The development and evaluation of a succession planning programme in nursing, in Australia

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1 Journal of Nursing Management, 2009, 17, The development and evaluation of a succession planning programme in nursing, in Australia SCOTT BRUNERO RN, Dip AppSc BHSc, M Nurs (nurs prac) 1, SUZIE KERR RN, GDSE, Grad Dip in Sc in Med 2 and GRAZYNA JASTRZAB RN, MNEd 3 1 Clinical Nurse Consultant, Liaison Mental Health Nursing, 2 Clinical Nurse Manager and 3 Clinical Nurse Consultant, Pain Management, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Correspondence Scott Brunero Prince of Wales Hospital EBB, NERU, rm 7 High st Randwick Sydney 2031 New South Wales Australia nsw.gov.au BRUNERO S., KERR S. & JASTRZAB G. (2009) Journal of Nursing Management 17, The development and evaluation of a succession planning programme in nursing, in Australia Aim This study reports on a locally organized model of succession planning in a 550-bed general hospital. Background Within healthcare, succession planning has traditionally been considered for people at the executive director level and little research has been published with nurses working at the clinical level. Method A succession planning model was developed from the literature and through a process of consultation with senior staff. The model was then evaluated from a customer satisfaction, programme progress, effective placement and organizational results perspectives. Nurses who were successful in obtaining a new role were surveyed after 6 weeks in the position. Descriptive statistics, including numbers of placements and types of positions filled, were recorded. A checklist for conducting a programme evaluation of succession planning was also used. Results Twenty-five nurses participated, with 31 positions succeeded to. Nurses reported positively that the programme was beneficial, increased their sense of career planning and gave them a greater understanding of their career pathway. Conclusions The succession planning programme provided an opportunity for the organization to identify new leaders. The study outcomes have identified potential improvements to the way succession planning is conducted at the hospital. Implications for nursing management Nurse Managers are in key positions to develop effective succession planning models. This study offers a process for managers to develop effective succession planning programmes within their organization. Keywords: leadership, management, organization, succession planning Accepted for publication: 18 December 2008 Introduction A key element of developing a workforce includes the notion of succession planning (Conger & Fulmer 2003). Hospitals are able to forecast budgets, develop new initiatives or modify existing strategies, but often fail to plan for the human resource side of service planning (Maxwell 2004). There is a need for a more formalized approach to succession planning in nursing, as the average age of nurses increases and growing demand for nursing services rise. Effort needs to be placed into the development of new leaders, to meet the demands for DOI: /j x 576 ª 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

2 Succession planning nursing in the future (Duffield & Franks 2001, Fruth 2003, Davidson et al. 2006, Sherrod 2006). Succession planning has been described as a process by which one or more successors are identified for key positions (or groups of similar key positions), and career moves where development activities are planned for these successors. Successors may be ready to do the job (short-term successors) or seen as having longerterm potential (long-term successors) (Hirsh 2000, Blouin et al. 2006). Succession planning is more succinctly defined by Poteet (1987) as Ôa strategy for identifying current and future leadership and managerial needsõ (p. 342). Smeltzer (2002) argues that succession planning should be seen in a broad sense as preparing individuals for future roles, not just for replacing positions within the organization. The process can align staff and managers with the organizationõs strategic directions. It can also identify the people who can meet the demand of the organization after specific development of the skills and attributes required for advanced roles. Succession planning decreases recruitment and orientation costs, encourages a culture of staff ownership of their personal growth and can instill staff loyalty. A formal succession planning programme within a hospital can demonstrate a clear organizational commitment to career development and professional advancement. Having successors ready to fill key staff vacancies can ensure continuity of service and enhance organizational stability. Ensuring a steady supply of people with the right skills, knowledge and attitudes is required by large organizations to maintain the high levels of service demanded by health service users (Bolton & Roy 2004, McConnell 2006, Wolf et al. 2006). Literature review Various models and approaches have been taken of succession planning (Rothwell 2001, Soares 2002, Bolton & Roy 2004, Beyers 2006, Goudreau & Hardy 2006). There is a substantive amount of literature in the corporate sector, but within nursing the succession planning literature is scarce (Bolton & Roy 2004, Sherrod 2006, Weiss & Drake 2007). The nursing literature contains descriptions of how to develop organization specific programmes, but there were no formal evaluative papers of succession planning programmes found in this review. Redman (2006) in North America reports and describes the key elements of succession planning. Redman (2006) highlights the need for support from the senior administrative level, assessment of linchpin positions, assessment of