OVERVIEW OF RESEARCH PROJECTS IN THE ICT DOMAIN ICT statistical report for annual monitoring (StReAM)

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "OVERVIEW OF RESEARCH PROJECTS IN THE ICT DOMAIN 2012. ICT statistical report for annual monitoring (StReAM)"

Transcription

1 OVERVIEW OF RESEARCH PROJECTS IN THE ICT DOMAIN 2012 ICT statistical report for annual monitoring (StReAM) 12 June 2013

2 ACRONYMS AAL: ACC: ARTEMIS: ASS: BPN: CA: CIP: CP: CSA: EEA: EPO: FP: FET: GBAORD: GERD: GOV: HES/REC: ICT: INFRA: IP: IPPA: MS: NoE: NUTS: PNP: PRC: PSP: PUC: R&D: RI: SA: SME: SICA: SO: StReAM: STREP: TC: TN: JRU: JTI: JU: VA: WIPO: Ambient Assisted Living Accession countries Advanced Research & Technology for Embedded Intelligence in Systems Associated Countries Best Practices Networks Coordination or networking actions Competitiveness and Innovation Framework Programme Collaborative Project Coordination and Support Action European Economic Area European Patent Office Framework Programme Future and Emerging Technologies Government budget appropriations or outlays for research and development Gross domestic expenditure on R&D Governmental organisation High Education Institutions and Research Centres Information and Communication Technology Infrastructural projects Large scale integrating collaborative projects Integrated Programme Portfolio Analysis Member States Network of Excellence Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics Private non-profit organisation Private Commercial organisation Policy Support Programme Public bodies that are for profit Research and Development Research Infrastructure Specific support actions Small and Medium Enterprises Specific International Cooperation Actions Strategic Objective Statistical Report for Annual Monitoring Specific Targeted Research Projects Third Country Thematic Networks Joint Research Unit Joint Technology Initiative Joint Undertaking Value Added Word Intellectual Property Office ii

3 The database of FP7 ICT projects supporting this report is published as an open dataset at the following address: https://ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/en/download-data The visualisation tool of the Digital Agenda Scoreboard allows you to explore the main indicators derived from this dataset: iii

4 Introduction This report provides a comprehensive overview of the monitoring activity carried out by DG Communication Networks, Content and Technology in It stems from the knowledge needs of internal policy makers and builds on the previous Statistical Report for Annual Monitoring (StReAM) and Integrated Programme Portfolio Analysis (IPPA) report. The research activities monitored are the ICT research actions under the Cooperation Programme and the e-infrastructures activity under the Capacities Programme of the Seventh Framework Programme (FP7), including the Artemis and Eniac Joint Technological Initiatives (JTIs), and the Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) Joint Programme (JP); as well as the policy support actions carried out under the Competitiveness and Innovation Framework Policy Support Programme (CIP ICT PSP). The report is structured as follows: Chapter 1 presents a brief narrative of the main policy messages that can be drawn from the analysis carried out in the report; Chapter 2 includes an extensive analysis of the FP7 ICT theme project portfolio. The composition of the ICT Theme of FP7 is described focusing on several key aspects, such as funding allocations, participations, SMEs' involvement, strategic objectives and countries; Chapter 3 presents the key data on e-infrastructures activity; Chapter 4 presents the key data on JTIs (Artemis and Eniac) and AAL Programmes; Chapter 5 illustrates the state of play of the CIP ICT PSP programme, presenting key data on participants and projects financed under this programme; Chapter 6 presents a detailed country analysis for the 27 EU Member States on their participation to the ICT Theme of FP7. The projects included in the FP7 ICT theme and CIP ICT PSP portfolio monitoring database for 2012 are those signed before 31 December 2012 and whose negotiation phase had been finalised by that date (i.e. projects that were undergoing negotiation as of this date and were not signed are not included in the dataset supporting the report). The reported numbers for 2012 are not final and are likely to increase as more agreements are signed and recorded in the database; also, on-going projects can be subject to amendments. For this reason the reported statistical data for past years are always retrospectively updated in the following Stream Reports. iv

5 Methodology The report is based on administrative data of the whole population of projects as available in the MIS database. It analyses several aspects related to the portfolio of projects, based on descriptive statistical analysis. It provides a consolidated analysis for the years , and analysis on a yearly basis for selected indicators. To facilitate the reading and understanding please note that: a participant is defined as an organisation participating to the programme/project; a participation is defined as the involvement of an organisation in a project/programme (i.e. projects have multiple partners and an organization can be the partner of multiple projects); Analyses by year are carried out considering the year of first signature of a project. Feedback from readers is most welcome, as it will help to improve the next reports to be produced under the FP7 and Horizon 2020 monitoring systems. Please send comments to: European Commission DG Communication Networks, Content and Technology Unit F.4 "Knowledge Base" v

6 Table of contents 1 Executive Summary Part I FP7 Statistical analysis Portfolio analysis In a nutshell Overall participation, funding and project figures Calls launched Overall analysis by type of instrument Project Data In a nutshell Average number of participations Funding to projects Funding to partners Funding evolution Type of organisations Legal status Top 50 Participants In a nutshell Participations Country analysis In a nutshell Country analysis Member States Associated and accession countries Third countries Regional analysis Small and Medium Enterprises In a nutshell SMEs participation and funding SMEs by instruments SMEs presence by Strategic Objectives SMEs presence by country Analysis by strategic objective SO 1: Future networks and the Internet vi

7 2.7.2 SO 2: Software, Services and interconnected objects SO 3: Trustworthy ICT SO 4: Networked Media SO 5: Cognitive Systems and Robotics SO 6: Nanoelectronics SO 7: Micro/nanosystems SO 8: Embedded Systems SO 9: Photonics SO 10: Organic and large area electronics SO 11: Language technologies SO 12: Intelligent Information Management SO 13: ICT for Health SO 14: ICT and Ageing SO 15: ICT for Inclusion SO 16: ICT for Governance and Policy Modelling SO 17: ICT for Energy Efficiency SO 18: ICT for Transport SO 19: ICT for the Enterprise SO 20: ICT for Learning SO 21: Digital Libraries SO 22: FET SO 23: International Cooperation SO 24: Accompanying Measures Part II FP7 e-infrastructures activity Funding, participations and projects Instruments and legal status of participants Geographic analysis Part IV JTIs and AAL JTIs ARTEMIS ENIAC AAL Joint Programme AAL JP organisations and country distribution AAL and types of participating organisations Part III CIP ICT-PSP Portfolio analysis vii

8 5.1.1 In a nutshell Funding, participations and projects Instruments Analysis by organisation type Top 20 participants In a nutshell Participations Country Analysis In a nutshell Aggregate country analysis Country analysis Annex 1 FP7 Country analysis Austria & the ICT Theme of FP Belgium & the ICT Theme of FP Bulgaria& the ICT Theme of FP Cyprus & the ICT Theme of FP Czech Republic & the ICT Theme of FP Denmark & the ICT Theme of FP Estonia & the ICT Theme of FP Finland & the ICT Theme of FP France and the ICT Theme of FP Germany & the ICT Theme of FP Greece & the ICT Theme of FP Hungary & the ICT Theme of FP Ireland & the ICT Theme of FP Italy & the ICT Theme of FP Latvia & the ICT Theme of FP Lithuania & the ICT Theme of FP Luxembourg & the ICT Theme of FP Malta & the ICT Theme of FP The Netherlands & the ICT Theme of FP Poland & the ICT Theme of FP Portugal & the ICT Theme of FP Romania & the ICT Theme of FP Slovakia & the ICT Theme of FP Slovenia & the ICT Theme of FP viii

9 Spain & the ICT Theme of FP Sweden & the ICT Theme of FP The United Kingdom & the ICT Theme of FP ix

10 Table of Tables Table 1 FP6, FP7 and its evolution... 8 Table 2 Calls launched under FP7 ICT Table 3 Funding, participations and organisations by legal status, (cumulated figures) Table 4 Top 50 participants to FP7-ICT calls, (cumulated figures) Table 5 Participations and EC funding by country group (cumulated figures ) 22 Table 6 FP7 ICT EC funding and participations per Member State (cumulated figures ) Table 7 - FP7 ICT EC funding and participations per Associated Country Table 8 FP7 ICT EC funding and participation per Accession Country Table 9 FP7 ICT participation and EC funding to Top 20 third countries Table 10 FP7 ICT Top 50 European regions by participations and funding Table 11 - FP7 ICT Incidence of SMEs by strategic objective (as % of total funding and participations, cumulated figures ) Table 12 - FP7 ICT Incidence of SMEs by Member State (as % of total funding and participations, cumulated figures ) Table 13 FP7 ICT EC funding, number of projects and participations by Strategic Objective (cumulated figures ) Table 14 Strategic objective Future Networks and Internet - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) Table 15 Strategic objective Software, Services and interconnected objects - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) Table 16 Strategic objective Trustworthy ICT - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) Table 17 Strategic objective Networked Media - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) Table 18 Strategic objective Cognitive Systems and Robotics - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) Table 19 Strategic objective Nanoelectronics - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) Table 20 Strategic objective Micro/nanosystems - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) Table 21 Strategic objective Embedded Systems - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) Table 22 Strategic objective Photonics - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) Table 23 Strategic objective Organic and large area electronics - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) Table 24 Strategic objective Language technologies - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) Table 25 Strategic objective Intelligent Information Management - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) Table 26 Strategic objective ICT for Health - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) Table 27 Strategic objective ICT and Ageing - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) Table 28 Strategic objective ICT for Inclusion - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) x

11 Table 29 Strategic objective ICT for Governance and Policy Modelling - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) Table 30 Strategic objective ICT for Energy Efficiency - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) Table 31 Strategic objective ICT for Transport - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) Table 32 Strategic objective ICT for the Enterprise - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) Table 33 Strategic objective ICT for Learning - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) Table 34 Strategic objective Digital Libraries - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) Table 35 Strategic objective FET - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) Table 36 Strategic objective International Cooperation - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) Table 37 Strategic objective Accompanying Measures - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) Table 38 e-infrastructures activity portfolio, (cumulated figures) Table 39 e-infrastructures - EC funding and participations by country group, (cumulated figures) Table 40 Main data about ARTEMIS Table 41 Main data about ENIAC Table 42 AAL JP projects in a nutshell Table 43 Main data concerning CIP ICT PSP, (cumulated funding) Table 44 Top 20 participants in the CIP ICT PSP programme, (cumulated figures) Table 45 CIP ICT PSP - Participations and EC funding by country group, (cumulated figures) Table 46 CIP ICT PSP - Country distribution for EC funding and participations, (cumulated figures) xi

12 Table of Figures Figure 1 EC funding allocated and projects funded under FP7 ICT ( )... 8 Figure 2 Number of participations to FP-ICT programmes by year, Figure 3 New participating organisations by year, Figure 4 FP7 EC funding per call Figure 5 FP7-EC funding per instrument, (cumulated figures; Millions ) Figure 6 FP7 projects and participations by instrument (%), (cumulated figures) Figure 7 FP average number of participations per project type, (cumulated figures) Figure 8 FP average EC funding per project (cumulated figures) Figure 9 FP average EC funding per organisation (cumulated figures) Figure 10 Funding evolution, FP6 and FP7 (Millions, cumulated figures) Figure 11 Funding by category of organisations, Millions and %, (cumulated figures) Figure 12 Participations by category of organisations, (cumulated figures) Figure 13 FP7 ICT EC participations by country group and year, Figure 14 FP7 ICT EC funding by country group and strategic objective (cumulated figures ) Figure 15 FP7 ICT - Total EC funding by Member State ( per million ICT sector VA), Figure 16 FP7 ICT - Total EC funding by Member State ( per million ICT GERD), Figure 17 FP7 ICT project coordination per Member State, (cumulated figures) Figure 18 SMEs' participation and funding narrow definition, (cumulated figures) Figure 19 SMEs' participation and funding to FP ICT projects narrow definition, share (%) over total funding and participation, by year ( ) Figure 20 SMEs' participation and funding broad definition, (cumulated figures) Figure 21 FP6 and FP7 SMEs funding by instruments (for FP7 cumulated figures ) Figure 22 -FP6 and FP7 participations by instruments (for FP7 cumulated figures ) Figure 23 FP7 ICT Distribution of SMEs funding by strategic objective (% of total funding allocated to SMEs, cumulated figures ) Figure 24 FP7 ICT Top 20 countries by funding to SMEs (cumulated figures, ) Figure 25 FP7 ICT Top 20 countries by SMEs' participations (cumulated figures, ) Figure 26 FP7 ICT SMEs incidence in associated countries (cumulated figures ) Figure 27 FP7 ICT SMEs incidence in Accession countries (cumulated figures ) Figure 28 FP7 ICT number of projects per aggregated SO by instrument, (cumulated figures) Figure 29 FP7 ICT EC funding per aggregated SO by instrument, (cumulated figures) xii

13 Figure 30 FP7 ICT EC funding to top 10 countries by strategic objective, (cumulated figures) Figure 31 FP7 ICT Legal status per strategic objective, (cumulated figures).. 44 Figure 32 Strategic objective Future Networks and Internet - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 33 Strategic objective Future Networks and Internet - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) Figure 34 Strategic objective Software, Services and interconnected objects - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 35 Strategic objective Software, Services and interconnected objects - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) Figure 36 Strategic objective Trustworthy ICT - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 37 Strategic objective Trustworthy ICT - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) Figure 38 Strategic objective Networked Media - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 39 Strategic objective Networked Media - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) Figure 40 Strategic objective Cognitive Systems and Robotics - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 41 Strategic objective Cognitive Systems and Robotics - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) Figure 42 Strategic objective Nanoelectronics - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 43 Strategic objective Nanoelectronics - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) Figure 44 Strategic objective Micro/nanosystems - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 45 Strategic objective Micro/nanosystems - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) Figure 46 Strategic objective Embedded Systems - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 47 Strategic objective Embedded Systems - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) Figure 48 Strategic objective Photonics - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 49 Strategic objective Photonics - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) Figure 50 Strategic objective Organic and large area electronics - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 51 Strategic objective Organic and large area electronics - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) Figure 52 Strategic objective Language technologies - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 53 Strategic objective Language technologies - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) Figure 54 Strategic objective Intelligent Information Management - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 55 Strategic objective Intelligent Information Management - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) xiii

14 Figure 56 Strategic objective ICT for Health - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 57 Strategic objective ICT for Health - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) Figure 58 Strategic objective ICT and Ageing - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 59 Strategic objective ICT and Ageing - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) Figure 60 Strategic objective ICT for Inclusion - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 61 Strategic objective ICT for Inclusion - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) Figure 62 Strategic objective ICT for Governance and Policy Modelling - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 63 Strategic objective ICT for Governance and Policy Modelling - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) Figure 64 Strategic objective ICT for Energy Efficiency - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 65 Strategic objective ICT for Energy Efficiency - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) Figure 66 Strategic objective ICT for Transport - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 67 Strategic objective ICT for Transport - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) Figure 68 Strategic objective ICT for the Enterprise - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 69 Strategic objective ICT for the Enterprise - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) Figure 70 Strategic objective ICT for Learning - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 71 Strategic objective ICT for Learning - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) Figure 72 Strategic objective Digital Libraries - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 73 Strategic objective Digital Libraries - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) Figure 74 Strategic objective FET - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 75 Strategic objective FET - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) Figure 76 Strategic objective International Cooperation - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 77 Strategic objective International Cooperation - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) Figure 78 Strategic objective Accompanying Measures - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 79 Strategic objective Accompanying Measures - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) Figure 80 e-infrastructures EC funding by call, Figure 81 e-infrastructures participations by type of instrument, (cumulated figures) xiv

15 Figure 82 e-infrastructures EC Funding and participations (%) by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 83 e-infrastructures - EC Funding and participations (%) by type of organisation, (cumulated figures) Figure 84 e-infrastructures - EC funding by Member State, (cumulated figures) Figure 85 e-infrastructures - EC funding by Member State ( per million ICT VA), Figure 86 e-infrastructures - EC funding by Member State as % of ICT GERD, Figure 87 e-infrastructures Top recipient of EC funding among accession, associated and third countries, (cumulated figures) Figure 88 ENIAC - Eligible costs per area in the projects selected for funding Figure 89 AAL - Organisations in successful proposals for call Figure 90 AAL - Organisations in successful proposals for call Figure 91 AAL - Organisations in successful proposals for call Figure 92 AAL - Organisations in successful proposals for call Figure 93 AAL - Organisations in successful proposals for call Figure 94 AAL - Organisation types in successful proposal for call Figure 95 AAL - Organisation types in successful proposal for call Figure 96 AAL - Organisation types in successful proposal for call Figure 97 AAL - Organisation types in successful proposal for call Figure 98 AAL - Organisation types in successful proposal for call Figure 99 CIP ICT PSP - Distribution of EC funding allocated by calls Figure 100 CIP ICT PSP EC budget distribution by instrument, (cumulated figures) Figure 101 CIP ICT PSP EC funding and total cost, (cumulated figures) Figure 102 CIP ICT PSP projects, (cumulated figures) Figure 103 CIP ICT PSP participations, (cumulated figures) Figure 104 CIP ICT PSP EC Funding by type of organisation and instrument, (cumulated figures) Figure 105 CIP ICT PSP participations by organisation type, (cumulated figures) Figure CIP ICT-PSP EC funding per Member State, (cumulated figures) Figure 107 CIP ICT PSP distribution of project coordinators, (cumulated figures) Figure CIP ICT-PSP EC funding per Member State ( per million total ICT sector VA), Figure CIP ICT-PSP EC funding per Member State (as % of ICT GERD), Figure 110 AT, Participation and EC funding, Figure 111 AT, Number of participating organisations and new entries, Figure 112 AT - Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 113 AT Funding by organisation type, (cumulated figures) Figure 114 AT - Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 115 AT - Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 116 Top 50 AT organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) Figure 117 BE, Participation and EC funding, Figure 118 BE, Number of participating organisations and new entries, Figure 119 BE- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 120 BE - Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) xv

16 Figure 121 BE- Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 122 BE- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 123 Top 50 BE organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) Figure 124 BG, Participation and EC funding, Figure 125 BG, Number of participating organisations and new entries, Figure 126 BG - Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 127 BG - Funding by organisation type, (cumulated figures) Figure 128 BG - Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 129 BG - Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 130 BG organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) Figure 131 CY, Participation and EC funding, Figure 132 CY, Number of participating organisations and new entries, Figure 133 CY- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 134 CY Funding by organisation type, (cumulated figures) Figure 135 CY- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 136 Top 30 CY organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) Figure 137 CZ, Participation and EC funding, Figure 138 CZ, Number of participating organisations and new entries, Figure 139 CZ - Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 140 CZ Funding by organisation type, (cumulated figures) Figure 141 CZ - Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 142 CZ - Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 143 Top 50 CZ organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) Figure 144 DK, Participation and EC funding, Figure 145 DK, Number of participating organisations and new entries, Figure 146 DK - Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 147 DK Funding by organisation type, (cumulated figures) Figure 148 DK - Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures). 150 Figure 149 DK - Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 150 Top 50 DK organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) Figure 151 EE, Participation and EC funding, Figure 152 EE, Number of participating organisations and new entries, Figure 153 EE- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 154 EE Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) Figure 155 EE- Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 156 EE - Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 157 EE organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) Figure 158 FI, Participation and EC funding, Figure 159 FI, Number of participating organisations and new entries, Figure 160 FI - Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, xvi

17 Figure 161 FI Funding by organisation type, (cumulated figures) Figure 162 FI - Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 163 FI - Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 164 Top 50 FI organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) Figure 165 FR, Participation and EC funding, Figure 166 FR, Number of participating organisations and new entries, Figure 167 FR- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 168 FR Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) Figure 169 FR- Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 170 FR- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 171 Top 50 FR organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) Figure 172 DE, Participation and EC funding, Figure 173 DE, Number of participating organisations and new entries, Figure 174 DE - Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 175 DE Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) Figure 176 DE - Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 177 DE - Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 178 Top 50 DE organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) Figure 179 EL, Number of participating organisations and new entries, Figure 180 EL Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) Figure 181 EL - Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 182 HU, Participation and EC funding, Figure 183 HU, Number of participating organisations and new entries, Figure 184 HU- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 185 HU Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) Figure 186 HU - Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures). 180 Figure 187 HU- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 188 Top 50 HU organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) Figure 189 IE, Participation and EC funding, Figure 190 IE, Number of participating organisations and new entries, Figure 191 IE - Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 192 IE Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) Figure 193 IE - Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 194 IE - Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 195 Top 50 IE organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) Figure 196 IT, Participation and EC funding, Figure 197 IT, Number of participating organisations and new entries, Figure 198 IT- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 199 IT Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) Figure 200 IT- Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 201 IT- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) xvii

18 Figure 202 Top 50 IT organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) Figure 203 LV& the ICT Theme of FP7, Participation and EC funding, Figure 204 LV& the ICT Theme of FP7, Number of participating organisations and new entries, Figure 205 LV Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) Figure 206 LV- Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 207 LV- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 208 LV organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) Figure 209 LT, Participation and EC funding, Figure 210 LT, Number of participating organisations and new entries, Figure 211 LT- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 212 LT Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) Figure 213 LT- Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 214 LT- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 215 LT organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) Figure 216 LU, Participation and EC funding, Figure 217 LU, Number of participating organisations and new entries, Figure 218 LU- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 219 LU - Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) Figure 220 LU- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 221 LU organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) Figure 222 MT, Participation and EC funding, Figure 223 MT, Number of participating organisations and new entries, Figure 224 MT Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) Figure 225 MT- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 226 MT organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) Figure 227 NL, Participation and EC funding, Figure 228 NL, Number of participating organisations and new entries, Figure 229 NL - Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 230 NL Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) Figure 231 NL- Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 232 NL- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 233 Top 50 NL organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) Figure 234 PL, Participation and EC funding, Figure 235 PL, Number of participating organisations and new entries, Figure 236 PL- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure PL Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) Figure 238 PL - Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 239 PL - Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 240 Top 50 PL organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) Figure 241 PT, Participation and EC funding, Figure 242 PT, Number of participating organisations and new entries, xviii

19 Figure 243 PT- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 244 PT Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) Figure 245 PT- Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 246 PT- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 247 Top 50 PT organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) Figure 248 RO, Participation and EC funding, Figure 249 RO, Number of participating organisations and new entries, Figure 250 RO - Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 251 RO Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) Figure 252 RO- Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 253 RO - Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 254 Top 50 RO organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) Figure 255 SK, Participation and EC funding, Figure 256 SK, Number of participating organisations and new entries, Figure 257 SK- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 258 SK Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) Figure 259 SK- Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 260 SK- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 261 SK organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) Figure 262 SI, Participation and EC funding, Figure 263 SI, Number of participating organisations and new entries, Figure 264 SI- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 265 SI Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) Figure 266 SI- Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 267 SI- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 268 Top 50 SI organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) Figure 269 ES, Participation and EC funding, Figure 270 ES, Number of participating organisations and new entries, Figure 271 ES- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 272 ES Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) Figure 273 ES- Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 274 ES- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 275 Top 50 ES organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) Figure 276 SE, Participation and EC funding, Figure 277 SE, Number of participating organisations and new entries, Figure 278 SE- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 279 SE Funding by organisation type, (cumulated figures) Figure 280 SE- Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 281 SE- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 282 Top 50 SE organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) xix

20 Figure 283 UK, Participation and EC funding, Figure 284 UK, Number of participating organisations and new entries, Figure 285 UK- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 286 UK Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) Figure 287 UK- Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 288 UK- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 289 Top 50 UK organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) xx

21 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY In 2012, the seventh Framework Programme 1 (FP7) ICT and the Competitiveness and Innovation Framework Programme 2 (CIP) ICT Policy Support Programme (PSP) were in their sixth year of implementation; this report covers the first 28 calls under FP7 ICT, the first 7 calls under e-infrastructures activity and the first 7 calls under CIP ICT PSP. The ARTEMIS and ENIAC Joint Undertakings were in their fifth year of implementation and have launched and managed 5 and 7 calls respectively. The Ambient Assisted Living Joint Programme was in its fifth year of implementation and has launched 6 calls 3. The key policy insights emerging from the analysis, based on data available on 1 January 2013 are 4 : In the period , the FP7 ICT research actions under the Cooperation Programme has allocated funding to 1,831 projects for a total Union funding of 6,125,195,635. This resulted in 18,177 participations by 5,553 legal entities from 117 countries; Specific Targeted Research Projects (STREPs) are the prevailing instruments in terms of funding (51% of the total), number of projects (64%) and participations (52%), followed by large scale Integrated Projects (IPs), which account for 41% of funding, 17% of projects and 29% of participations; STREPs are the prevailing instruments for almost all the strategic objectives (SOs), with the exception of International cooperation and Accompanying measures, where coordination (CA) and support actions (SA) prevail. These also represent a significant part of ICT for transport and Future and Emerging Technologies (FET). IPs are strongly present in areas such as Future Networks and Internet, Cognitive systems and robotics and ICT for health, whereas Networks of Excellence tend to concentrate in Future Networks and Internet and Embedded systems; Overall, 5,553 different legal entities have participated to the programme over the period , with an average number of 1,400 organisations taking part every year. Also, every year new organisations participate to the programme, with new entries representing a significant share of total participants, in 2012 they accounted for 41% of total participating organisations; Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) are the main category of participating organisations (35% of the total) and their participation has been increasing since the beginning of FP7, reaching 15% of total funding and 18% of total participations in 2012 (from 14% of funding and 15% of participations in 2007). However, there are large differences across strategic objectives, as SMEs are especially present in Language Technologies, International Cooperation (28% of the total funding allocated to the SOs), ICT for Governance and Policy Modelling (24%), ICT for the enterprise (19%), ICT for Health and for Energy efficiency (18%), while they are marginal in 1 In the current programming period ( ) the total FP7 budget is 53 billion, 9 billion of which are allocated to ICT. 2 The programme has a budget of 728 Million for the period At the time of writing results from call 6 were not yet available for statistical purposes. 4 The figures below are cumulated for the years , unless differently stated. 1

22 FET (3%) and Cognitive Systems and Robotics (7%). Also, geographical differences emerge from the analysis, with SMEs being relatively more present (i.e. in terms of relative funding and participations) in some Member States, such as Bulgaria and Latvia; In terms of legal status of the participating organisations, FP7 is slightly more focused on governmental bodies such as universities and research centres, as compared to FP6. Nearly half of funding (46%) goes to Governmental organisations; private commercial organisations also represent a fairly large percentage (34.5%), although their relative share of funding has decreased from 40% in FP6. Private non-profit organisations on the contrary increased their participation in comparison to FP6 (18.9% from 15.7%), whereas public bodies for profit went down from 3.3% to 0.6%; In absolute terms, Germany is the biggest recipient of EC funding for FP7 ICT, followed by the United Kingdom, Italy, France and Spain. The top 5 recipients above account for 60% of the EC funding and for 58% of participations over the period When compared to the total value added of their ICT sector, Cyprus, Greece, Austria, Belgium and Germany are the EU Member States receiving the highest funding, whereas Italy, France, United Kingdom, Finland and Denmark are below the EU average. When compared to the national expenditure in research and development in the ICT sector (ICT GERD 5 ), the biggest beneficiaries are Cyprus, Slovakia, Latvia, Bulgaria and Lithuania; The patterns of participation are also reflected in the profile of the 50 top-ranking organisations (that account for one third of total allocated budget). They are in the large majority (42) research organisations, while large companies (8) are less present than in FP6 (where 17 out of 50 were large companies). In terms of geographical distribution, 45 out of 50 organisations are based in Member States, 5 in associated countries (Israel, Norway and Switzerland); The e-infrastructures activity allocated more than 496 Million in EC funding to 139 projects and 2,125 participations by 829 different organisations. Public and governmental bodies account for the majority of participations and receive more than half of EU allocated funding, with private companies representing 22% of funding and 13% of participations. Participation from large companies is very low, as they account for 5% of funding and 6% of participations, by converse SMEs tend to obtain higher funding than other institutions and entities, as they represent the same share of participations as large enterprises (6%) but account for 17% of EC funding. Non-profit organisations account for one fifth of funding and 17% of participations. In absolute terms the United Kingdom is the biggest recipient, with almost one fourth of total funding allocated over the period The UK is the biggest recipient also in comparison to the national value added of the ICT sector, followed by Bulgaria, Denmark, Poland and Greece; Since 2008 the ARTEMIS Joint Undertaking has successfully launched and managed 44 projects from its first four Calls, launched negotiations on 8 projects from its fifth Call and initiated preparations for its sixth and final Call. After four Calls, ARTEMIS- JU has 44 running projects representing a total R,D & I investment of 708 million, comprising 228 million, National contributions, 116 million contribution by the EU and 363 million from Industry. Of the 586 unique entities participating in ARTEMIS projects (with many organizations participating in multiple projects), 207 (35%) are 5 ICT GERD, calculated as the sum of ICT BERD and ICT GBAORD. 2

23 large enterprises, 210 (36%) are SMEs and 169 (29%) are public research organisations; At the end of 2012 there were 50 active projects managed by the ENIAC Joint Undertaking, with 1,102 participants from 532 organizations, out of which 217 (41%) are small and medium sized enterprises, 174 (33%) are research institutes and universities, and 141 (26%) are large companies. The total eligible costs in the 50 projects selected for funding approached 1.8 Billion, the national funding reached 396 million and the ENIAC JU contributions amount to 280 million; The first five calls of AAL programme allocated more than 86 million of EU contribution to 131 projects for more than 358 million. The EC contributed a percentage of the costs of the projects that varies from 20.98% for call 2 to 28.66% for call 1; The CIP ICT PSP allocated 466 million to 190 projects resulting in 3,398 participations by 2,314 different organisations. Public bodies represent 33% of funding received and 32% of participations; they also exceed 50% of funding received by Pilot A type of projects. SMEs receive 17% of total funding and account for 16% of participations. In absolute terms, Spain is the main recipient of funding and has overtaken Italy in 2012 in terms of funds received. When compared to the country's ICT sector total value added and ICT GERD, however, Lithuania, Malta, Latvia and Cyprus and Greece receive the highest funding; 3

24 Seventh Framework Programme As of January 2013, the FP7-ICT has funded under the ICT Theme billion to 1,831 projects that involve 5,553 different organisations in 117 countries worldwide, including all the 27 EU Member States. The projects include 18,177 participations with an average project funding of 3.3 Million and an average funding per participation of 337,000. Compared to FP6, the funding allocated by year has slightly increased (+1%) 6, the number of projects funded per year is higher (+8.2%), whereas the number of participations and participating organisations has decreased (-15% and -17% respectively). Compared to FP6, the balance has shifted more towards STREPs type of projects, while IPs tend to attract less funding and fewer participants than in FP6. Consortia tend to involve fewer partners (9.9 instead of 12.7 under FP6) but receive more or less the same amount of funding, so that the average funding per participation shows an increase (+19.5%). Several consortia build on previous experiences of collaboration and tend to reiterate them, as emerged by other studies conducted by the European Commission. Research institutions are the main category of participants to ICT FP7 projects, accounting for 63% of funding and 57% of participations; in some countries they account for more than that, as in Finland (76%), Greece (75%) and the United Kingdom (72%). The participation of SMEs under the ICT Theme of FP7 has been increasing over the years, reaching 15% of total funding and 18% of total participations in Future Networks and Internet and ICT for health together account for 18% of the total funding going to SMEs (ca. 78 Million and 76 Million respectively). SMEs' participation varies across strategic objectives: when looking at the relative presence by SO, in Language technologies and ICT for the enterprise SMEs account for almost one third and roughly one fourth of the total funding, whereas they almost absents in areas such as FET and Cognitive Systems and Robotics. In some countries SMEs play a very important role, as they represent a relatively higher share of total participants and account for a larger share of funding: e.g. they account for almost 66% of total funding in Bulgaria and more than one third in Hungary, Latvia and Slovakia. Large companies in FP7 attract 21% of funding and 22% of participations and are slightly less represented than in FP6, as it is also reflected in the top 50 ranking, out of which only eight are large private companies. The percentage of funding allocated to large companies is relatively higher in Luxembourg (56%), France (30%), Spain (28%), Germany (26%), Estonia (25%) and Italy (24%), countries that are home to world players such as Telefonica or Thales. Moreover, large companies tend to be among the largest recipients in associated and third countries. In terms of geographical coverage, when compared to data for FP6 7, Germany is in absolute terms still the main recipient in 2012 (20.95% of total funding in FP7, 1.5 percentage points more than in FP6). France's percentage of funding has shrunk to 10% from 13.2%, while Italy and the UK are stable at 10% and 11% respectively. ICT Research and Development activity is concentrated in a number of key regions in Europe that attract the most talented researchers, as shown by the regional analysis of FP7 ICT funding and participations at NUTS 3 level. In the period , the top 50 6 The 6th Framework Programme (FP6) funded European Research and Technological Development from 2003 until FP6 allocated over four years 4,041,739,263.6 to 1,128 projects. 7 Data for FP6 comes from the IPPA 2006 report. Bulgaria and Romania were not included in the report. 4

25 Regions in Europe 8 participations 10. attracted 63% of total funding 9, accounting for 60% of the total As for funding, the top 50 Regions are located in 14 Member States, whereas in terms of participations, the top 50 include regions from 17 Member States. In some countries the R&D activity is heavily concentrated in the capital region. Paris and Madrid account for 44% and 40% of funding respectively; the other top beneficiaries (Germany, Italy, the UK) by converse show a more diverse picture, with funding distributed among several important poles of research. The main hubs for ICT research in Europe are Munich, Paris and London 11, followed by Madrid, Athens, Milan and Rome; the regions of Budapest, Ljubljana, Prague and Warsaw are among the top 50 in terms of participations. Moreover, various degrees of specialisation exist in Europe, as shown by the analysis by strategic objective. Germany is the top recipient of funds in all categories but three and the country attracts 32% of funding in ICT for the Enterprise and 29% in ICT for Transport. The United Kingdom is the leading country in the SOs ICT for learning and Digital libraries, with 19% and 18% of total funding respectively, and together with Germany accounts for 15% in ICT for Health. Italy is relatively strong in ICT for ageing (15% of total funding), Cognitive Systems and Robotics (14%), FET and Language Technologies (13%). France has a relatively strong presence in Nanoelectronics (17%), Future Networks and Internet (16%) and International Cooperation (15%), whereas Spanish organisations excel in ICT for inclusion (16%) and ICT for Energy efficiency (14%). Swiss companies are particularly strong in Micro and nanosystems (9%). The Netherlands are relatively stronger in Organic and large area electronics (14%), while Belgium has a relatively strong presence in Nanoelectronics (10%). Greek companies are active mostly in ICT for Governance and Policy Modelling (11%) and ICT for Health (8%). Austria stands out for its share (13%) in ICT for Governance and Policy Modelling. Under the e-infrastructures activity projects financed by DG CONNECT under the Capacities programme more than 496 Million in EC funding has been allocated over the period to 139 projects and 2,125 participations by 829 different organisations. In 2012, DG CONNECT commissioned a three-year study 12 to analyse the patents and publications 13 resulting from the FP7 ICT projects. The analysis of the main outputs of the programme is a key aspect for an evidence-based policy approach towards research and development. In 2014 an ex-post evaluation of the FP7 ICT will be carried out by DG CONNECT to comprehensively examine the outputs, results and impacts of EU funded research in the field of ICT under FP7. 8 NUTS3 level classification. 9 Total funding allocated to NUTS 3 level Regions in Member States: 5.6 billion. 10 Total participations in NUTS 3 level Regions in Member States: 16, In the NUTS3 classification, London is split in five different NUTS 3 regions; the total EU funding of the five is considered here. 12 Analysis of publications and patents of ICT research in FP7, Smart 2011/ The analysis is based on data from the FP7 projects survey carried out by DG CONNECT, cross-checked with the existing patents and publications databases (e.g. PATSTAT and Scopus). The first yearly report (2012) analysed peer-reviewed articles and proceedings papers for the year 2011 and patent data for the years 2009 and

