with the President and identifies institutional priorities for the coming year. O DMACC does not appear to have a process to systematically select, manage, and distribute data and performance information to support its continuous improvement and planning efforts. Without a standard process, the institution may limit its ability to proactively identify improvement opportunities. 7P3- How do you determine the needs of your departments and units related to the collection, storage, and accessibility of data and performance information? Discussions are held with each department regarding their continuing role in achieving the 2016 FIRSTS Goals and other goals of the institution. These discussions include analysis of all available data to identify new strategies or modify existing ones to improve service to students and stakeholders. Additional data collection, analysis and reporting are identified and every effort is made to meet these needs either at the departmental level or through the Office of Institutional Effectiveness. Departments are encouraged to create metrics and collect performance data outside of institutional sources. Often there is a tradeoff between which measurements would best illustrate improvements and the time and personnel requirements necessary to produce and maintain these metrics. Priorities for selecting measures include validity and reliability, ability to be maintained over time, ease of acquiring the information, and time and budget restrictions. These efforts are supported through the Office of Institutional Effectiveness with training and development of faculty and staff. O Although the institution communicates with each department on their role in meeting 2016 FIRSTS Goals and other institutional goals, it is not clear if there is a cohesive and/or systemic program for discussion of departmental and unit needs with respect to data collection, storage, and accessibility. 7P4- How, at the organizational level, do you analyze data and information regarding overall performance? How are these analyses shared throughout the organization? The Office of Institutional Effectiveness (OIE) is responsible for collecting, analyzing and disseminating organizational performance data. The Executive Director serves on Cabinet, regularly attends Provosts/Deans and faculty District Chair meetings, is responsible for supporting assessment of student learning activities and the AQIP Leadership Team, oversees program evaluation, serves as Assistant to the President, and assists the Board of Directors with the President s evaluation matrix and succession planning. This position is well connected to assure that data and analyses flow throughout the college. The OIE staff conducts numerous presentations to share and gather input regarding institutional performance data and provides training on analyzing and using data for continuous improvement. The OIE is responsible for creating the institutional scorecard each year as well as developing many of the shorter time-interval indicators discussed previously. In addition, the office supports faculty and staff analyses of institutional and departmental data. O The Office of Institutional Effectiveness (OIE) is responsible for collecting, analyzing, and disseminating data. It is not clear if data analysis skills and capabilities are prevalent throughout the institution and if faculty and staff are trained in data collection and analysis methods. Therefore, little data analysis may be occurring relative to institutional and process level performance outside of OIE, Criterion 7 99