individuals in terms of their leadership abilities, gap analysis of current talent pool, design and implementation of a leadership programme, and the periodic evaluation of the succession planning process. Bolton and Roy (2004) outline five key components of succession planning: identifying key positions; identifying potential candidates; developing potential candidates; appointing successors; and committing resources. Bolton and Roy (2004) note that some organizations approach succession planning in a secretive closed fashion with positions being targeted which are only known to a few. They support a more open process which proposes that all nurses are continually supported to enhance the skills and knowledge to promote advancement in their careers. Beyers (2006) interviewed senior nurse executives in North America to determine how succession planning was being practiced at five different hospital settings. Beyers (2006) concluded from the interviews that succession planning is a complex process and needs to be individualized to the context of particular organizations. Beyers (2006) noted its application in healthcare is largely driven by staff turnover, the realization that commitment and loyalty are valuable assets in an organization. Cadmus (2002) supports the view that succession planning needs to start with senior management support requiring engagement and commitment from all members of staff. Cadmus (2006) adds that partnerships with human resources departments and nursing education departments can add to the success of succession planning programmes. Blouin et al. (2006) and Davidson et al. (2006) both outline the importance of leadership development in nursing. The developing of leadership in succession planning sits well within Bolton and RoyÕs (2004) domain of developing potential candidates in succession planning. While knowledge and skill development is essential for someone to take on a new role, the broader concept of leadership development has recently attracted more attention in the nursing research literature. Blouin et al. (2006) describes a leadership development programme as a strategy for effective succession planning. In a process of leadership development, all staff in leadership roles were ranked according to their developmental needs. Blouin et al. (2006) argues that highlighting strong and weak leadership styles has raised the expectations of leaders and thus their commitment to leadership excellence. Davidson et al. (2006) reports barriers to clinical leadership as organizational structures that preclude nurses ª 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd, Journal of Nursing Management, 17,

3 S. Brunero et al. from clinical decision-making, shortage of nurses, absence of well-evaluated models of care and employment of less-skilled clinicians. Leadership development is regarded as a process of facilitating people for career moves, through individualized development programmes (Goudreau & Hardy 2006). Succession planning is seen as a broad arching process that needs to be individualized for organizations and embedded as part of the organizational structure. At the study site, the initial concept was drawn from a wider effort to improve the nursing culture, using practice development models (McCormak et al. 2004). Aim There were two aims to this pilot study; first to develop a locally defined succession planning model and second, to evaluate the outcomes of this model. Method The study occurred in 2006 at a large (550 bed) metropolitan tertiary referral teaching hospital. Ethics approval was sought and received by the South Eastern Sydney Illawarra Area Health Service (Northern Sector). First, the succession planning model was developed from the literature and a process of consultation with senior staff. After implementation the model was then evaluated using approaches suggested by Rothwell (2001). Development of local model of succession planning A developmental process of literature review, steering committee, consultation and critical review was undertaken to prepare the project for trial (Bower 2000, Husting & Alderman 2001, Rothwell 2001, Bolton & Roy 2004). Expressions of interest for nurses to attend a group to discuss succession planning were distributed via to nurses at the study site. A series of three separate discussion groups were held, each containing between 6 and 10 ward-based nursing staff. Adapted from focus group methodologies proposed by Ruff et al. (2005) and Krueger (2006) the following two focused questions were put to the groups: How is succession planning currently conducted at the hospital? What would be the barriers in developing a formal succession plan programme? Two facilitators conducted the groups (first and second authors): one facilitator acted as the discussion facilitator and the other kept notes on the groupõs responses, which were then reiterated back to the group at the end of each session. The project team then met and a content analysis of the data from each discussion group was conducted. The following issues surrounding succession planning were identified: currently there is no formal structure or process; there maybe be financial implications; a programme/process needs to be developed across the hospital; knowledge and skills of staff need to be developed; an evaluation process of succession planning needed to occur. Early in 2005, a hospital-wide steering committee was formed to develop a strategy for implementing succession planning. The committee comprised of a broad range of nursing managers and senior clinical staff. A literature review was undertaken searching, CINAHL, Medline, and human resources databases for papers on succession planning particularly in the health care sector. Informal