26 CIP ICT PSP The CIP ICT Policy Support Programme has a budget of 728 Million for the period It supports the wider uptake of ICT in Europe including particularly the priorities expressed within the i2010 and Europe2020 initiative. It aims to stimulate innovation and competitiveness and accelerate the development of a sustainable, competitive, innovative and inclusive information society. Under the calls considered in this report, 466 Million have been allocated to 190 different projects. This results in 3,398 participations by 2,314 different organisations. The average amount of funding received is 2.45 Million per project and 137,000 per participation. However, the CIP ICT PSP is a heterogeneous programme that contains projects that are different in terms of size and nature of participants. Pilot A are projects which are mainly addressed at the public administrations of the member states for the deployment of a given ICT platform. Pilot As are large projects ( 8.7 Million in funding on average) mainly targeting ministries and public bodies of the Member States, while pilot B focus on the uptake of innovative ICT based services and products and represent more than 60% of total funding. Finally, Thematic Networks show a smaller size and more open to private sector companies and universities. Pilot B types of projects received the bulk of funding, with 283 Million. Thematic Networks and Best Practice Network received 24.4 and 58.9 Million respectively. Public bodies represent 33% of funding received and 32% of participations; they also exceed 50% of funding received by Pilot A type of projects. SMEs receive 17% of total funding and account for 16% of participations. The Europeana foundation is confirmed as the largest single recipients of funds (as in 2011), and Spain has overtaken Italy in 2012 in terms of absolute funds received. 6

27 2 PART I FP7 STATISTICAL ANALYSIS The Seventh Framework Programme (FP7) is the main funding scheme of the European Union for Research and Development. The budget for the current programming period ( ) is 53 billion, 9 billion of which allocated to ICT. The analysis in the following sections is based on the FP7 ICT database as of 1 January 2013, and considers the projects signed by 31 December Portfolio analysis This section provides an overview of the ICT Theme of FP7 portfolio's composition, drawing comparison with FP6 and among the years In a nutshell FP7 is in its sixth year of implementation and the total funding allocated over the years reached 6,125,195,635; Overall 5,553 different organisations from 117 countries participated to the 1,831 projects funded over the period considered, for a total of 18,177 participations; Under the FP7 ICT projects tend to get smaller than in FP6, but the average amount per participant is increasing. Consortia have fewer partners on average; Compared to FP6, the funding allocated by year has slightly increased (+1%), the number of projects funded per year is higher (+8.2%), whereas the number of participations and participating organisations has decreased (-15% and -17% respectively). The average funding per project has decreased (-6.6%), whereas the average EC funding per participant has increased (+19.5%); Compared to FP6, funding has been strongly rebalanced towards Specific Targeted Research Projects (CP-STREPs), whilst it has been reduced for large scale Integrated Projects (CP-IP) and Networks of Excellence (NoEs). Overall participation, funding and project figures In 2012 the ICT Theme of FP7 was in its sixth and penultimate year of implementation. As a result of the 28 calls launched in the period , 1,831 projects have been funded for a total Union funding of 6,125,195,635, approximately two billion more than the total funding allocated under FP6 ( 4,041,739,264) over four years. The number of projects closed as of 31 December 2012 was Compared to FP6, the funding allocated by year has slightly increased (+1%) 15, the number of projects funded per year is higher (+8.2%), whereas the number of participations and participating organisations has decreased (-15% and -17% respectively). The average funding per project has decreased (-6.6%), whereas the average EC funding per participant has increased (+19.5%) (Table 1). 14 It includes projects classified in the database as 'finished normally' (n=404) and 'terminated with unknown status' (n=378). 15 The 6th Framework Programme (FP6) funded European Research and Technological Development from 2003 until FP6 allocated over four years 4,041,739,263.6 to 1,128 projects. 7

28 Table 1 FP6, FP7 and its evolution Evolution FP6 FP7 FP6 FP7 Evolution (comparison by year) EC Funding 4,041,739,264 6,125,195, % Number of projects 1,128 1, % Participations 14,330 18, % Organisations 4,487 5, % Average project size 3,583,102 3,345, % Average EC funding per participant 282, , % Over the period , 1,021 billion have been allocated on average every year to ICT FP7 projects, with the highest budget allocated in The number of projects funded by year was on average 305, and the number of participations 3,030. Overall, 5,553 different legal entities have participated to the programme over the period , with an average number of 1,400 organisations taking part every year. SMEs represent 35% of the organisations, followed by Research institutes and universities (29%), and by large enterprises (26%). The remaining 11% of organisations are national ministries and non-profit institutions such as foundations. Also, every year new organisations participate to the programme, with new entrants representing a significant share of total participants, in 2012 for instance they accounted for 41% of total participating organisations (Figure 3). Figure 1 EC funding allocated and projects funded under FP7 ICT ( ) 8

29 Figure 2 Number of participations to FP-ICT programmes by year, Figure 3 New participating organisations by year, *New entries are defined as organisations participating for the first time in a given year 9

30 2.1.3 Calls launched As of January 2013, a total number of 28 calls had been launched under FP7 ICT (Table 2). In terms of funding, the largest call was call 1 (launched in 2007), under which billion were allocated, followed by call 4 (launched in 2009), call 8 (2011), call 7 (2011) and call 5 16 (2009). The bulk of funding (approximately 5.6 billion) was received by "General" calls, representing 92% of the total funding for FP7 ICT (Figure 4). Table 2 Calls launched under FP7 ICT CALL DESCRIPTION EC funding Number of projects Number of participations FP ICT-GC 19,447, FP NMP-ENV-ENERGY-ICT-EeB 13,735, FP NMP-ICT-FoF 34,886, FP ICT-FI 88,588, FP ICT-GC 29,742, FP NMP-ENV-ENERGY-ICT-EeB 19,442, FP NMP-ICT-FoF 79,799, FP ICT-GC 29,987, FP NMP-ENV-ENERGY-ICT-EeB 28,994, FP NMP-ICT-FoF 59,872, FP7-ICT ,192,993, ,573 FP7-ICT ,191, ,626 FP7-ICT ,037, FP7-ICT-2007-C 65,851, FP7-ICT ,214, ,442 FP7-ICT ,874, ,113 FP7-ICT ,044, FP7-ICT-2009-C 92,041, FP7-ICT ,269, ,182 FP7-ICT ,556, ,049 FP7-ICT ,376, FP7-ICT-2011-C 54,107, FP7-ICT-2011-EU-Brazil 5,498, FP7-ICT-2011-EU-Russia 2,599, FP7-ICT-2011-FET-F 9,994, FP7-ICT-2011-SME-DCL 34,994, FP7-ICT-ENERGY ,055, FP7-ICT-SEC ,996, Total 6,125,195,635 1,831 18, Call includes some supplementary funding to projects selected in previous calls. Top ups are due to new partners entering the consortia or replacing existing participants. In order to avoid double counting, these 19 entries are not computed as new projects. However, they are new participations. 10

31 Figure 4 FP7 EC funding per call Overall analysis by type of instrument FP7 ICT includes five different types of instrument, classified as follows: Collaborative projects - large scale integrated projects (CP-IP). IP funding is for research projects carried out by consortia with participants from different countries, aiming at developing new knowledge, new technology, products, demonstration activities or common resources for research in a comprehensive programme approach including a coherent and integrated set of activities dealing with multiple issues; Collaborative projects - small or medium scale focused research actions (CP-STREP). They cover research projects carried out by consortia in a sharply focused approach; Collaborative projects - Specific International Cooperation Actions (CP-SICA) 17. Here funding is given to support to research project carried out by consortia in a special form of international co-operation projects / infrastructures; Coordination and Support Actions (CSA) - Support to activities aimed at coordinating or supporting research activities and policies (networking, exchanges, coordination of funded projects; trans-national access to research infrastructures, studies, conferences, etc.); and Networks of Excellence (NoEs) - Support to Joint Programme of Activities implemented by a number of research organisations integrating their activities in a given field, carried out by research teams in the framework of longer term cooperation. 17 CP-SICA and INFRA are mentioned together as they are both "residual" types of instrument in terms of number of participations and funding received. INFRA refers to the FP6 instrument, while SICA refers to FP7 CP instrument. 11

32 CP-STREP and CP-IP are the main instruments in terms of EC funding; together they represented 84% of funding in FP6 and 92% of funding in FP7 ICT. In FP7 there has been a shift in balance towards CP-STREPs, and a corresponding decrease in CP-IPs. With an increase of about 1.7 billion (from billion of allocated funding in FP6 to billion) in FP7, CP-STREPs represent in FP7 the main instrument of funding, accounting for half of the total funding allocated (from 34% in FP6 to 51% in FP7). Funding to CP-IPs has slightly increased from million to million, with a decrease in sharing of total funding from 50% to 41% (Figure 5). Another trend observed is the sharp decline for NoEs, which have seen their budget halved from the previous programme (from 315 million to 164 million) and the increase in funding for CSAs (from 172 million to 310 million). CP-SICA and FP6 INFRA are presented together, although the two instruments differ in nature and objectives and are therefore not comparable. As a result of funding allocation, the distribution of number of projects and participations by instruments is substantially similar to the distribution of EC funding by instrument under FP7 ICT. The number of CP-STREPs projects funded sharply increased from 623 in FP6 to 1,165 in FP7 (representing 64% of the total projects funded); CP-IPs increased from 231 to 318 (17% of total projects), while CSAs increased from 207 to 303 (16.5% of total projects). The NoEs declined from 57 to 39, i.e. representing only 2% of the total projects funded (Figure 6). Also in terms of participations, CP-STREPs significantly increased by about three thirds, with 9,531 as compared to 5,386. The NoEs experienced the sharpest decline (more than 9 percentage points), representing today only 4% of participations. Participations in IP projects have increased from 4,854 to 5,348 (ca. 30% of the total number of participations), whereas CSAs relative weight is substantially unchanged, at ca. 13% of total participations (Figure 6). Figure 5 FP7-EC funding per instrument, (cumulated figures; Millions ) 12

33 Figure 6 FP7 projects and participations by instrument (%), (cumulated figures) 13

34 2.2 Project Data The instruments financed under FP6 and FP7 have complementary functions that contribute to fulfilling the objective of the ICT Theme of FP7. They lead to very different types of projects that vary in terms of number of participants, financial volume, legal status of organisations involved and strategic objectives. This section presents key data on the projects funded, the number of participants and the legal status of participating organisations In a nutshell The following main points emerged from the analysis of project data: The average number of participants per project is 10 (lower than in FP6, 12.7); On average, the EC total funding per project is 3.35 million, compared to 3.58 million in FP6; The total average funding per participation amounts to 337,000 in FP7 (compared to 282,000) under FP6. In terms of average EC funding per organisation, there is a slight increase from 900,000 to more than 1,144,000 in FP7; In terms of funding evolution, there was an increase in funding per participant and participation and a decrease in funding per project, while funding project coordinators remains the same; In terms of legal status of participants: Private commercial organisations are the majority of organisations (61%), followed by governmental organisations (23%) and private non-profit organisations; Governmental organisations receive the largest percentage of funding, followed by Private commercial organisations, Public non-profit organisations and Public organisations for profit; Governmental organisations account for the highest number of participations; Public non-profit organisations show the highest average EC funding per participation; Considering the different Strategic Objectives Networking, FET and ICT for Health attract the highest number of participations and the largest share of funding Average number of participations Compared to FP6, FP7 ICT projects tend to have fewer partners. The average of number of participants per project went down from 12.7 for FP6 projects to 9.9 for FP7. This reduction concerns to a different extent all the types of instrument. The reduction in number of participants is especially remarkable for IPs (from 21 to 16.8), and for NoEs, with an average number of participants down from 34 to 20. Although the number of participants in NoEs decreased, it is relatively higher compared to the other types of instruments, due to the nature and aim of this instrument, i.e. networking (Figure 7). 14

35 Figure 7 FP average number of participations per project type 18, (cumulated figures) Funding to projects The average funding per project in FP7 is lower than the funding received under FP6 (-6.6%) and is around 3.35 million. The average EC funding for NoEs projects decreased by almost one fourth from 5.52 million in FP6 to 4.2 million in FP7 (-24%), whereas the average EC funding for IPs went down from 8.76 million in FP6 to 7.87 million (-10.2%). STREP increased in terms of average funding by 21%, with an average EC funding at 2.69 million in FP7 ( 2.22 million in FP6). The average size of CSA shows a steady increase, from 0.83 million in FP6 to 1.02 million in FP7 (+23%). Figure 8 FP average EC funding per project (cumulated figures) 18 CP-SICA/INFRA instrument is not shown due to the negligible influence. 15

36 2.2.4 Funding to partners EC funding per participation increased substantially under FP7 ICT, from an average 282,000 in FP6 to 337,000 for the current programme (+19.47%), with all instruments showing an increased average funding per participation. IP is the instrument with the largest participation in size ( 468,000), followed by STREPs ( 329,000) and NoEs ( 209,000). CSAs average funding is 127,000, the sharpest increase from FP6 (+38%). In terms of average funding per organisation, under some instruments it remained stable (IPs: +1.15%) or decreased (NoE: -6.41%), whereas it doubled or had a three-fold increase under others (STREPs: %; CSA: +72.8%) (Figure 9). Figure 9 FP average EC funding per organisation (cumulated figures) Funding evolution The reduction in the number of participations per project (Figure 7) is accompanied by an increase in average funding per organisation (from 900,000 in FP6 to 1,144,000 in FP7), whereas the average funding per project in FP7 ( million) is below the average funding per project in FP6 ( 3.58 million). In terms of funding received by project coordinators, the total funding for FP7 ICT is slightly below the figure for FP6 ( 698,000 and 708,000 respectively). 16

37 Figure 10 Funding evolution, FP6 and FP7 (Millions, cumulated figures) Type of organisations FP7 ICT attracts different categories of organisations. The PPM database allows distinction in the following categories: High Education Institutions and Research Centres (HES/REC); Large Companies (LARGE); Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs 19 ); Other organisations (NIL 20 ). HES/REC organisations are 29% of the total, but they represent by far the most significant category of recipients in terms of funding (63%). SMEs represent 35% of participating organisations and account for 14% of funding; large companies are the 29% of participating organisations and represent 20.5% of funding; the remaining 11% are other organisations, accounting for 2.5% of funding. The same trend as for funding can be observed for participations, with research centres and high education institutions accounting for more than half of the participations (57.4%), followed by large companies (21.5%), SMEs (16.1%) and other organisations (5%). Project coordinators also belong to research centres or higher education institutions in the large majority of projects (68%), and to large companies in 21% of projects. Project coordinators from SMEs account for 9% of coordinators (compared to 16% of participations). 19 A thorough analysis of the SMEs trends for FP7 ICT is carried out in section This category is mainly composed of national ministries and non-profit institutions such as foundations. 17

38 Figure 11 Funding by category of organisations, Millions and %, (cumulated figures) Figure 12 Participations by category of organisations, (cumulated figures) 18

39 2.2.7 Legal status Organisations taking part in the FP7 ICT are classified by legal status in the following categories: GOV (Governmental organisation); PNP (Private non-profit organisation); PRC (Private Commercial organisation); PUC (Public bodies that are for profit). Nearly half of funding (46%) allocated under FP7 ICT goes to Governmental organisations, (23% of the total participating organisations); private commercial organisations, the majority (61%) in number of organisations, also represent a fairly large percentage (34.5%), although their relative share of funding has decreased from 40% in FP6. Private non-profit organisations (14% of the total organisations) on the contrary increased their participation in comparison to FP6 (18.9% from 15.7%), whereas public bodies for profit (1% of organisations) went down from 3.3% to 0.6%. In terms of participations, however, the relative share of participants has only slightly changed in comparison with FP6, except for Public bodies for profit, which under the current FP account for 0.9% of total participations only (from 3.3% in FP6). Governmental organisations account for 44.5% of the total (43.6% in FP6), private commercial organisations represent 38% (unchanged from FP6), whereas private non-profit organisations represent 16.7% of total, increased from 15% in FP6. On average, governmental organisations tend to be involved in a higher number of projects (6), followed by private non-profit organisations (4), public bodies for profit (2.5) and private commercial organisations, which on average participate to 2 projects (Table 3). Private non-profit organisations receive on average more funding per participation ( 381,585) followed by governmental organisations with 348,318 and by private commercial organisations ( 307,119), while public bodies for profit are the organisations receiving less EC funding per participation on average ( 209,257). Table 3 Funding, participations and organisations by legal status, (cumulated figures) Legal status of participating organisation Total funding (Million ) Participations Organisations Average number of participations/ organisation Governmental organisation 2,816 8,084 1,292 6 (GOV) Private non-profit 1,158 3, organisation (PNP) Private Commercial 2,116 6,889 3,417 2 organisation (PRC) Public bodies that are for profit (PUC) Total 6,125 18,177 5,553 The overall picture that emerges from the considerations above is that FP7 is in line with FP6 patterns of financing, although FP7 is slightly more focused on governmental bodies such as universities and research centres, as compared to FP6, as reflected by the small decrease in 19

40 funding received by private companies. This is also confirmed by the analysis of the top 50 participants carried out in section Top 50 Participants In a nutshell The top 50 organisations (by EC funding) represent almost 30% of the total EC funding allocated; 84% of top 50 funding is allocated to universities, research centres and other public or governmental bodies; 16% of the total EC funding allocated to the top 50 organisations goes to private companies; Only 8 private companies are found in the top 50 recipients; The top recipient alone represents 3% of total funding and is present in 20% of projects Participations This section focuses on the main participants to FP7-ICT projects. Overall, the top 50 organisations represent almost 30% of the budget allocated (Table 4). The Fraunhoefer Institute is the largest single recipient (as in 2009, 2010 and 2011 reports), with 331 participations, amounting to approximately 189 million of funding, i.e. 3% of the total EC funding allocated. The German institute is present - either as coordinator or partner in more than 300 projects, which represent 20% of the total number of projects funded by FP7-ICT. Other large recipients include research centres of countries like France (Commissariat à l' énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique), Belgium (Interuniversitair Micro-electronica centrum VZW), Finland and Italy, but also several technical universities (Lausanne, London, Munich or Zurich). Universities and research centres account for the large majority of funding, with 84% of the 1.8 billion EC funding received in total by the top-50 recipients. On average, an organisation of the top 50 ranking has participated to 74 projects and has received ca. 34 million of EC funding. Eight large private companies are present in the ranking, with a total EC funding received over the period of about 282 million, representing 4.6% of total EC funding (15% of the total funding received by the top-50 organisations). The figures show a decrease in participations from private companies (and their relative importance among the main recipients) over the years, a trend even more important when compared to data related to the FP6, where 17 out of 50 organisations were private large companies. The first private company in the top-50 ranked organisations (3 rd in the ranking) comes also from Germany (SAP AG), with a total of 81 participations and a total EC funding equal to 75.1 million. Other large corporations are from Spain, France, Netherlands, Italy and Israel. In terms of geographical distribution, 45 out of 50 organisations are based in the EC15; the remaining five are based in associated countries (Israel, Norway and Switzerland). None of the 50 top-ranking organisations is based in a new Member State. Germany has 10 organisations in the ranking, followed by the UK with 6, France and the Netherlands with 5 each, Italy and Spain with 4, Greece and Belgium with 3. Furthermore, several of the organisations included above are located in specific geographic areas such as the Parisian 20

41 basin, South East England or Bayern, indicating a clear geographic concentration, across and within Member States. Table 4 Top 50 participants to FP7-ICT calls, (cumulated figures) ORGANISATION Participation Funding % Organisati Legal Countr s (Million ) funding on type status y FRAUNHOFER-GESELLSCHAFT ZUR FOERDERUNG DER ANGEWANDTEN FORSCHUNG 331 E.V % HES/REC PNP DE COMMISSARIAT A L ENERGIE ATOMIQUE ET AUX ENERGIES ALTERNATIVES % HES/REC GOV FR SAP AG % LARGE PRC DE INTERUNIVERSITAIR MICRO-ELECTRONICA CENTRUM VZW % HES/REC PNP BE TEKNOLOGIAN TUTKIMUSKESKUS VTT % HES/REC GOV FI TELEFONICA INVESTIGACION Y DESARROLLO SA % LARGE PRC ES CENTRE NATIONAL DE LA RECHERCHE SCIENTIFIQUE % HES/REC GOV FR EIDGENOESSISCHE TECHNISCHE HOCHSCHULE ZURICH % HES/REC GOV CH ECOLE POLYTECHNIQUE FEDERALE DE LAUSANNE % HES/REC GOV CH CONSIGLIO NAZIONALE DELLE RICERCHE % HES/REC GOV IT STIFTELSEN SINTEF % HES/REC PNP NO INSTITUT NATIONAL DE RECHERCHE EN INFORMATIQUE ET EN AUTOMATIQUE % HES/REC GOV FR NEDERLANDSE ORGANISATIE VOOR TOEGEPAST NATUURWETENSCHAPPELIJK 62 ONDERZOEK 39 - TNO0.63% HES/REC GOV NL CENTRE FOR RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY HELLAS % HES/REC PNP GR KATHOLIEKE UNIVERSITEIT LEUVEN % HES/REC GOV BE UNIVERSITY OF SURREY % HES/REC GOV UK UNIVERSITY COLLEGE LONDON % HES/REC GOV UK KUNGLIGA TEKNISKA HOEGSKOLAN % HES/REC GOV SE INSTITUTE OF COMMUNICATION AND COMPUTER SYSTEMS % HES/REC GOV GR IMPERIAL COLLEGE OF SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND MEDICINE % HES/REC GOV UK TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITEIT DELFT % HES/REC GOV NL THALES COMMUNICATIONS & SECURITY SAS % LARGE PRC FR UNIVERSITEIT TWENTE % HES/REC GOV NL UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHAMPTON % HES/REC GOV UK ATOS SPAIN SA % LARGE PRC ES THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH % HES/REC GOV UK PHILIPS ELECTRONICS NEDERLAND B.V % LARGE PRC NL IBM ISRAEL - SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY LTD % LARGE PRC IL TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITEIT EINDHOVEN % HES/REC GOV NL TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITAET DRESDEN % HES/REC GOV DE DEUTSCHES ZENTRUM FUER LUFT - UND RAUMFAHRT EV % HES/REC PNP DE CHALMERS TEKNISKA HOEGSKOLA AB % HES/REC PNP SE POLITECNICO DI MILANO % HES/REC GOV IT UNIVERSIDAD POLITECNICA DE MADRID % HES/REC GOV ES DEUTSCHES FORSCHUNGSZENTRUM FUER KUENSTLICHE INTELLIGENZ GMBH % HES/REC PNP DE UNIVERSITAET STUTTGART % HES/REC GOV DE TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITAT BERLIN % HES/REC GOV DE FOUNDATION FOR RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY HELLAS % HES/REC PNP GR Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie % HES/REC GOV DE RHEINISCH-WESTFAELISCHE TECHNISCHE HOCHSCHULE AACHEN % HES/REC GOV DE CSEM CENTRE SUISSE D'ELECTRONIQUE ET DE MICROTECHNIQUE SA - RECHERCHE 35 ET DEVELOPPEMENT % HES/REC PNP CH STMICROELECTRONICS SRL % LARGE PRC IT TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITAET WIEN % HES/REC GOV AT UNIVERSITAT POLITECNICA DE CATALUNYA % HES/REC GOV ES FRANCE TELECOM SA % LARGE PRC FR THE UNIVERSITY OF SHEFFIELD % HES/REC GOV UK TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITAET GRAZ % HES/REC GOV AT SCUOLA SUPERIORE DI STUDI UNIVERSITARI E DI PERFEZIONAMENTO SANT'ANNA % HES/REC GOV IT TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITAET MUENCHEN % HES/REC GOV DE IMINDS VZW % HES/REC PNP BE Total top 50 3,740 1,778,619,181 29% Total 18,177 6,125,195,635 21

42 2.4 Country analysis The following section presents an overview of countries' involvement in the ICT Theme of FP7. The analysis distinguishes between Member States, associated countries 21, accession countries 22 and third countries. For each Member State, an additional country fiche is presented in Annex In a nutshell In absolute terms, Germany, the United Kingdom, France, Italy and Spain are the top 5 recipient countries, accounting for more than 60% of the EC funding and for 58% of participations; The number of participations and the percentage of funding allocated to associated countries has increased from FP6 to FP7 by one percentage point, representing 7.2% of the total; Accessing and third countries' participation is negligible, with a share of total funding below 1% (0.5% and 0.7% respectively) Country analysis Member States attract the bulk of EC funding and participations: with more than 16,000 participations (about 90% of the total number of participations) and funding of more than 5.6 billion, almost 92% of the total (in line with 2011 figure), although with relevant differences among Member States (this aspect is further discussed in the next section). Table 5 Participations and EC funding by country group (cumulated figures ) Country Group Participations % EC funding % EU Member States 16, % 5,610,769, % Associated countries 1, % 443,084, % Accession countries % 30,286, % Third countries % 41,054, % 18, % 6,125,195, % Associated countries represent 6.2% of participations and 7.2% of funding, mainly due to the presence of research-oriented players such as Switzerland, Norway and Israel; this finding is in line with previous years' results. Associated countries are particularly present in strategic objectives such as FET, where they account for 12% of total EC funding allocated for this SO, Trustworthy ICT (10%) and Micro/nanosystems (10%). Organisations from associated countries also act as coordinators in 98 projects. Accession countries (Western Balkans and 21 Under associated countries we include EEA and EFTA countries (Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland) together with Far Oer Islands and Israel. Iceland is also included in this group. These are countries that are contributing financially to the FP7. Accession countries have also signed a MoU and are at any effect associated to the FP7 programme. However, for analytical reasons they are dealt with separately in this chapter. 22 Accession countries include candidate countries (Croatia, FYR Macedonia, Montenegro and Turkey) and potential candidate countries (Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo under UNSCR 1244/99 and Serbia). 22

43 Turkey) receive a marginal part of funding (slightly below 1%) and 164 participations, with 9 projects coordinated in total. Finally, third countries represent 3% of participations, but only 0.7% of EC funding. This is due to the fact that participations from third countries are often linked to support and coordinated actions, where organisations are part of large consortia with budget divided among several organisations. The presence of third countries is particularly relevant in the strategic objective "International cooperation" where they represent 48% of participations and 26% of EC funding (compared to 25% in 2011 and 30% in 2010). Figure 13 FP7 ICT EC participations by country group and year, Figure 14 FP7 ICT EC funding by country group and strategic objective (cumulated figures ) 23

44 2.4.3 Member States In absolute terms, over the period German organisations dominate funding and participations, being the recipient of 21% of the total funding, with more than 3,000 participations. Germany is followed by the United Kingdom, France, Italy and Spain; the above Member States account for about 60% of total funding allocated over the period. Table 6 FP7 ICT EC funding and participations per Member State (cumulated figures ) Country EC Funding Percentage Participations Percentage Member States 5,610,769, % 16, % GERMANY 1,283,042, % 3, % UNITED KINGDOM 710,564, % 1, % FRANCE 615,322, % 1, % ITALY 612,931, % 2, % SPAIN 479,913, % 1, % NETHERLANDS 335,851, % % BELGIUM 262,109, % % GREECE 259,699, % % AUSTRIA 216,155, % % SWEDEN 207,631, % % FINLAND 134,888, % % IRELAND 98,740, % % PORTUGAL 85,991, % % DENMARK 79,875, % % POLAND 48,159, % % HUNGARY 33,012, % % SLOVENIA 31,213, % % CZECH REPUBLIC 30,549, % % ROMANIA 18,977, % % CYPRUS 18,140, % % LUXEMBOURG 11,795, % % BULGARIA 11,163, % % SLOVAKIA 9,754, % % ESTONIA 7,745, % % LITHUANIA 2,947, % % LATVIA 2,708, % % MALTA 1,884, % % When compared to the total value added of their ICT sector (2009 data; EC funding/million total ICT total ICT sector value added), Cyprus, Greece, Austria, Belgium and Germany are the EU Member States Member States receiving the highest funding, whereas Italy, France, United Kingdom, Finland and Finland and Denmark are below the EU average (Figure 15). When compared to the national expenditure in ICT research and development (ICT GERD 23, Figure 16), Cyprus is the main beneficiary, followed by Slovakia, Latvia, Bulgaria and Lithuania, whereas countries with high expenditure in ICT, such as Sweden, Denmark, Ireland and Finland have a lower ratio, suggesting that these countries rely relatively little on this source of funding. 23 ICT GERD, calculated as the sum of ICT BERD and ICT GBAORD. 24

45 Figure 15 FP7 ICT - Total EC funding by Member State ( per million ICT sector VA), 2009 Source: EUROSTAT, IPTS Figure 16 FP7 ICT - Total EC funding by Member State ( per million ICT GERD), 2009 Source: EUROSTAT, IPTS 25

46 In terms of average size of participations, the average EC funding received ranges from ca. 130,000 for Malta, Lithuania and several accession countries to more than 400,000 in Germany, Israel and Norway. The average EC funding per participation amounts to 385,000 for the UK, higher than France ( 315,000) and Italy (ca. 290,000). Germany leads the highest number of projects (11% of the projects it participates to), followed by Italy (12%) and Spain (15%). Some countries tend to express a lower number of participations, but are more likely to take a leading role. When comparing the ratio of projects coordinated against the number of projects participated, Greek, Belgian and Austrian organisations result also very active as project coordinators. The highest ratios are found for Latvia and Luxembourg (23% and 16%). Some countries such as Bulgaria and Lithuania do not have any project coordinator. Figure 17 FP7 ICT project coordination per Member State, (cumulated figures) Associated and accession countries Associated countries account for slightly above 7% of EC funding and generated 1,126 participations, roughly 6% of the total (Table 7). Associated countries are generally advanced countries with heavy investment in R&D. Switzerland is the ninth largest recipient in terms of funding and three Swiss organisation can be found in the Top 50 ranking presented above. This ranking also includes one Israeli and one Norwegian organisation. Swiss organisations coordinate 53 projects, followed by Norwegian and Israeli ones with 24 and 20 project coordinators respectively. These figures show an upward trend compared to FP6, where only 5.7% of funding was directed towards associated countries (source: IPPA 2006). 26

47 Table 7 - FP7 ICT EC funding and participations per Associated Country Country EC Funding Percentage Participations Percentage Associated countries 443,084, % 1, % ICELAND 2,109, % % ISRAEL 106,380, % % LIECHTENSTEIN % 1 0.0% NORWAY 83,138, % % SWITZERLAND 251,456, % % Accession countries are on the contrary rather marginal under FP7 ICT, a trend also identified under the previous programming period. These countries do not manage to take part extensively in the programme and represent less than 0.5% of funding and participations (Table 8). Turkey accounts for more than half of the funding (52%) and represents 42% of the accessing countries' participations. Turkish organisations also coordinate 6 projects. Table 8 FP7 ICT EC funding and participation per Accession Country Country EC Funding Percentage Participations Percentage Accessing Countries 30,286, % % ALBANIA 64, % 2 0.0% BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA 216, % 6 0.0% CROATIA 4,544, % % FORMER YUGOSLAV REPUBLIC OF MACEDONIA 1,128, % 8 0.0% MONTENEGRO 185, % 5 0.0% SERBIA 8,168, % % TURKEY 15,979, % % Third countries Third countries represent around 3% of the participations (550) and account for 0.6% of total EC funding, i.e. around 41 million. In absolute terms, the main flow of funding is directed towards strategic partners such as the United States and emerging economies such as Russia, China, Brazil and India. In terms of thematic areas, third countries represent 26% of the budget allocated to the strategic objective "International cooperation", with an amount of almost 10.4 million. This strategic objective also accounts for 202 of the 505 third countries' participations. 27

48 Table 9 FP7 ICT participation and EC funding to Top 20 third countries Country EC Funding Percentage Participations Percentage Third countries 41,054, % % RUSSIA 6,991, % % UNITED STATES 6,842, % % CHINA 3,798, % % BRAZIL 3,256, % % INDIA 2,262, % % AUSTRALIA 1,470, % % SOUTH AFRICA 1,434, % % JAPAN 1,138, % % NEW ZEALAND 1,008, % 9 0.0% ARGENTINA 745, % % MOROCCO 709, % 6 0.0% COLOMBIA 704, % % BELARUS 682, % % CANADA 634, % % HONG KONG 624, % 2 0.0% CHILE 581, % % MEXICO 523, % 9 0.0% EGYPT 458, % % GIBRALTAR 450, % 1 0.0% INDONESIA 446, % 4 0.0% 28

49 2.5 Regional analysis Research and Development activity in Europe is concentrated in a number of key regions that attract the most talented researchers; ICT is not an exception to this trend. In the period , the top 50 Regions in Europe (NUTS3 level classification) attracted 63% of total funding 24, accounting for 60% of the total participations 25 (Table 10). As for funding, the top 50 Regions are located in 14 Member States, whereas in terms of participations, the top 50 include regions from 17 Member States. In some countries the R&D activity is heavily concentrated in the capital region, and out of the 1,766 Regions in Europe (NUTS3 level classification), only 661 (37%) have been beneficiaries of FP7 ICT funding over the period Helsinki attracted 78% of the overall EC funding allocated to Finland over the period , whereas Lisbon and the Attiki-Athens region account respectively for 59% and 58% of the total EC funding received by Portugal and Greece. Paris and Madrid account for 44% and 40% of funding respectively; the other top beneficiaries (Germany, Italy and the UK) by converse show a more diverse picture, with funding distributed among several important poles of research, with ten German, seven Italian and six English cities listed in the top 50 regions. In terms of overall EC funding received over the period , Munich is the European city that leads, followed by Paris, London 26 and Madrid. Munich has several companies located in its urban area such as Siemens and BMW, and it is also the seat of the Munich Technical University and various departments of the Fraunhoefer Institute. The regions of Budapest, Ljubljana, Prague and Warsaw are in the top 50 in terms of participations (Cyprus, Sofia and Bucharest are part of the top 100). 24 Total funding allocated to NUTS 3 level Regions in Member States: 5.6 billion. 25 Total participations in NUTS 3 level Regions in Member States: 16, In the NUTS3 classification, London is split in five different 5 NUTS 3 regions; the total EU funding of the five is considered here. 29