102 thereby limiting DMACC s ability to identify improvement actions and learn how to link its actions to positive outcomes. 7P5- How do you determine the needs and priorities for comparative data and information? What are your criteria and methods for selecting sources of comparative data and information within and outside the higher education community? DMACC regularly seeks quality comparative data to assist the institution in its continuous improvement efforts. Comparative data and information may be selected for use if they are valid, reliable, consistently available, and deemed to be of value in helping students learn or achieving other institutional objectives. Often, knowledge of new data sources occurs as a result of membership in state, regional and national professional organizations; current research literature; and recommendations from faculty, staff and external stakeholders. Current sources of comparative data include the National Community College Benchmark Project (NCCBP); Integrated Postsecondary Education Data (IPEDS) from the National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES); Management Information System data collected from all Iowa community colleges from the Iowa Department of Education; Iowa unemployment insurance data, National Student Clearinghouse, local, state and national labor statistics; Iowa and national occupational projection data; US Census data; and Midwest benefit and wage comparisons. State and/or national exam data are used for programs requiring such certification for its graduates. S DMACC collects comparative data from a variety of sources including: the National Community College Benchmark Project (NCCBP); the National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES); National Student Clearinghouse; the Iowa Department of Education; and other state and national sources of demographic and labor force information. O Although the College regularly seeks quality comparative data and have existing benchmarking initiatives, the processes and methods for the collection of comparative data do not appear to have been fully developed. Without regular collection of comparative data, DMACC may be limited in its ability to improve its performance. 7P6- How do you ensure department and unit analysis of data and information aligns with your organizational goals for instructional and non-instructional programs and services? How is this analysis shared? Office of Institutional Effectiveness staff is responsible for supporting the departmental data and information needs of the district. This responsibility often includes not only filling requests for data and analysis, but also assisting departmental staff in deciding what data deserves their attention and will assist them in contributing to the 2016 FIRSTS Goals. In addition to addressing the specific questions asked by each department, OIE staff also includes additional analysis pertaining to the overall instructional and non-instructional goals of the district. Self-service data sources available to faculty and staff are also designed to be relevant to the strategic interests of the college. DMACC has defined various terms useful in departmental analyses, including student retention, success rates, pass rates, award completion, persistence and others. This allows data and information to be comparable across the institution and be consistent over time. If appropriate, data requests are routinely supplemented to add breakdowns and analyses regarding race, gender and socioeconomic status. These areas are often not contained in the original request, but their inclusion is well received by departments. S OIE staffs assist different departments in data requests and contribution to 2016 FIRSTS goals, providing additional analyses based on district goals, and designing self-service data relevant to the College s strategic initiatives. DMACC has defined terms (e.g., student retention, success rates) to create consistency for cross-institutional comparisons. O DMACC has defined various terms useful in departmental analyses, including student retention, success rates, pass rates, award completion, persistence and others. It is unclear what the processes are, or the way in which the analyses are shared. Criterion 7 100

103 7P7- How do you ensure the timeliness, accuracy, reliability, and security of your information system(s) and related processes? DMACC s processes to ensure the timeliness, accuracy, reliability, and security of information systems continue to be strengths of the institution as concluded in the 2006 Systems Appraisal Feedback Report. Processes include; a) proper staffing and oversight of staff dedicated to maintaining the SCT Banner Student Information System, b) adherence to best practices regarding information technology and its security identified by state and federal guidelines, c) maintenance of an IT disaster recovery plan including regular backups with off-site storage and redundant systems, d) conducting regular security audits, and e) separate production and reporting databases. DMACC has three primary data systems; 1) the production SCT Banner SIS system that includes student, finance, financial aid, and human resource modules, 2) the reporting copy of the production database updated nightly, and 3) the SAS business intelligence suite. Data accuracy is maintained in the production and SAS systems through adequate staffing, training and support for data systems. All primary data systems reside within the DMACC firewall, with industry standard protections from intrusion and viruses in place. Separate user IDs and passwords are required for the Banner system and for network and access. O Although the portfolio provides a description of a strong IT capability, it is not clear how it focuses on employee needs and expectations. There is no description of how employees are supported by IT and are able to define their requirements. Results (R) 7R1- What measures of the performance and effectiveness of your system for information and knowledge management do you collect and analyze regularly? Table 7.1 shows the measures used to determine the performance and effectiveness of DMACC s information and knowledge management system. Table 7.1- Measures for Information and Knowledge Management AQIP Examiner Data for Criterion 7 Number of Tables in the BI data warehouse Size of data warehouse Number of Active BI users Number of Information Requests to the Office of Institutional Effectiveness O It is not clear what measures are used to determine the effectiveness of its system. The measures reported are limited to performance, not measures to track institutional effectiveness. This lack of appropriate data may make it difficult to determine the effectiveness of the analysis of performance measures. 7R2- What is the evidence that your system for Measuring Effectiveness meets your organization s needs in accomplishing its mission and goals? The AQIP Examiner Survey section on Criterion 7 is an indirect measurement of DMACC s ability to measure effectiveness. Table 7.2 shows DMACC s scores compared to the mean of all other organizations. DMACC exceeds the mean of other institutions for each question. DMACC s overall measuring effectiveness score showed the greatest difference from the mean of other institutions for all AQIP criteria with a difference of.33. DMACC opted to build its own data warehouse to support institutional effectiveness instead of purchasing the standard data warehouse product from SCT Banner. Since Table 7.2- DMACC AQIP Examiner Scores for Measuring Effectiveness Criterion 7 101