contacts with other health services were made to identify any succession planning models currently in use. An operational definition of succession planning for this project was developed from the literature and the consultation process and noted as; ÔShort term successors the opportunity to relieve in a senior managerial or clinical nursing position for planned leave reliefõ. What differs from simple leave replacement to succession planning is the development of the individual for the role. Our study process allowed applicants to have the opportunity to undertake training and professional development in preparation for working in the relief position. The steering committee then developed a project proposal. This proposal contained an overview of succession planning principles, key steps in succession planning and a flowchart for individual nursing departments to follow when commencing succession planning (see Figure 1). Two pilot sites were identified, clinical programme one (acute services; e.g. cardiac and intensive care units) and clinical programme two (anaesthetics and surgery services). A series of monthly meetings were held with senior nurses from each clinical programme. Potential positions for succession were identified: Clinical Nurse Manager (CNM), Nurse Unit Manager (NUM), Clinical Nurse Consultants (CNC), Nurse Educator (NE) and Clinical Nurse Educator (CNE), of all the respective clinical specialties. An expression of interest 578 ª 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd, Journal of Nursing Management, 17,

4 Succession planning Expression of interest advertised Applicant submit expression of interest Program acknowledge receipt of expression of interest Applications distributed amongst working party Interviews conducted by working party & organise interview within 6 weeks Feedback given Candidates put on list in preparation for role Objectives set for candidates Figure 1 Succession planning process. Individual succession plan developed Resubmit expression of interest next round document was created which allowed nurses the ability to see what positions were available. A professional practice development booklet was created for individual staff to identify learning competencies to be able to undertake the relevant roles. The CNM learning competencies included: advanced leadership ability, bed management principles, human resource management, financial management, organizational and advanced problem-solving skills and decision-making skills. The NUM learning competencies included: patient access, staff and human resources management, financial management, patient safety and improvement, occupational health and safety and leadership. The CNC learning competencies included: quality improvement, evaluation and research, education, clinical leadership, clinical services planning, essential skills and clinical consultancy. The NE and CNE learning competencies included: continuum of care, leadership and management, human resources management, information management and safe practice and environment. A range of opportunities such as coaching, mentoring and clinical supervision workshops that already existed in the healthcare service were highlighted as opportunities for nurses to gain the necessary skills and confidence to undertake their new roles (Brunero & Stein-Parbury 2007, Yu et al. 2008). Through these reflective processes individuals identified gaps in their competency levels. A succession planning information session was held for all interested staff to attend. The session contained information and discussion on a range of issues, including an overview of the acute care programme, the professional nurse strategy for acute care, succession planning process, a review of senior roles and an open panel discussion for questions to be addressed to the presenters. The interview process for applicants contained a structured series of questions aimed at ascertaining the staff members understanding of the roles, their own professional goals and provided learning and feedback opportunity. In the expression of interest add, ª 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd, Journal of Nursing Management, 17,

5 S. Brunero et al. applicants were asked to supply a curriculum vitae and cover letter. Designated time within the nursesõ working day was used for the nurse to participate in this nonclinical activity. Orientation handbooks for each of the specialty roles were formulated to assist new staff in the relieving position, with quick reference to critical information on the role. characteristic. This questionnaire was completed by the project team (n = 7) as an in-depth knowledge of the succession planning programme is required for its completion. Per cent in agreement to each statement was determined by adding the four (important) and five (very important) on the Likert scale and rounded to the nearest decile, which is shown in the results. Evaluation of the outcomes Rothwell (2001) suggests a four-part approach to succession planning evaluation: customer satisfaction, programme progress, effective placement and organizational results. A survey was developed to determine RothwellÕs (2001) customer satisfaction part of the evaluation model. All the nurses who were successful in obtaining a new role through the clinical programme were surveyed at 6 weeks post their start in the new role. Three questions with a yes, no and unsure answer and space for written comments were used. The questions were: Was the succession planning process beneficial to you? Has the professional development plan assisted in your career planning? Has this opportunity given you a better understanding of your potential career pathway? The yes and no answers were summarized using