50 Table 10 FP7 ICT Top 50 European regions by participations and funding # NUTS 3 COUNTRY TOTAL CUMULATED FUNDING (Million ) NUTS 3 1 MÜNCHEN, KREISFREIE STADT DE 297 PARIS FR PARIS FR 266 MÜNCHEN, KREISFREIE STADT DE 611 COUNTRY TOTAL CUMULATED PARTICIPATIONS MADRID ES 190 MADRID ES Attiki GR 151 Attiki GR BARCELONA ES 127 ROMA IT ROMA IT 125 MILANO IT INNER LONDON - WEST UK 124 BARCELONA ES MILANO IT 122 INNER LONDON - WEST UK ARR. LEUVEN BE 108 HELSINKI - UUSIMAA FI HELSINKI - UUSIMAA FI 105 WIEN AT HAUTS-DE-SEINE FR 93 HAUTS-DE-SEINE FR WIEN AT 86 ARR. LEUVEN BE STOCKHOLMS LÄN SE 85 STOCKHOLMS LÄN SE RHEIN-NECKAR-KREIS DE 78 ARR. DE BRUXELLES-CAPITALE BE 214 / ARR. VAN BRUSSEL- HOOFDSTAD 15 ZUIDOOST-NOORD-BRABANT NL 77 BERLIN DE DELFT EN WESTLAND NL 74 YVELINES FR BERLIN DE 69 ZUIDOOST-NOORD-BRABANT NL YVELINES FR 66 TORINO IT GROOT-AMSTERDAM NL 59 GROOT-AMSTERDAM NL STUTTGART, STADTKREIS DE 59 GRANDE LISBOA PT TORINO IT 58 VÄSTRA GÖTALANDS LÄN SE GRAZ AT 58 DELFT EN WESTLAND NL VÄSTRA GÖTALANDS LÄN SE 58 BUDAPEST HU ARR. DE BRUXELLES-CAPITALE BE 57 KARLSRUHE, STADTKREIS DE 135 / ARR. VAN BRUSSEL- HOOFDSTAD 25 GRANDE LISBOA PT 51 Städteregion Aachen DE KARLSRUHE, STADTKREIS DE 49 STUTTGART, STADTKREIS DE THESSALONIKI GR 49 GRAZ AT Städteregion Aachen DE 48 TRENTO IT TWENTE NL 44 DUBLIN IE TRENTO IT 43 ALPES-MARITIMES FR PISA IT 43 PISA IT SURREY UK 42 ISÈRE FR EDINBURGH, CITY OF UK 41 MIASTO WARSZAWA PL DRESDEN, KREISFREIE STADT DE 40 THESSALONIKI GR GENOVA IT 39 VALENCIA / VALÈNCIA ES DUBLIN IE 38 GENOVA IT ARR. GENT BE 37 GUIPÚZCOA ES KÖLN, KREISFREIE STADT DE 35 BOLOGNA IT VALENCIA / VALÈNCIA ES 34 OSREDNJESLOVENSKA SI GUIPÚZCOA ES 33 TWENTE NL ALPES-MARITIMES FR 32 ESSONNE FR INNER LONDON - EAST UK 31 Cambridgeshire CC UK BREMEN, KREISFREIE STADT DE 31 DRESDEN, KREISFREIE STADT DE Cambridgeshire CC UK 31 ARR. GENT BE SOUTHAMPTON UK 30 RHEIN-NECKAR-KREIS DE BUDAPEST HU 29 HLAVNI MESTO PRAHA CZ KAISERSLAUTERN, KREISFREIE DE 29 SURREY UK 86 STADT 48 OXFORDSHIRE UK 28 INNER LONDON - EAST UK BOLOGNA IT 28 EDINBURGH, CITY OF UK OUTER LONDON - WEST AND UK 28 KÖLN, KREISFREIE STADT DE 76 NORTH WEST Total Top 50 NUTS3 Regions 3,557 Total Top 50 NUTS3 Regions 9,778 % of total NUTS3 Regions (MS) 63% % of total NUTS3 Regions (MS) 60% 2.6 Small and Medium Enterprises 30

51 2.6.1 In a nutshell SMEs represent 16% of the total participations in FP7-ICT and 14% of the total funding, in line with the objectives of the programme; Compared to FP6, both the total funding and the number of participations increased, with an increase from 11-12%% to 14%, and from 15% to 16% respectively; SMEs tend to take more part in STREPs and less in IPs and NoEs than in FP6; The main strategic objectives for SMEs' participations are ICT for health and Future networks and internet; Bulgaria has the highest rate of funding received by SMEs (66% of the total funding received by the country) and the highest percentage of participations represented by SMEs (49%) SMEs participation and funding Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) represent one of the main categories of participants in ICT Theme of FP7 (35% of participating organisations are SMEs). The definition of SMEs used in this report is limited to private companies that meet the SME criteria (narrow definition), therefore public-owned SMEs (e.g. small research centres) are not included. However, in order to compare both with FP6 and with other themes of FP7 27, a broader definition is also considered. Applying the 'narrow definition', over the period , SMEs accounted in FP7 for 16% of total participations (2,935 in total) and 14% of total EC funding ( 850 million in total). In comparison with FP6, a slight upward trend is observed, as in the previous programme SMEs accounted for 15% of participations and 12% of funding (Figure 18). The increasing SMEs' participation is shown by the analysis on a yearly basis ( ) of their incidence over the total EC funding and participations (Error! Reference source not found.). 27 As for the IST component of FP6, both a narrow and a broad component were used to assess the presence of SMEs. As for the narrow definition, the ISTpact project (Study into the impact of FP6 IST July 2012 IPs, STREP, NoE), reported SME Participation at 15.66% and the total funding at 12.03%, whereas in the Stream Report 2011 the SME Participation was 14.8% and the total funding at 11.3%. As for the broad definition, the IPPA 2006 indicated SME Participation at 20.6% and total funding at 16.2%, whereas the Stream 2011 indicated SME Participation at 19.4% and total funding at 15.2%. A broader definition relying on self-declared SMEs is adopted by DG RTD in its monitoring report on the Seventh Framework Programme. In this report small research centres and foundations are counted as SMEs. 31

52 Figure 18 SMEs' participation and funding narrow definition, (cumulated figures) Figure 19 SMEs' participation and funding to FP ICT projects narrow definition, share (%) over total funding and participation, by year ( ) Applying the 'broader definition', data show that the share of funding has remained stable at 15%, whereas the participation rate has slightly decreased compared to FP6, from 19% to 17.5% ( 32

53 Figure 20). This might be due to an additional check that is carried out by DG CONNECT under FP7 to verify the genuine nature of SMEs declaration. The message is that FP7 is more attracting to private SMEs with respect to FP6, even if the total figures for self-declared SMEs are declining. Another effect of the additional check is that the difference between the two classifications in FP7 is much smaller than in FP6. 33

54 Figure 20 SMEs' participation and funding broad definition, (cumulated figures) SMEs by instruments 28 In terms of funding, STREPs and IPs are the main instruments of SMEs' participation (accounting together for 94% of the total), followed by SA (4%) and CA (1.4% 29 ), NoEs (0.5%) and SICA with 0.1%. These shares are in line with those of FP6 ( Figure 21), although there has been from the previous programme a reallocation of funding from IPs to STREPs (from 47% to 39% and from 46% to 55%). The relative shares among different instruments correspond in large part to the trends in participation, with the exception of CA and SA, which account respectively for 3.3% and 8.3% of participations, even though they absorb a relatively smaller share of funding. Figure 21 FP6 and FP7 SMEs funding by instruments (for FP7 cumulated figures ) 28 This section and the following present statistics based on the narrow definition of SMEs as described above and including FET. 29 CA and SA are reported together in the chart, for the purpose of comparison with FP6 figures. 34

55 Figure 22 -FP6 and FP7 participations by instruments (for FP7 cumulated figures ) SMEs presence by Strategic Objectives SMEs funding varies greatly across Strategic Objectives (SOs). SMEs are present notably in SOs such as Future Networks and Internet (9.2%), ICT for Health (9%), Software, Services and the Internet (6%), Photonics (6%), ICT for Energy Efficiency (5.7%), Embedded System (5.5%), ICT for enterprise (5.4%) and Intelligent Information Management (5.3%). These eight SOs represent 52.4% of the total funding, lower than 54.2% and 55.4% in StReAM 2011 and 2010 respectively, suggesting that SMEs are increasing their participation in more and different strategic objectives. Strategic objectives are different in each framework programme; therefore it is not possible to capture the evolution of SMEs funding. However, the cross-programme analysis reveals that while in FP5 and in FP6 the strategic objectives that had the largest number of SME participation were application-related, SME participations are still high in advanced application fields (ICT for Health, ICT for Transport, etc.) but also in highly innovative technology fields (embedded system, photonics, micro/nanosystem, etc.). 35

56 Figure 23 FP7 ICT Distribution of SMEs funding by strategic objective (% of total funding allocated to SMEs, cumulated figures ) The incidence of SMEs on the total funding received and on the total number of participations varies according to the strategic objectives considered (Table 11). Overall, the incidence in terms of participations is higher than the incidence in budgetary terms (with some exceptions), suggesting that on average SMEs obtain less funding than other types of organisations. SMEs are especially present in international cooperation, where they represent 28% of the funding and 16% of participations, whereas they are particularly weak in FET (3% of funding, 21% of participations) and in Cognitive systems and robotics (7% of funding, 23% of participations). 36

57 Table 11 - FP7 ICT Incidence of SMEs by strategic objective (as % of total funding and participations, cumulated figures ) Funding Participation 01 Future Networks and Internet 10% 11% 02 Software, Services and internet connected objects 16% 10% 03 Trustworthy ICT 13% 19% 04 Networked Media 16% 16% 05 Cognitive Systems and Robotics 7% 23% 06 Nanoelectronics 13% 21% 07 Micro/nanosystems 18% 22% 08 Embedded Systems 16% 17% 09 Photonics 17% 23% 10 Organic and large area Electronics 15% 20% 11 Language Technologies 28% 24% 12 Intelligent Information Management 19% 22% 13 ICT for Health 18% 16% 14 ICT and Ageing 13% 16% 15 ICT for Inclusion 18% 16% 16 ICT for Governance and Policy Modelling 24% 18% 17 ICT for Energy Efficiency 18% 18% 18 ICT for Transport 15% 13% 19 ICT for the Enterprise 19% 34% 20 ICT for Learning 14% 20% 21 Digital Libraries 13% 4% 22 FET 3% 21% 23 International Cooperation 28% 16% 24 Accompanying Measures 15% 16% SMEs presence by country In absolute terms, the Member States with higher allocation of funding and higher participation by SMEs are Germany, the UK, France, Italy and Spain (Figure 24). Hungary, Poland and Slovenia are among the top 20 countries for SMEs' funding and participation, and in addition to them Bulgaria also ranks among the top as for SMEs' participation (Figure 24 and Figure 25). 37

58 Figure 24 FP7 ICT Top 20 countries by funding to SMEs (cumulated figures, ) Figure 25 FP7 ICT Top 20 countries by SMEs' participations (cumulated figures, ) In terms of incidence of SMEs on the countries' participations and funding, Bulgaria is the country among the Member States with largest participation of SMEs (49%), followed by Malta (43%), Slovakia (32%), and Hungary (27%). Luxembourg is the country with the lowest number of participations by SMEs (5%) followed by Belgium (13%). In terms of funding, again Bulgaria is the country with the highest share of funding allocated to SMEs (66%), followed by Latvia (43%), Hungary (34%), Slovakia (33%), and Malta (27%). Luxembourg is also the Member State that shows the lowest percentage of funding allocated to SMEs (4%), followed by Finland (10%) and Sweden (11%) (Table 12). 38

59 Table 12 - FP7 ICT Incidence of SMEs by Member State (as % of total funding and participations, cumulated figures ) Funding Participations AUSTRIA 16% 20% BELGIUM 11% 13% BULGARIA 66% 49% CYPRUS 24% 24% CZECH REPUBLIC 24% 18% DENMARK 15% 18% ESTONIA 17% 24% FINLAND 10% 15% FRANCE 16% 16% GERMANY 12% 15% GREECE 16% 19% HUNGARY 34% 27% IRELAND 13% 16% ITALY 12% 15% LATVIA 43% 21% LITHUANIA 25% 18% LUXEMBOURG 4% 5% MALTA 27% 43% NETHERLANDS 14% 16% POLAND 18% 16% PORTUGAL 22% 20% ROMANIA 21% 19% SLOVAKIA 33% 32% SLOVENIA 26% 26% SPAIN 13% 15% SWEDEN 11% 14% UNITED KINGDOM 14% 19% Within the associated countries, Israel is the highest in the ranking as for SMEs' incidence on EC funding (21%) and participations (21%). SMEs incidence on total participations is the lowest in Iceland (9%), but high in funding (17%). Countries such as Switzerland and Norway, which receive a large share of total EC funding in FP7-ICT show a lower percentage of SMEs incidence on total funding and participations (Figure 26). 39

60 Figure 26 FP7 ICT SMEs incidence in associated countries (cumulated figures ) As for accession countries, Serbia shows the largest percentage of funding (33% of funding and 30% of participations are by SMEs) followed by Turkey with 17% of funding and 29% by SMEs (Figure 27). Figure 27 FP7 ICT SMEs incidence in Accession countries (cumulated figures ) 40

61 2.7 Analysis by strategic objective Funding in FP7-ICT is structured around eleven key R&D areas, representing the challenges to be addressed if Europe is to become one of the world leaders in next generation ICT and their applications. These are: Challenge 1: Pervasive and Trusted Network and Service Infrastructures; Challenge 2: Cognitive Systems and Robotics; Challenge 3: Alternative Paths to Components and Systems; Challenge 4: Technologies for Digital Content and Languages; Challenge 5: ICT for Health, Ageing Well, Inclusion and Governance; Challenge 6: ICT for a low carbon economy; Challenge 7: ICT for the Enterprise and Manufacturing; Challenge 8: ICT for learning and access to cultural resources; Challenge 9: FET; Challenge 10: International cooperation; Challenge 11: Horizontal actions. As several of these challenges include many operational objectives, which are very different in nature, the following analysis is based on the disaggregation of the challenges included in the work programme into 24 different strategic objectives (SOs). The SOs differ in terms of industrial sectors and typology of organisations participating, as well as in terms of countries' specialisations. Table 13 FP7 ICT EC funding, number of projects and participations by Strategic Objective (cumulated figures ) Strategic Objective EC funding % Projects % Participations % 01 Future Networks and Internet 774,872, % % 2, % 02 Software, Services and internet connected objects 333,484, % % % 03 Trustworthy ICT 280,123, % % % 04 Networked Media 236,075, % % % 05 Cognitive Systems and Robotics 430,641, % % % 06 Nanoelectronics 206,422, % % % 07 Micro/nanosystems 242,472, % % % 08 Embedded Systems 292,196, % % 1, % 09 Photonics 299,828, % % % 10 Organic and large area Electronics 171,997, % % % 11 Language Technologies 111,557, % % % 12 Intelligent Information Management 235,573, % % % 13 ICT for Health 434,337, % % 1, % 14 ICT and Ageing 93,295, % % % 15 ICT for Inclusion 113,837, % % % 16 ICT for Governance and Policy Modelling 41,339, % % % 17 ICT for Energy Efficiency 266,142, % % % 18 ICT for Transport 304,259, % % 1, % 19 ICT for the Enterprise 243,155, % % % 20 ICT for Learning 241,419, % % % 21 Digital Libraries 69,055, % % % 22 FET 574,037, % % 1, % 23 International Cooperation 40,297, % % % 24 Accompanying Measures 88,772, % % % Total 6,125,195, % 1, % 18, % 41

62 Future Networks and Internet is the SO that attracts the largest share of funding (12.7%) and the highest number of participations (12.9% of the total), followed by FET (9.4% of funding and 9.8% of participations), which accounts for the highest number of projects (13.4%). Other major objectives in terms of funding and participations are ICT for Health (7.1% and 6.5%), Embedded systems (4.8% and 5.9%) and ICT for transport (5% and 5.7%) (Table 13). International Cooperation, ICT for Governance and Policy Modelling and Digital Libraries account for the smallest amounts of funding (0.7%, 0.7% and 1.1% respectively), although in the case of the SO International Cooperation the share of projects is 2.6%, indicating the very small average size of these projects. The largest number of projects per aggregated SO can be found in FET (13%), followed by Future Networks and Internet (10%), Embedded Systems (6.2%), Cognitive Systems and Robotics (6%), and ICT for Health (Table 13). FET display more projects than the SO Future Networks and Internet, despite the difference of about 200 million in allocated budget. The SOs Digital libraries and ICT for Governance and Policy Modelling have only 15 and 22 projects respectively. STREPs are the prevailing instruments for almost all the strategic objectives, with the exception of International cooperation and Accompanying measures, where coordination and support actions prevail. IPs are strongly present in areas such as Future Networks and Internet, Cognitive systems and robotics and ICT for health. NoEs tend to concentrate in Future Networks and Internet and Embedded systems. CA and SA represent a significant part of International cooperation, Accompanying measures, ICT for transport and FET. Figure 28 FP7 ICT number of projects per aggregated SO by instrument, (cumulated figures) 42

63 Figure 29 FP7 ICT EC funding per aggregated SO by instrument, (cumulated figures) Different specialisation patterns emerge from the analysis of country presence by strategic objective. The top 10 countries represent around 80% of total funding for almost all the strategic objectives, with the exception of the strategic objective International cooperation (60%), where accession and third countries play a major role. The top 10 countries show a relative strength in different areas of research: Germany is the top recipient of funds in all categories but three. The country attracts 32% of funding in ICT for the Enterprise and 29% in ICT for Transport; The United Kingdom is the leading country in the SOs ICT for learning and Digital libraries, with 19% and 18% of total funding respectively, and together with Germany accounts for 15% in ICT for Health; Italy is relatively strong in ICT for ageing (15% of total funding), Cognitive Systems and Robotics (14%), FET and Language Technologies FET (13%); France has a relatively strong presence in Nanoelectronics (17%), Future Networks and Internet (16%) and International Cooperation (15%); Spanish organisations excel in ICT for inclusion (16%) and ICT for Energy efficiency (14%); Swiss companies are particularly strong in Micro and nanosystems (9%); The Netherlands is relatively strong in Organic and large area electronics (14%); Belgium has a relatively strong presence in Nanoelectronics (10%); Greek companies are active mostly in ICT for Governance and Policy Modelling (11%) and ICT for Health (8%); Austria stands out for its share (13%) in ICT for Governance and Policy Modelling. 43

64 Figure 30 FP7 ICT EC funding to top 10 countries by strategic objective, (cumulated figures) SO aggregated DE UK IT FR ES NL BE EL CH AT Others 01 Future Networks and Internet 18% 11% 7% 16% 12% 2% 5% 5% 2% 1% 22% 02 Software, Services and internet connected objects 21% 12% 11% 11% 11% 4% 2% 5% 2% 3% 19% 03 Trustworthy ICT 24% 8% 11% 11% 7% 5% 4% 3% 6% 5% 17% 04 Networked Media 19% 15% 9% 11% 8% 7% 3% 6% 3% 3% 16% 05 Cognitive Systems and Robotics 26% 16% 14% 6% 5% 3% 3% 3% 6% 3% 16% 06 Nanoelectronics 25% 6% 8% 17% 3% 5% 10% 1% 5% 6% 14% 07 Micro/nanosystems 23% 7% 9% 15% 6% 4% 6% 3% 9% 3% 16% 08 Embedded Systems 18% 11% 11% 13% 7% 9% 5% 4% 3% 4% 16% 09 Photonics 25% 13% 6% 13% 4% 6% 7% 4% 5% 2% 16% 10 Organic and large area Electronics 26% 8% 5% 9% 3% 14% 8% 2% 7% 3% 14% 11 Language Technologies 21% 13% 10% 7% 13% 4% 2% 5% 3% 2% 20% 12 Intelligent Information Management 25% 14% 8% 4% 5% 7% 1% 6% 4% 8% 17% 13 ICT for Health 15% 15% 12% 6% 9% 8% 4% 8% 5% 3% 15% 14 ICT and Ageing 17% 12% 15% 4% 10% 8% 1% 7% 1% 7% 18% 15 ICT for Inclusion 17% 10% 8% 5% 16% 3% 3% 7% 5% 8% 17% 16 ICT for Governance and Policy Modelling 19% 15% 10% 2% 5% 5% 2% 11% 0% 13% 18% 17 ICT for Energy Efficiency 16% 9% 11% 6% 14% 5% 4% 5% 3% 4% 24% 18 ICT for Transport 29% 7% 9% 7% 5% 8% 7% 4% 1% 3% 20% 19 ICT for the Enterprise 32% 9% 13% 5% 8% 4% 1% 4% 4% 3% 18% 20 ICT for Learning 17% 19% 10% 5% 5% 8% 5% 5% 3% 8% 17% 21 Digital Libraries 17% 18% 5% 8% 5% 8% 2% 5% 1% 7% 22% 22 FET 18% 13% 13% 11% 6% 6% 3% 2% 7% 3% 17% 23 International Cooperation 10% 8% 7% 15% 7% 3% 3% 5% 1% 1% 40% 24 Accompanying Measures 24% 9% 12% 13% 8% 4% 5% 2% 3% 6% 15% Grand Total 21% 12% 10% 10% 8% 5% 4% 4% 4% 4% 18% With regards to the legal status of participants, governmental bodies represent the majority of participations in most strategic objectives, and in particular in FET, Cognitive Systems and Robotics, ICT for Learning and ICT for Health, whereas private companies are very active in areas such as ICT for Transport, ICT for Enterprise, Software, Services and Interconnected objects, and Networked Media. As for public non-profit organisations, the main areas of activity are ICT for Inclusion and ICT for Ageing (Figure 31). 44

65 Figure 31 FP7 ICT Legal status per strategic objective, (cumulated figures) 45

66 2.7.1 SO 1: Future networks and the Internet Key facts: Future Networks and the Internet is the largest strategic objective in terms of funding received, with 13% of the total EC funding allocated over the period ; 188 projects have been granted funding over the period , involving 2,352 participations, mainly as STREPs (57% of projects) and IPs (27%) (Table 14); In terms of funding, IPs account for more than half (54.5%) of the budget allocated, followed by STREPs (38%). In comparison with other SOs, IPs and NoEs are more represented than in average in terms of funding and participations respectively (Table 14); In terms of legal status, private commercial companies are the main participants with about 46% of total funding (higher than the average for other SOs), followed by governmental organisations (Figure 32); In absolute terms, Germany, France, and Spain are the Member States more active in this SO, with about 104 million, 96.5 million and 72.9 million funding received over the period For several Member States, this SO attracts an important share of total funding: it represents 20% and more of total funding for France, Finland, Poland, Portugal and Spain; The top recipients for this SO are Telefónica Investigación y Desarrollo, Fraunhofer Institute, Iminds, The University of Surrey, Thales Communications, Commissariat à l'energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, France Telecom and Alcatel-Lucent Deutschland. Table 14 Strategic objective Future Networks and Internet - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) STREP IP SICA CA SA NoE Total Projects (%) 56.9% 27.1% 4.3% 7.4% 4.3% 100% Participations 956 1, ,352 (%) 40.6% 43.5% 3.1% 3.7% 9.1% 100% EC Funding (Million ) (%) 38.2% 54.5% 1.7% 1.7% 3.9% 100% 46

67 Figure 32 Strategic objective Future Networks and Internet - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 33 Strategic objective Future Networks and Internet - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) 47

68 2.7.2 SO 2: Software, Services and interconnected objects Key facts: Software, Services and interconnected objects account for 5.4% of total funding allocated over the period ; 85 projects have been granted funding, for the large majority under the instrument of STREP (63.5%) and IPs (22%), for a total of 824 participations over the period ; In terms of funding, STREPs and IPs attracted an equal relative share of budget (48% and 47% respectively) (Table 15); In terms of legal status, private commercial companies are the main participants with about 45% of total funding (higher than the average for other SOs), followed by governmental organisations (40%) (Figure 34); In absolute terms, Germany, United Kingdom, France, Italy and Spain are the top beneficiaries as for funding. This strategic objective is relatively important for certain Member States, such as Ireland, Romania (12% of total funding received by the Member State), Slovenia (11%) and Luxembourg (10%); The top recipient for this strategic objective is SAP AG, followed by Stiftelsen Sintef, Fraunhofer, Telefonica and IBM Israel. Table 15 Strategic objective Software, Services and interconnected objects - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) STREP IP SICA CA SA NoE Total Projects (%) 63.5% 22.4% 2.4% 10.6% 1.2% 100% Participations (%) 52.9% 37.9% 1.3% 5.3% 2.5% 100% EC Funding (Million ) (%) 48.3% 47.2% 0.3% 1.7% 2.5% 100% 48

69 Figure 34 Strategic objective Software, Services and interconnected objects - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 35 Strategic objective Software, Services and interconnected objects - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) 49

70 2.7.3 Key facts: SO 3: Trustworthy ICT Trustworthy ICT account for 4.6% of total funding allocated over the period ; 78 projects have been granted funding, mostly under the instrument of STREP (56%) and IPs (20.5%), for a total of 764 participations (Figure 55, Figure 56 and Figure 57). In terms of legal status, private companies lead in terms of funding received with around 44% of the total, followed by governmental organisations (39%); The top recipient for this strategic objective is SAP AG, followed by IBM, Fraunhofer; Stiftelsen Sintef and Katholieke Universiteit Leuven. Table 16 Strategic objective Trustworthy ICT - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) STREP IP SICA CA SA NoE Total Projects (%) 56.4% 20.5% 12.8% 6.4% 3.8% 100% Participations (%) 51.8% 31.2% 6.7% 5.9% 4.5% 100% EC Funding (Million ) (%) 45.6% 46.0% 3.0% 2.1% 3.3% 100% Figure 36 Strategic objective Trustworthy ICT - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) 50

71 Figure 37 Strategic objective Trustworthy ICT - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) 51

72 2.7.4 SO 4: Networked Media Key facts: Networked Media accounts for 4% of total funding allocated over the period ; 62 projects have been granted funding, for a total of 595 participations; The distribution of projects, participations and funding is mostly directed towards STREPs (58%, 53% and 47% respectively), followed by IPs which account for an equal share of funding (47%), despite representing only one fourth of projects and one third of participations; In terms of legal status, private companies lead in terms of funding received with 42% (16% are SMEs), followed by governmental organisations (35%); In absolute terms, Germany, the UK, France, Italy and Spain are the top 5 countries in terms of funding (61% of the total). Israel, Switzerland and Turkey are performing relatively well in this SO and are among the main 20 beneficiaries; The top recipient for this SO is the German Fraunhoefer Institute, followed by the Centre for Research and Technology Hellas and the University of Surrey. Table 17 Strategic objective Networked Media - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) STREP IP SICA CA SA NoE Total Projects (%) 58.1% 21.0% 4.8% 12.9% 3.2% 100% Participations (%) 53.1% 31.1% 3.9% 10.1% 1.8% 100% EC Funding (Million ) (%) 47.2% 46.7% 1.1% 2.2% 2.8% 100% 52

73 Figure 38 Strategic objective Networked Media - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 39 Strategic objective Networked Media - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) 53

74 2.7.5 SO 5: Cognitive Systems and Robotics Key facts: Cognitive Systems and Robotics accounts for 7% of total funding allocated over the period ; 110 projects have been granted funding, for a total of 923 participations; Compared to the average figures for the ICT Theme of FP7, in terms of instruments this SO shows a higher percentage of STREPs projects (69% of the total) with very little relevance of CA and SAs; In terms of legal status, governmental bodies account for 66% of funding, while private companies are almost absent (12% of total funding); One fourth of the total funding is allocated to Germany, followed by the UK, Italy and Switzerland (together these top 5 countries account for 64% of funding); The top recipients for this strategic objective are the Technical University of Munich, the Fraunhoefer Institute, the Italian Institute of Technology and the ETH in Zurich. Table 18 Strategic objective Cognitive Systems and Robotics - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) STREP IP SICA CA SA NoE Total Projects (%) 69.1% 25.5% 3.6% 1.8% 100% Participations (%) 52.2% 39.2% 3.8% 4.8% 100% EC Funding (Million ) (%) 49.2% 46.5% 1.5% 2.8% 100% 54

75 Figure 40 Strategic objective Cognitive Systems and Robotics - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 41 Strategic objective Cognitive Systems and Robotics - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) 55

76 2.7.6 SO 6: Nanoelectronics Key facts: Nanoelectronics accounts for 3.4% of total funding allocated over the period ; 56 projects have been granted funding, for a total of 619 participations; One fourth of the funded projects are SAs; compared to the average figures for the ICT Theme of FP7, this SO shows also a higher percentage of projects under the instruments of CAs and NoEs (3.6% each), and a lower percentage of STREPs and IPs, accounting together for 13% of total funding; In terms of legal status, nanoelectronics presents a higher percentage of Private commercial companies than average (38% of total funding; 13% to SMEs); Belgium is third in the ranking for this SO, while the UK is not in the top 5; The top recipients for this strategic objective are the Belgian IMEC Research centre, the Commissariat à l'energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives and the Fraunhoefer Institute. Table 19 Strategic objective Nanoelectronics - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) STREP IP SICA CA SA NoE Total Projects (%) 51.8% 16.1% 3.6% 25.0% 3.6% 100% Participations (%) 41.7% 30% 3.4% 15.3% 9.5% 100% EC Funding (Million ) (%) 46.4% 40.8% 0.7% 8.7% 3.4% 100% 56

77 Figure 42 Strategic objective Nanoelectronics - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 43 Strategic objective Nanoelectronics - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) 57

78 2.7.7 SO 7: Micro/nanosystems Key facts: Micro/nanosystems accounts for 4% of funding allocated over the period ; 64 projects have been granted funding, for a total of 631 participations, mainly under the instrument of STREPs (66% of projects and 52% of funding), in line with the average figures for the ICT Theme of FP7; In terms of legal status, micro/nanosystems is characterised by a higher percentage of Private non-profit organisations than the average (24%); In absolute terms, Switzerland and Belgium have a relatively important presence in this SO, ranking third and fifth respectively among the Top 5 beneficiary countries; The top recipients for this strategic objective are the French Commissariat à l'energie Atomique, the IMEC research centre and the Fraunhofer-Institute. Table 20 Strategic objective Micro/nanosystems - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) STREP IP SICA CA SA NoE Total Projects (%) 65.6% 23.4% 6.3% 4.7% 100% Participations (%) 54.2% 34.5% 7.8% 3.5% 100% EC Funding (Million ) (%) 52.3% 44.6% 2.5% 0.6% 100% Figure 44 Strategic objective Micro/nanosystems - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) 58

79 Figure 45 Strategic objective Micro/nanosystems - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) 59

80 2.7.8 Key facts: SO 8: Embedded Systems Embedded systems accounts for 5% of funding allocated over the period ; 114 projects have been granted funding, for a total of 1,075 participations; STREPs represent more than 75% of projects, dominating also in terms of participations and funding. NoEs are also well represented with more than 10% of participations; In terms of legal status, governmental bodies are the main type of organisations participating (51% of total funding); The top recipients are Gent University, the Eindhoven University and the French Commissariat à l'energie Atomique et aux énergies alternatives. Table 21 Strategic objective Embedded Systems - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) STREP IP SICA CA SA NoE Total Projects (%) 76.3% 7% 0.9% 11.4% 4.4% 100% Participations (%) 70.5% 10% 1.0% 7.9% 10.6% 100% EC Funding (Million ) (%) 74.7% 15.7% 0.3% 2.2% 7.2% 100% Figure 46 Strategic objective Embedded Systems - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) 60

81 Figure 47 Strategic objective Embedded Systems - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) 61

82 2.7.9 SO 9: Photonics Key facts: Photonics accounts for 5% of funding allocated over the period ; 85 projects have been granted funding, for a total of 824 participations; STREPS are the main instrument (67% of funding) and, compared to the average, CSAs and NoEs play an important role (18% of projects); In terms of legal status, governmental organisations are the most present (44% of funding); The top 5 beneficiary countries account for 44% of total funding. Switzerland, Israel, Norway and Russia are among the top 20 beneficiaries; The top recipients for this strategic objective are the Fraunhoefer Institute, the French Commissariat à l'energie Atomique et aux énergies alternatives and the Interuniversitair Micro-electronica Centrum VZW. Table 22 Strategic objective Photonics - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) STREP IP SICA CA SA NoE Total Projects (%) 67.1% 15.3% 4.7% 9.4% 3.5% 100% Participations (%) 56.1% 26.5% 3.7% 8.2% 5.6% 100% EC Funding (Million ) (%) 50.5% 38.5% 5.2% 2.1% 3.7% 100% Figure 48 Strategic objective Photonics - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) 62

83 Figure 49 Strategic objective Photonics - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) 63

84 SO 10: Organic and large area electronics Key facts: Organic and large area electronics accounts for 2.8% of funding allocated over the period ; 43 projects have been granted funding, for a total of 424 participations; Compared to the average figures for the ICT Theme of FP7, there is a higher percentage of STREPs projects (69%), and lower of IPs (17%). NoEs also have an important position in terms of participations (8.7%); In terms of legal status, governmental organisations are the main participants (44%), followed by private commercial companies; The Netherlands and Belgium have a relatively important presence in this SO, ranking second and fifth respectively among the Top 5 beneficiary countries, whereas Italy and Spain perform relatively low compared to their ranking in the other SOs; The top recipients for this SO are the Fraunhoefer Institute and the Dutch TNO, followed by the Belgian IMEC. Table 23 Strategic objective Organic and large area electronics - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) STREP IP SICA CA SA NoE Total Projects (%) 69% 16.7% 7.1% 2.4% 4.8% 100% Participations (%) 55.4% 25% 9.4% 1.4% 8.7% 100% EC Funding (Million ) (%) 53.1% 35.6% 6.7% 0.3% 4.2% 100% Figure 50 Strategic objective Organic and large area electronics - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) 64

85 Figure 51 Strategic objective Organic and large area electronics - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) 65

86 SO 11: Language technologies Key facts: Language technologies account only for 1.8% of funding allocated over the period This strategic objective is dominated by STREPs, that represent 82% of projects and 78% of funding; 45 projects have been granted funding, for a total of 303 participations; In terms of legal status, Private Non Profit organisations account for 24% and governmental organisations for 40%; The top recipients for this strategic objective are the German research centre for artificial intelligence, the Fondazione Bruno Kessler and the University of Edinburgh. Table 24 Strategic objective Language technologies - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) STREP IP SICA CA SA NoE Total Projects (%) 82.2% 2.2% 2.2% 11.1% 2.2% 100% Participations (%) 76.2% 3.6% 1.7% 13.5% 5.0% 100% EC Funding (Million ) (%) 77.7% 7.1% 1.1% 8.8% 5.4% 100% Figure 52 Strategic objective Language technologies - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) 66