104 this data warehouse is created locally, the number of tables included in the warehouse indicates DMACC s ability to build measurement resources to meet institutional need. There are currently 100 tables in the data warehouse, with 67 of these being regularly accessed through the BI system. The data warehouse currently contains 2.62 GB of data accessible to faculty and staff through the BI platform. The information stored in this warehouse was determined through reporting and analysis needs of the Office of Institutional Effectiveness, or through identifying and meeting the data needs of faculty and staff. DMACC also maintains a reporting instance of the Banner database containing approximately 2,000 tables and over 300 GB of data. The goal of the data warehouse is to maintain a repository of the most frequently used data that are most applicable to measuring institutional performance. The number of users of DMACC s BI platform is an indicator of DMACC s effectiveness in providing access to relevant data used in the improvement process. All DMACC faculty and staff have access to the system, and in the past two years 159 of them have accessed the system. This system has made data more available to faculty and staff and has increased DMACC s capacity to meet employee needs for data and information. In addition to the BI platform, DMACC faculty and staff may make requests for data to either Information Solutions or the Office of Institutional Effectiveness. Each request usually involves running a program or query against the Banner reporting database to the data warehouse. From January 1, 2010 to October 24, 2010, 150 requests for data and information that required accessing either the Banner database or the data warehouse were made to the Office of Institutional Effectiveness. OO Aside from the AQIP Examiner survey which is administered on a three year cycle, there do not appear to be any measures of employee or Board satisfaction with data collection, analysis, distribution or use of data, information and knowledge. The institution may have an opportunity to build a more comprehensive system to accomplish this and provide accurate measures of its performance. The BI platform has been accessed by 159 faculty and staff (approximately 12%). Providing trend data would help show if data access is increasing over time. 7R3- How do your results for the performance of your processes for Measuring Effectiveness compare with the results of other higher education organizations and, if appropriate, of organizations outside of higher education? The AQIP Examiner data are benchmarked against the mean for all other institutions using the survey. Comparative data is shown in Table 7.2. O While DMACC scored above the mean for each question on the AQIP Examiner survey Criterion 7 section, and the overall score for this section had the greatest difference from the mean of other institutions for all AQIP criteria, the comparative data appears to lack the breadth and depth necessary for DMACC to accurately measure its performance against its mission and goals. The college may have an opportunity to expand its comparative data collection and analysis, and thus its performance measures. Improvement (I) 7I1- What recent improvements have you made in this category? How systematic and comprehensive are your processes and performance results for Measuring Effectiveness? DMACC s continued use of the 2016 FIRSTS Goals Scorecard as shown in Figure 1.18 in Criterion 1 and Criterion 8, and the Board of Director s evaluation process for the President has increased the expectations for accountability at DMACC. By establishing measurable outcomes at the highest levels, the standard has been set for the direction of the college and how to measure progress toward stated goals. DMACC s use of Workplace LEAN has improved the college s ability to measure effectiveness. The Workplace LEAN process begins with each group identifying and quantifying efforts for each step in a process with possible measures for efficiency gains. This has created an increased interest in Criterion 7 102

105 metrics, as people can understand the rationale behind the metrics and have input into these measures. DMACC continues to develop its BI strategy to provide relevant and useful data to all levels of the institution. DMACC realized that to achieve its goals and provide useful measurement data throughout the institution, new strategies were necessary to extend the reach of IT and Institutional Effectiveness staff. Faculty and staff can access and analyze many data sources directly and can continue to make requests for information and analysis when needed. The expansion and increased scope of the Office of Institutional Effectiveness have created a valuable resource for the college. Faculty and staff use this department for all types of reporting and data analysis and know their efforts are supported with knowledgeable and helpful staff who will work to meet their needs. S The institution has expanded the role of its Office of Institutional Effectiveness and continues to use its 2016 FIRSTS Goal Scorecard and the Board of Director s evaluation process for the President to improve efforts, expectations, accountability, and standards for producing measurable outcomes. 7I2- How do your culture and infrastructure help you to select specific processes to improve and to set targets for improved performance results in Measuring Effectiveness? The establishment and maintenance of the 2016 FIRSTS Goals and their annual scorecard, and the creation and use of the Board s evaluation matrix for the President models how DMACC will use data to be accountable for institutional goals. Faculty and staff understand the long term goals of the institution and realize they have input and ownership in achieving these goals. DMACC s infrastructure for creating improvement measures for the entire institution, and for each department and individual, has matured and continues to be a priority of the college. O The 2016 FIRST Goals allowed for the establishment of measurable outcomes at the highest levels. It is not clear if a culture and infrastructure where defining processes, collecting and analyzing data, reviewing performance, and identifying opportunities for improvement has been established. Criterion 7 103