descriptive statistics and a content analysis was performed on the written comments. To assess the outcomes of placements, descriptive statistics including numbers of placements and types of positions filled were recorded. To gather data of the clinical programme progress and organizational results, the evaluation tool by Rothwell (2001) was used, entitled ÔA checklist for conducting a programme evaluation for the succession planning and management programmeõ (p. 284). This checklist contains 28 recommended characteristics of successful succession planning programmes. Each characteristic is rated a yes or no for the presence of the individual characteristic. If the characteristic was present it was given a rating on a one- to five-point Likert scale for the level of its importance in the programme (1 = not important to 5 = very important). A project team consisting of two clinical nurse consultants, three nursing unit mangers, a senior nurse manager and a nurse educator was formed. The project team first agreed on the presence of the characteristic in the studies succession planning programme then individually rated the importance of the Results Twenty-five nurses participated in the programme (of 44 applicants) some of who had the opportunity to relieve in a more than one senior role, during the study period. Over the study period, 19 Nursing Unit Manager positions were replaced, one Clinical Nurse Educator role, six Clinical Nurse Consultants and five Nurse Educator Roles (n = 31). There were 19 nurses who applied but were not interviewed, reasons for this include: maternity leave (n = 4), annual leave (n = 5), resignation from hospital (n = 3), withdrawal of application (n = 2) and other unknown reasons (n = 5). Completed questionnaires were returned from all participants (n = 25). Nurses answered the question ÔWas the succession planning process beneficial to you?õ with 20 saying yes, two answered no and three were unsure. Staff reported the interviewing experience as being valuable, the experience in the role giving them real time insight into the different roles and ability to set career goals and plan for the future. Participants reported the succession planning benefits as: ÔIt gave me experience and skill that I didnõt have previously, it helped me gain interview skillõ. ÔHelps with gaining interview skills, setting, objectives, and outcomes to achieve clearer career pathway to both me and managersõ. ÔHave been given the chance to gain experience in a senior positions, setting objectives that I wished to achieveõ. A negative comment was concerned with the amount of preparation time before entering into the role as stated: ÔWould have liked more information regarding requirements of the Clinical Nurse Consultant roleõ & I was unable to spend enough time learning what the role entailed before commencingõ. Participants were then asked: Has the professional development plan assisted in your career planning? Eighteen answered yes, five answered no and two were 580 ª 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd, Journal of Nursing Management, 17,

6 Succession planning unsure. Participants described the experience as a chance to build their strength and identify their weaknesses, and helping them to choose career directions such as clinical, managerial or educational. The following are examples of what participants reported: ÔIt is a chance to experience areas that I maybe interested in, and from their make a more informed choice about my career pathõ. ÔGives a guide to what you want to achieve and within a certain time frameõ. ÔIt made me experience an area of nursing that I never thought I would be interested, it helped me achieve my goals in a planned wayõ. ÔHas confirmed that I do not want the positionõ. The final questions asked: Has this opportunity given you a better understanding of your potential career pathway? Twenty answered yes, one said no and four were unsure. Most participants confirmed in themselves whether they were making the right choice of career path. Some said that they were sure that they would not take the career path they had the opportunity to experience. Participants reported: ÔI was torn between a clinical nurse educator role and management. This experience has defined the clinical educator role more to my likingõ. ÔIt also helped me identify my strengths and weaknesses, so I am more prepared to consider my potential career pathwayõ. ÔI would now be keen to apply for a permanent position as a nurse managerõ. The overall results of the programme evaluation checklist are shown in Table 1. Of the 28 recommended characteristics of succession planning by Rothwell (2001), three items were found not to be present. The items were: ÔEstablished incentives/rewards for identified successors in the succession planning programmeõ, ÔEstablished incentives/rewards for managers with identified successorsõ and ÔDeveloped a means to budget for a succession planning programmeõ. The succession planning programme was not attached to any specific funding and there was no financial reward systems built Table 1 Checklist for conducting a programme evaluation for the succession planning and management programme Characteristic of an effective programme Per cent in agreement (rounded to nearest decile) Tied the succession planning programme to organisational strategic plans 90 Tied the succession planning programme to individual programmes 100 Tied the succession planning to training programmes 90 Prepared a written programme purpose 90 Prepared written programme goals, to indicate what results the succession planning should achieve 90 Established measurable objectives (number of position replaced each year) 90 Identified what groups are to be serviced by the programme, in priority? 