87 Figure 53 Strategic objective Language technologies - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) 67

88 SO 12: Intelligent Information Management Key facts: Intelligent Information Management accounts for 4% of funding allocated over the period ; Funding under this strategic objective is mostly directed to IPs (8%), whereas STREPs are relatively lower compared to the average; 66 projects have been granted funding, for total 619 participations; Governmental organisations account for half of total funding; In absolute terms, Austria and Netherlands are the third and fifth top countries in terms of total funding, whereas France is in a relatively lower position compared to the average for other SOs (3% of funding); The top recipients for this SO are the Fraunhoefer-Institute, the University of Innsbruck and SAP Ag. Table 25 Strategic objective Intelligent Information Management - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) STREP IP SICA CA SA NoE Total Projects (%) 54.5% 24.2% 7.6% 9.1% 4.5% 100% Participations (%) 45.6% 34.6% 7.4% 5.8% 6.6% 100% EC Funding (Million ) (%) 41.8% 47.9% 3.1% 3.5% 3.8% 100% Figure 54 Strategic objective Intelligent Information Management - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) 68

89 Figure 55 Strategic objective Intelligent Information Management - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) 69

90 SO 13: ICT for Health Key facts: ICT for Health accounts for 7% of funding allocated over the period ; 99 projects have been granted funding, for total 1,188 participations; Compared to the average figures for the ICT Theme of FP7, this strategic objective shows a higher percentage of IPs, which account for 43% of participations and 53% of funding; Governmental organisations account for slightly more than half of total funding; In absolute terms, the UK is the main recipient in terms of funding (14.5%), followed by Germany with 14%, Greece also has a strong performance in this area performing fifth among the top 5 beneficiary countries; The top recipient for this strategic objective is the Fraunhoefer Institute followed by Philips, the University of Oxford, the University College London and the Greek foundation for research and technology. Table 26 Strategic objective ICT for Health - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) STREP IP SICA CA SA NoE Total Projects (%) 56.6% 27.3% 2.0% 4.0% 8.1% 2.0% 100% Participations (%) 44.2% 43.4% 1.9% 2.9% 4.5% 3.3% 100% EC Funding (Million ) (%) 40.5% 53.4% 0.7% 1.6% 1.3% 2.5% 100% Figure 56 Strategic objective ICT for Health - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) 70

91 Figure 57 Strategic objective ICT for Health - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) 71

92 SO 14: ICT and Ageing Key facts: ICT and Ageing accounts for 1.5% of funding allocated over the period ; 29 projects have been granted funding, for total 315 participations; CAs and SAs account for almost one third of projects, higher percentage compared to the average figures for the ICT Theme of FP7, while the bulk of funding is allocated to STREPs (53%). This SO does not have NoEs; As for the legal status of participant organisations, a higher than average percentage of funding is allocated to Private Non Profit organisations (29% ); Mediterranean countries such as Italy, Spain, Israel and Greece show strong participation in this SO; The top recipients for this strategic objective are Fraunhoefer Institute, the Norwegian institute Stiftelsen Sintef and Philips. Table 27 Strategic objective ICT and Ageing - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) STREP IP SICA CA SA NoE Total Projects (%) 55.2% 13.8% 17.2% 13.8% 100% Participations (%) 46.7% 28.3% 14.9% 10.2% 100% EC Funding (Million ) (%) 53.4% 35.9% 7.5% 3.2% 100% Figure 58 Strategic objective ICT and Ageing - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) 72

93 Figure 59 Strategic objective ICT and Ageing - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) 73

94 SO 15: ICT for Inclusion Key facts: ICT for Inclusion accounts for 2% of funding allocated over the period , mainly granted to governmental organisations (accounting for 41% of total funding); 27 out of the 38 projects funded are STREPs, instrument accounting for a higher percentage than for the other SOs; Spanish and UK organisations perform especially well in this SO; The top recipients for this strategic objective are the Greek centre for research and technology, the Fraunhoefer institute and the technical university of Graz. Table 28 Strategic objective ICT for Inclusion - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) STREP IP SICA CA SA NoE Total Projects (%) 55.3% 17.1% 7.9% 18.4% 1.3% 100% Participations (%) 59.2% 33.2% 4.2% 3.5% 100% EC Funding (Million ) (%) 58.3% 38.8% 0.9% 2% 100% Figure 60 Strategic objective ICT for Inclusion - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) 74

95 Figure 61 Strategic objective ICT for Inclusion - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) 75

96 SO 16: ICT for Governance and Policy Modelling Key facts: This small strategic objective has only 41 Million (0.7%) of funding allocated to 18 projects over the period , 14 of which are STREPs; In terms of legal status, ICT for governance and policy shows a higher percentage of private companies than average (37%) for the majority SMEs (24%); In absolute terms, Germany is the largest recipient of funding, followed by the United Kingdom, Austria, Italy and Greece. The Netherlands perform well, preceding Spain and France in the top 20 beneficiary countries; The top three recipients for this strategic objective are Germans: the Fraunhoefer Institute, the university of Koblenz and Cellar AG. Table 29 Strategic objective ICT for Governance and Policy Modelling - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) STREP IP SICA CA SA NoE Total Projects (%) 77.8% 5.6% 5.6% 11.1% 100% Participations (%) 74% 9.6% 10.2% 6.2% 100% EC Funding (Million ) (%) 80.6% 15.8% 1.3% 2.3% 100% Figure 62 Strategic objective ICT for Governance and Policy Modelling - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) 76

97 Figure 63 Strategic objective ICT for Governance and Policy Modelling - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) 77

98 SO 17: ICT for Energy Efficiency Key facts: ICT for Energy Efficiency accounts for 4.3% of funding allocated over the period , with 99 projects funded and 946 participations; Compared to the average figures for the ICT Theme of FP7, this SO is characterised by an overwhelming presence of STREPs (87% of projects and 91% of funding) and a single IP; In terms of legal status, private commercial organisations represent 44% of beneficiaries, higher than the average; The top recipient for this strategic objective is the Fraunhoefer Institute, followed by SAP Ag and the Fundacion Tecnalia Research & Innovation. Table 30 Strategic objective ICT for Energy Efficiency - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) STREP IP SICA CA SA NoE Total Projects (%) 86.9% 1% 1% 5.1% 6.1% 100% Participations (%) 85.3% 3.4% 1.8% 3.8% 5.7% 100% EC Funding (Million ) (%) 91.2% 3.3% 0.9% 2.1% 2.5% 100% Figure 64 Strategic objective ICT for Energy Efficiency - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) 78

99 Figure 65 Strategic objective ICT for Energy Efficiency - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) 79

100 SO 18: ICT for Transport Key facts: ICT for transport accounts for 5% of funding allocated over the period , half of which directed towards the 13 IPs projects. SAs projects are 14 out of 76, whereas STREPs are 42 and produce 44% of the 1,029 participations for this strategic objective; In terms of legal status, ICT for transport shows a higher percentage of Private commercial organisations than average, with 55% of funding going to companies (for the majority large enterprises); In absolute terms, Sweden is the second recipient for this SO after Germany; The top recipients for this SO are European Road Transport Telematics Implementation Coordination Organisation (Belgium), the Teknologian Tutkimuskeskus VTT and Volvo Technology AB. Table 31 Strategic objective ICT for Transport - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) STREP IP SICA CA SA NoE Total Projects (%) 55.3% 17.1% 7.9% 18.4% 1.3% 100% Participations (%) 43.9% 37.2% 5.9% 12.0% 1% 100% EC Funding (Million ) (%) 42.0% 49.6% 2.2% 5.4% 0.8% 100% Figure 66 Strategic objective ICT for Transport - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) 80

101 Figure 67 Strategic objective ICT for Transport - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) 81

102 SO 19: ICT for the Enterprise Key facts: ICT for the enterprise accounts for 4% of funding allocated over the period , with 58 projects funded and 635 participations; The majority (59%) of projects are STREPs; there are no active NoE; In terms of legal status, ICT for the enterprise accounts for a higher percentage of Private commercial organisations (52.5%) than the average. SMEs account for 19% of total allocated funding; Germany accounts for 23.5% of total funding; Switzerland, Israel and Turkey are among the top 20 beneficiary countries; The top recipient for this strategic objective is Sap Ag followed by Fraunhoefer institute and the University of Patras. Table 32 Strategic objective ICT for the Enterprise - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) STREP IP SICA CA SA NoE Total Projects (%) 58.6% 31% 5.2% 5.2% 100% Participations (%) 47.6% 43% 6.9% 2.5% 100% EC Funding (Million ) (%) 41.1% 56.8% 1.4% 0.7% 100% 82

103 Figure 68 Strategic objective ICT for the Enterprise - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) Figure 69 Strategic objective ICT for the Enterprise - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) 83

104 SO 20: ICT for Learning Key facts: ICT for Learning accounts for 4% of the total funding allocated over the period , with 65 projects funded and 720 total participations; Although 575 of projects are STREPs, IPs attract over half of the total funding, a higher share compared to the average figures for the ICT Theme of FP7; In terms of legal status, ICT for learning accounts for a higher percentage of Governmental organisations than average (57%); Austria and the Netherlands have strong performance in this SO and they rank fourth and fifth among the top 20 beneficiary countries; The top recipients for this strategic objective are Technische Universitaet Graz, the Dutch Open University and K.U. Leuven. Table 33 Strategic objective ICT for Learning - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) STREP IP SICA CA SA NoE Total Projects (%) 56.9% 26.2% 6.2% 7.7% 3.1% 100% Participations (%) 42.6% 40.6% 4.6% 5.1% 7.1% 100% EC Funding (Million ) (%) 39.1% 51.8% 2.1% 2.6% 4.4% 100% Figure 70 Strategic objective ICT for Learning - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) 84

105 Figure 71 Strategic objective ICT for Learning - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) 85

106 SO 21: Digital Libraries Key facts: Digital Libraries accounts for 1.1% of total funding allocated over the period , with 15 projects funded and 190 participations; Compared to the average figures for the ICT Theme of FP7, this small SO displays a higher percentage of IPs (more than half of total funding) and NoEs, which account for 16.5% of funding and more than one fourth of participations; In terms of legal status, funding for digital libraries is directed mainly towards public organisations (51% of total funding); United Kingdom ranks first in terms of funding, Ireland also performs well (sixth among top beneficiaries), compared to the general ranking per country; The top recipients for this strategic objective are Fraunhoefer-Institute, IBM Israeland Sap Ag. Table 34 Strategic objective Digital Libraries - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) STREP IP SICA CA SA NoE Total Projects (%) 46.7% 33.3% 6.7% 13.3% 100% Participations (%) 29.5% 35.3% 7.9% 27.4% 100% EC Funding (Million ) (%) 29.5% 52.3% 1.7% 16.5% 100% Figure 72 Strategic objective Digital Libraries - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) 86

107 Figure 73 Strategic objective Digital Libraries - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) 87

108 SO 22: FET Key facts: FET is the first strategic objective in terms of number of projects (246) and the second in terms of funding (9.4%) and participations (almost 1,800); The large majority of projects (73%) are STREPs, attracting 66% of total funding; In terms of legal status, 7% of total funding is allocated to governmental organisations; In absolute terms, Germany is the main recipient country; Italy, the United Kingdom, France and Switzerland also present strong performance in FET; The top recipient for this strategic objective is French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique followed by the University of Lausanne and ETH Zurich. Table 35 Strategic objective FET - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) STREP IP SICA CA SA NoE Total Projects (%) 73.2% 11.8% 9.8% 5.3% 100% Participations (%) 65.8% 21.2% 11.2% 1.7% 100% EC Funding (Million ) (%) 65.8% 30.2% 3.5% 0.5% 100% Figure 74 Strategic objective FET - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) 88

109 Figure 75 Strategic objective FET - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) 89

110 SO 23: International Cooperation Key facts: International Cooperation accounts for 0.7% of total funding allocated over the period , with 47 projects funded and 421 participations; Projects for this strategic objective are mostly SAs (32 out of 47), accounting for 52% of funding; 3 SICAs and 12 STREPs have also been funded; Governmental organisations receive 43% of total funding, followed by private commercial companies (37%) and private non-profit organisations (18%); In absolute terms, France is the leader in terms of EC funding. The USA is 8 th in the ranking and several countries (South Africa, India, Morocco, Russia and Brazil) are among the top 20 beneficiary countries; The top recipient for this strategic objective is Sigma Orionis, followed by IIMC and the Fraunhofer Institute. Table 36 Strategic objective International Cooperation - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) STREP IP SICA CA SA NoE Total Projects (%) 25.5% 6.4% 68.1% 100% Participations (%) 20.9% 7.4% 71.7% 100% EC Funding (Million ) (%) 34.5% 13.3% 52.3% 100% Figure 76 Strategic objective International Cooperation - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) 90

111 Figure 77 Strategic objective International Cooperation - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) 91

112 SO 24: Accompanying Measures Key facts: Accompanying measures account for 1.4% of total funding allocated over the period ; 45 projects have been funded, for total 477 participations; In terms of legal status, private commercial organisations account for 44% of the total and private non-profit for 22%; The top recipients for this strategic objective are Fraunhoefer Institute and Bosch. Table 37 Strategic objective Accompanying Measures - Projects, participations and funding by instrument, (cumulated figures) STREP IP SICA CA SA NoE Total Projects (%) 44.4% 2.2% 40.0% 13.3% 100% Participations (%) 38.8% 0.8% 54.7% 5.7% 100% EC Funding (Million ) (%) 66.5% 0.1% 30.0% 3.4% 100% Figure 78 Strategic objective Accompanying Measures - EC funding by legal status, (cumulated figures) 92

113 Figure 79 Strategic objective Accompanying Measures - EC funding by top 20 countries, (cumulated figures) 93

114 3 PART II FP7 E-INFRASTRUCTURES ACTIVITY This chapter focuses on the e-infrastructures activity and on the portfolio analysis of the projects financed by DG CONNECT under this heading. The Research Infrastructures programme is funded under the FP7 'Capacities' Specific Programme. The e-infrastructures activity, as a part of the Research Infrastructures programme, focuses on ICT-based infrastructures and services that cut across a broad range of user disciplines. It aims at empowering researchers with an easy and controlled online access to facilities, resources and collaboration tools, bringing them the power of ICT for computing, connectivity, storage and instrumentation. In DG CONNECT, it focuses on the further development and evolution of the high-capacity and high-performance communication network (GÉANT), distributed computing infrastructures (grids and clouds), supercomputer infrastructures, simulation software, scientific data infrastructures, e-science services as well as on the adoption of e-infrastructures by user communities. 3.1 Funding, participations and projects The e-infrastructures activity has allocated over the period million of EC funding. It has financed 139 projects, resulting in 2,125 participations by 829 different legal entities. Table 38 e-infrastructures activity portfolio, (cumulated figures) e-infrastructures activity FP7 EC Funding 496,027,567 Number of projects 139 Participations 2,125 Organisations 829 Average project size 3,568, Average EC funding per participant 233, A specific characteristic of the e-infrastructures activity is the number of third parties involved (457 participations), 246 of which do not receive any EC funding. Most of these third parties are Joint Research Unit (JRU) members. JRU is the mechanism to pool entities of the same nationality under a single beneficiary, thus allowing structuring the national e- Infrastructure actors. Funding has been allocated through 7 calls, starting in 2007 (Figure 80). 94

115 Figure 80 e-infrastructures EC funding by call, Instruments and legal status of participants All the projects under e-infrastructures activity are CSA or CP-CSA (Figure 81). Figure 81 e-infrastructures participations by type of instrument, (cumulated figures) As for the legal status of participants, public and governmental bodies account for the majority of participations and receive more than half of EC allocated funding (57%), with private companies representing 22% of funding and 13% of participations. Non-profit organisations account for one fifth of funding and 17% of participations (Figure 82). 95

116 Figure 82 e-infrastructures EC Funding and participations (%) by legal status, (cumulated figures) Participation from large companies is very low, as they account for 5% of funding and 6% of participations, by converse SMEs tend to obtain higher funding than other institutions and entities, as they represent the same share of participations as large enterprises (6%) but account for 17% of EC funding (Figure 83). Figure 83 e-infrastructures - EC Funding and participations (%) by type of organisation, (cumulated figures) 3.3 Geographic analysis As for the ICT Theme of FP7, EU Member States represent the bulk of participants (78.6%) and funding (89.1%) received. Associated countries account for 7.2% of funding, whereas accession countries and third countries for 2% and 1.7% respectively (Table 39). 96

117 Table 39 e-infrastructures - EC funding and participations by country group, (cumulated figures) Country Group Participations % EC funding % Member States 1, % 442,181, % Associated countries % 35,576, % Accession countries % 9,675, % Third countries % 8,593, % 2, % 496,027, % Among the Member states the UK is the biggest recipient in absolute terms, with almost one fourth of total funding allocated over the period (Figure 84). Germany and Italy follow the UK with 12% and 10% respectively and preceed the Netherlands and France. The UK is the biggest recipient also in comparison to the national value added of the ICT sector, followed by Bulgaria, Denmark, Poland and Greece (Figure 84). Figure 84 e-infrastructures - EC funding by Member State, (cumulated figures) 97

118 Figure 85 e-infrastructures - EC funding by Member State ( per million ICT VA), 2009 Source: EUROSTAT, IPTS Figure 86 e-infrastructures - EC funding by Member State as % of ICT GERD, 2009 Source: EUROSTAT, IPTS Among the associated and accession countries, Switzerland is in absolute terms the first recipent with about 30 million, followed by Turkey (~ 4.7 million), Norway (~ 4 million) 98

119 and Israel (~ 1.4 million). Among third countries, Russia was allocated ~ 1.2 million during the period , followed by Brasil by South Korea with ~ 1.2 million and ~ 963,000 respectively. Figure 87 e-infrastructures Top recipient of EC funding among accession, associated and third countries, (cumulated figures) 99

120 4 PART IV JTIS AND AAL This section gives information about the composition of the Joint Technology Initiatives (JTIs) ARTEMIS and ENIAC, and of the Ambient Assisted Living Programme (AAL). 4.1 JTIs ARTEMIS and ENIAC are Joint Technological Initiatives organised as tripartite (involving industry, Member States and the European Commission) Public Private Partnership. Their aim is to integrate in a pan-european strategic programme, research and technology development in the fields of Embedded Systems (ARTEMIS) and Nanoelectronics (ENIAC). JTIs are autonomous initiatives publishing their own annual reports in which more information can be found. JTIs aim to develop public-private partnerships established at European level in order to leverage more R&D investments from member states, associated countries and industry, to boost European competitiveness and to reduce fragmentation of EU R&D. JTIs are closely linked to the work of European Technology Platforms. In a small number of cases, European Technology Platforms achieved such an ambitious scale and scope that they required the mobilisation of large public and private investments as well as substantial research resources to implement important elements of their Strategic Research Agendas. JTIs represent an effective mean of meeting the needs of this small number of European Technology Platforms. The Joint undertakings were formally established in 2008 and they are going to last until The overall contributions for ARTEMIS were anticipated to be 2.5 billion and 2.8 billion for ENIAC, out of which about 1/6 originates from the ICT Theme of FP ARTEMIS ARTEMIS (Advanced Research & Technology for Embedded Intelligence in Systems) was established in 2004 as the European Technology Platform for Embedded Systems. The technology platforms were conceived to bring together public and private stakeholders to set up and implement common research agendas in fields of industrial relevance. The industry-led ARTEMIS initiative aims to consolidate the position of Europe as a leading worldwide player in the design, integration and supply of Embedded Systems. The ARTEMIS JTI was established to take forward the work of the Technology Platform and build on it. The Joint Undertaking (JU), is a public-private partnership between the European Commission, Member States and ARTEMIS-IA, a not-for-profit Industrial Association formed by private stakeholders that participated in setting up the ARTEMIS ETP. The Joint Undertaking was established in 2008 to manage and coordinate research activities through open calls for proposals in a ten-year, 2.5 billion research programme on Embedded Computing Systems. The programme is open to organisations in European Union Member States and Associated Countries. 100

121 Since 2008 the ARTEMIS JU has successfully launched and managed 44 projects from its first four Calls, launched negotiations on 8 projects from its fifth Call and initiated preparations for its sixth and final Call. After four Calls, ARTEMIS-JU has 44 running projects, representing a total R,D & I investment of 708 million, comprising 228 million of National contributions, 116 million contribution by the EU and 363 million from Industry. The Average Countries per Project is about 7, compared to a historically typical 3 to 5, indicating that the ARTEMIS programme has achieved one of its high-level goals - reducing fragmentation by enlarging the typical project footprint at a European level. Of the 586 unique entities participating in ARTEMIS projects (with many organization participating in multiple projects), 207 (35%) are Large Enterprises, 210 (36%) are SMEs and 169 (29%) are public research organisations. That more that 70% of the participants are industrial players indicates the true industrial focus of the programme. That 36% of the organisations are SMEs can be explained by the National contribution, favourable to SME participation, and the establishment of local ARTEMIS networks. The distribution of investment over the 8 ARTEMIS Sub-Programmes shows a large distortion in favour of ASP1 (Safety-critical systems, with 32%) and ASP5 (Architectures, with 26%): ASP1 because of its high importance for the Transport and Medical industries, attracting larger projects with directly industrially relevant outcomes, and ASP5 through the high technical complexity of low-power multi-core platforms, attracting generally smallerscale projects and higher academic content. The effort distribution over the three Industrial Priorities too shows a strong bias towards Design Methods and Tools, driven partly by the preponderance of ASP1 projects and also due to the other priorities (Reference Designs and Architectures, and Seamless Connectivity and Middleware) necessarily requiring development tools to support them. (Source: ARTEMIS Joint Undertaking Annual Activity Report ). Table 40 Main data about ARTEMIS ARTEMIS Call 2008 Call 2009 Call 2010 Call 2011 Call 2012 TOTAL Projects * 52 No. of partners National funding 59,288,747 67,190,047 55,209,165 38,809,711 59,700,000** 280,197,670 EU funding 33,250,377 34,894,089 27,762,650 23,794,607 47,100,000** 166,801,723 Countries *Under negotiation **Indicative funding (Source: Artemis website and ARTEMIS Joint Undertaking Annual Activity Report ) ENIAC The ENIAC Joint Undertaking (JU) was created in February 2008 in order to implement a Joint Technology Initiative (JTI) on nanoelectronics - a research programme aimed at 30 ARTEMIS-ED ARTEMIS-ED

122 enhancing the further integration and miniaturisation of devices and increasing their functionalities. The ENIAC JU is set up as a public-private partnership, bringing together the European Commission and European Member and Associated States with AENEAS, the association representing the R&D actors in nanoelectronics (Corporate, SME's, research institutes and universities) in Europe. At the end of 2012 there were 50 active projects in the ENIAC JU programme, with 1,102 participants from 532 organizations, out of which 217 (41%) are small and medium sized enterprises, 174 (33%) are research institutes and Universities, and 141 (26%) are large companies. The total eligible costs in the 50 projects selected for funding approached 1.8 Billion, the national funding reached 396 million and the ENIAC JU contributions amount to 280 million. Table 41 Main data about ENIAC ENIAC Call 2008 Call 2009 Call 2010 Call Call Call Call TOTAL 1 Projects National 57,820,000 67,370,000 54,800,000 45,500,000 72,945,000 37,600,00 98,300, ,735,000 funding EU 32,000,000 37,953,500 30,140,000 25,300,000 27,500,000 17,600, ,800, ,293,500 funding Countries (Source: ENIAC website and ENIAC Annual Activity Report 2012) Altogether, the funding engaged is split approximately equally between application areas and technology areas (Figure 88). Figure 88 ENIAC - Eligible costs per area in the projects selected for funding Source: ENIAC Annual Activity Report

123 The SMEs engaged 200 million in the projects, representing 11% of the eligible costs, consequently receiving 11% of the ENIAC JU grants and 49.4 million (12.5%) of the national funding. The trend of strong SME participation continued in 2012: in the projects selected for funding in Calls (Call 6) and (Call 7) there are 247 participations from 178 organizations, among which there are 61 SMEs representing 34.3% of the participating organizations. In 2012, the SMEs contributed 58.3 million of the total eligible costs, a 36% increase over the previous year. In 2012, however, the large companies had an even stronger engagement, so that percentagewise the SME contribution represented 6.9% of the total eligible cost. They received 8.7 million grants from the ENIAC JU, (7.0% of the total, the same proportion as the eligible costs) and 13.5 million (9.9%) of the national contributions. (Source: ENIAC Annual Activity Report 2012). 103

124 4.2 AAL Joint Programme The objective of the AAL Joint Programme (AAL JP) is to enhance the quality of life of older people and strengthen the industrial base in Europe through the use of Information and Communication Technologies. The motivation of the new funding activity is in the demographic change and ageing in Europe, which implies not only challenges but also opportunities for the citizens, the social and healthcare systems as well as industry and the European market. The AAL Joint Programme is initially set up for six-year duration from 2008 to The programme s planned total budget is 700 M, of which approx. 50% is public funding - from the AAL Partner States and the European Commission - and approx. 50% is private funding from participating private organisations (e.g. enterprises) 32. The public funding consists of contributions of the national programmes of the AAL Partner States (this funding is only granted to the successful project partners residing in the respective Partner State) and that of the European Community. The EC financial contribution amounts to a maximum of 150 M for the duration of the AAL Joint Programme At the time of writing results from call 6 were not yet available for statistical purposes. So far, 131 projects have been financed under the first five calls, involving partners from 23 European countries: 20 European member states (Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece 33, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom) and 3 Associated States: Israel, Norway and Switzerland 34. The European Commission is not part of the implementation structures but contributes with a substantial financial support that is granted on the basis of article 185 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU). The first five calls allocated more than 86 million of EU contribution to projects for more than 358 million. The EC contributed for a percentage that varies from 20.98% for call 2 to 28.66% for call 1. Table 42 AAL JP projects in a nutshell call 5* call 4 call 3 call 2 call 1 Total Cost 83,175,306 75,852,119 79,134,087 73,634,180 47,149,946 EC contribution 21,542,071 16,685,391 19,161,200 15,450,996 13,513,538 National contribution 27,085,628 21,218,723 24,857,178 26,484,842 15,574,715 Partner contribution 34,547,607 37,948,005 35,115,708 31,698,342 18,061,693 % EC contribution 25.90% 22.00% 24.21% 20.98% 28.66% * call 5 figures based on budgets before negotiations 32 See: 33 Greece officially left the AAL JP in Switzerland still subject of formal accession 104

125 Partners number Partners number AAL JP organisations and country distribution According to the AAL JP statistical reports, Spain has the strongest presence in the first five calls with more than 340 participations, followed by Germany (260) and Italy (179). The Netherland, France, Austria and the UK also have a strong presence in the Programme. Figure 89 AAL - Organisations in successful proposals for call 5 Project partners in ranked proposals (N=642) Figure 90 AAL - Organisations in successful proposals for call 4 Project partners in ranked proposals (N=444) Austria 38 Belgium 3 3 Cyprus Denmark Finland France 33 Germany 56 Ireland Israel Italy Luxembourg The Netherlands 55 Norway 12 Poland 4 Portugal 0 Romania 13 Slovenia Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom

126 Figure 91 AAL - Organisations in successful proposals for call 3 Figure 92 AAL - Organisations in successful proposals for call 2 Figure 93 AAL - Organisations in successful proposals for call 1 106

127 4.2.2 AAL and types of participating organisations SMEs are the more numerous type of organisation in AAL. Their share in terms of number of participations has been increasing steadily from 39% to 50% in call 4 and remains high in call 5. The share of research organisations has slightly decreased over the 5 calls (from 23% to 13%), while the participation of user organisations has increased. Figure 94 AAL - Organisation types in successful proposal for call 5 Organisation by type in ranked proposals N=(642) Users 20% Other 1% Large Enter 7% Universities 13% Research 13% Small Medium Enter 46% Figure 95 AAL - Organisation types in successful proposal for call 4 Organisation by type in ranked proposals (N=444) Universities 9,01% USER 16,44% Small Medium Enterpr. 49,77% Research 13,51% OTHER 0,68% Large Enterpr. 10,59% 107

128 Figure 96 AAL - Organisation types in successful proposal for call 3 Figure 97 AAL - Organisation types in successful proposal for call 2 108

129 Figure 98 AAL - Organisation types in successful proposal for call 1 109

130 5 PART III CIP ICT-PSP This chapter analyses the composition of the CIP ICT PSP programme, based on the analysis of projects signed as of 1 January The ICT PSP supports the realisation of European policies, in particular the Digital Agenda for Europe, and is aligned with its priorities. It aims at stimulating smart sustainable and inclusive growth by accelerating the wider uptake and best use of innovative digital technologies and content by citizens, governments and businesses. In addition to illustrating and validating the high value of digital technologies for the economy and society, it will foster the development of EU-wide markets for innovations enabling every company in Europe to benefit from the largest internal market in the world. Particular emphasis is put on areas of public interest, given their weight in the European economy and the unique solutions that ICT can bring to the societal challenges that lie ahead such as health and ageing, inclusion, energy efficiency, sustainable mobility, culture preservation and learning as well as efficient public administrations. The main challenges include the relatively slow uptake of ICT innovations in the public sector and the high fragmentation of relevant markets, due notably to a lack of interoperability between ICT solutions deployed across the member states and Associated Countries. The ICT PSP covers technological and non-technological innovations that have moved beyond the final research demonstration phase. The ICT PSP does not support research activities that fall under the scope of the FP7. There are no significant changes compared to the data included in StReAM 2011 as for the projects' structure and the average amounts of funding allocated to projects. The Europeana foundation is confirmed as the largest single recipients of funds (as in 2011), and Spain has overtaken Italy in 2012 in terms of funds received Portfolio analysis In a nutshell The CIP ICT PSP has allocated over the period million, distributed to 190 different projects and 3,395 participations from 2,314 different organisations; The average project receives around 2.45 million of EC funding, while the average funding per participation is 137,000; Pilot B types of projects received the bulk of funding, with 283 million, whereas Thematic Networks and Best Practise Network received only 28 and 59 million respectively; Public bodies represent 33% of funding received and 32% of participations; they also exceed 50% of funding received by Pilot A type of projects. SMEs receive 17% of total funding and account for 16% of participations Funding, participations and projects The CIP ICT PSP has allocated over the period million, divided in 190 different projects and 3,395 participations from 2,314 different organisations. The average 110

131 project receives around 2.45 million of EC funding (increased from 2.3 million in 2011), while the average funding per participation is 137,000 (lower than in 2011 and 2010). Table 43 Main data concerning CIP ICT PSP, (cumulated funding) CIP ICT PSP EC Funding 466,077,712 Number of projects 190 Participations 3,398 Organisations 2,314 Average EC funding per project 2,453,041 Average EC funding per participation 137,162 The fifth call was by the largest one as it allocated 115 million (Figure 99). Figure 99 CIP ICT PSP - Distribution of EC funding allocated by calls 111

132 5.1.3 Instruments CIP ICT PSP includes four different types of instrument: Pilot (Type A) - building on initiatives in Member States or associated countries; Pilot (Type B) - stimulating the uptake of innovative ICT based services and products; Thematic Networks (TN) - providing a forum for stakeholders for experience exchange and consensus building; Best Practices Networks (BPN) ad hoc instruments only active in certain scientific areas Pilot (Type A): this type of pilot focuses on implementing and demonstrating interoperability by creating service operations between cooperating Member States in the context of agreed policy priorities. Services should be already operational at national, regional or local level in the Member States or associated countries participating in the operation of the proposed pilot. Alternatively the services should be in advanced phase of national/regional testing. The main outcome of this type of pilot is the implementation of an open, common interoperable service solution based on an initial common specification agreed amongst participants in the pilot. Pilot (Type B): type B pilots aim at a first implementation of an ICT based innovative service addressing the needs of citizens, governments and businesses. The pilots should be carried out under realistic conditions. The emphasis is on fostering innovation in services, consequently the pilot may need to take-up completed R&D work, may extend already tested prototype services or may combine/integrate several partial solutions to realise a new innovative approach. Whichever approach is taken, the outcome of the work shall be an operational pilot service demonstrating significant impact potential. It is considered essential from the outset that the pilot will engage a complete value-chain of stakeholders in the work. Thematic Networks (TN): thematic networks address a common theme by bringing together relevant stakeholders, expertise and facilities with the objective of exploring new ways of implementing ICT-based solutions. The network may activate working groups, workshops and exchanges of good practices, with the aim of creating the necessary conditions and consensus on action plans, standards and specifications and in view to ensure the widest future replication and co-deployment of innovative solutions. The network should provide guidance for ICT-enabled solutions and their roll-out and will highlight the remaining obstacles to be overcome. Best Practice Network (BPN): Best Practice Network (BPN) was a funding instrument open only for the theme "digital libraries" for a transition period (up to 2011). The objective was to promote the adoption of standards and specifications for making European digital libraries more accessible and usable by combining the "consensus building and awareness raising" function of a network with the large-scale implementation in real-life context of one or more concrete specifications or standards by its members. Pilot B type of projects received more than half of funding available (60.8%) with 283 million (Figure 100), to which million of funding from partners are added. Thematic networks are covered for their entirety by EC funding, while Pilot A are covered by partners for more than half of the amount. 112

133 Figure 100 CIP ICT PSP EC budget distribution by instrument, (cumulated figures) Figure 101 CIP ICT PSP EC funding and total cost, (cumulated figures) 113

134 In terms of number of projects, Pilot B are the largest majority (126 out of 190, i.e. 66% of the total), whereas Pilot A are 11 (5 more than in 2011) and BPNs are 17 (13 more than in 2011). By crossing data on projects with those on EC funding, it is noted that there are differences in terms of average EC funding received by type of projects, with TN receiving around 787,000, and Pilot As reaching an average of 8.7 million. Similarly, Pilot B account for more than half of the total participations (53%), followed by the thematic networks (23%). Pilot A projects have the highest average number of participants per project (35, 32 in 2011 and 23 in 2010), while Pilot B only have 14 partners on average, indicating that pilot A tend to attract new participants as long as they mature. Pilot A also have the higher average EC funding per participant ( 245,800), whereas thematic networks have the lowest with an average EC funding of 36,200. Figure 102 CIP ICT PSP projects, (cumulated figures) Figure 103 CIP ICT PSP participations, (cumulated figures) 114

135 5.1.4 Analysis by organisation type Organisations taking part in the CIP ICT PSP are classified by type in the following categories: HES/REC (High Education and Schools and Research Centres); PUB (Public Bodies); SMEs (Small Medium Enterprise); LARGE (Large companies). Ministries and public bodies attract most of the funding (32%), followed by high education and research centres (30%) and large companies (21%). SMEs receive 17% of the total funding. However, large differences exist across instruments (Figure 104), confirming findings of 2011 data. Pilot A projects attract mainly governmental bodies and very few SMEs, while Pilot B have a more balanced presence of the various organisation types. Large companies represent more than 20% of funding for Pilot A and Pilot B projects, while SMEs reach the 20% threshold only in pilot B. Governmental bodies are attracting half of funding for thematic network, where the presence of private sector is limited (one fourth in total between large companies and SMEs). As for participations (Figure 105), the distribution by organisation type is similar to the distribution of the EC funding received. Figure 104 CIP ICT PSP EC Funding by type of organisation and instrument, (cumulated figures) 115