106 Processes (P) 8P1- What are your key planning processes? The processes used to develop the 2016 FIRSTS Goals and the strategic plan are thoroughly described in DMACC s 2006 Systems Portfolio. This process was identified as a significant strength of the institution and continues to be the cornerstone of DMACC s strategic planning process. The sharing and discussion of performance information across the college as described in Criterion 7 stimulates planning for improvement at all levels across the college. These departmental goals and strategies are shared and supported according to the processes described under Criteria 1 and 2 of this document. However, because DMACC is a large institution with a broad scope of services and programs, an institutional planning process is also in place to review and improve institutional strategies, activities, and efforts necessary to continue progress toward meeting the 2016 FIRSTS Goals. DMACC s 2006 Systems Portfolio described a planning system that was bridging an existing formal strategic planning process initiated prior to becoming an AQIP institution, and the processes required according to the nine AQIP criteria. Since 2006, DMACC has successfully merged existing processes fully into the AQIP model. DMACC s institutional planning process involves an annual assessment of progress toward the 2016 FIRSTS Goals by the Cabinet, Provosts and Deans group, and the AQIP Leadership Team. This process includes identifying annual improvements to assure that effort is maintained through training, policy and procedure development, and resource allocation. Goals and indicators not meeting annual targets are also identified and addressed through soliciting input from appropriate stakeholders to define potential barriers for improvement, using this input to identify strategies to address barriers, and identifying human and financial resources to support these objectives. These objectives are often identified as AQIP Action Projects according to their priority and scope across the institution. The AQIP Leadership Team is responsible for monitoring, directing and supporting each AQIP Action Project to assure success. DMACC s institutional planning process also includes a periodic formal study and refinement of its improvement efforts toward its strategic goals. This assures that strategies that were adopted but have proven ineffective can be replaced by new strategies. DMACC is currently involved in this process and will complete its evaluation in 2011, which will mark the half-way point toward the 2016 Goals. This strategic planning study process is conducted by college leadership including, Provosts, Deans, department directors, and faculty and staff and includes environmental scanning, literature review to identify best practices, visiting other institutions, and many discussions across the college. This effort is being supported by the Office of Institutional Effectiveness. S The 2016 FIRSTS Goals produced a new vision statement and priorities to move the institution toward realization of the vision and culminated with approval of the plan by the Board of Trustees. Progress toward the 2016 FIRSTS Goals is assessed annually, which includes identifying annual improvements, maintaining progress through training, policy and procedures, or resource allocation; reviewing goals and indicators that did not reach targets; and addressing associated barriers. Strategies to overcome these barriers often are conceived as AQIP action projects. This process has a periodic, formal review midway through the planning cycle. 8P2- How do you select short- and long-term strategies? Short-term strategies are identified as part of DMACC s annual planning processes described in 8P1 of this document. Many departmental short-term strategies are identified and implemented with minimal direction from administration. These short-term strategies are encouraged and are looked upon as a favorable result of increased efforts in sharing performance information, communication, supporting departmental decision making, and providing tools to support continuous improvement (i.e. - LEAN processes, access to data, etc.). Short-term strategies for the institution stem from the annual evaluation of the 2016 FIRSTS Goals scorecard information across the institution. This process allows the institution to identify and continue successful strategies and to develop new or refine existing strategies for those areas not Criterion 8 104