90 Established a written policy statement to guide the programme 70 Articulated a written philosophy about the programme 40 Established a programme action plan 70 Established a schedule of programme events based on the action plan 40 Fixed responsibility for organisational oversight of the programme 60 Fixed responsibility of each participant in the programme 100 Established incentives/rewards for identified successors in the succession planning programme Not present Established incentives/rewards for managers with identified successors Not present Developed a means to budget for a succession planning programme Not present Devised a means to keep records for individuals who are designated as successors 70 Created workshops to train management employees about the succession planning programme 100 Created workshops to train individuals about career planning 90 Established a means to clarify present position responsibilities 90 Established a means to clarify future position responsibilities 70 Established a means to appraise individual performance 70 Established a means to compare individual skills to the requirements of future position 100 Established a way to review organisational talent at least annually 100 Established a way to forecast future talent needs 90 Established a way to plan for meeting succession planning needs through individual developmental plans 40 Established a means to track individual activities to prepare successors for individual advancement 40 Established a means to evaluate the results of the succession planning programme 90 ª 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd, Journal of Nursing Management, 17,

7 S. Brunero et al. in for staff at the study site. The items rated with lower importance were concerned with the writing of an articulated philosophy, the schedule of events in an action plan, individual development plans and individual advancement. Whilst rated lower in this study the importance of a philosophy or vision statement may have helped succession planning continue beyond its pilot phase. The remaining items were rated as being important or very important. Discussion There were clear reported benefits to the organization; the opportunity for staff to experience different roles has subsequently enabled staff to take up more senior positions. The more formalized approach to succession planning gave the organization an opportunity to identify potential new leaders. It is recommended that succession planning be used for all levels of staff, not just chief executive officers as all staff need some level of replacement at some point in time (Redman 2006). Succession planning is recommended to be done before the need to replace arises (Cadmus 2002, Beyers 2006). At the study site, succession planning was considered before the need to replace arose but only with senior positions, future programmes should look at all levels of staff. Components of succession planning were developed and progress made towards a working model of succession planning. In terms of the first aim of the study, to develop a local succession planning model, what was achieved could be described as short-term succession planning which includes leave relief and opportunities to experience different roles as described by Blouin et al. (2006). Tracking an individualõs development needs (see Table 1) was rated low by the project team, probably because of a lack of an accurate or consistent monitoring system. Future programmes will need closer scrutiny as to the use of individual succession planning records and journals as methods of monitoring participantõs progress. The succession planning model was flexible enough to identify a range of senior to junior nurses to participate. The second aim of the study was to evaluate the outcomes of the succession planning model. Overall the results of the study were positive for both participants and the organization. Clearly participants found the opportunity to be acting in a more senior role challenging and it allowed direction in their thinking about their future career. Staff found the succession planning process an opportunity for interview practice, making decisions on career pathways (clinical or managerial), a learning opportunity to find out more about the organization and the different roles in the hospital. Study limitations Only successful candidates were canvassed for their feedback on the succession planning programme, this limits our findings, canvassing the staff that were unsuccessful may have enabled the authors to have a broader understanding of the succession planning programme. As the individual differences between succession planning programmes are dependent on organizations it is difficult to make comparisons from our results to others who have taken similar approach with this survey tool. Evaluative methods that attempt to determine the cost effectives and or cost savings that succession planning can bring a hospital need to be included in further studies. Recommendations and implications for nursing management The study has suggested potential further improvements that could be made to the individualized nature of succession planning at the hospital as suggested by Beyers (2006). These improvements have been broken down into two distinct models of succession planning, which is proposed to be trialled. Model one would be a centralized process for coordinating succession planning, involving the services of human resources, nursing workforce and or other senior roles with links to all nursing departments. Given the volume of work involved a dedicated project manager leading this work would be beneficial. Model two would originate from the senior staff member wanting a successor in their role