136 Figure 105 CIP ICT PSP participations by organisation type, (cumulated figures) 5.2 Top 20 participants In a nutshell Top 20 organisations and bodies represent more than 13% of funding; The top recipient at the end of 2012 was the Europeana foundation, which represents alone 2.5% of total funding Participations This section focuses on the main participants to CIP ICT-PSP projects. The top 20 organisations represent 13.3% (15.2% in 2011 and 17.3% in 2010) of the budget allocated. The Europeana foundation, which has its legal seat in the Netherlands, is the largest single recipient of CIP ICT PSP funding with 11.5 million and ten participations. The foundation is followed by the Norwegian Agency for Public Management and egovernment, with 5 million and three participations. Other large recipients include Atos (ES) and CapGemini (NL) together with public bodies such as regions (Bremen Veneto, Southern Denmark, Veneto), national bodies (such as the Justice ministry of Nordrhein Westfalen) but also several research centres (the Italian CNR and the Fraunhoefer Institute) and private companies (like Engineering or Empirica). Germany and the Netherlands have three organisations, whereas Denmark, Greece, Italy and Spain have two (Table 39). 116

137 Table 44 Top 20 participants in the CIP ICT PSP programme, (cumulated figures) # Participant Participations EC funding % EC funding Org_Type Country 1 STICHTING EUROPEANA 10 11,544, % PUB NL 2 DIREKTORATET FOR FORVALTNING OG IKT 4 5,050, % PUB NO 3 ATOS SPAIN SA 9 4,702, % LARGE ES 4 FRAUNHOFER-GESELLSCHAFT ZUR FOERDERUNG DER 19 3,425, % HES/REC DE ANGEWANDTEN FORSCHUNG E.V 5 CONSIGLIO NAZIONALE DELLE RICERCHE 16 3,295, % HES/REC IT 6 CAPGEMINI NEDERLAND BV 3 2,934, % LARGE NL 7 PEPPOL.AT CONSORTIUM MINISTRY OF FINANCE & 1 2,755, % LARGE AT FEDERAL COMPUTING CENTER & PUBLIC PROCUREMENT AGENCY GBR 8 ENGINEERING - INGEGNERIA INFORMATICA SPA 7 2,540, % LARGE IT 9 ARISTOTELIO PANEPISTIMIO THESSALONIKIS 7 2,528, % HES/REC GR 10 NATIONAL TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS 14 2,445, % HES/REC GR 11 EMPIRICA GESELLSCHAFT FUER KOMMUNIKATIONS- 8 2,441, % SME DE UND TECHNOLOGIE FORSCHUNG MBH 12 KONINKLIJKE BIBLIOTHEEK 5 2,298, % HES/REC NL 13 Justizministerium des Landes Nordrhein-Westfalen 1 2,240, % PUB DE 14 REGION SYDDANMARK 5 2,136, % PUB DK 15 ALFAMICRO-SISTEMAS DE COMPUTADORES, LDA 7 2,109, % SME PT 16 SVERIGES KOMMUNER OCH LANDSTING 2 2,040, % PUB SE 17 IT-OG TELESTYRELSEN*NATIONAL IT- AND TELECOM 2 2,022, % PUB DK AGENCY NITA 18 INTERDISCIPLINARY INSTITUTE FOR BROADBAND 9 1,941, % HES/REC BE TECHNOLOGY 19 STIFTUNG PREUSSISCHER KULTURBESITZ 7 1,893, % PUB DE 20 INVESTIGACION Y DESARROLLO INFORMATICO EIKON 4 1,791, % LARGE ES SL Total Top 20 participants 62,141, % 117

138 5.3 Country Analysis In a nutshell In absolute terms, Spain and Italy top the ranking in terms of number of participations, number of project coordinators and funding received. Compared to the size of their ICT sector, Lithuania, Malta, Greece, Latvia and Cyprus receive the highest funding; Almost all participations come from Member States (95%), with the important exception of Norway. Accession countries are increasing their presence in CIP ICT PSP projects compared to 2010; The Europeana foundation is the largest single recipient of EC funding under the CIP ICT PSP. Aggregate country analysis This section presents the statistics related to the geographical distribution of the EC funding and participations. Member States represent the bulk of EC funding and participations (Table 45), with more than 95% for a total funding of more than 445 million. Associated countries represent only 2.6% of participations and 2.7% of funding; these figures are lower if compared to the presence of associated countries in the FP7 ICT. Norway is the most important player under the CIP ICT PSP. Accession and third countries still receive a marginal but growing part of funding (1.8% in 2012 compared to 1.2% in 2011 and 0.4% in 2010), and have more participations than in 2011 (80 instead of 38). Overall therefore the CIP ICT PSP appears to be a programme focused on the Member States, with the important exception of Norway. Table 45 CIP ICT PSP - Participations and EC funding by country group, (cumulated figures) Participations % EC funding % MS 3, % 445,261, % ASS % 12,441, % ACC % 8,275, % OTHER 5 0.1% 100,376 0% 3, % 466,077, % Country analysis In 2012, Spain is the largest beneficiary in absolute terms, position held by Italy in 2010 and 2011, country that ranks second in Italy is followed by Germany, while the Netherlands rank fourth, followed by the UK and Greece (Table 46). Compared to the size of their ICT sector (Total ICT sector VA), Lithuania, Malta, Greece, Latvia and Cyprus receive the highest funding (Figure 108). In comparison with the national investment in ICT R&D, Lithuania, Latvia, Malta, Cyprus and Romania are the top recipients (Figure 109). Spanish organisations have also the highest number of participations (421, 12.4% of total participations), whereas Italian participations are 388 in total. Belgium ranks third with 273 participations (8%), although it ranks eight in terms of funding (6%), this suggests a smaller size for Belgian participations, probably due to the doubling of institutions present in the country. The United Kingdom accounts for 7.9% of participations, followed by Germany (7.7%). Third countries such as Monaco, the Vatican and Japan are also taking part in CIP ICT PSP projects, but they do not receive any funding 118

139 Table 46 CIP ICT PSP - Country distribution for EC funding and participations, (cumulated figures) Country Country group EC funding % Participations % 1 ES MS 60,458, % % 2 IT MS 57,109, % % 3 DE MS 45,764, % % 4 NL MS 40,455, % % 5 UK MS 35,655, % % 6 GR MS 29,664, % % 7 FR MS 28,056, % % 8 BE MS 27,646, % % 9 AT MS 17,974, % % 10 SE MS 14,772, % % 11 PT MS 14,093, % % 12 DK MS 12,562, % % 13 NO ASS 10,173, % % 14 FI MS 9,160, % % 15 IE MS 7,558, % % 16 CZ MS 5,441, % % 17 RO MS 5,241, % % 18 SI MS 4,692, % % 19 PL MS 4,255, % % 20 BG MS 3,971, % % 21 HU MS 3,770, % % 22 LU MS 3,612, % % 23 TR ACC 3,543, % % 24 EE MS 3,017, % % 25 HR ACC 2,855, % % 26 LV MS 2,522, % % 27 IS ASS 2,251, % % 28 CY MS 2,197, % % 29 LT MS 1,999, % % 30 SK MS 1,921, % % 31 RS ACC 1,876, % % 32 MT MS 1,423, % % 33 GB ASS 260, % % 34 GL OTHER 94, % % 35 CH OTHER 16, % % 36 LI ACC 5, % % 37 VA OTHER % % 38 JP OTHER % % 39 MK OTHER % % 40 MC OTHER % % Total 466,077, % 3, % The first five countries account for more than half of EC funding received (Figure 106), lower than for the FP7 programme, indicating that CIP ICT PSP is a programme with a more even allocation of funding among countries. Norway is the only non-member states that can be found in the upper part of the ranking, with 2.2% of EC funding. Italy and Spain have also the largest number of project coordinators with 38 and 36 projects respectively, followed by Germany (22) and Belgium (16). 119

140 Figure CIP ICT-PSP EC funding per Member State, (cumulated figures) Figure 107 CIP ICT PSP distribution of project coordinators, (cumulated figures) 120

141 Figure CIP ICT-PSP EC funding per Member State ( per million total ICT sector VA), 2009 Source: EUROSTAT, IPTS Figure CIP ICT-PSP EC funding per Member State (as % of ICT GERD), 2009 Source: EUROSTAT, IPTS 121

142 6 ANNEX 1 FP7 COUNTRY ANALYSIS 122

143 6.1 Austria & the ICT Theme of FP7 AUSTRIA: Total EC Funding: 216 M (3.5% of total) Total number of participations: 616 (3.4% of total) Number of project co-ordinations: 80 Cumulated figures over the period Key Messages With 3.5% of total funding, participation to 616 projects and 80 projects coordinated, Austrian organisations have been very active in the FP7-ICT Programme over the period ; Participation and funding have been rather consistent over the years , with an average participation to 90 projects per year, and average EC funding received of 37 million per year; Over the period , 193 organisations have participated to the FP-ICT Programme. In 2012 new organisations represented 36% of participants; Research organisations lead participation with 66% of funding, strongly dominated by 4 top institutes that together receive half of this (Technical University of Graz, Technical University of Wien, University of Innsbruck and the Joanneum Institute); The top 50 beneficiaries account for 82% of the total funding allocated to the country; In terms of geographical distribution, Vienna, Graz and Innsbruck are the main poles of research in the country; Although it has improved significantly since FP6, industrial participation remains relatively low at 37% with an equal relative share of funding (16%) going to large enterprises and SMEs; The main strengths are in the areas of FET, ICT for Learning, Intelligent Information Management. Austria is also very active in other strategic areas and has been at the origin of important developments, for instance in the areas of Embedded Systems and trustworthy ICT. 123

144 Figure 110 AT, Participation and EC funding, Figure 111 AT, Number of participating organisations and new entries,

145 Figure 112 AT - Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 113 AT Funding by organisation type, (cumulated figures) 125

146 Figure 114 AT - Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 115 AT - Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) 126

147 Figure 116 Top 50 AT organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) # Organisation Type EU funding % 1 TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITAET WIEN HES/REC 21,882, % 2 TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITAET GRAZ HES/REC 20,755, % 3 UNIVERSITAET INNSBRUCK HES/REC 16,377, % 4 JOANNEUM RESEARCH HES/REC 12,713, % FORSCHUNGSGESELLSCHAFT MBH 5 AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH HES/REC 8,754, % 6 UNIVERSITAET GRAZ HES/REC 6,387, % 7 INFINEON TECHNOLOGIES AUSTRIA AG LARGE 6,095, % 8 AMS AG LARGE 5,802, % 9 UNIVERSITAET WIEN HES/REC 5,350, % 10 TECHNIKON FORSCHUNGS- UND LARGE 4,967, % PLANUNGSGESELLSCHAFT MBH 11 SALZBURG RESEARCH HES/REC 4,790, % FORSCHUNGSGESELLSCHAFT M.B.H. 12 UNIVERSITAET LINZ HES/REC 4,800, % 13 CURE CENTRUM FUR DIE UNTERSUCHUNG HES/REC 3,994, % UND REALISIERUNG ENDBENUTZERORIENTIERTER INTERAKTIVER SYSTEME 14 MEDIZINISCHE UNIVERSITAT GRAZ HES/REC 3,312, % 15 FTW FORSCHUNGSZENTRUM HES/REC 3,311, % TELEKOMMUNIKATION WIEN GMBH 16 MEDIZINISCHE UNIVERSITAET WIEN HES/REC 3,194, % 17 PROFACTOR GMBH SME 2,694, % 18 BOC ASSET MANAGEMENT GMBH SME 2,369, % 19 OESTERREICHISCHE AKADEMIE DER HES/REC 2,349, % WISSENSCHAFTEN 20 AVL LIST GMBH LARGE 1,883, % 21 GUGER TECHNOLOGIES OEG SME 1,880, % 22 AT & S AUSTRIA TECHNOLOGIE & LARGE 1,783, % 23 UNIVERSITAET KLAGENFURT HES/REC 1,702, % 24 ZENTRUM FUER SOZIALE INNOVATION HES/REC 1,633, % 25 BOC INFORMATION SYSTEMS GMBH SME 1,555, % 26 GUGER TECHNOLOGIES OG SME 1,453, % 27 EV GROUP E. THALLNER GMBH LARGE 1,439, % 28 FACHHOCHSCHULE VORARLBERG GMBH HES/REC 1,355, % 29 KOMPETENZZENTRUM FUR HES/REC 1,348, % 30 OESTERREICHISCHE HES/REC 1,342, % 31 CELLENT AG LARGE 1,325, % 32 VEREIN ZUR FORDERUNG DER IT- HES/REC 1,302, % 33 OESTERREICHISCHE NIL 1,257, % 34 STI INTERNATIONAL CONSULTING UND SME 1,201, % 35 WIRTSCHAFTSUNIVERSITAT WIEN HES/REC 1,154, % 36 PARIS-LODRON-UNIVERSITÄT SALZBURG HES/REC 1,120, % 37 TTTECH COMPUTERTECHNIK AG SME 1,111, % 38 KONARKA AUSTRIA FORSCHUNGS UND SME 1,093, % 39 OESTERREICHISCHE HES/REC 1,093, % 40 IMS NANOFABRICATION AG SME 1,069, % 41 SEMANTIC TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE HES/REC 961, % 42 IN-VISION DIGITAL IMAGING OPTICS SME 939, % 43 ÖSTERREICHISCHES FORSCHUNGS- UND HES/REC 916, % 44 MONTANUNIVERSITAET LEOBEN HES/REC 902, % 45 SEMANTIC WEB COMPANY GMBH SME 818, % 46 FLUIDTIME DATA SERVICES GMBH SME 808, % 47 FH OO FORSCHUNGS & ENTWICKLUNGS HES/REC 794, % 48 LAM RESEARCH AG LARGE 779, % 49 INSET RESEARCH AND ADVISORY SME 749, % UNTERNEHMENSBERATUNG GMBH 50 BARTENBACH LICHTLABOR GMBH SME 717, % Total 216,330, % 127

148 6.2 Belgium & the ICT Theme of FP7 BELGIUM: Total EC Funding: 262 M (4.3% of total) Total number of participations: 722 (4% of total) Number of project co-ordinations: 97 Cumulated figures over the period Key Messages Belgium is an important player in the ICT field and participation has been fairly stable since FP5 (4.3% of total funding). Belgian organisations are very active in project coordination with 97 projects led; Participation and funding have been rather consistent over the years , with average 120 participation to projects per year, and average EC funding received of 44 million per year; Over the period , 208 organisations have participated to the FP-ICT Programme. In 2012 new organisations represented 43% of participants; Belgian research organisations lead participation with 68% of funding. Research participation is very strongly concentrated in IMEC and KUL (who together account for 36% of funding). VUB and Catholic university of Louvain also rank high among the top 50 beneficiaries; SMEs account for 11% of funding, while large enterprises account for 15%. Alcatel is the first company by funding; The top 50 beneficiaries account for 87% of the total funding allocated to the country; In terms of geographical distribution, Leuven is the first pole of research, followed by Brussels and other Flemish hubs such as Antwerpen and Gent; The main strengths are in the areas of future networks and Internet, Nanoelectronics, Photonics, ICT for Transport, where Belgium's participation is above the EU average, FET and ICT for Health (in line with EU average). 128

149 Figure 117 BE, Participation and EC funding, Figure 118 BE, Number of participating organisations and new entries,

150 Figure 119 BE- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 120 BE - Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) 130

151 Figure 121 BE- Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 122 BE- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) 131

152 Figure 123 Top 50 BE organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) # Organisation Type EU funding % 1 INTERUNIVERSITAIR MICRO-ELECTRONICA CENTRUM VZW HES/REC 61,174, % 2 KATHOLIEKE UNIVERSITEIT LEUVEN HES/REC 33,597, % 3 IMINDS VZW HES/REC 20,162, % EUROPEAN ROAD TRANSPORT TELEMATICS IMPLEMENTATION COORDINATION 11,812, % 4 ORGANISATION S.C.R.L. LARGE 5 UNIVERSITEIT GENT HES/REC 10,338, % 6 VRIJE UNIVERSITEIT BRUSSEL HES/REC 8,675, % 7 ALCATEL-LUCENT BELL NV LARGE 7,712, % 8 UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE DE LOUVAIN HES/REC 7,602, % 9 UNIVERSITE LIBRE DE BRUXELLES HES/REC 4,650, % CUSTODIX NV 3,796, % 10 SME JRC -JOINT RESEARCH CENTRE- EUROPEAN COMMISSION 3,785, % 11 HES/REC 12 EUN Partnership AISBL NIL 3,466, % UNIVERSITEIT ANTWERPEN 3,231, % 13 HES/REC 14 UNIVERSITE DE LIEGE HES/REC 3,045, % MULTITEL ASBL 2,772, % 15 HES/REC CENTRE D'EXCELLENCE EN TECHNOLOGIES DE L'INFORMATION ET DE LA COMMUNICATION 2,564, % 16 HES/REC 17 UNIVERSITE DE MONS HES/REC 2,482, % 18 AGILENT TECHNOLOGIES BELGIUM NV LARGE 2,460, % VLAAMSE INSTELLING VOOR TECHNOLOGISCH ONDERZOEK N.V. 2,351, % 19 HES/REC 20 AGFA HEALTHCARE N.V. LARGE 1,989, % 21 UNIVERSITEIT HASSELT HES/REC 1,906, % 22 AGENTSCHAP VOOR INNOVATIE DOOR WETENSCHAP EN TECHNOLOGIE NIL 1,898, % 23 SPACE APPLICATIONS SERVICES NV SME 1,785, % 24 AGFA-GEVAERT N.V. SME 1,587, % 25 SPACEBEL SA SME 1,536, % 26 Xenics nv SME 1,449, % 27 NXP SEMICONDUCTORS BELGIUM NV LARGE 1,306, % 28 MATERIALISE NV LARGE 1,245, % 29 LMS INTERNATIONAL NV LARGE 1,026, % 30 RESEARCH IN ADVANCED MEDICAL INFORMATION AND TELEMATICS VZW HES/REC 1,008, % 31 BREAST INTERNATIONAL GROUP - AISBL HES/REC 1,002, % 32 Institut Jules Bordet HES/REC 997, % 33 GFI ADELIOR NV LARGE 977, % 34 TYCO ELECTRONICS RAYCHEM BVBA LARGE 968, % 35 ON SEMICONDUCTOR BELGIUM BVBA LARGE 929, % 36 LABORATOIRE VIRTUEL EUROPEEN DANS LE DOMAINE DE L'INTEROPERABILITE DES NIL 905, % 37 European Network of Living Labs NIL 887, % 38 BARCO NV LARGE 867, % 39 NEWTEC CY NV LARGE 829, % 40 TECHNICAL SUPPORT FOR EUROPEAN ORGANISATIONS SPRL SME 827, % 41 RESEAU MENON E.E.I.G. HES/REC 807, % 42 SPIKES SME 801, % 43 EUROPE UNLIMITED S.A. SME 786, % 44 POLIS - PROMOTION OF OPERATIONAL LINKS WITH INTEGRATED SERVICES, ASSOCIATION NIL 777, % 45 MAGWEL NV SME 768, % 46 CMOSIS NV SME 753, % 47 EPIGAN BVBA SME 726, % 48 TENFORCE BVBA* SME 706, % 4C TECHNOLOGIES NV 703, % 49 LARGE 50 LOGIT SYSTEMS BVBA SME 687, % Total 262,109, % 132

153 6.3 Bulgaria& the ICT Theme of FP7 BULGARIA: Total EC Funding: 11.1M (0.2% of total) Total number of participations: 72 (0.4% of total) Number of project co-ordinations: 0 Cumulated figures over the period Key Messages Bulgarian participation has remained stable at 0.2% since FP6. No Bulgarian organisations are project coordinators; Over the period , 37 organisations have participated to the FP-ICT Programme. In 2012 half of participants were new organisations; There has been a very strong SME s participation in FP7 (more than 4 times the EU average in terms of funding). SMEs currently account for 66% funding and 49% of all Bulgarian participations. Participation of Research institutions is conversely low (43%); Sofia is the main and only hub for Bulgarian research and development; Areas of relative strength include Intelligent Information Management, Networked Media, Language Technologies and ICT for inclusion; Areas with low participation include some of the key enabling technologies. FET, Micro/nanosystems, Photonics, Organic and large area electronics are among the key areas where no Bulgarian organisation is present. 133

154 Figure 124 BG, Participation and EC funding, Figure 125 BG, Number of participating organisations and new entries,

155 Figure 126 BG - Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 127 BG - Funding by organisation type, (cumulated figures) 135

156 Figure 128 BG - Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 129 BG - Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) 136

157 Figure 130 BG organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) # Organisation Type EU funding % 1 Ontotext AD SME 4,133, % 2 INSTITUTE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES HES/REC 897, % 3 MM SOLUTIONS AD SME 710, % 4 MARIE CURIE ASSOCIATION HES/REC 657, % 5 SOFIISKI UNIVERSITET SVETI KLIMENT OHRIDSKI HES/REC 630, % 6 INSTITUTE FOR PARALLEL PROCESSING OF THE BULGARIAN ACADEMY HES/REC 558, % 7 OF TechnoLogica SCIENCES EAD SME 483, % 8 MICROSYSTEMS LTD SME 403, % 9 COMMETRIC EOOD SME 314, % 10 VIRTECH LTD SME 283, % 11 I-SOFT OOD SME 166, % 12 ASTEA SOLUTIONS AD SME 136, % 13 UNIVERSITY OF RUSE ANGEL KANCHEV HES/REC 129, % 14 INSTITUTE OF SYSTEMS ENGINEERING AND ROBOTICS - BULGARIAN HES/REC 127, % ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 15 Leading Edge S.N.C. di Vergine Pietro e Woolaway Nigel Robert SME 125, % 16 HONEYWELL EOOD LARGE 114, % 17 WEBGATE AD SME 114, % 18 PARALLEL WORLD SDRUZHENIE HES/REC 104, % 19 Favit Network EOOD SME 103, % 20 ENERGY AGENCY OF PLOVDIV ASSOCIATION HES/REC 99, % 21 KODAR OOD SME 96, % 22 URSIT OOD SME 92, % 23 OBSHTINA IVANOVO NIL 89, % 24 AGENCY FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND EUROINTEGRATION - HES/REC 88, % 25 MIKROPROCESORNI USTROISTVA I SISTEMI ZA TRANSPORTA SME 86, % 26 SDRUZENIE BULGARSKA ASOCIACIA NA SOFTUERNITE KOMPANII NIL 85, % 27 CENTRAL LABORATORY OF GENERAL ECOLOGY - ZENTRALNA HES/REC 79, % 28 INFO-LOGICA OOD SME 78, % 29 GAMA/SOFIA LTD SME 62, % 30 UNIVERSITY SPECIALIZED HOSPITAL FOR ACTIVE TREATMENT OF SME 55, % 31 TSENTAR ZA GRADSKA MOBILNOST EOOD LARGE 36, % 32 Solarpro EAD SME 34, % 33 ASSOCIATION "NATIONAL CENTRE FOR SUPERCOMPUTING HES/REC 30, % 34 NACIONALNA BIBLIOTEKA SV SV CYRIL I METODIJ (St. St. Cyril and HES/REC 30, % 35 SIRMA SOLUTIONS JSC SME 26, % 36 CENTRAL LABORATORY OF MECHATRONICS AND INSTRUMENTATION HES/REC 20, % 37 TECHNOLOGICA EOOD LARGE 0 0.0% 38 INSTITUT PO BIORAZNOOBRAZIE I EKOSISTEMNI IZSLEDVANIYA HES/REC 0 0.0% Total 11,288, % 137

158 6.4 Cyprus & the ICT Theme of FP7 CYPRUS: Total EC Funding: 18.1M (0.3% of total) Total number of participations: 68 (0.4% of total) Number of project co-ordinations: 2 Cumulated figures over the period Key Messages EC funding contribution to Cyprus has increased from ~0.2%/ 9.3M in FP6 to ~0,3%/ 18.1M ( ) in FP7; Over the period , 30 organisations have participated to the FP-ICT Programme. In 2012 half of participants were new organisations; Industrial participation is very high, with SMEs accounting for about one fourth of the total funding allocated to the country and large enterprises for 20%, and is concentrated in a handful of organizations; The main recipient is the University of Cyprus which accounts for 43% of all funding; Areas of strength include key areas such as Future networks and Internet, Micro/nanosystems, Embedded systems and ICT for Health; No regional breakdown is provided as Cyprus is considered as a single NUTS 3 region. 138

159 Figure 131 CY, Participation and EC funding, Figure 132 CY, Number of participating organisations and new entries,

160 Figure 133 CY- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 134 CY Funding by organisation type, (cumulated figures) 140

161 Figure 135 CY- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) 141

162 Figure 136 Top 30 CY organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) 142

163 6.5 Czech Republic & the ICT Theme of FP7 CZECH REPUBLIC: Total EC Funding: 30.5M (0.5% of total) Total number of participations: 118 (0.6% of total) Number of project co-ordinations: 1 Cumulated figures over the period Key Messages Czech participation has decreased from ~0.7% in FP6 to ~0.5% in FP7 ( ). Only 1 project is coordinated by Czech organizations; Over the period , 56 organisations have participated to the FP-ICT Programme. In 2012 new organisations represented 54% of participants; With 24% of total funding allocated, SME s participation in FP7 is strong. Participation of Research institutions represents 57% of total funding and is strongly concentrated in a handful of organizations including the Czech Technical University in Prague and in Brno and Karl University in Prague; Areas of strength include Cognitive systems and Robotics, ICT for Health, and ICT for Inclusion, but also Language Technology and ICT for the Enterprise and Transport; Funding is geographically concentrated in Prague and Brno. 143

164 Figure 137 CZ, Participation and EC funding, Figure 138 CZ, Number of participating organisations and new entries,

165 Figure 139 CZ - Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 140 CZ Funding by organisation type, (cumulated figures) 145

166 Figure 141 CZ - Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 142 CZ - Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) 146

167 Figure 143 Top 50 CZ organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) 147

168 6.6 Denmark & the ICT Theme of FP7 Denmark: Total EC Funding: 79.9M (1.3% of total) Total number of participations: 225 (1.2% of total) Number of project co-ordinations: 18 Cumulated figures over the period Key Messages Danish participation in the ICT Programme had decreased between FP5 and FP6 from 1.6% to 1.3% and it is at 1.3% of the total funding in FP7 ( ); Over the period , 84 organisations have participated to the FP-ICT Programme. In 2012 new organisations represented 44% of participants; Although it has improved significantly since FP6, industrial participation remains low at 26% overall, with large enterprises receiving l1% of funding and 15% going to SMEs; Research organizations lead participation with 67% of funding, strongly dominated by a few top universities (very strong concentration in Aalborg U ~21%); In regional terms funding is directed mainly towards Nordjylland and the Copenhagen area; Main strengths are in FET, but Denmark is very strong in all technological areas (e.g. photonics), as well as in some application areas with a very strong presence in ICT for health and ICT for energy efficiency. 148

169 Figure 144 DK, Participation and EC funding, Figure 145 DK, Number of participating organisations and new entries,

170 Figure 146 DK - Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 147 DK Funding by organisation type, (cumulated figures) 150

171 Figure 148 DK - Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 149 DK - Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) 151

172 Figure 150 Top 50 DK organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) 152

173 6.7 Estonia & the ICT Theme of FP7 ESTONIA: Total EC Funding: 7.7M (0.1% of total) Total number of participations: 34 (0.2% of total) Number of project co-ordinations: 4 Cumulated figures over the period Key Messages Estonian participation has remained around 0.1~0.15% (as in FP6) in terms of funding; Over the period , 20 organisations have participated to the FP-ICT Programme. In 2012 new organisations represented half of the participants; Areas of strength are ICT for Learning (27% of total funding), FET, Trustworthy ICT, whereas areas with low participation include Photonics, Organic and large area electronics, where no Estonian organisation is present; More than half of total funding (52%) is allocated to research centres and universities, with the main recipients being all the technical universities, located either in Tallinn or in Tartu. SMEs represent 17% of total funding allocated and large enterprises 25%; The two regions that received FP7 funding so far are the ones around Tallinn and Tartu. 153

174 Figure 151 EE, Participation and EC funding, Figure 152 EE, Number of participating organisations and new entries,

175 Figure 153 EE- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 154 EE Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) 155

176 Figure 155 EE- Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 156 EE - Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) 156

177 Figure 157 EE organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) # Organisation Type EU funding % 1 TALLINNA TEHNIKAULIKOOL HES/REC 1,476, % 2 TARTU ULIKOOL HES/REC 1,368, % 3 CYBERNETICA AS LARGE 1,332, % 4 TALLINN UNIVERSITY HES/REC 802, % 5 TALLINNA TEHNIKAUELIKOOLI KUEBERNEETIKA INSTITUUT HES/REC 351, % 6 AKTSIASELTS SERTIFITSEERIMISKESKUS LARGE 252, % 7 REALEYES OU SME 247, % 8 RAHVUSARHIIV NIL 226, % 9 APPRISE OU SME 220, % 10 TIIGRIHUPPE SIHTASUTUS NIL 193, % 11 TARTU BIOTEHNOLOOGIA PARK AS LARGE 174, % 12 EUPROCOM OU SME 167, % 13 OÜ TESTONICA LAB SME 162, % 14 NORTAL AS SME 153, % 15 OU ELIKO TEHNOLOOGIA ARENDUSKESKUS LARGE 141, % 16 EPLER & LORENZ AS SME 134, % 17 OÜ Skeleton Technologies SME 133, % 18 Elvior OÜ SME 125, % 19 Eesti Opetajate Liit LARGE 65, % 20 SIHTASUTUS ARCHIMEDES NIL 13, % Total 7,745, % 157

178 6.8 Finland & the ICT Theme of FP7 FINLAND: Total EC Funding: M (2.2% of total) Total number of participations: 408 (2.2% of total) Number of project co-ordinations: 37 Cumulated figures over the period Key Messages Finland is a very important player in the ICT field and participation in the FP7 ICT Theme has risen from ~1.1% in FP5 and has remained fairly stable at ~2.2%; Participation and funding have been rather consistent over the years , with an average participation to 6 projects per year (10 in the first two years of the programme), and average EC funding received of 22.5 million per year; Over the period , 122 organisations have participated to the FP-ICT Programme. In 2012 new organisations represented 36% of participants; Research institutes' participation is very important (76%) and strongly concentrated in VTT (with more than 42% of funding alone); Nokia, Nokia-Siemens and the Ericsson Group lead industrial participation. Industrial participation is barely above 20% overall (including both large and small companies); The region around Helsinki attracts almost 80% of funding, with some other players clustered in innovative cities; The main strengths are in the areas of Future networks and Internet, micro/nanosystems, organic and large area electronics, but also in ICT for Energy- Efficiency and ICT for Transport. 158

179 Figure 158 FI, Participation and EC funding, Figure 159 FI, Number of participating organisations and new entries,

180 Figure 160 FI - Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 161 FI Funding by organisation type, (cumulated figures) 160

181 Figure 162 FI - Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 163 FI - Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) 161

182 Figure 164 Top 50 FI organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) # Organisation Type EU funding % 1 TEKNOLOGIAN TUTKIMUSKESKUS VTT HES/REC 54,418, % 2 AALTO-KORKEAKOULUSAATIO HES/REC 16,566, % 3 OULUN YLIOPISTO HES/REC 8,755, % 4 TTY-SAATIO HES/REC 4,923, % 5 NOKIA OYJ LARGE 4,477, % 6 TEKNILLINEN KORKEAKOULU HES/REC 4,239, % 7 HELSINGIN YLIOPISTO HES/REC 3,376, % 8 NOKIA SIEMENS NETWORKS OY LARGE 2,045, % 9 ABO AKADEMI HES/REC 1,514, % 10 TIETO-JA VIESTINTATEOLLISUUDEN TUTKIMUS TIVIT OY NIL 1,475, % 11 DIGITAL MEDIA INNOVATIONS FINLAND DIMES RY SME 1,225, % 12 GRANLUND OY LARGE 1,196, % 13 LAPPEENRANNAN TEKNILLINEN YLIOPISTO HES/REC 1,191, % 14 OY L M ERICSSON AB LARGE 1,121, % 15 JYVASKYLAN YLIOPISTO HES/REC 1,042, % 16 TAMPEREEN TEKNILLINEN YLIOPISTO HES/REC 982, % 17 MEGA ELEKTRONIIKKA OY SME 911, % 18 ILMATIETEEN LAITOS HES/REC 858, % 19 MODULIGHT OY SME 691, % 20 SENSINODE OY SME 651, % 21 GEODEETTINEN LAITOS HES/REC 647, % 22 TAMPEREEN YLIOPISTO HES/REC 602, % 23 VARSINAIS-SUOMEN SAIRAANHOITOPIIRIN KUNTAYHTYMA HES/REC 597, % 24 GLOBAL INNOVATION NETWORK OY SME 594, % 25 ITÄ-SUOMEN YLIOPISTO HES/REC 592, % 26 CANATU OY SME 553, % 27 VAIBMU OY SME 537, % 28 ABB OY LARGE 503, % 29 RENESAS MOBILE EUROPE OY LARGE 493, % 30 YIT Kiinteistötekniikka Oy LARGE 486, % 31 FORECA CONSULTING OY SME 483, % 32 POYRY FINLAND OY LARGE 482, % 33 OULU INNOVATION OY HES/REC 480, % 34 RAMBOLL FINLAND OY LARGE 464, % 35 CASCARD OY SME 458, % 36 SPACE SYSTEMS FINLAND OY SME 451, % 37 VAASAETT LTD AB OY SME 431, % 38 CULMINATUM INNOVATION OY LTD NIL 421, % 39 MEDICEL OY SME 418, % 40 CSC-TIETEEN TIETOTEKNIIKAN KESKUS OY NIL 407, % 41 TELLABS OY LARGE 400, % 42 EMTELE OY SME 375, % 43 ACCANTO SYSTEMS OY SME 366, % 44 MATTERSOFT OY SME 350, % 45 FLUIDHOUSE OY - FH SME 346, % 46 CLOTHING PLUS OY LARGE 341, % 47 SUOMEN PUNAINEN RISTI NIL 339, % 48 GASERA OY SME 336, % 49 HYTEST OY SME 331, % 50 Enfucell Oy SME 322, % Total 134,888, % 162

183 6.9 France and the ICT Theme of FP7 FRANCE: Total EC Funding: 615.3M (10% of total) Total number of participations: 1,948 (10.7% of total) Number of project co-ordinations: 185 Cumulated figures over the period Key Messages France is one of the main players in ICT Research, although participation in the Programme has decreased in the past few years (FP6: ~12.6% - FP7:10%); Funding had decreased in the years 2008 and 2009, but in the past three years it averaged 108 million per year; One fifth of total funding is allocated to research in Future Networks and Internet and 11% in FET. French organisations are extremely strong in these main technologies and theoretical research (as well as photonics, nanoelectronics and embedded systems); Industrial participation is very high, with Large Enterprises accounting for 30% of total funding and SMEs for 16%. Both large enterprise and research participation is characterised by a relatively strong concentration in a few big players; The French main players are concentrated in Paris and the Parisian basin (Hauts de Seine, Yvelines) and other areas around Nice, Grenoble and Toulouse. 163