107 meeting expectations. Specific sources proven valuable for short-term strategies include LEAN projects conducted throughout the college, the Enrollment Management Team, attendance at regional and national trainings, involvement with work-alike groups across the state, and regular meetings across the district. Long-term strategies are evaluated and developed according to the AQIP evaluation cycle. DMACC has found it beneficial to re-evaluate current long-term strategies as part of a formal study and refinement process as described in 8P1 at the same time as preparing the Systems Portfolio. This reinforces alignment of current planning with the nine AQIP criteria. Long-term strategies are selected as part of the periodic institutional planning study described previously and from reviewing Systems Portfolio Appraisals and participation in AQIP Strategy Forums. O Although the institution successfully developed the 2016 FIRSTS Goals, it is not clear if a systematic process to identify short and long term strategies has been established. Without this process it may be difficult to ensure that the institution considers market and other factors that could signal emerging changes that need to be addressed, as well as strategic challenges that must be overcome to ensure long-term sustainability of the organization. 8P3- How do you develop key action plans to support your organizational strategies? Key action plans are developed and driven by the FIRSTS Goals and the indicators under each of the goals. Each action plan has specific objectives, timelines, and clear measurement objectives. Action plans are developed through the processes described in this section. The AQIP Leadership Team is responsible for advocating for action plans, monitoring and sharing their progress, and reporting results across the institution and with the Higher Learning Commission. Action plans are regularly discussed at Cabinet and Provost/Dean meetings, and progress is reported to the Board annually. All action plans are available for review by all stakeholders on the DMACC AQIP web site. O Although the institution develops key action plans as part of the FIRSTS Goals process, there does not appear to be a method as to how this is to be accomplished. As a result, there is a strong likelihood that variance will occur in the processes used and a possibility that some departments or campuses will not fully participate in development of the Strategic Initiatives that are important to achieving the Goals. Without a more defined approach to ensuring the involvement of the departments and campuses in developing Strategic Initiatives, there is greater risk that misalignment in plan implementation will occur. 8P4- How do you coordinate and align your planning processes, organizational strategies, and action plans across your organization s various levels? DMACC coordinates planning across the institution by including representation from all levels of the college on key leadership committees and commissions, regular planning and sharing meetings with stakeholders, annual coordinated budgeting process, and providing for multi-directional communication throughout the institution. Committee and commission members are selected from all campuses and across all levels of the college, if possible. The coordinated budgeting process collects resource requests to support local planning efforts which are then reviewed, prioritized and approved according to how well these plans support the strategic goals of the college. Multidirectional communication between departments regarding planning is facilitated through regular meetings and contacts between key stakeholder groups. The Office of Institutional Effectiveness supports strategic planning efforts across the college and support efforts at all levels. O DMACC coordinates planning by including representation from all levels of the college on key leadership committees and commissions, regular planning and sharing meetings with stakeholders and annual budgeting and through regular multi-directional communication; however, it is not clear how planning processes, organizational strategies, and action plans are aligned. 8P5- How you define objectives, select measures, and set performance targets for your organizational strategies and action plans? Criterion 8 105