to be responsible to coordinate the process within their own individual clinical stream. For example, a nurse consultant knowingly going on leave in 12 months time would be responsible to advertise, interview and develop a potential candidate. These models reflect the arguments put forward by Beyers (2006) that succession planning needs to be aligned with the individualõs organizational structures and goals. Developing stronger links with the human resources department would have added further to the success of succession planning at the study site which is also mentioned by Cadmus (2006). Systems which identify potential leaders and champions could occur through a performance management appraisal tool, or other method for identifying high achievers. This process may be seen as necessary for 582 ª 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd, Journal of Nursing Management, 17,

8 Succession planning people to move towards more formal succession planning. It is recommended that the professional practice plan, the interview process and the information session as previously mentioned be maintained as precursors for succession planning (Bolton & Roy 2004, Fine 2005, McConnell 2006). Conclusions The study describes the process and outcome of succession planning in a large tertiary referral metropolitan hospital. Nurse Managers are well placed within organizations to lead succession planning development. Using the results of the study, nurse managers should reflect on the developmental process undertaken in our study and the benefits of succession planning reported to stimulate local defined models of succession planning within their workplace. A foundation for future larger scale and more in-depth succession planning models has now been established. The study has been overall a positive learning experience, with benefits and gaps in the process being identified. Contributions SB, principal writer, literature review, methodology, results and discussion; SK, literature review, methodology, results and discussion; GJ, research methodology, editing, data analyst. References Beyers M. (2006) Nurse executives perspectives on succession planning. The Journal of Nursing Administration 36 (6), Blouin A., McDonagh K., Neistadt A. & Helfand B. (2006) Leading tomorrows healthcare orgainizations, strategies and tactics for effective succession planning. The Journal of Nursing Administration 36 (6), Bolton J. & Roy W. (2004) Succession planning. The Journal of Nursing Administration 34 (12), Bower F. (2000) Succession planning. A strategy for taking charge. Nursing Leadership Forum 4 (4), Brunero S. & Stein-Parbury J. (2007) The effectiveness of clinical supervision in nursing: an evidenced based literature review. Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing 25 (3), Cadmus E. (2002) Defining generations in succession planning: there are four! Seminars for Nurse Managers 10 (4), Cadmus E. (2006) Succession planning. The Journal of Nursing Administration 36 (6), Conger J. & Fulmer R. (2003) Leadership pipeline. Harvard Business Review December, Davidson P., Elliot D. & Daly J. (2006) Clinical leadership in contemporary clinical practice: implications for nursing in Australia. Journal of Nursing Management 14, Duffield C. & Franks H. (2001) The role and preparation of first line nurse managers in Australia where are we going and how did we get there? Journal of Nursing Management 9, Fine D. (2005) Commentaries on best practices in succession planning. Modern Healthcare 35, 49. Fruth R. (2003) Begin succession planning today. Nursing Management September, 12. Goudreau K. & Hardy J. (2006) Succession planning and individual development. The Journal of Nursing Administration 36 (6), Hirsh W. (2000) Succession Planning Demystified. Institute for Employment Studies, Brighton. Available at: employment-studies.co.uk/summary/summary.php?id=372, accessed 13 February Husting P. & Alderman M. (2001) Replacement ready. Nursing Management 32 (9), Krueger R. (2006) Is it a focus group? Tips on how to tell. Journal of Wound Ostomy Continence Nursing 33 (4), Maxwell M. (2004) Putting success into succession planning. Nursing Economics 22 (5), 285. McConnell C. (2006) Succession planning valuable process or pointless exercise. The Health Care Manager 25 (1), McCormak B., Manley K. & Garbett R. (2004) Practice Development in Nursing, 3rd edn, Blackwell, London. Poteet G. (1987) Succession planning in nursing administration. Journal of Pediatric Nursing 2 (5), Redman R. (2006) Leadership succession planning an evidencebased approach for managing the future. The Journal of Nursing Management 36 (6), Rothwell W. (2001) Effective Succession Planning, 2nd edn. American Management Association, New York, NY. Ruff C., Alexander I. & McKie C. (2005) The use of focus group methodology in health disparities research. Nursing Outlook 53 (3), Sherrod D. (2006) Succession planning. Nursing Management 64, Smeltzer C.H. (2002) Succession planning. Journal of Nursing Administration 32 (12), 615. Soares D. (2002) Developing a succession plan: the North Bronx Healthcare Network. Seminars for Nurse Managers 10 (4), Weiss L. & Drake A. (2007) Nursing leadership succession planning in Veterans Health Administration. Nursing Administration Quarterly 31 (1), Wolf G., Bradie J. & Greenhouse P. (2006) Investment in the future. The Journal of Nursing Administration 36 (6), Yu N., Collins C., Cavanagh M., White K. & Fairbrother G. (2008) Positive coaching with frontline managers: enhancing their effectiveness and understanding why. International Coaching Psychology Review 3 (2), ª 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd, Journal of Nursing Management, 17,

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