184 Figure 165 FR, Participation and EC funding, Figure 166 FR, Number of participating organisations and new entries,

185 Figure 167 FR- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 168 FR Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) 165

186 Figure 169 FR- Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 170 FR- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) 166

187 Figure 171 Top 50 FR organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) # Organisation Type EU funding % 1 COMMISSARIAT A L ENERGIE ATOMIQUE ET AUX ENERGIES ALTERNATIVES HES/REC 87,156, % 2 CENTRE NATIONAL DE LA RECHERCHE SCIENTIFIQUE HES/REC 46,060, % 3 INSTITUT NATIONAL DE RECHERCHE EN INFORMATIQUE ET EN AUTOMATIQUE HES/REC 39,158, % 4 THALES COMMUNICATIONS & SECURITY SAS LARGE 29,787, % 5 FRANCE TELECOM SA LARGE 21,132, % 6 Institut Mines-Telecom HES/REC 15,243, % 7 THALES SA LARGE 13,337, % 8 EURECOM HES/REC 12,873, % 9 UNIVERSITE PIERRE ET MARIE CURIE - PARIS 6 HES/REC 12,178, % 10 III V LAB GIE HES/REC 10,566, % 11 ALCATEL - LUCENT BELL LABS FRANCE LARGE 9,624, % 12 GEIE ERCIM SME 7,354, % 13 TECHNICOLOR R&D FRANCE SNC LARGE 7,092, % 14 INSTITUT NATIONAL DE LA SANTE ET DE LA RECHERCHE MEDICALE (INSERM) HES/REC 6,959, % 15 THALES SERVICES SAS LARGE 6,222, % 16 UNIVERSITE JOSEPH FOURIER GRENOBLE 1 HES/REC 5,287, % 17 EBERHARD KARLS UNIVERSITAET TUEBINGEN HES/REC 5,023, % 18 SOFTEAM LARGE 4,683, % 19 TRIALOG SME 4,032, % 20 XEROX SAS LARGE 3,661, % 21 UNIVERSITE PARIS DIDEROT - PARIS 7 HES/REC 3,491, % 22 SIGMA ORIONIS SME 3,455, % 23 RENAULT s.a.s. represented by GIE REGIENOV LARGE 3,045, % 24 ASSOCIATION POUR LA RECHERCHE ET LE DEVELOPPEMENT DES METHODES ET HES/REC 3,027, % 25 STMICROELECTRONICS S.A. LARGE 2,960, % 26 THALES ALENIA SPACE FRANCE LARGE 2,959, % 27 CENTRE SCIENTIFIQUE ET TECHNIQUE DU BATIMENT HES/REC 2,908, % 28 UNIVERSITE DE RENNES I HES/REC 2,864, % 29 ASTRIUM SAS LARGE 2,847, % 30 UNIVERSITE PAUL SABATIER TOULOUSE III HES/REC 2,759, % 31 JCP-CONSULT SAS SME 2,754, % 32 UNIVERSITE DE FRANCHE-COMTE HES/REC 2,728, % 33 SEQUANS COMMUNICATIONS SA SME 2,720, % 34 CASSIDIAN SAS LARGE 2,706, % 35 STMICROELECTRONICS CROLLES 2 SAS LARGE 2,582, % 36 MORPHO LARGE 2,444, % 37 EUROPEAN AERONAUTIC DEFENCE AND SPACE COMPANY EADS FRANCE SAS SME 2,335, % 38 EBM WEBSOURCING SAS SME 2,314, % 39 GEMALTO SA LARGE 2,285, % 40 INSTITUT FRANCAIS DES SCIENCES ET TECHNOLOGIES DES TRANSPORTS, DE HES/REC 2,196, % 41 ECOLE SUPERIEURE D'ELECTRICITE HES/REC 2,179, % 42 UNIVERSITE PARIS-SUD HES/REC 2,105, % 43 TECHNICOLOR R&D PARIS SNC LARGE 1,976, % 44 SAGEMCOM ENERGY & TELECOM SAS LARGE 1,975, % 45 SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC INDUSTRIES SAS LARGE 1,958, % 46 INSTITUT FRANCAIS DE RECHERCHE POUR L'EXPLOITATION DE LA MER HES/REC 1,931, % 47 UNIVERSITE BORDEAUX I HES/REC 1,899, % 48 STMICROELECTRONICS GRENOBLE 2 SAS LARGE 1,876, % 49 Bull SAS LARGE 1,876, % 50 HITACHI EUROPE SAS LARGE 1,857, % Total 615,322, % 167

188 6.10 Germany & the ICT Theme of FP7 GERMANY: Total EC Funding: 1,283M (21% of total) Total number of participations: 3,086 (17% of total) Number of project co-ordinations: 341 Cumulated figures over the period Key Messages Germany is one of the key players in ICT Research, with 21% of total allocated funding in FP7 over the period projects are coordinated by German organizations; Research institutions account for 60% of total funding, and the industry involvement is also very high (26% of funding to large enterprises, 12% to SMEs) across the Programme. Fraunhoefer is the largest participant in the programme far ahead of all others; Companies like SAP, Infineon, OSRAM are also main beneficiaries and ICT user industries like Siemens health, Volkswagen group and Daimler AG; The main strengths are in Cognitive systems and robotics, photonics, ICT for transport and ICT for the enterprise; Funding is geographically concentrated around Munich, Baden-Württemberg (Rhein- Neckar-Kreis), and in major cities such Frankfurt, Berlin and Dresden. 168

189 Figure 172 DE, Participation and EC funding, Figure 173 DE, Number of participating organisations and new entries,

190 Figure 174 DE - Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 175 DE Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) 170

191 Figure 176 DE - Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 177 DE - Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) 171

192 Figure 178 Top 50 DE organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) # Organisation Type EU funding % 1 FRAUNHOFER-GESELLSCHAFT ZUR FOERDERUNG DER ANGEWANDTEN FORSCHUNG E.V HES/REC 188,949, % 2 SAP AG LARGE 75,135, % 3 TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITAET DRESDEN HES/REC 25,938, % 4 DEUTSCHES ZENTRUM FUER LUFT - UND RAUMFAHRT EV HES/REC 25,858, % 5 DEUTSCHES FORSCHUNGSZENTRUM FUER KUENSTLICHE INTELLIGENZ GMBH HES/REC 25,094, % 6 UNIVERSITAET STUTTGART HES/REC 23,759, % 7 TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITAT BERLIN HES/REC 23,448, % 8 Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie HES/REC 22,810, % 9 RHEINISCH-WESTFAELISCHE TECHNISCHE HOCHSCHULE AACHEN HES/REC 22,550, % 10 TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITAET MUENCHEN HES/REC 20,449, % 11 SIEMENS AG LARGE 20,020, % 12 ALCATEL-LUCENT DEUTSCHLAND AG LARGE 16,194, % 13 INFINEON TECHNOLOGIES AG LARGE 14,975, % 14 MAX PLANCK GESELLSCHAFT ZUR FOERDERUNG DER WISSENSCHAFTEN E.V. HES/REC 13,329, % 15 ROBERT BOSCH GMBH LARGE 13,043, % 16 UNIVERSITAET DUISBURG-ESSEN HES/REC 12,712, % 17 GOTTFRIED WILHELM LEIBNIZ UNIVERSITAET HANNOVER HES/REC 12,711, % 18 TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITAET DARMSTADT HES/REC 11,548, % 19 IHP GMBH - INNOVATIONS FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE MICROELECTRONICS/LEIBNIZ- HES/REC 11,540, % 20 INSTITUT UNIVERSITAET FUER BREMEN INNOVATIVE MIKROELEKTRONIK HES/REC 11,004, % 21 PHILIPS TECHNOLOGIE GMBH LARGE 10,883, % 22 FORSCHUNGSZENTRUM INFORMATIK AN DER UNIVERSITAET KARLSRUHE HES/REC 9,991, % 23 RUHR-UNIVERSITAET BOCHUM HES/REC 9,087, % 24 ALBERT-LUDWIGS-UNIVERSITAET FREIBURG HES/REC 8,727, % 25 JULIUS-MAXIMILIANS UNIVERSITAET WUERZBURG HES/REC 8,649, % 26 INSTITUT FUER MIKROTECHNIK MAINZ GMBH HES/REC 7,914, % 27 DEUTSCHE TELEKOM AG LARGE 7,781, % 28 BUNDESMINISTERIUM FUER BILDUNG UND FORSCHUNG NIL 7,587, % 29 VOLKSWAGEN AG LARGE 7,538, % 30 OFFIS E.V. HES/REC 7,308, % 31 UNIVERSITAET KOBLENZ-LANDAU HES/REC 7,266, % 32 TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITAET ILMENAU HES/REC 7,241, % 33 EADS DEUTSCHLAND GMBH LARGE 7,179, % 34 EURESCOM-EUROPEAN INSTITUTE FOR RESEARCH AND STRATEGIC STUDIES IN LARGE 7,063, % 35 TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITAET DORTMUND HES/REC 7,046, % 36 JACOBS UNIVERSITY BREMEN GGMBH HES/REC 6,739, % 37 Continental Automotive GmbH LARGE 6,634, % 38 Universität Passau HES/REC 6,612, % 39 UNIVERSITAET DES SAARLANDES HES/REC 6,502, % 40 UNIVERSITAET BIELEFELD HES/REC 6,383, % 41 OSRAM OPTO SEMICONDUCTORS GMBH LARGE 6,068, % 42 UNIVERSITAET ULM HES/REC 6,028, % 43 LUDWIG-MAXIMILIANS-UNIVERSITAET MUENCHEN HES/REC 5,869, % 44 UNIVERSITAET PADERBORN HES/REC 5,797, % 45 TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITAET BRAUNSCHWEIG HES/REC 5,781, % 46 KUKA Laboratories GmbH LARGE 5,667, % 47 RUPRECHT-KARLS-UNIVERSITAET HEIDELBERG HES/REC 5,575, % 48 DAIMLER AG LARGE 5,532, % 49 INSTITUT FUER RUNDFUNKTECHNIK GMBH HES/REC 5,513, % 50 VDI/VDE INNOVATION + TECHNIK GMBH LARGE 5,488, % Total 1,283,042, % 172

193 6.11 Greece & the ICT Theme of FP7 GREECE: Total EC Funding: M (4.2% of total) Total number of participations: 744 (4% of total) Number of project co-ordinations: 101 Cumulated figures over the period Key Messages Greek participation has been stable around 4.2% since FP6. In terms of of EC funding per million of GDP, Greece ranks highest among the EU Member States as for funding received. 101 projects are coordinated by Greek organization; Research participation is very important (75%) and research institutions occupy the first ten positions among recipients. Funding to SMEs is in line with the EU average (16%), whereas large enterprises are weakly represented (8% only); The main strengths are in the areas of future networks and internet, software and embedded systems, ICT for Health, ICT for Ageing and; More than half of funding is directed towards Athens and the Attica region. Other hubs can be found in Thessaloniki, Iraklion and Patras. 173

194 Figure 1 EL, Participation and EC funding, Figure 179 EL, Number of participating organisations and new entries,

195 Figure 3 EL - Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 180 EL Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) 175

196 Figure 181 EL - Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 5 EL - Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) 176

197 Figure 6 Top 50 EL organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) # Organisation Type EU funding % 1 CENTRE FOR RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY HELLAS HES/REC 33,822, % 2 INSTITUTE OF COMMUNICATION AND COMPUTER SYSTEMS HES/REC 31,248, % 3 FOUNDATION FOR RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY HELLAS HES/REC 23,396, % 4 NATIONAL AND KAPODISTRIAN UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS HES/REC 12,867, % 5 NATIONAL CENTER FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH "DEMOKRITOS" HES/REC 12,282, % 6 UNIVERSITY OF PATRAS HES/REC 9,985, % 7 RESEARCH AND EDUCATION LABORATORY IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES HES/REC 8,793, % 8 ATHENA RESEARCH AND INNOVATION CENTER IN INFORMATION COMMUNICATION & HES/REC 7,759, % KNOWLEDGE TECHNOLOGIES 9 ARISTOTELIO PANEPISTIMIO THESSALONIKIS HES/REC 7,092, % 10 NATIONAL TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS HES/REC 6,766, % 11 COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE & PRESS DIOPHANTUS HES/REC 6,624, % 12 ATHENS TECHNOLOGY CENTER SA SME 6,401, % 13 INTRACOM SA TELECOM SOLUTIONS LARGE 4,781, % 14 ATHENS UNIVERSITY OF ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS - RESEARCH CENTER HES/REC 4,672, % 15 SINGULARLOGIC ANONYMI ETAIRIA PLIROFORIAKON SISTIMATON KAI EFARMOGON LARGE 3,739, % PLIROFORIKIS 16 Amerikaniko Kollegio Anatolia HES/REC 3,343, % 17 UNIVERSITY OF PIRAEUS RESEARCH CENTER HES/REC 3,223, % 18 Velti Anonymos Etairia Proionton Logismikou & Synafon Proionton & Ypiresion LARGE 3,037, % 19 EXODUS A.E. SME 2,832, % 20 PANEPISTIMIO IOANNINON HES/REC 2,463, % 21 ANONYMOS ETAIREIA ANTIPROSOPEION EMPORIOU KAI VIOMICHANIAS SME 2,420, % 22 TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY OF CRETE HES/REC 2,096, % 23 D.D. SYNERGY HELLAS ANONYMI EMPORIKI ETAIREIA PAROCHIS YPIRESION PLIROFORIKIS SME 1,917, % 24 SYNELIXIS LYSEIS PLIROFORIKIS AUTOMATISMOU & TILEPIKOINONION MONOPROSOPI EPE SME 1,888, % 25 PANEPISTIMIO THESSALIAS (UNIVERSITY OF THESSALY) HES/REC 1,856, % 26 ELLINOGERMANIKI AGOGI SCHOLI PANAGEA SAVVA AE HES/REC 1,713, % 27 University of the Aegean-Research Unit HES/REC 1,659, % 28 TELECOMMUNICATION SYSTEMS INSTITUTE HES/REC 1,633, % 29 SYSTEMA TEKNOLOTZIS ANONYMI ETAIREIA EFARMOGON ILEKTRONIKIS KAI PLIROFORIKIS SME 1,508, % 30 INSTITUTE OF ACCELERATING SYSTEMS AND APPLICATIONS HES/REC 1,368, % 31 UNIVERSITY OF PELOPONNESE HES/REC 1,164, % 32 SINGKIOULAR LOTZIK ANONYMOS ETAIRIA PLIROFORIAKON SYSTIMATON & EFARMOGON LARGE 1,066, % 33 TALANTON SA BUSINESS CONSULTING AND MARKETING SERVICES SME 1,050, % 34 KENTRO EREVNAS TECHNOLOGIAS KAI ANAPTYXIS THESSALIAS HES/REC 1,047, % 35 TECHNOLOGICAL EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CRETE HES/REC 998, % 36 OPTRONICS TECHNOLOGIES A.B.E.T.E. SME 996, % 37 HYPERTECH AE SME 953, % 38 MIKROSYSTIMATA MIKROROIS GIA GENETIKOUS ELEGKOUS KAI MORIAKI DIAGNOSTIKI EE SME 908, % 39 BLUECHIP TECHNOLOGIES AE SME 898, % 40 HELLENIC TELECOMMUNICATIONS ORGANIZATION S.A. - OTE AE (ORGANISMOS TILEPIKOINONION LARGE 895, % 41 ANONYMI ETAIRIA SYSTIMATON ORGANOSIS LEITOURGIAS KAI EPIKOINONIAS EPICHEIRISEON SME 893, % 42 GIOUMPITEK MELETI SCHEDIASMOS YLOPOIISI KAI POLISI ERGON PLIROFORIKIS ETAIREIA SME 882, % 43 COSMOTE KINITES TILEPIKOINONIES AE LARGE 875, % 44 PARAGON ANONYMH ETAIREIA MELETON EREVNAS KAI EMPORIOU PROIGMENHS TEXNOLOGIAS SME 844, % 45 TELETEL S.A. - TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SME 826, % 46 PANEPISTIMIO KRITIS (UNIVERSITY OF CRETE) HES/REC 806, % 47 Hellenic Telecommunications & Telematics Applications Company LARGE 777, % 48 GREEK RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY NETWORK S.A. LARGE 744, % 49 TECHNOLOGIKO EKPAIDEFTIKO IDRYMA MESOLOGGIOU (TECHNOLOGICAL EDUCATION INSTITUTE HES/REC 719, % OF MESSOLONGI) 50 PLANET S.A LARGE 657, % Total 259,699, % 177

198 6.12 Hungary & the ICT Theme of FP7 HUNGARY: Total EC Funding: 33M (0.5% of total) Total number of participations: 157 (0.9% of total) Number of project co-ordinations: 1 Cumulated figures over the period Key Messages Hungarian participation has decreased from ~1% in FP6 to ~0.5% so far in FP7 ( ). Hungarian organizations coordinate only one FP7 ICT project; Over the period , 67 organisations have participated to the programme; in 2012 new entrants represented 56% of the total organisations; With 34% of total funding, SME's participation in FP7 ICT is very strong. Conversely, large companies are very weakly represented (8% of total funding); Participation of Research institutions is strongly concentrated in a handful of organizations, with the Budapest University of Technology accounting for 24% of the funding received by the entire country; The main areas of strength are in key ICT technologies such as Future networks and Internet, Networked Media, FET, Trustworthy ICT, Nanoelectronics and Photonics; 88% of funding is concentrated in Budapest, the only hub of the country. 178

199 Figure 182 HU, Participation and EC funding, Figure 183 HU, Number of participating organisations and new entries,

200 Figure 184 HU- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 185 HU Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) 180

201 Figure 186 HU - Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 187 HU- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) 181

202 Figure 188 Top 50 HU organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) # Organisation Type EU funding % 1 BUDAPESTI MUSZAKI ES GAZDASAGTUDOMANYI EGYETEM HES/REC 7,986, % 2 MAGYAR TUDOMANYOS AKADEMIA SZAMITASTECHNIKAI ES AUTOMATIZALASI KUTATO HES/REC 2,972, % INTEZET 3 HOLOGRAFIKA HOLOGRAMELOALLITO FEJLESZTO ES FORGALMAZO KFT SME 2,583, % 4 SEARCH-LAB BIZTONSAGI ERTEKELO ELEMZO ES KUTATO LABORATORIUM KORLATOLT SME 1,938, % FELELOSSEGU TARSASAG 5 EÖTVÖS LORÁND TUDOMÁNYEGYETEM HES/REC 1,598, % 6 NOKIA SIEMENS NETWORKS TELEKOMMUNIKACIOS KERESKEDELMI ES SZOLGALTATO KFT LARGE 960, % 7 NETVISOR INFORMATIKAI ES KOMMUNIKACIOS ZARTKORUEN MUKODO SME 938, % RESZVENYTARSASAG 8 AITIA INTERNATIONAL INFORMATIKAI ZARTKORUEN MUKODO RT SME 878, % 9 PANNON EGYETEM HES/REC 786, % 10 CORVINNO TECHNOLOGIA TRANSZFER KOZPONT NONPROFIT KOZHASZNU KFT NIL 632, % 11 INNOREG KOZEP-MAGYARORSZAGI REGIONALIS INNOVACIOS UGYNOKSEG KOZHASZNU NIL 625, % EGYESULET 12 INSTITUTE FOR PSYCHOLOGY-HUNGARIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES HES/REC 543, % 13 BROADBIT HUNGARY FEJLESZTO ES TANACSADO KFT SME 515, % 14 FOLDMERESI ES TAVERZEKELESI INTEZET HES/REC 496, % 15 Mediso Orvosi Berendezes Fejleszto es Szerviz Kft. SME 479, % 16 ERICSSON MAGYARORSZAG KOMMUNIKACIOS RENDSZEREK K.F.T. LARGE 454, % 17 ALKALMAZOTT LOGIKAI LABORATORIUM KUTATO FEJLESZTO SZOVETKEZET (Applied Logic SME 402, % Laboratory) 18 NETVISOR INFORMATIKAI ES KOMMUNIKACIOS SZOLGALTATO KORLATOLT FELELOSSEGU SME 402, % TARSASAG 19 MUSZAKI FIZIKAI ES ANYAGTUDOMANYI KUTATOINTEZET - MAGYAR TUDOMANYOS HES/REC 361, % AKADEMIA 20 SZEGEDI TUDOMANYEGYETEM HES/REC 353, % 21 KILGRAY FORDITASTECHNOLOGIAI KFT SME 341, % 22 INTERACTIVE NET DESIGN KERESKEDELMI ES SZOLGALTATO KFT SME 335, % 23 GEOX TERINFORMATIKAI KFT SME 311, % 24 SZILARDTESTFIZIKAI ES OPTIKAI KUTATOINTEZETE - MAGYAR TUDOMANYOS AKADEMIA HES/REC 310, % 25 INVITEL TAVKOZLESI ZRT LARGE 309, % 26 BUDAI EGESZSEGKOZPONT KFT SME 296, % 27 MFKK FELTALALOI ES KUTATO KOZPONT SZOLGALTATO KFT SME 277, % 28 KOZEP-EUROPAI EGYETEM HES/REC 274, % 29 COLLEGIUM BUDAPEST EGYESULET HES/REC 270, % 30 DEBRECENI EGYETEM HES/REC 263, % 31 PROLAN IRANYITASTECHNIKAI ZARTKORUEN MUKODO RESZVENYTARSASAG SME 249, % 32 BME VIKING ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HES/REC 247, % 33 Campden BRI Magyarorszag Nonprofit Korlatolt Felelossegu Tarsasag HES/REC 227, % 34 MENTOR GRAPHICS MAGYARORSZAG SZAMITASTECHNIKAI TANACSADO ES LARGE 218, % 35 RESEARCH CENTRE FOR NATURAL SCIENCES, HUNGARIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES HES/REC 199, % 36 ASTRON INFORMATIKAI FEJLESZTO ES TANACSADO KORLATOLT FELELOSSEGU TARSASAG SME 195, % 37 OPTXWARE KUTATAS-FEJLESZTESI KORLATOLT FELELOSSEGU TARSASAG SME 185, % 38 COMFORT CONSULTING MERNOKI TANACSADO ES SZOLGALTATO KFT SME 163, % 39 AUTIZMUS ALAPITVANY NIL 163, % 40 PETABYTE TUDOMANYOS KUTATO ES FEJLESZTO NONPROFIT KFT HES/REC 159, % 41 MICRED MIKROELEKTRONIKAI KUTATO FEJLESZTO ES SZOLGALTATO KFT SME 150, % 42 SEMMELWEIS EGYETEM HES/REC 145, % 43 SEMILAB FELVEZETO FIZIKAI LABORATORIUM RESZVENYTARSASAG LARGE 144, % 44 G-ROBOTS SZOLGALTATO ES KERESKEDELMI KFT SME 137, % 45 MAGYAR TELEKOM TAVKOZLESI NYILVANOSAN MUKODO RESZVENYTARSASAG LARGE 133, % 46 SAFEPAY SYSTEMS SZOLGALTATO ES KEREASAG KFT SME 125, % 47 YGOMI EUROPE KFT LARGE 111, % 48 NI HUNGARY SOFTWARE ES HARDWARE GYARTO KORLATOLTFELELOSSEGU TARSASAG KFT LARGE 108, % 49 Educatio Public Services Non-profit LLC HES/REC 106, % 50 FRONTENDART SZOFTVER KFT SME 103, % Total 33,012, % 182

203 6.13 Ireland & the ICT Theme of FP7 IRELAND: Total EC Funding: 98.7M(1.6% of total) Total number of participations: 288 (1.6% of total) Number of project co-ordinations: 36 Cumulated figures over the period Key Messages EC contribution to Ireland in ICT has increased from ~1.1% in FP6 to ~1.6% so far in FP7. Ireland coordinates 36 projects; Over the period organisations participated to the programme, in 2012 new entrants represented 39% of total organisations; Industrial participation represents one third of total funding allocated, with large enterprises accounting for 17% and SMEs for 13%; Industrial participation from large enterprises is strongly concentrated (INTEL and Symantec), whereas SME participation is fair and diversified; As for research organisations, key players are the university college at Cork and the Galway university; Areas of strength include key technology areas such as Future Networks and Internet, software, services and internet connected objects, photonics, intelligent information management, trustworthy ICT and ICT for Energy Efficiency. Digital libraries are also an Irish stronghold in ICT; 38% of funding is directed towards the Dublin region, but important clusters are also located around Cork, Galway and Waterford. 183

204 Figure 189 IE, Participation and EC funding, Figure 190 IE, Number of participating organisations and new entries,

205 Figure 191 IE - Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 192 IE Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) 185

206 Figure 193 IE - Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 194 IE - Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) 186

207 Figure 195 Top 50 IE organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) # Organisation Type EC funding % 1 UNIVERSITY COLLEGE CORK, NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF IRELAND, CORK HES/REC 19,267, % 2 NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF IRELAND, GALWAY HES/REC 10,890, % 3 THE PROVOST, FELLOWS, FOUNDATION SCHOLARS & THE OTHER MEMBERS OF HES/REC 10,761, % BOARD OF THE COLLEGE OF THE HOLY & UNDIVIDED TRINITY OF QUEEN ELIZABETH NEAR DUBLIN 4 WATERFORD INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY HES/REC 10,422, % 5 INTEL PERFORMANCE LEARNING SOLUTIONS LIMITED LARGE 8,826, % 6 DUBLIN CITY UNIVERSITY HES/REC 7,240, % 7 UNIVERSITY OF LIMERICK HES/REC 2,934, % 8 UNIVERSITY COLLEGE DUBLIN, NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF IRELAND, DUBLIN HES/REC 2,519, % 9 IBM IRELAND PRODUCT DISTRIBUTION LIMITED LARGE 1,592, % 10 EBLANA PHOTONICS LIMITED SME 1,552, % 11 IIMC INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT CORPORATION LIMITED SME 1,353, % 12 SYMANTEC LIMITED LARGE 1,336, % 13 CORK INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY HES/REC 1,220, % 14 GOOGLE IRELAND LIMITED LARGE 1,119, % 15 RED HAT LIMITED LARGE 923, % 16 Intune Networks Limited SME 867, % 17 NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF IRELAND MAYNOOTH HES/REC 862, % 18 DUBLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY HES/REC 860, % 19 SYNOPSYS INTERNATIONAL LIMITED LARGE 764, % 20 INCORAS SOLUTIONS LIMITED SME 739, % 21 UNITED TECHNOLOGIES RESEARCH CENTRE IRELAND, LIMITED LARGE 693, % 22 THE NATIONAL MICROELECTRONICS APPLICATIONS CENTRE LTD SME 605, % 23 CYNTELIX CORPORATION LIMITED SME 602, % 24 RISARIS LIMITED SME 529, % 25 ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS IN IRELAND HES/REC 507, % 26 LAKE COMMUNICATIONS LTD LARGE 496, % 27 MeaningMine Ltd SME 469, % 28 NUMA ENGINEERING SERVICES LIMITED SME 440, % 29 EmpowerTheUser Ltd SME 410, % 30 NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR THE BLIND OF IRELAND NIL 408, % 31 BIOSENSIA LIMITED SME 404, % 32 REDZINC SERVICES LIMITED SME 385, % 33 CELLIX LIMITED SME 374, % 34 JUNIPER NETWORKS IRELAND LIMITED LARGE 347, % 35 MOVIDIUS LTD SME 339, % 36 VALENTIA TECHNOLOGIES SME 338, % 37 BETAPOND LIMITED SME 292, % 38 BOC INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES CONSULTING LIMITED SME 287, % 39 Alcatel Lucent Ireland Limited LARGE 265, % 40 NATIONAL GALLERY OF IRELAND NIL 251, % 41 CORA TINE TEORANTA LTD SME 240, % 42 CREGANNA UNLIMITED COMPANY LARGE 239, % 43 ENERIT LIMITED SME 229, % 44 IRISH MUSEUM OF MODERN ART COMPANY HES/REC 227, % 45 M & M QUALTECH LIMITED SME 219, % 46 NTERA LIMITED SME 207, % 47 TEMPERATURE LIMITED SME 189, % 48 L.M. ERICSSON LIMITED LARGE 173, % 49 Daysha Consulting limited SME 173, % 50 PINTAIL LTD SME 172, % Total 98,740, % 187

208 6.14 Italy & the ICT Theme of FP7 ITALY: Total EC Funding: 612.9M (10% of total) Total number of participations: 2,122 (11.7% of total) Number of project co-ordinations: 237 Cumulated figures over the period Key Messages Italian participation in the ICT Programme had decreased between FP5 and FP6 from ~12.3% to 10% in FP7 so far. Italian organizations coordinate 237 projects; Over the period organisations participated to the programme; in 2012 new entrants represented 37% of the total number of participating organisations; Large enterprises account for almost one fourth (24%) of total funding allocated, whereas SMEs account for 12%. STMicroelectronics, Engineering SPA and Telecom Italia are among the main recipients; Italy has a diversified R&D basis: it is very strongly represented in the FET area as well as in ICT for health. It has also a strong presence in key technology areas such as embedded systems, cognitive systems and robotics, trustworthy ICT and software and services; Funding is mainly directed towards the two hubs of Milan and Rome. Other major clusters can be found around industrial cities (Torino, Genova) and university centers (Pisa, Trento and Bologna). 188

209 Figure 196 IT, Participation and EC funding, Figure 197 IT, Number of participating organisations and new entries,

210 Figure 198 IT- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 199 IT Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) 190

211 Figure 200 IT- Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 201 IT- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) 191

212 Figure 202 Top 50 IT organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) # Organisation Type EU funding % 1 CONSIGLIO NAZIONALE DELLE RICERCHE HES/REC 42,979, % 2 POLITECNICO DI MILANO HES/REC 25,350, % 3 STMICROELECTRONICS SRL LARGE 21,978, % 4 SCUOLA SUPERIORE DI STUDI UNIVERSITARI E DI PERFEZIONAMENTO SANT'ANNA HES/REC 20,618, % 5 CENTRO RICERCHE FIAT SCPA HES/REC 17,692, % 6 FONDAZIONE ISTITUTO ITALIANO DI TECNOLOGIA HES/REC 17,158, % 7 FONDAZIONE BRUNO KESSLER HES/REC 16,472, % 8 TELECOM ITALIA S.p.A LARGE 14,939, % 9 ALMA MATER STUDIORUM-UNIVERSITA DI BOLOGNA HES/REC 13,823, % 10 UNIVERSITA DEGLI STUDI DI TRENTO HES/REC 13,633, % 11 UNIVERSITA DI PISA HES/REC 13,565, % 12 ENGINEERING - INGEGNERIA INFORMATICA SPA LARGE 12,192, % 13 UNIVERSITA DEGLI STUDI DI ROMA LA SAPIENZA HES/REC 12,052, % 14 POLITECNICO DI TORINO HES/REC 11,753, % 15 CONSORZIO NAZIONALE INTERUNIVERSITARIO PER LE TELECOMUNICAZIONI HES/REC 10,393, % 16 UNIVERSITA DEGLI STUDI DI GENOVA HES/REC 10,197, % 17 UNIVERSITA DEGLI STUDI DI PADOVA HES/REC 9,321, % 18 CREATE-NET (CENTER FOR RESEARCH AND TELECOMMUNICATION EXPERIMENTATION FOR HES/REC NETWORKED 8,463,882 COMMUNITIES) 1.4% 19 TXT E-SOLUTIONS SPA LARGE 6,869, % 20 UNIVERSITA DEGLI STUDI DI NAPOLI FEDERICO II. HES/REC 5,666, % 21 ISTITUTO SUPERIORE MARIO BOELLA SULLE TECNOLOGIE DELL'INFORMAZIONE E DELLE TELECOMUNICAZIONI HES/REC 5,238, % 22 UNIVERSITA DEGLI STUDI DI MILANO HES/REC 5,201, % 23 UNIVERSITA DEGLI STUDI DI VERONA HES/REC 4,770, % 24 MICRON SEMICONDUCTOR ITALIA SRL LARGE 4,733, % 25 COMAU SPA LARGE 4,442, % 26 FONDAZIONE SANTA LUCIA HES/REC 3,966, % 27 SOFTECO SISMAT SRL LARGE 3,830, % 28 UNIVERSITA DEGLI STUDI DI PARMA HES/REC 3,809, % 29 UNIVERSITA' DEGLI STUDI DI SIENA HES/REC 3,738, % 30 CONSORZIO INTERUNIVERSITARIO NAZIONALE PER L'INFORMATICA HES/REC 3,732, % 31 HEWLETT PACKARD ITALIANA SRL LARGE 3,503, % 32 UNIVERSITA DEGLI STUDI DI MODENA E REGGIO EMILIA HES/REC 3,360, % 33 FONDAZIONE ISTITUTO PER L'INTERSCAMBIO SCIENTIFICO (I.S.I.) HES/REC 3,264, % 34 UNIVERSITA DEGLI STUDI DI PAVIA HES/REC 3,214, % 35 FONDAZIONE CENTRO SAN RAFFAELE DEL MONTE TABOR HES/REC 2,959, % 36 SELEX SISTEMI INTEGRATI SPA LARGE 2,921, % 37 SCS SRL SME 2,880, % 38 ALCATEL-LUCENT ITALIA S.P.A. LARGE 2,841, % 39 D'APPOLONIA SPA LARGE 2,737, % 40 NEXTWORKS SME 2,698, % 41 UNIVERSITA CA' FOSCARI VENEZIA HES/REC 2,662, % 42 INTECS INFORMATICA E TECNOLOGIA DEL SOFTWARE S.P.A LARGE 2,598, % 43 UNIVERSITA DEGLI STUDI DELL'AQUILA HES/REC 2,580, % 44 UNIVERSITA DEGLI STUDI DI PERUGIA HES/REC 2,534, % 45 CONSORZIO FERRARA RICERCHE HES/REC 2,521, % 46 CEFRIEL - SOCIETA CONSORTILE A RESPONSABILITA LIMITATA HES/REC 2,496, % 47 SCUOLA INTERNAZIONALE SUPERIORE DI STUDI AVANZATI IN TRIESTE HES/REC 2,494, % 48 ISTITUTO ORTOPEDICO RIZZOLI HES/REC 2,459, % 49 RAI-RADIOTELEVISIONE ITALIANA SPA LARGE 2,388, % 50 EXACT LEARNING SOLUTIONS SPA SME 2,369, % 192

213 6.15 Latvia & the ICT Theme of FP7 LATVIA: Total EC Funding: 2.7M(0.04% of total) Total number of participations: 14 (0.1% of total) Number of project co-ordinations: 3 Cumulated figures over the period Key Messages Latvian participation has decreased from ~0.08% in FP5 and FP6 to ~0.04% so far in FP7; Over the period organisations participated to the programme; Participation is strongly concentrated in few areas, such as Language Technologies (43% of total funding allocated to the country), FET (21%) and ICT for governance (13%). By converse, Latvia is totally absent in several important strategic objectives; SMEs participation in FP7 is very strong (43% of funding), Large enterprises are almost absent (only 1% of funding); Almost 60% of total funding is concentrated in Riga. 193