108 Organizational objectives according to the 2016 FIRSTS Goals are established as part of the institutional scorecard. By definition, the outcome for each goal and indicator is to be first in the state and first according to the national benchmark group by Target rankings are included for all indicators when possible from 2006 to 2016, along with actual rankings. These targets were established by the Office of Institutional Effectiveness according to past DMACC trend lines, benchmark data, effectiveness of past processes in each area, and with input from district administration. S DMACC sets objectives according to its 2016 FIRSTS Goals scorecard and strives to be the first in the state and in the national benchmark group. Targets are established by the OIE according to previous trends, benchmarks, past process effectiveness, and administrative input. 8P6- How do you link strategy selection and action plans, taking into account levels of current resources and future needs? Recent economic conditions have caused DMACC to be much more deliberate in funding strategies and action plans designed to help meet the 2106 FIRSTS Goals. Previously, DMACC funded an internal grant program to support projects promoting the 2016 FIRSTS Goals. This program has been discontinued in recent years due to budget restrictions and cost reduction initiatives. In its place, DMACC solicits specific, targeted action plans that become known through planning processes, or identifies departmental projects that show promise for institutional improvement. These projects are brought before Cabinet for approval based on their overall cost and the potential benefit for the institution. If possible, programs are identified that help students learn and meet other objectives, but also have a favorable return on investment. A recent example of this type of project is the DMACC Call Center. Knowledgeable student service specialists call students identified to be experiencing specific barriers to continuation (i.e. - incomplete financial aid application, accepted for admission but not registered, not or quit attending, etc.). These specialists have the skills to help students directly over the phone, or can refer students to other areas of the college. All referrals are tracked using the same system IT uses to track helpdesk requests to assure that follow-up occurred and that all efforts were made to resolve the situation. A return on investment analysis demonstrated that not only does this project help improve strategic goals by keeping students enrolled and progressing, but also results in a net revenue increase for the college. Admittedly, these types of projects are rare, but every effort is being made to create these types of strategic initiatives for the college. Development of the Adjunct Advantage program, the August Academy, room scheduling software plans, workplace LEAN, and DMACC Track case management software are a few examples of action projects that were funded either through solicitation as a strategic interest of the college, or identification of departmental ideas worthy of implementation college-wide. S Due to budget constraints, DMACC has discontinued an internal grant program to support 2016 FIRSTS Goals and replaced it with solicitation of specific, targeted action plans or identification departmental projects contributing to institutional improvement; the Cabinet approves these based on cost-benefit analyses. The Call Center, Adjunct Advantage, August Academy, room-scheduling software, workplace LEAN, and DMACC Track are examples of successful programs. O DMACC solicits organizational or departmental action plans that are consistent with the strategic interests of the College, however, the precise criteria or process through which this occurs is not discussed, nor is it clear how current resources play a role. Developing a systematic process with clear criteria linked to strategic goals may allow the College to solicit organizational or department action projects more readily and budget for associated resource needs. 8P7- How do you assess and address risk in your planning processes? In general, risk is encouraged and tolerated as a means for making significant improvement in the college. Risk of program or project failure is seen as a normal part of the continuous improvement process. However, processes are in place to minimize or mitigate risk to assure responsible use of resources. Criterion 8 106

109 DMACC s budgeting process is very conservative and is not based on anticipated enrollment growth. Any additional tuition revenue realized is used to fund new programs or projects that are not included in the original budget. This ensures that funding new initiatives does not overextend the DMACC budget. The planning process uses various strategies to minimize or mitigate risk. Analyses of return on investment for new programs or services are conducted when possible. Discussions regarding potential worst case scenarios for new projects are conducted to identify any risk and its potential negative impact on the college. A broad spectrum of stakeholders is included in the planning process to gather input regarding risk. The planning process routinely includes an attempt to identify best practices and learn from other institutions that have initiated similar projects. O It is not apparent that any risk analysis was accomplished during development of 2016 FIRSTS Goals so that a clear understanding could be established as to the importance of certain aspects of the plan or the ability of the institution to actually execute the plan. Without a well developed process to evaluate risk, it may be difficult to identify and deal proactively with potential problems. 8P8- How do you ensure that you will develop and nurture faculty, staff, and administrator capabilities to address changing requirements demanded by your organizational strategies and action plans? DMACC s ability to identify, analyze and address stakeholder needs (1P15, 2P5, 3P1, 3P3, 4P8, 6P1, 6P2, 7P3), communicate expectations to stakeholders (1P6, 2P3, 2P4, 5P7, 5P8), and measure effectiveness (7P1-7P7) provide a solid foundation for employee development to address changing organizational strategies and action plans. DMACC s institutional goals were created as a result of input from many stakeholders. Expectations are clearly defined and communicated, and employees are supported and their contributions toward attainment of these goals is appreciated and acknowledged. Every effort is made to empower individuals to contribute toward attainment of DMACC s 2016 FIRSTS Goals by encouraging entrepreneurial activity, accepting risk, listening to stakeholders and adjusting or adopting strategies accordingly, and providing useful information regarding changing strategies and action plans. O While institutional goals are developed with input from many stakeholders, it is not apparent that other resource needs were proactively addressed before 2016 FIRSTS Goals was implemented. If all needs are not adequately addressed, DMACC s ability to develop and nurture faculty, staff, and administrator capabilities to address changing requirements demanded by the Priorities and Initiatives may be limited. Results (R) 8R1 What measures of the effectiveness of your planning processes and systems do you collect and analyze regularly? DMACC uses the AQIP Examiner survey to measure the effectiveness of its planning processes and systems. DMACC results for Criterion 8- Planning Continuous Improvement are shown in Table 8.1. DMACC s scores exceed the mean for all other institutions using the AQIP Examiner survey. Table 8.1- DMACC AQIP Examiner Results for Planning Continuous Improvement S The AQIP Examiner Survey is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the College s planning processes and systems. Criterion 8 107