214 Figure 203 LV& the ICT Theme of FP7, Participation and EC funding, Figure 204 LV& the ICT Theme of FP7, Number of participating organisations and new entries,

215 Figure 205 LV Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) Figure 206 LV- Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) 195

216 Figure 207 LV- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 208 LV organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) # Organisation Type EU funding % 1 TILDE SIA SME 1,154, % 2 SOCIOTEHNISKO SISTEMU INZENIERIJASINSTITUTS VIDZEMES AUGSTSKOLAS AGENTURA HES/REC 469, % 3 LATVIJAS UNIVERSITATE HES/REC 404, % 4 RIGAS TEHNISKA UNIVERSITATE HES/REC 185, % 5 LATVIJAS UNIVERSITATES CIETVIELU FIZIKAS INSTITUTS HES/REC 161, % 6 LATVIJAS ZINATNU AKADEMIJA HES/REC 145, % 7 STARPTAUTISKA LIETISKAS OPTIKAS BIEDRIBA NIL 111, % 8 LATVIJAS UNIVERSITATES MATEMATIKAS UN INFORMATIKAS INSTITUTS HES/REC 46, % 9 LR IZGLITIBAS UN ZINATNES MINISTRIJA NIL 17, % Total 2,695, % 196

217 6.16 Lithuania & the ICT Theme of FP7 LITHUANIA: Total EC Funding: 2.9M (0.05% of total) Total number of participations: 22 (0.1% of total) Number of project co-ordinations: 0 Cumulated figures over the period Key Messages Lithuanian participation has decreased from ~0.16% in FP6 to ~0.05% so far in FP7; Over the period organisations have participated to the programme; Areas of strenght are Photonics, FET, ICT for Health, ICT for Energy-Efficiency and ICT for the enterprise, but the country is totally absent in several important strategic objectives; SMEs account for one fourth of total funding, whereas larger enterprises participation is low (8%); The capital region attracts 67% of total funding. 197

218 Figure 209 LT, Participation and EC funding, Figure 210 LT, Number of participating organisations and new entries,

219 Figure 211 LT- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 212 LT Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) Figure 213 LT- Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) 199

220 Figure 214 LT- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 215 LT organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) # Organisation Type EU funding % 1 VILNIAUS UNIVERSITETAS HES/REC 711, % 2 KAUNO TECHNOLOGIJOS UNIVERSITETAS HES/REC 444, % 3 YUKON ADVANCED OPTICS WORLDWIDE SME 393, % 4 VALSTYBINIS MOKSLINIU TYRIMU INSTITUTAS FIZINIU IR TECHNOLOGIJOS MOKSLU CENTRAS HES/REC 323, % 5 UZDAROJI AKCINE BENDROVE MOKSLINE-GAMYBINE FIRMA SVIESOS KONVERSIJA LARGE 236, % 6 EKSPLA UAB SME 173, % 7 LIETUVOS ENERGETIKOS INSTITUTAS HES/REC 171, % 8 SVIETIMO INFORMACINIU TECHNOLOGIJU CENTRAS VALSTYBES BIUDZETINE ISTAIGA - ITCNIL 133, % 9 Institute of Psychophysiology and Rehabilitation of the Kaunas University of Medicine HES/REC 112, % 10 NO MAGIC EUROPE UAB SME 93, % 11 UAB AEROGEODEZIJOS INSTITUTAS SME 78, % 12 KLAIPEDOS UNIVERSITETAS HES/REC 40, % 13 VYTAUTO DIDZIOJO UNIVERSITETAS HES/REC 35, % 14 AKCIJU SABIEDRIBA LATVENERGO LARGE 13, % 15 PUSLAIDININKIU FIZIKOS INSTITUTAS HES/REC 0 0.0% 16 KAUNO MEDICINOS UNIVERSITETAS HES/REC 0 0.0% 17 LIETUVOS SVEIKATOS MOKSLU UNIVERSITETAS HES/REC 0 0.0% Total 2,961, % 200

221 6.17 Luxembourg & the ICT Theme of FP7 LUXEMBOURG: Total EC Funding: 11.8 M (0.2% of total) Total number of participations: 44 (0.2% of total) Number of project co-ordinations: 7 Cumulated figures over the period Key Messages Participation from Luxembourg has remained around 0.2% of funding since FP5; Over the period , 19 organisations participated to the programme; Luxembourg organisations are active in ICT for Health, ICT for Energy-Efficiency, ICT for Governance, ICT for the Enterprise but also in some key technology areas such as Future Networks and Internet, Software and services and Trustworthy ICT; Activity is strongly concentrated in a few large companies (56% of funding); SMEs participation is very low at 4% of total funding. Research participation is equally concentrated; No regional breakdown is provided as Luxembourg is considered as a single NUTS 3 region. 201

222 Figure 216 LU, Participation and EC funding, Figure 217 LU, Number of participating organisations and new entries,

223 Figure 218 LU- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 219 LU - Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) 203

224 Figure 220 LU- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) Figure 221 LU organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) # Organisation Type EU funding % 1 INTRASOFT INTERNATIONAL SA LARGE 4,333, % 2 UNIVERSITE DU LUXEMBOURG HES/REC 3,620, % 3 SES ASTRA TECHCOM SA LARGE 859, % 4 ITRUST CONSULTING SARL SME 472, % 5 CIRCUIT FOIL LUXEMBOURG SARL LARGE 444, % 6 CENTRE DE RECHERCHE PUBLIC HENRI TUDOR HES/REC 394, % 7 FBConsulting S.A.R.L. LARGE 302, % 8 SWORD TECHNOLOGIES SA LARGE 270, % 9 TECHNOLOGIES SANS FRONTIERES ASBL NIL 258, % 10 Centre Virtuel de la Connaissance sur l'europe HES/REC 250, % 11 EuroTeleServ A.s.b.l. NIL 250, % 12 IEE INTERNATIONAL ELECTRONICS & ENGINEERING S.A. LARGE 159, % 13 SES ASTRA SA LARGE 148, % 14 LUXINNOVATION GIE LARGE 17, % 15 BUSINESS OBJECTS S.A. LARGE 11, % 16 MINISTERE D'ETAT NIL 0 0.0% Total 11,795, % 204

225 6.18 Malta & the ICT Theme of FP7 MALTA: Total EC Funding: 1.9 M (0.03% of total) Total number of participations: 14 (0.1% of total) Number of project co-ordinations: 1 Cumulated figures over the period Key Messages Participation from Malta has decreased from ~0.06% in FP6 to ~0.03% so far in FP7; Over the period , only nine organisations participated to the programme; SMEs represent 27% of total funding, there are no larger enterprises participating; Activities are very strongly concentrated in ICT for Health, ICT for Learning and FET; No regional breakdown is provided as Malta is considered as a single NUTS 3 region. 205

226 Figure 222 MT, Participation and EC funding, Figure 223 MT, Number of participating organisations and new entries,

227 Figure 224 MT Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) Figure 225 MT- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) 207

228 Figure 226 MT organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) # Organisation Type EU funding % 1 UNIVERSITA TA MALTA HES/REC 723, % 2 Acrosslimits Limited SME 324, % 3 Mediterranean Institute of Primary Care HES/REC 217, % 4 Civil Protection Department - Ministry of Home Affairs NIL 212, % 5 PARAGON LIMITED SME 136, % 6 HERITAGE MALTA NIL 99, % 7 MALTA COUNCIL FOR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY NIL 78, % 8 THE COMMONWEALTH NETWORK OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY FOR DEVELOPMENT HES/REC 51, % 9 WORLD MATCH LIMITED SME 40, % Total 1,884, % 208

229 6.19 The Netherlands & the ICT Theme of FP7 NETHERLANDS: Total EC Funding: M (5.5% of total) Total number of participations: 894 (4.9% of total) Number of project co-ordinations: 86 Cumulated figures over the period Key Messages Participation from the Netherlands has increased from ~4.8% in FP5 and FP6 to ~5.5% in FP7 so far. The Netherlands has 86 project coordinators; Over the period , 268 Dutch organizations participated to the programme; Research organizations have a strong participation (65% of funding). Large enterprises account for 18% of total funding; the Philips Group dominates industry participation. SMEs participation is relatively good with 14% of total funding; Important research centers like TNO and universities such as Delft, Twente and Eindhoven can be found in the top 10; The main strengths are in FET, ICT for Health, Embedded Systems, Organic and Large Area Electronics, Networked Media, Embedded Systems, ICT for Learning and ICT for Transport; The main poles of attraction for funding are Eindhoven, Delft, Amsterdam and Twente. 209

230 Figure 227 NL, Participation and EC funding, Figure 228 NL, Number of participating organisations and new entries,

231 Figure 229 NL - Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 230 NL Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) 211

232 Figure 231 NL- Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 232 NL- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) 212

233 Figure 233 Top 50 NL organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) # Organisation Type EU funding % 1 NEDERLANDSE ORGANISATIE VOOR TOEGEPAST NATUURWETENSCHAPPELIJK HES/REC 38,783, % 2 ONDERZOEK TECHNISCHE - UNIVERSITEIT TNO DELFT HES/REC 29,918, % 3 UNIVERSITEIT TWENTE HES/REC 29,435, % 4 PHILIPS ELECTRONICS NEDERLAND B.V. LARGE 26,994, % 5 TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITEIT EINDHOVEN HES/REC 26,438, % 6 UNIVERSITEIT VAN AMSTERDAM HES/REC 13,742, % 7 VERENIGING VOOR CHRISTELIJK HOGER ONDERWIJS WETENSCHAPPELIJK ONDERZOEK HES/REC 7,805, % EN PATIENTENZORG 8 STICHTING CENTRUM VOOR WISKUNDE EN INFORMATICA HES/REC 7,134, % 9 PHILIPS CONSUMER LIFESTYLE B.V. LARGE 4,694, % 10 STICHTING KATHOLIEKE UNIVERSITEIT HES/REC 4,690, % 11 STICHTING KATHOLIEKE UNIVERSITEIT BRABANT UNIVERSITEIT VAN TILBURG HES/REC 4,430, % 12 TIE NEDERLAND B.V. SME 4,375, % 13 RIJKSUNIVERSITEIT GRONINGEN HES/REC 4,356, % 14 MAPPER LITHOGRAPHY B.V. SME 3,645, % 15 STICHTING VU-VUMC HES/REC 3,341, % 16 ALMENDE B.V. SME 3,334, % 17 STICHTING ENERGIEONDERZOEK CENTRUM NEDERLAND HES/REC 3,257, % 18 UNIVERSITEIT UTRECHT HES/REC 3,108, % 19 OPEN UNIVERSITEIT NEDERLAND HES/REC 2,992, % 20 STICHTING NOVAY HES/REC 2,607, % 21 ERASMUS UNIVERSITAIR MEDISCH CENTRUM ROTTERDAM HES/REC 2,606, % 22 UNIVERSITEIT LEIDEN HES/REC 2,553, % 23 KONINKLIJKE BIBLIOTHEEK HES/REC 2,373, % 24 NAVTEQ B.V. LARGE 2,362, % 25 Academisch Medisch Centrum bij de Universiteit van Amsterdam HES/REC 2,278, % 26 NXP SEMICONDUCTORS NETHERLANDS BV LARGE 2,272, % 27 STICHTING INTERNET MEMORY FOUNDATION HES/REC 2,215, % 28 LOGICA NEDERLAND B.V. LARGE 2,156, % 29 PHOENIX BV SME 2,114, % 30 STICHTING NEDERLANDS INSTITUUT VOOR BEELD EN GELUID NIL 2,032, % 31 INSTITUUT VOOR NEDERLANDSE LEXICOLOGIE HES/REC 1,989, % 32 RECORE SYSTEMS BV SME 1,956, % 33 STICHTING EMBEDDED SYSTEMS INSTITUTE HES/REC 1,852, % 34 ACADEMISCH ZIEKENHUIS LEIDEN - LEIDS UNIVERSITAIR MEDISCH CENTRUM HES/REC 1,754, % 35 PHILIPS MEDICAL SYSTEMS NEDERLAND BV LARGE 1,751, % 36 MINISTERIE VAN INFRASTRUCTUUR EN MILIEU NIL 1,670, % 37 STICHTING IMEC NEDERLAND HES/REC 1,554, % 38 CAVENDISH KINETICS B.V. SME 1,513, % 39 STICHTING DIENST LANDBOUWKUNDIG ONDERZOEK HES/REC 1,470, % 40 ERASMUS UNIVERSITEIT ROTTERDAM HES/REC 1,434, % 41 MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC R&D CENTRE EUROPE B.V. LARGE 1,433, % 42 UNIVERSITEIT MAASTRICHT HES/REC 1,395, % 43 ESAOTE EUROPE B.V. LARGE 1,315, % 44 THALES NEDERLAND BV LARGE 1,286, % 45 KEMA NEDERLAND BV LARGE 1,242, % 46 Bicore services b.v. SME 1,180, % 47 WAGENINGEN UNIVERSITY HES/REC 1,135, % 48 PORTAVITA BV SME 1,091, % 49 LIONIX BV LARGE 1,070, % 50 TOMTOM INTERNATIONAL BV LARGE 1,048, % Total 335,851, % 213

234 6.20 Poland & the ICT Theme of FP7 Poland: Total EC Funding: 48.1 M (0.8% of total) Total number of participations: 232 (1.3% of total) Number of project co-ordinations: 9 Cumulated figures over the period Key Messages Polish participation in the ICT Programme has decreased from ~1.1% in FP6 to ~0.8% in FP7 so far. Poland has only 9 project coordinators; Over the period , 86 Polish organisations participated to the programme; Participation of large industry is at 12%. There has been a relatively strong participation from SMEs (18%) and a good participation from research institutions (68%), although it is strongly concentrated in a few organizations, with Politechnika Warszawska alone benefiting from 15% of overall funding; Areas of strength include Future Networks and Internet, FET, Photonics and ICT for health; Funding is concentrated in the Warsaw region (43% of total), with clusters also in Poznan, Krakow and Wroclaw. 214

235 Figure 234 PL, Participation and EC funding, Figure 235 PL, Number of participating organisations and new entries,

236 Figure 236 PL- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure PL Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) 216

237 Figure 238 PL - Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 239 PL - Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) 217

238 Figure 240 Top 50 PL organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) # Organisation Type EU funding % 1 POLITECHNIKA WARSZAWSKA HES/REC 7,028, % 2 INSTYTUT CHEMII BIOORGANICZNEJ PAN HES/REC 4,421, % 3 POLITECHNIKA WROCLAWSKA HES/REC 3,275, % 4 AKADEMIA GORNICZO-HUTNICZA IM. STANISLAWA STASZICA W KRAKOWIE HES/REC 3,151, % 5 UNIWERSYTET WARSZAWSKI HES/REC 2,907, % 6 Wroclawskie Centrum Badan EIT+ Sp z o.o HES/REC 1,486, % 7 POZNAN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY HES/REC 1,438, % 8 UNIWERSYTET JAGIELLONSKI HES/REC 1,383, % 9 TELEKOMUNIKACJA POLSKA S.A. LARGE 1,286, % 10 SOFTWARE MIND SA SME 1,136, % 11 INSTYTUT TECHNOLOGII ELEKTRONOWEJ HES/REC 1,064, % 12 ITTI Sp.zo.o. SME 959, % 13 NARODOWE CENTRUM BADAN I ROZWOJU NIL 779, % 14 PRZEMYSLOWY INSTYTUT AUTOMATYKI I POMIAROW PIAP HES/REC 730, % 15 Telcordia Poland SP. Z O.O. LARGE 627, % 16 FUNDACJA ROZWOJU KARDIOCHIRURGII IM PROF ZBIGNIEWA RELIGI HES/REC 594, % 17 TOP-GAN SP ZOO SME 581, % 18 INTERCON SP. Z O.O. SME 551, % 19 BARTLOMIEJ MARCIN STANCZYK SME 535, % 20 ORACLE POLSKA SP. Z O. O. LARGE 523, % 21 MOSTOSTAL WARSZAWA SA LARGE 514, % 22 POLITECHNIKA LODZKA HES/REC 505, % 23 COMARCH S.A. LARGE 483, % 24 AMEPOX MICROELEKTRONICS CO LTD SP ZOO SME 468, % 25 INSTYTUT LOGISTYKI I MAGAZYNOWANIA HES/REC 454, % 26 Airoptic Spolka z Ograniczona Odpowiedzialnoscia LARGE 446, % 27 UNIWERSYTET MIKOLAJA KOPERNIKA W TORUNIU HES/REC 435, % 28 UNIWERSYTET GDANSKI HES/REC 422, % 29 VIGO SYSTEM S.A. SME 421, % 30 ADVA OPTICAL NETWORKING SP. Z.O.O LARGE 415, % 31 ESAPROJEKT SP Z OO LARGE 415, % 32 POLSKO JAPONSKA WYZSZA SZKOLA TECHNIK KOMPUTEROWYCH PJWSTK HES/REC 386, % 33 NOKIA SIEMENS NETWORKS SP Z O O LARGE 356, % 34 PARASOFT SA SME 312, % 35 INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS SLAWOMIR PIETRZYK SME 297, % 36 GEOSYSTEMS POLSKA SPOLKA Z OGRANICZONA ODPOWIEZIALNOSCIA SME 296, % 37 PROXIMETRY POLAND SP. Z O.O. SME 293, % 38 BOC INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES CONSULTING SP. Z.O.O. SME 290, % 39 NAUKOWA I AKADEMICKA SIEC KOMPUTEROWA NIL 276, % 40 INSTYTUT FIZYKI MOLEKULARNEJ, POLSKIEJ AKADEMII NAUK HES/REC 262, % 41 INSTITUTE OF BIOCYBERNETICS AND BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING - POLISH ACADEMY HES/REC OF SCIENCES 259, % 42 MEDICALGORITHMICS SA SME 257, % 43 INSTYTUT TRANSPORTU SAMOCHODOWEGO HES/REC 253, % 44 UNIVERSYTET MEDYCZNY W LODZI. HES/REC 238, % 45 ORTEH SPZOO SME 227, % 46 Harpo Sp. z o. o. SME 211, % 47 INSTYTUT LACZNOSCI - PANSTWOWY INSTYTUT BADAWCZY HES/REC 203, % 48 IPLS INTELLIGENT POWERLINE SYSTEMS - Sp.zoo SME 199, % 49 UNIWERSYTET MARII CURIE-SKLODOWSKIEJ HES/REC 195, % 50 WYZSZA SZKOLA INFORMATYKI I ZARZADZANIA Z SIEDZIBA W RZESZOWIE HES/REC 195, % Total 48,159, % 218

239 6.21 Portugal & the ICT Theme of FP7 PORTUGAL: Total EC Funding: 86M (1.4% of total) Total number of participations: 247 (1.7% of total) Number of project co-ordinations: 17 Cumulated figures over the period Key Messages Portuguese participation in the ICT Programme is at 1.4%, approximately the same level as in FP5, and higher than in FP6; Over the period , 107 Portuguese organisations participated to the programme; Research institutions dominate participation with 64% of total funding. SME s participation is very high (22%), whereas participation from larger enterprises accounts for 13% of total funding and is strongly concentrated in Portugal Telecom; The main strengths are in the areas Future Networks and Internet, Cognitive systems and Robotics and Trustworthy ICT; The Lisbon area is the largest recipient of funds with 59% of total funding allocated to the country. 219

240 Figure 241 PT, Participation and EC funding, Figure 242 PT, Number of participating organisations and new entries,

241 Figure 243 PT- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 244 PT Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) 221

242 Figure 245 PT- Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 246 PT- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) 222

243 Figure 247 Top 50 PT organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) # Organisation Type EU funding % 1 INSTITUTO DE TELECOMUNICACOES HES/REC 10,836, % 2 INESC ID - INSTITUTO DE ENGENHARIA DE SISTEMAS E COMPUTADORES, HES/REC 7,418, % INVESTIGACAO E DESENVOLVIMENTO EM LISBOA 3 INSTITUTO SUPERIOR TECNICO HES/REC 7,137, % 4 PORTUGAL TELECOM INOVACAO SA LARGE 6,165, % 5 UNINOVA - INSTITUTO DE DESENVOLVIMENTO DE NOVAS TECNOLOGIAS HES/REC 5,796, % 6 FUNDACAO DA FACULDADE DE CIENCIAS DA UNIVERSIDADE DE LISBOA HES/REC 3,438, % 7 INESC PORTO - INSTITUTO DE ENGENHARIA DE SISTEMAS E COMPUTADORES DO HES/REC 2,218, % PORTO 8 INOV INESC INOVACAO - INSTITUTO DE NOVAS TECNOLOGIAS HES/REC 2,028, % 9 CAIXA MAGICA SOFTWARE LDA SME 2,026, % 10 FACULDADE CIENCIAS E TECNOLOGIA DA UNIVERSIDADE DE COIMBRA HES/REC 1,821, % 11 TEKEVER - TECNOLOGIAS DE INFORMACAO, S.A. SME 1,568, % 12 CARD4B - SYSTEMS, S.A. SME 1,315, % 13 UNIVERSIDADE DE COIMBRA HES/REC 1,314, % 14 UNIVERSIDADE DO PORTO HES/REC 1,299, % 15 PDM E FC PROJECTO DESENVOLVIMENTO MANUTENCAO FORMACAO E SME 1,290, % 16 CONSULTADORIA UNIVERSIDADE DE LDA AVEIRO HES/REC 1,250, % 17 ISA - Intelligent Sensing Anywhere S.A. SME 1,230, % 18 LINK CONSULTING - TECNOLOGIAS DE INFORMACAO S.A. SME 1,201, % 19 INESC MICROSISTEMAS E NANOTECNOLGIAS-INSTITUTO DE ENGENHARIA DE HES/REC 1,143, % 20 SISTEMAS YDREAMS - DE INFORMATICA COMPUTADORES S.A. PARA OS MICROSISTEMAS E AS NANOTECNOLOGIAS SME 1,048, % 21 UNIVERSIDADE DO MINHO HES/REC 1,014, % 22 GMVIS SKYSOFT SA LARGE 983, % 23 NOKIA SIEMENS NETWORKS PORTUGAL SA LARGE 819, % 24 CINTAL - CENTRO INVESTIGACAO TECNOLOGICA DO ALGARVE HES/REC 819, % 25 LABORATORIO NACIONAL DE ENGENHARIA CIVIL HES/REC 767, % 26 ALFAMICRO-SISTEMAS DE COMPUTADORES, LDA SME 753, % 27 PLANESTRADA OPERACAO E MANUTENCAO RODOVIARIA SA SME 630, % 28 OCEANSCAN - MARINE SYSTEMS & TECHNOLOGY LDA SME 628, % 29 ONE SOURCE CONSULTORIA INFORMATICA LDA SME 623, % 30 OTLIS - OPERADORES DE TRANSPORTES DA REGIAO DE LISBOA ACE SME 619, % 31 EFACEC ENGENHARIA E SISTEMAS SA LARGE 589, % 32 MARESTRADA - OPERACOES E MANUTENCAORODOVIARIA SA SME 584, % 33 AWAIBA CONSULTADORIA, DESENVOLVIMENTO E COMERCIO DE COMPONENTES SME 577, % 34 FUNDACAO CALOUSTE GULBENKIAN HES/REC 491, % 35 CELOPLAS - PLASTICOS PARA A INDUSTRIA SA SME 461, % 36 FACULDADE DE CIENCIAS DA UNIVERSIDADE DE LISBOA HES/REC 453, % 37 COFAC COOPERATIVA DE FORMACAO E ANIMACAO CULTURAL CRL HES/REC 442, % 38 CNOTINFOR - CENTRO DE NOVAS TECNOLOGIAS DA INFORMACAO, LIMITADA SME 432, % 39 WAVECOM SOLUCOES RADIO LIMITADA SME 418, % 40 ASSOCIACAO FRAUNHOFER PORTUGAL RESEARCH HES/REC 411, % 41 FUNDACAO D. ANNA SOMMER CHAMPALIMAUD E DR. CARLOS MONTEZ HES/REC 396, % 42 Associação CCG/ZGDV - Centro de Computação Gráfica HES/REC 393, % 43 KEEP SOLUTIONS LDA SME 372, % 44 VOICEINTERACTION TECNOLOGIAS DE PROCESSAMENTO DA FALA, SA SME 364, % 45 ASSOCIACAO DO INSTITUTO SUPERIOR TECNICO PARA A INVESTIGACAO E HES/REC 361, % 46 PLUX, ENGENHARIA DE BIOSENSORES LDA SME 360, % 47 FACULDADE DE ENGENHARIA DA UNIVERSIDADE DO PORTO HES/REC 360, % 48 Instituto Politécnico de Bragança HES/REC 356, % 49 INSTITUTO SUPERIOR DE ENGENHARIA DO PORTO HES/REC 342, % 50 IMAR- INSTITUTO DO MAR HES/REC 318, % Total 85,991, % 223

244 6.22 Romania & the ICT Theme of FP7 ROMANIA: Total EC Funding: 18.9 M (0.3% of total) Total number of participations: 98 (0.5% of total) Number of project co-ordinations: 1 Cumulated figures over the period Key Messages Romanian participation in the ICT Programme has increased from ~0.15% in FP5 to 0.3% in FP6 and in FP7 so far; Over the period , 51 organisations participated to the programme; SMEs participation is quite high (21%), whereas larger enterprises account for 16% of total funding, a low but increasing figure (15% in 2011 and 10% in 2010); Research participation is very focused on a few organisations such as the universities of Bucharest and Cluj napoca; Areas of strength include Future Networks and Internet, Software Services and internet connected objects, ICT for Health and for Energy-Efficiency; The Bucharest region attracts half of the total Romanian funding, with other hubs being around Cluj and Timisoara. 224

245 Figure 248 RO, Participation and EC funding, Figure 249 RO, Number of participating organisations and new entries,

246 Figure 250 RO - Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 251 RO Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) 226

247 Figure 252 RO- Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 253 RO - Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) 227

248 Figure 254 Top 50 RO organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) # Organisation Type EU funding % 1 UNIVERSITATEA POLITEHNICA DIN BUCURESTI HES/REC 3,502, % 2 UNIVERSITATEA TEHNICA CLUJ-NAPOCA HES/REC 2,418, % 3 INSTITUTUL E-AUSTRIA TIMISOARA HES/REC 1,238, % 4 INSTITUTUL NATIONAL DE CERCETAREDEZVOLTARE PENTRU MICROTEHNOLOGIE HES/REC 1,149, % 5 SIEMENS PROGRAM AND SYSTEM ENGINEERING SRL LARGE 903, % 6 INSTITUTUL NATIONAL DE CERCETARE-DEZVOLTARE IN INFORMATICA - ICI BUCURESTI HES/REC 866, % 7 INFO WORLD SRL SME 603, % 8 BLUE POINT IT SOLUTIONS SRL SME 483, % 9 MIRA TELECOM SRL SME 442, % 10 UNIVERSITATEA DE VEST DIN TIMISOARA HES/REC 414, % 11 COMPUTER SHARING BUCURESTI SRL SME 411, % 12 TEAMNET INTERNATIONAL SA SME 401, % 13 HONEYWELL ROMANIA SRL LARGE 346, % 14 SIVECO ROMANIA SA LARGE 335, % 15 ROMSOFT SRL SME 331, % 16 UNIVERSITATEA POLITEHNICA DIN TIMISOARA HES/REC 301, % 17 SC IPA SA HES/REC 296, % 18 UNIVERSITATEA ALEXANDRU IOAN CUZA IASI HES/REC 278, % 19 IDEEA ADVERTISING SRL SME 274, % 20 INTRAROM S.A. LARGE 273, % 21 INSTITUTUL DE CERCETARI PENTRU INTELIGENTIA ARTIFICIALA HES/REC 266, % 22 WIRTEK S.R.L. SME 262, % 23 UNIVERSITATEA ROMANO-AMERICANA ASOCIATIE HES/REC 240, % 24 SIEMENS SRL LARGE 231, % 25 UNIVERSITATEA DIN CRAIOVA HES/REC 220, % 26 INCLUSION ALLIANCE FOR EUROPE GEIE SME 200, % 27 INSTITUTUL NATIONAL DE CERCETARE DEZVOLTARE PENTRU FIZICA LASERILOR HES/REC 191, % 28 SOFTGRESS S.R.L. SME 183, % 29 UNIVERSITATEA BABES BOLYAI HES/REC 176, % 30 UNIVERSITATEA DIN BUCURESTI HES/REC 160, % 31 LANGUAGE WEAVER SRL SME 151, % 32 CS ROMANIA SA LARGE 143, % 33 UNIVERSITATEA LUCIAN BLAGA DIN SIBIU HES/REC 136, % 34 MY SOFT SRL SME 131, % 35 UTI GRUP SA LARGE 130, % 36 UNIVERSITATEA DIN PITESTI HES/REC 127, % 37 Fundatia Medis NIL 122, % 38 OMEGA INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT & LOGISTICS SRL LARGE 120, % 39 ENERGOECO SRL LARGE 111, % 40 GEUMACS CONSULTING SRL SME 108, % 41 MINISTERUL APARARII NATIONALE NIL 100, % 42 ASOCIATIA ROMANA PENTRU INDUSTRIA ELECTRONICA SI SOFTWARE LARGE 93, % 43 CENTRUL DE ECONOMIA INDUSTRIEI SI SERVICIILOR HES/REC 92, % 44 INTEL SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT SRL LARGE 91, % 45 ROMTELECOM SA LARGE 90, % 46 ASOCIATIA DE STANDARDIZARE DIN ROMANIA NIL 89, % 47 Infineon Technologies Romania and CO. Societate in Comandita Simpla LARGE 82, % 48 R.T.T ROMANIA TELECOMUNICATION TRADING S.R.L SME 73, % 49 AQUATIM SA LARGE 50, % 50 ASOCIATIA DE ASISTENTA PSIHOPEDAGOGICA SI SOCIALA PENTRU COPII SI TENERII CU LARGE 16, % APTITUDINI INALTE Total 19,486, % 228

249 6.23 Slovakia & the ICT Theme of FP7 SLOVAKIA: Total EC Funding: 9.7M (0.2% of total) Total number of participations: 53 (0.3% of total) Number of project co-ordinations: 4 Cumulated figures over the period Key Messages Participation of Slovakia in the ICT Programme has remained around ~0.2% since FP6; Over the period , 24 organisations participated to the programme; There has been a very strong participation from SMEs (33%), whereas research and industry participations are limited (52% and 14% respectively) and concentrated in a few organisations; The university of Kosice is the first Slovakian recipient of funding; Participation is concentrated in the following areas: ICT for Enterprise, ICT for Energy Efficiency, FET and ICT for Governance; The capital region of Bratislava accounts for more than half (56%) of the funding received, followed by Kosice and Nitra. 229

250 Figure 255 SK, Participation and EC funding, Figure 256 SK, Number of participating organisations and new entries,

251 Figure 257 SK- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 258 SK Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) 231

252 Figure 259 SK- Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 260 SK- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) 232

253 Figure 261 SK organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) # Organisation Type EU funding % 1 TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY KOSICE HES/REC 1,874, % 2 INTERSOFT A.S. SME 1,071, % 3 FYZIKALNY USTAV SLOVENSKEJ AKADEMIE VIED HES/REC 1,061, % 4 USTAV INFORMATIKY, SLOVENSKA AKADEMIA VIED HES/REC 897, % 5 BROADBIT SLOVAKIA SRO SME 826, % 6 SLOVENSKA TECHNICKA UNIVERZITA V BRATISLAVE HES/REC 632, % 7 NEMETSCHEK SLOVENSKO, S.R.O. SME 557, % 8 Ardaco, a.s. LARGE 406, % 9 INDRA Slovakia, a.s. LARGE 389, % 10 UNIVERZITA KOMENSKEHO V BRATISLAVE HES/REC 328, % 11 CORINEX COMMUNICATIONS AS SME 328, % 12 TOWERCOM AS LARGE 282, % 13 SLOVAK TELEKOM AS LARGE 169, % 14 ELFA S.R.O. SME 141, % 15 Institute of Electrical Engineering, Slovak Academy of Sciences HES/REC 124, % 16 SAE-AUTOMATION, S.R.O SME 122, % 17 JAZYKOVEDNY USTAV LUDOVITA STURA SLOVENSKEJ AKADEMIE VIED HES/REC 116, % 18 CLINICAL RESEARCH ASSOCIATES & CONSULTANTS S.R.O. SME 100, % 19 SLOVENSKA AGENTURA ZIVOTNEHO PROSTREDIA THE SLOVAK ENVIRONMENTAL AGENCY NIL 84, % 20 BIC BRATISLAVA. SPOL. S.R.O. LARGE 80, % 21 Kosice self-governing region NIL 76, % 22 VYSOKOSPECIALIZOVANY ODBORNY USTAV GERIATRICKY SV. LUKASA V KOSICIACH N.O.NIL 45, % 23 CORDIA AS SME 33, % 24 MEDMARK SRO SME 0 0.0% Total 9,754, % 233

254 6.24 Slovenia & the ICT Theme of FP7 SLOVENIA: Total EC Funding: 31.2M (0.5% of total) Total number of participations: 130 (0.7% of total) Number of project co-ordinations: 4 Cumulated figures over the period Key Messages Slovenian participation in the ICT Programme has increased from ~0.25% in FP5 to ~0.4% in FP6 and to 0.5% FP7 so far, showing an increasing competitiveness of the Slovenian R&D sector; Over the period , 53 Slovenian organisations participated to the programme; There has been a relatively strong participation from SMEs (26% of total funding) and a good participation from research institutions (61%), although it is very strongly concentrated in two organizations only; Participation of large industry (10%) is low but increasing (it was 5% in 2011) and concentrated in a handful of organizations; Areas of strength include ICT for energy efficiency, Intelligent Information Management, Cognitive systems and Robotics, Software, Services and internet connected objects and Intelligent Information Management; Slightly less than 90% of total funding is directed towards Ljubljana. 234

255 Figure 262 SI, Participation and EC funding, Figure 263 SI, Number of participating organisations and new entries,

256 Figure 264 SI- Number of participations to projects and participations by SMEs, Figure 265 SI Funding by organisation type (%), (cumulated figures) 236

257 Figure 266 SI- Funding by regions at NUTS 3 level, (cumulated figures) Figure 267 SI- Funding by research area (strategic objectives), (cumulated figures) 237