110 8R2- What are your performance results for accomplishing your organizational strategies and action plans? DMACC s 2016 FIRSTS Goals Scorecard has been in place for four full years and shows DMACC s progress toward meeting institutional objectives. Figures show the scorecard and accompanying data. Measures for 3F- new revenue from grants, investment and other sources were not included because metrics were never created for this measure. Variability in the data for this measure made it difficult to establish a stable trend line. Results for measure 3H were not included as they are too lengthy for inclusion in this document. LEAN results, however, have been shared throughout this document. DMACC has six more years to reach these goals and will continue to revise processes and strategies to improve effectiveness. Colleges included in DMACC s national benchmark cohort are listed in 1R6 of Criterion 1. Figure 8.1- DMACC 2016 FIRSTS Goals Scorecard Criterion 8 108

111 Figure FIRSTS Goals Scorecard Measures 1A-1E Criterion 8 109

112 Figure FIRSTS Goals Scorecard Measures 1F-1H Criterion 8 110

113 Figure FIRSTS Goals Scorecard Measures 2A-2D Criterion 8 111

114 Figure FIRSTS Goals Scorecard Measures 3A-3D Criterion 8 112

115 Figure FIRSTS Goals Scorecard Measures 3E,3G O It appears that only a few indicators are in place that will allow for determining the effectiveness of the planning process. The institution may need more measures to allow the leadership team to understand if the strategy is successful in producing better outcomes. 8R3- What are your projections or targets for performance of your strategies and action plans over the next 1-3 years? Performance targets out to 2016 are included in Figures Dark blue bars represent past performance and light blue bars are future goals for each indicator. Formal targets have not been developed for those indicators without benchmark groups. Improved performance each year is expected for these measures. Future targets may be modified each year depending on past performance and annual priorities. O It is difficult to determine if progress is being made towards meeting or exceeding the targets that were developed as part of the scorecard. 8R4- How do your results for the performance of your processes for Planning Continuous Improvement compare with the performance results of other higher education organizations and, if appropriate, of organizations outside of higher education? Most, but not all, indicators have appropriate benchmarks and comparative data. Benchmarks against all Iowa community colleges and against the national benchmark cohort, when they exist, are included for each indicator. CAAP student learning assessment data are benchmarked against national norms established by ACT. OO There is little comparative or competitive data are available to demonstrate how DMACC s effectiveness in its strategic planning process compares with other higher education organizations or those outside of higher education. 8R5- What is the evidence that your system for Planning Continuous Improvement is effective? How do you measure and evaluate your planning processes and activities? The institutional scorecard shown in Figure 8.1 provides evidence of the effectiveness of DMACC s continuous improvement efforts. Overall, DMACC is pleased with these efforts aimed at meeting the 2016 FIRSTS Goals. The institution has made sustained progress toward the goal of being first in Criterion 8 113

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