258 Figure 268 Top 50 SI organisations by funding, (cumulated figures) # Organisation Type EU funding % 1 INSTITUT JOZEF STEFAN HES/REC 13,690, % 2 UNIVERZA V LJUBLJANI HES/REC 3,287, % 3 XLAB RAZVOJ PROGRAMSKE OPREME IN SVETOVANJE D.O.O. SME 2,389, % 4 GORENJE GOSPODINJSKI APARATI D.D. LARGE 751, % 5 KORONA INZENIRING DD SME 743, % 6 ZAVOD ZA VARNOSTNE TEHNOLOGIJE INFORMACIJSKE DRUZBE IN ELEKTRONSKO POSLOVANJE HES/REC 680, % 7 ETREL SVETOVANJE IN DRUGE STORITVE DOO SME 644, % 8 AMIS DRUZBA ZA TELEKOMUNIKACIJE D.O.O. LARGE 547, % 9 UNIVERZA V MARIBORU HES/REC 526, % 10 COMTRADE PROGRAMSKE RESITVE DOO LARGE 436, % 11 TELEKOM SLOVENIJE D.D. LARGE 412, % 12 ELAPHE, podjetje za razvoj in prodajo elektricnih vozil ter energijskih virov d.o.o SME 406, % 13 CYCORP, RAZISKOVANJE IN EKSPERIMENTALNI RAZVOJ D.O.O. SME 390, % 14 ENVIGENCE, OKOLJSKA INTELIGENCA, DOO SME 356, % 15 ELEKTRO LJUBLJANA PODJETJE ZADISTRIBUCIJO ELEKTRICNE ENERGIJE D.D. LARGE 345, % 16 INNOVATION SERVICE NETWORK PODJETNISKO IN POSLOVNO SVETOVANJE DOO SME 320, % 17 UNIVERZITETNI KLINIKNI CENTER LJUBLJANA HES/REC 300, % 18 UNIVERZITETNI REHABILITACIJSKI INSTITUT REPUBLIKE SLOVENIJE-SOCA NIL 290, % 19 ZEMANTA PAMETNE SPLETNE STORITVE INSVETOVANJE DOO SME 279, % 20 SOLVERA LYNX NOVE TEHNOLOGIJE ZA ENERGETIKO DD SME 277, % 21 Thyia Tehnologije d.o.o SME 262, % 22 Univerzitetni klinicni center Maribor NIL 253, % 23 MEIS STORITVE ZA OKOLJE D.O.O. SME 240, % 24 BOSIO PROIZVODNO-TRGOVSKO PODJETJE D.O.O. SME 239, % 25 INEA INFORMATIZACIJA ENERGETIKA AVTOMATIZACIJA DOO SME 219, % 26 SLOVENSKA TISKOVNA AGENCIJA DOO SME 205, % 27 AMANOVA - INTELIGENTNI SISTEMI, SENZORJI IN NOVI MATERIALI D.O.O. SME 200, % 28 IPAK INSTITUT ZA SIMBOLNO ANALIZO IN RAZVOJ INFORMACIJSKIH TEHNOLOGIJ VELENJE HES/REC ZAVOD 193, % 29 MG-SOFT PODJETJE ZA RACUNALNISKI INZENIRING DOO SME 189, % 30 SOLVERA LYNX NOVE TEHNOLOGIJE ZA ENERGETIKO DOO SME 178, % 31 GOSPODARSKO INTERESNO ZDRUZENJE ACS SLOVENSKI AVTOMOBILSKI GROZD HES/REC 168, % 32 RADIOTELEVIZIJA SLOVENIJA JAVNI ZAVVOD LJUBLJANA NIL 163, % 33 OPREMA RAVNE PNEVMATIKA, HIDRAVLIKA, ORODJA IN TEHNOLOSKE LINIJE D.O.O. SME 162, % 34 Inovacijsko-razvojni institut Univerze v Ljubljani HES/REC 149, % 35 ORIA POSLOVNE RESITVE DOO SME 147, % 36 AMZS DRUZBA ZA OPRAVLJANJE STORITEV CLANOM AMD IN DRUGIM UDELEZENCEM V CESTNEM LARGE PROMETU 136,650 DD 0.4% 37 KULTURNO IZOBRAZEVALNO DRUSTVO KIBLA NIL 121, % 38 TRIMO INZENIRING IN PROIZVODNJA MONTAZNIH OBJEKTOV, D.D. LARGE 120, % 39 ELEKTRO GORENJSKA PODJETJE ZA DISTRIBUCIJO ELEKTRICNE ENERGIJE DD LARGE 112, % 40 SALONIT ANHOVO GRADBENI MATERIALI D.D. LARGE 111, % 41 Uprava RS za zaščito in reševanje, Ministrstvo za obrambo NIL 109, % 42 BORZEN, ORGANIZATOR TRGA Z ELEKTRICNO ENERGIJO, DOO SME 104, % 43 SINTESIO USTANOVA NIL 84, % 44 ELEKTRO-SLOVENIJA D.O.O. LARGE 73, % 45 AMNIN D.O.O CENTR ZA ZNANSTVENO VIZUALIZACIJO SME 62, % 46 REGIONALNA USTANOVA CENTER ZA PODPORO RAZVOJU E-UPRAVLJANJA NIL 61, % 47 NARODNA IN UNIVERZITETNA KNJIZNICA NIL 50, % 48 MINISTRSTVO ZA VISOKO SOLSTVO, ZNANOST IN TEHNOLOGIJO NIL 14, % 49 HERMES SOFTLAB PROGRAMSKA OPREMA D.D. LARGE 0 0.0% 50 ISKRA ZASCITE D.O.O. PODJETJE ZA IZVAJANJE ZASCIT, INZENIRING IN KOOPERACIJE SME 0 0.0% Total 31,213, % 238

259 6.25 Spain & the ICT Theme of FP7 SPAIN: Total EC Funding: M (7.8% of total) Total number of participations: 1,502 (8.3% of total) Number of project co-ordinations: 218 Cumulated figures over the period Key Messages Spanish participation in the ICT Programme had decreased from 7.3% in FP5 to 6.3% in FP6 and is increasing again with 7.8% of funding in FP7 so far; Over the period , 478 Spanish organisations participated to the programme; Industrial participation is strong (28% of funding to Large Enterprises), with Telefonica and Atos dominating. SMEs participation stands at 13% of funding. Research participation (56% of total funding) is quite balanced between the key Spanish universities and research centers; Main strengths are quite concentrated in technological areas such as Future Networks and Internet, Software and Services, but also in application areas such as ICT for health and ICT for energy efficiency; In terms of geographical distribution, funding is mainly directed towards the two hubs of Madrid and Barcelona, followed by other industrial areas such as Valencia, Bilbao and San Sebastian. 239

260 Figure 269 ES, Participation and EC funding, Figure 270 ES, Number of participating organisations and new entries,

SURVEY ON THE TRAINING OF GENERAL CARE NURSES IN THE EUROPEAN UNION. The current minimum training requirements for general care nurses

SURVEY ON THE TRAINING OF GENERAL CARE NURSES IN THE EUROPEAN UNION. The current minimum training requirements for general care nurses SURVEY ON THE TRAINING OF GENERAL CARE NURSES IN THE EUROPEAN UNION This survey serves as a background document for the discussion of the Commission's legislative proposal to modernize the minimum requirements

More information

INNOBAROMETER 2015 - THE INNOVATION TRENDS AT EU ENTERPRISES

INNOBAROMETER 2015 - THE INNOVATION TRENDS AT EU ENTERPRISES Eurobarometer INNOBAROMETER 2015 - THE INNOVATION TRENDS AT EU ENTERPRISES REPORT Fieldwork: February 2015 Publication: September 2015 This survey has been requested by the European Commission, Directorate-General

More information

ENTERING THE EU BORDERS & VISAS THE SCHENGEN AREA OF FREE MOVEMENT. EU Schengen States. Non-Schengen EU States. Non-EU Schengen States.

ENTERING THE EU BORDERS & VISAS THE SCHENGEN AREA OF FREE MOVEMENT. EU Schengen States. Non-Schengen EU States. Non-EU Schengen States. ENTERING THE EU BORDERS & VISAS THE SCHENGEN AREA OF FREE MOVEMENT An area without internal borders where EU citizens and non-eu nationals may move freely EU Schengen States Non-Schengen EU States IS Azores

More information

European Research Council

European Research Council ERC Starting Grant Outcome: Indicative statistics Reproduction is authorised provided the source ERC is acknowledged ERCEA/JH. ERC Starting Grant: call Submitted and selected proposals by domain Submitted

More information

THE ROLE OF PUBLIC SUPPORT IN THE COMMERCIALISATION OF INNOVATIONS

THE ROLE OF PUBLIC SUPPORT IN THE COMMERCIALISATION OF INNOVATIONS Flash Eurobarometer THE ROLE OF PUBLIC SUPPORT IN THE COMMERCIALISATION OF INNOVATIONS REPORT Fieldwork: January February 2014 Publication: May 2014 This survey has been requested by the European Commission,

More information

Implementing the cooperation mechanisms of the RES directive current status and open questions

Implementing the cooperation mechanisms of the RES directive current status and open questions Implementing the cooperation mechanisms of the RES directive current status and open questions Corinna Klessmann, Ecofys Germany RE-SHAPING Workshop, Vilnius, 16.05.2011 Supported by Intelligent Energy

More information

Comparison of annuity markets (OECD National Annuity Markets: Features and Implications, Rusconi 2008) Mercer

Comparison of annuity markets (OECD National Annuity Markets: Features and Implications, Rusconi 2008) Mercer May 2009 Retirement Income/Annuities Around the World What US Policy Makers Might Learn Barbara Marder, Baltimore Global Defined Contribution Consulting Leader www.mercer.com 1 Comparison of annuity markets

More information

ERMInE Database. Presentation by Nils Flatabø SINTEF Energy Research. ERMInE Workshop 2 - Northern Europe Oslo, 1. November 2006

ERMInE Database. Presentation by Nils Flatabø SINTEF Energy Research. ERMInE Workshop 2 - Northern Europe Oslo, 1. November 2006 ERMInE Database Presentation by Nils Flatabø SINTEF Energy Research ERMInE Workshop 2 - Northern Europe Oslo, 1. November 26 Overview Content of the Ermine Database Electronic Questionnaire RTD&D Data

More information

Number of resident patent applications to the European Patent Office per 1 million population

Number of resident patent applications to the European Patent Office per 1 million population CENTRAL STATISTICAL OFFICE STATISTICAL OFFICE IN KATOWICE Sustainable Development Indicators. National module More information: for substantive matters concerning: national indicators and those on the

More information

Joint Research Centre (JRC) Economic Analysis of Electronic Identification (EID) of Small Ruminants in Member States

Joint Research Centre (JRC) Economic Analysis of Electronic Identification (EID) of Small Ruminants in Member States 1 Joint Research Centre (JRC) Economic Analysis of Electronic Identification (EID) of Small Ruminants in Member States IPSC - Institute for the Protection and Security of the Citizen Ispra - Italy http://ipsc.jrc.ec.europa.eu/

More information

ANALYSIS OF THE STAKEHOLDER CONSULTATION ON

ANALYSIS OF THE STAKEHOLDER CONSULTATION ON ANALYSIS OF THE STAKEHOLDER CONSULTATION ON Science and Technology, the key to Europe s future: guidelines for future European policy to support research COM(353)2004 DG Research, European Commission,

More information

BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION IN THE EU

BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION IN THE EU Flash Eurobarometer BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION IN THE EU REPORT Fieldwork: March-April 22 Publication: November 22 This survey has been requested by Directorate-General for Justice

More information

European Research Council

European Research Council ERC Advanced Grants 2011 Outcome: Indicative Statistics Reproduction is authorised provided that the source ERC is acknowledged NB: In these graphs grantee refers to a candidate selected for ERC funding

More information

Dublin, March 2013. EPSO Network of Experts in the field of Personnel Selection 14th March 2013

Dublin, March 2013. EPSO Network of Experts in the field of Personnel Selection 14th March 2013 Dublin, March 2013 EPSO Network of Experts in the field of Personnel Selection 14th March 2013 On-going and upcoming competitions AD2012 by Citizenship AD2012 Citizenship %EU Population validated application

More information

Our patent and trade mark attorneys are here to help you protect and profit from your ideas, making sure they re working every bit as hard as you do.

Our patent and trade mark attorneys are here to help you protect and profit from your ideas, making sure they re working every bit as hard as you do. Our patent and trade mark attorneys are here to help you protect and profit from your ideas, making sure they re working every bit as hard as you do. Our people work with everyone from multi-nationals

More information

What do the recent regional GDP statistics tell us about Cohesion?

What do the recent regional GDP statistics tell us about Cohesion? Analysis from the CPMR Secretariat July 2015 What do the recent regional GDP statistics tell us about Cohesion? Headline messages - Recent regional GDP statistics reveal that regional disparities are on

More information

EUROPEAN YOUTH: PARTICIPATION IN DEMOCRATIC LIFE

EUROPEAN YOUTH: PARTICIPATION IN DEMOCRATIC LIFE Flash Eurobarometer EUROPEAN YOUTH: PARTICIPATION IN DEMOCRATIC LIFE REPORT Fieldwork: April 2013 Publication: May 2013 This survey has been requested by the European Commission, Directorate-General for

More information

INNOVATION IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR: ITS PERCEPTION IN AND IMPACT ON BUSINESS

INNOVATION IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR: ITS PERCEPTION IN AND IMPACT ON BUSINESS Flash Eurobarometer INNOVATION IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR: ITS PERCEPTION IN AND IMPACT ON BUSINESS REPORT Fieldwork: February-March 22 Publication: June 22 This survey has been requested by the European Commission,

More information

72/2015-21 April 2015

72/2015-21 April 2015 72/2015-21 April 2015 Provision of deficit and debt data for 2014 - first notification Euro area and EU28 government deficit at 2.4% and 2.9% of GDP respectively Government debt at 91.9% and 86.8% In 2014,

More information

ATTITUDES OF EUROPEANS TOWARDS BUILDING THE SINGLE MARKET FOR GREEN PRODUCTS

ATTITUDES OF EUROPEANS TOWARDS BUILDING THE SINGLE MARKET FOR GREEN PRODUCTS Flash Eurobarometer 367 ATTITUDES OF EUROPEANS TOWARDS BUILDING THE SINGLE MARKET FOR GREEN PRODUCTS SUMMARY Fieldwork: December 2012 Publication: July 2013 This survey has been requested by the European

More information

Study on comparison tools and third-party verification schemes

Study on comparison tools and third-party verification schemes Justice and Consumers Study on comparison tools and third-party verification schemes ECCG 25/03/2015 Julien Brugerolle JUST E6 Introduction Study objectives Explore consumer behavioural patterns in the

More information

INTRODUCTION... 2. I. Participation in the 2014 European elections... 3

INTRODUCTION... 2. I. Participation in the 2014 European elections... 3 ?? Directorate-General for Communication PUBLIC OPINION MONITORING UNIT 2014 EUROPEAN ELECTIONS DESK RESEARCH Brussels, April 2015 Profile of voters and abstainees in the European elections 2014 INTRODUCTION...

More information

EUROPEANS SATISFACTION WITH RAIL SERVICES

EUROPEANS SATISFACTION WITH RAIL SERVICES Flash Eurobarometer 382a EUROPEANS SATISFACTION WITH RAIL SERVICES SUMMARY Fieldwork: September 2013 Publication: December 2013 This survey has been requested by the European Commission, Directorate-General

More information

European judicial training 2014. Justice

European judicial training 2014. Justice European judicial training 2014 Justice Europe Direct is a service to help you find answers to your questions about the European Union. Freephone number (*): 00 800 6 7 8 9 10 11 (*) Certain mobile telephone

More information

Voluntary health insurance and health care reforms

Voluntary health insurance and health care reforms Voluntary health insurance and health care reforms Sarah Thomson Senior Research Fellow, European Observatory Deputy Director, LSE Health IMF conference, Paris, 21 st June 2011 Health financing policy

More information

Finance Office. Place of supply of rules

Finance Office. Place of supply of rules Finance Office Place of supply of rules Contents 1. Introduction 2. Sales - Supply of services 2.1 Business or Consumer 2.2 Place of belonging 2.3 General rules 2.4 Exceptions applying to the general rules

More information

Social dumping and free movement: Overview of current issues from an economic point of view

Social dumping and free movement: Overview of current issues from an economic point of view Social dumping and free movement: Overview of current issues from an economic point of view Prof. dr. Jozef Pacolet & Frederic De Wispelaere Design Charles & Ray Eames - Hang it all Vitra Statistics on

More information

User language preferences online. Analytical report

User language preferences online. Analytical report Flash Eurobarometer 313 The Gallup Organization Flash Eurobarometer European Commission User language preferences online Analytical report Fieldwork: January 2011 Publication: May 2011 This survey was

More information

EUROPE 2020 TARGET: EARLY LEAVERS FROM EDUCATION AND TRAINING

EUROPE 2020 TARGET: EARLY LEAVERS FROM EDUCATION AND TRAINING EUROPE 2020 TARGET: EARLY LEAVERS FROM EDUCATION AND TRAINING By 2020, the share of early leavers from education and training (aged 18-24) should be less than 10% Early school leaving 1 is an obstacle

More information

EUROPEAN AREA OF SKILLS AND QUALIFICATIONS

EUROPEAN AREA OF SKILLS AND QUALIFICATIONS EUROPEAN AREA OF SKILLS AND QUALIFICATIONS REPORT Fieldwork: April - May 2014 Publication: June 2014 This survey has been requested by the European Commission, Directorate-General for Education and Culture

More information

EUROPE 2020 TARGETS: RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

EUROPE 2020 TARGETS: RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT EUROPE 2020 TARGETS: RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Research, development and innovation are key policy components of the EU strategy for economic growth: Europe 2020. By fostering market take-up of new, innovative

More information

HOW COMPANIES INFLUENCE OUR SOCIETY: CITIZENS VIEW

HOW COMPANIES INFLUENCE OUR SOCIETY: CITIZENS VIEW Flash Eurobarometer HOW COMPANIES INFLUENCE OUR SOCIETY: CITIZENS VIEW REPORT Fieldwork: October-November 2012 Publication: April 2013 This survey has been requested by the European Commission, Directorate-General

More information

CO2 BASED MOTOR VEHICLE TAXES IN THE EU IN 2015

CO2 BASED MOTOR VEHICLE TAXES IN THE EU IN 2015 CO2 BASED MOTOR VEHICLE TAXES IN THE EU IN 2015 COUNTRY AT (AUSTRIA) BE (BELGIUM) BG (BULGARIA) CO2/FUEL CONSUMPTION TAXES A fuel consumption tax (Normverbrauchsabgabe or NoVA) is levied upon the first

More information

OVERVIEW OF PURCHASE AND TAX INCENTIVES FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLES IN THE EU

OVERVIEW OF PURCHASE AND TAX INCENTIVES FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLES IN THE EU 01.04.2014 OVERVIEW OF PURCHASE AND TAX INCENTIVES FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLES IN THE EU This table provides an overview of the incentives that are granted in the Member States of the European Union for the

More information

Monitoring the social impact of the crisis: public perceptions in the European Union (wave 6) REPORT

Monitoring the social impact of the crisis: public perceptions in the European Union (wave 6) REPORT Eurobarometer Monitoring the social impact of the crisis: public perceptions in the European Union (wave 6) REPORT Fieldwork: December 2011 Publication: April 2012 This survey has been requested by Directorate-General

More information

INVESTING IN INTANGIBLES: ECONOMIC ASSETS AND INNOVATION DRIVERS FOR GROWTH

INVESTING IN INTANGIBLES: ECONOMIC ASSETS AND INNOVATION DRIVERS FOR GROWTH Flash Eurobarometer INVESTING IN INTANGIBLES: ECONOMIC ASSETS AND INNOVATION DRIVERS FOR GROWTH REPORT Fieldwork: January February 213 Publication: May 213 This survey has been requested by the European

More information

Taxation of tobacco products in the European Union. Frank Van Driessche DG Taxation and Customs Union May 2006

Taxation of tobacco products in the European Union. Frank Van Driessche DG Taxation and Customs Union May 2006 1 Taxation of tobacco products in the European Union Frank Van Driessche DG Taxation and Customs Union May 2006 2 Legislation on taxation Directive 92/79/EEC (Approximation of taxes on cigarettes) Directive

More information

I have asked for asylum in the EU which country will handle my claim?

I have asked for asylum in the EU which country will handle my claim? EN I have asked for asylum in the EU which country will handle my claim? A Information about the Dublin Regulation for applicants for international protection pursuant to article 4 of Regulation (EU) No

More information

Private Sector Debt Dívida do Sector Privado. dossiers. Economic Outlook Conjuntura Económica. Conjuntura Económica.

Private Sector Debt Dívida do Sector Privado. dossiers. Economic Outlook Conjuntura Económica. Conjuntura Económica. dossiers Economic Outlook Private Sector Debt Dívida do Sector Privado Last Update Última Actualização:12/08/2015 Portugal Economy Probe (PE Probe) Prepared by PE Probe Preparado por PE Probe Copyright

More information

EUROPEAN CITIZENS DIGITAL HEALTH LITERACY

EUROPEAN CITIZENS DIGITAL HEALTH LITERACY Flash Eurobarometer EUROPEAN CITIZENS DIGITAL HEALTH LITERACY REPORT Fieldwork: September 2014 Publication: November 2014 This survey has been requested by the European Commission, Directorate-General

More information

THE EUROPEAN EMERGENCY NUMBER 112

THE EUROPEAN EMERGENCY NUMBER 112 Flash Eurobarometer 368 THE EUROPEAN EMERGENCY NUMBER 112 SUMMARY Fieldwork: January 2013 Publication: February 2013 This survey has been requested by the European Commission, Directorate-General for Communications

More information

Computing our Future Computer programming and coding in schools in Europe. Anja Balanskat, Senior Manager European Schoolnet

Computing our Future Computer programming and coding in schools in Europe. Anja Balanskat, Senior Manager European Schoolnet Computing our Future Computer programming and coding in schools in Europe Anja Balanskat, Senior Manager European Schoolnet ABOUT THE SURVEY What do Ministries currently think about the topic? Curricula

More information

The coverage rate of social benefits. Research note 9/2013

The coverage rate of social benefits. Research note 9/2013 Research note 9/2013 SOCIAL SITUATION OBSERVATORY INCOME DISTRIBUTION AND LIVING CONDITIONS APPLICA (BE), EUROPEAN CENTRE FOR THE EUROPEAN CENTRE FOR SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY AND RESEARCH (AT), ISER UNIVERSITY

More information

GDP per capita, consumption per capita and comparative price levels in Europe

GDP per capita, consumption per capita and comparative price levels in Europe Economy and finance Author: Lars SVENNEBYE Statistics in focus 2008 GDP per capita, consumption per capita and comparative price levels in Europe Final results for 2005 and preliminary results for 2006

More information

RETAILERS ATTITUDES TOWARDS CROSS- BORDER TRADE AND CONSUMER PROTECTION

RETAILERS ATTITUDES TOWARDS CROSS- BORDER TRADE AND CONSUMER PROTECTION Eurobarometer RETAILERS ATTITUDES TOWARDS CROSS- BORDER TRADE AND CONSUMER PROTECTION REPORT Fieldwork: September - October 2012 Publication: June 2013 This survey has been requested by the European Commission,

More information

Digital Agenda Targets Progress report. Digital Agenda Scoreboard 2014

Digital Agenda Targets Progress report. Digital Agenda Scoreboard 2014 Digital Agenda Targets Progress report Digital Agenda Scoreboard 2014 1 NGA coverage: Fast broadband technologies capable of providing at least 30 Mbps are available to 64%, up from 54% a year ago Among

More information

SURVEY OF SCHOOLS: ICT IN EDUCATION COUNTRY PROFILE: CZECH REPUBLIC

SURVEY OF SCHOOLS: ICT IN EDUCATION COUNTRY PROFILE: CZECH REPUBLIC SURVEY OF SCHOOLS: ICT IN EDUCATION COUNTRY PROFILE: CZECH REPUBLIC November 2012 This report was prepared by the Contractor: European Schoolnet and University of Liège under contract SMART 2010/0039.

More information

Finnish foreign trade 2014 Figures and diagrams. 27.2.2015 FINNISH CUSTOMS Statistics 1

Finnish foreign trade 2014 Figures and diagrams. 27.2.2015 FINNISH CUSTOMS Statistics 1 Finnish foreign trade 214 Figures and diagrams 27.2.215 FINNISH CUSTOMS Statistics 1 IMPORTS, EXPORTS AND TRADE BALANCE 199-214 7 billion e 6 5 4 3 2 1-1 9 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

More information

Special Eurobarometer 390 CYBER SECURITY REPORT

Special Eurobarometer 390 CYBER SECURITY REPORT Special Eurobarometer 390 CYBER SECURITY REPORT Fieldwork: March 2012 Publication: July 2012 This survey has been requested by the European Commission, Directorate-General Home Affairs and co-ordinated

More information

Family Law. Fieldwork: June 2006 Report: October 2006

Family Law. Fieldwork: June 2006 Report: October 2006 The Gallup Organization Flash EB N o 188 Consular Protection and Family Law Flash Eurobarometer European Commission Family Law Summary Fieldwork: June 06 Report: October 06 Flash Eurobarometer 188 The

More information

SESAR. Luftfahrttechnologie - Auftaktveranstaltung zum 7. EU-Forschungsrahmenprogramm Wien, 4 Dezember 2006

SESAR. Luftfahrttechnologie - Auftaktveranstaltung zum 7. EU-Forschungsrahmenprogramm Wien, 4 Dezember 2006 Luftfahrttechnologie - Auftaktveranstaltung zum 7. EU-Forschungsrahmenprogramm Wien, 4 Dezember 2006 SESAR Christian Pusch EUROCONTROL Experimental Centre European page 1Organisation of 22 for the Safety

More information

Digital Inclusion and Skills. Digital Agenda Scoreboard 2014

Digital Inclusion and Skills. Digital Agenda Scoreboard 2014 Digital Inclusion and Skills Digital Agenda Scoreboard 2014 1 72% of EU population uses the internet weekly and 57% of disadvantaged do so. Most of EU population (62%) uses the internet every day. The

More information

SMES, RESOURCE EFFICIENCY AND GREEN MARKETS

SMES, RESOURCE EFFICIENCY AND GREEN MARKETS Eurobarometer SMES, RESOURCE EFFICIENCY AND GREEN MARKETS REPORT Fieldwork: September 2013 Publication: December 2013 This survey has been requested by the European Commission, Directorate-General for

More information

PREFERENCES OF EUROPEANS TOWARDS TOURISM

PREFERENCES OF EUROPEANS TOWARDS TOURISM Flash Eurobarometer 414 PREFERENCES OF EUROPEANS TOWARDS TOURISM SUMMARY Fieldwork: January 2015 Publication: March 2015 This survey has been requested by the European Commission, Directorate-General for

More information

RETAIL FINANCIAL SERVICES

RETAIL FINANCIAL SERVICES Special Eurobarometer 373 RETAIL FINANCIAL SERVICES REPORT Fieldwork: September 211 Publication: April 212 This survey has been requested by the European Commission, Directorate-General Internal Market

More information

RETAIL FINANCIAL SERVICES

RETAIL FINANCIAL SERVICES Special Eurobarometer 373 RETAIL FINANCIAL SERVICES REPORT Fieldwork: September 211 Publication: March 212 This survey has been requested by Directorate-General Internal Market and Services and co-ordinated

More information

Public Debt and Contingent Liabilities: A Cross-Country Comparison

Public Debt and Contingent Liabilities: A Cross-Country Comparison Public Debt and Contingent Liabilities: A Cross-Country Comparison Melchior Vella and Gevit Duca * 1. Contingent Liabilities 1.1 What are contingent liabilities? Contingent liabilities are obligations

More information

ECSEL Call 2015 Work Plan and submission tools. Yves Gigase

ECSEL Call 2015 Work Plan and submission tools. Yves Gigase ECSEL Call 2015 Work Plan and submission tools Yves Gigase 1 Where to find? Check out the ECSEL website and the participant portal for H2020 Documents: Work Plan: schedule, budget, topics, evaluation procedure

More information

E-COMMUNICATIONS HOUSEHOLD SURVEY

E-COMMUNICATIONS HOUSEHOLD SURVEY Special Eurobarometer 396 E-COMMUNICATIONS HOUSEHOLD SURVEY REPORT Fieldwork: February - March 2013 Publication: November 2013 This survey has been requested by the European Commission, Directorate-General

More information

Special Eurobarometer 431 DATA PROTECTION REPORT

Special Eurobarometer 431 DATA PROTECTION REPORT Special Eurobarometer 431 DATA PROTECTION REPORT Fieldwork: March 2015 Publication: June 2015 This survey has been requested by the European Commission, Directorate-General for Justice and Consumers and

More information

Towards a safer use of the Internet for children in the EU a parents perspective. Analytical report

Towards a safer use of the Internet for children in the EU a parents perspective. Analytical report Flash Eurobarometer 248 The Gallup Organisation Analytical Report Flash EB N o 251 Public attitudes and perceptions in the euro area Flash Eurobarometer European Commission Towards a safer use of the Internet

More information

Broadband Coverage in Europe Final Report 2009 Survey Data as of 31 December 2008. DG INFSO 80106 December 2009 IDATE 1

Broadband Coverage in Europe Final Report 2009 Survey Data as of 31 December 2008. DG INFSO 80106 December 2009 IDATE 1 Broadband Coverage in Europe Final Report 2009 Survey Data as of 31 December 2008 DG INFSO 80106 December 2009 IDATE 1 Table of contents 1. Methodological notes...5 2. Executive summary...7 3. European

More information

SMES, RESOURCE EFFICIENCY AND GREEN MARKETS

SMES, RESOURCE EFFICIENCY AND GREEN MARKETS Flash Eurobarometer 381 SMES, RESOURCE EFFICIENCY AND GREEN MARKETS SUMMARY Fieldwork: September 2013 Publication: December 2013 This survey has been requested by the European Commission, Directorate-General

More information

EUROPEAN SEMESTER THEMATIC FICHE ACCESS TO FINANCE

EUROPEAN SEMESTER THEMATIC FICHE ACCESS TO FINANCE EUROPEAN SEMESTER THEMATIC FICHE ACCESS TO FINANCE Access to finance is key to business development. Investment and innovation are not possible without adequate financing. A difficulty in getting finance

More information

Measuring innovation efficiency. INNO-Metrics Thematic Paper. December 2007

Measuring innovation efficiency. INNO-Metrics Thematic Paper. December 2007 Measuring innovation efficiency INNO-Metrics Thematic Paper Hugo Hollanders 1 and Funda Celikel Esser 2 December 2007 Disclaimer: The views expressed in this report, as well as the information included

More information

ECCE Standing Committee Education & Training

ECCE Standing Committee Education & Training ECCE Standing Committee Education & Training Impact of the Bologna Process on Civil engineering education in Europe Prof. Iacint Manoliu 45 th ECCE meeting Bucharest, 11 May 2007 SCD Civil Engineering

More information

Report on the Possibility for Insurance Companies to Use Hedge Funds 1

Report on the Possibility for Insurance Companies to Use Hedge Funds 1 CEIOPS-DOC-06/05 Rev.1 Report on the Possibility for Insurance Companies to Use Hedge Funds 1 December 2005 1. Introduction The purpose of this survey is to gather information at Community level on the

More information

E-COMMUNICATIONS AND TELECOM SINGLE MARKET HOUSEHOLD SURVEY

E-COMMUNICATIONS AND TELECOM SINGLE MARKET HOUSEHOLD SURVEY Special Eurobarometer 414 E-COMMUNICATIONS AND TELECOM SINGLE MARKET HOUSEHOLD SURVEY REPORT Fieldwork: January 2014 Publication: March 2014 This survey has been requested by the European Commission, Directorate-General

More information

Broadband markets Digital Agenda Scoreboard 1 2014

Broadband markets Digital Agenda Scoreboard 1 2014 Broadband markets Digital Agenda Scoreboard 2014 1 Broadband coverage: Basic broadband is available to everyone in the EU, while fixed technologies cover 97% leaving 6 million homes unconnected. Next Generation

More information

EN 106 EN 4. THE MOBILE USE OF THE INTERNET BY INDIVIDUALS AND ENTERPRISES. 4.1. Introduction

EN 106 EN 4. THE MOBILE USE OF THE INTERNET BY INDIVIDUALS AND ENTERPRISES. 4.1. Introduction 4. THE MOBILE USE OF THE INTERNET BY INDIVIDUALS AND ENTERPRISES 4.1. Introduction This chapter looks at mobile use of the internet by individuals and enterprises, benefiting from new data collected in

More information

ATTITUDES OF EUROPEANS TOWARDS BUILDING THE SINGLE MARKET FOR GREEN PRODUCTS

ATTITUDES OF EUROPEANS TOWARDS BUILDING THE SINGLE MARKET FOR GREEN PRODUCTS Eurobarometer ATTITUDES OF EUROPEANS TOWARDS BUILDING THE SINGLE MARKET FOR GREEN PRODUCTS REPORT Fieldwork: December 2012 Publication: July 2013 This survey has been requested by the European Commission,

More information

Factsheet Swiss European Mobility Programme (SEMP/ex-Erasmus)

Factsheet Swiss European Mobility Programme (SEMP/ex-Erasmus) Factsheet Swiss European Mobility Programme (SEMP/ex-Erasmus) Academic year 2016-2017 1. Institutional Information 1.1. Institutional details Name of the institution Code Institution website Online course

More information

Minimum Wage Protection Current German and European Debates

Minimum Wage Protection Current German and European Debates Årskonferanse i Fafo Østforum Fire år etter EU-utvidelsen: Status og framtidsperspektiver Oslo, 3 June 2008 Minimum Wage Protection Current German and European Debates Thorsten Schulten Wirtschafts- und

More information

SURVEY OF SCHOOLS: ICT IN EDUCATION COUNTRY PROFILE: SPAIN

SURVEY OF SCHOOLS: ICT IN EDUCATION COUNTRY PROFILE: SPAIN SURVEY OF SCHOOLS: ICT IN EDUCATION COUNTRY PROFILE: SPAIN November 2012 This report was prepared by the Contractor: European Schoolnet and University of Liège under contract SMART 2010/0039. The views

More information

Poverty and Social Exclusion in Central, Eastern and South-Eastern European Member States. Michael Knogler

Poverty and Social Exclusion in Central, Eastern and South-Eastern European Member States. Michael Knogler Department of Economics Policy Issues No. May 1 Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung Landshuter Straße, D-937 Regensburg Telefon: ++9 (9 1) 93 5-1 E-Mail: info@ios-regensburg.de Internet: www.ios-regensburg.de

More information

Total. Manufacturing. High tech. Medium-high tech. Low and medium-low tech. Total. Market services Know ledge intensive

Total. Manufacturing. High tech. Medium-high tech. Low and medium-low tech. Total. Market services Know ledge intensive Statistics in focus SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY High tech industries and knowledge based services The importance of R&D and Human Resources in Science and Technology Figure 1: Proportion of Human Resources

More information

YOUNG PEOPLE AND DRUGS

YOUNG PEOPLE AND DRUGS Eurobarometer YOUNG PEOPLE AND DRUGS REPORT Fieldwork: June 2014 Publication: August 2014 This survey has been requested by the European Commission, Directorate-General for Justice and co-ordinated by

More information

COMPANIES ENGAGED IN ONLINE ACTIVITIES

COMPANIES ENGAGED IN ONLINE ACTIVITIES Flash Eurobarometer 413 COMPANIES ENGAGED IN ONLINE ACTIVITIES SUMMARY Fieldwork: January-February 2015 Publication: May 2015 This survey has been requested by the European Commission, Directorate-General

More information

Flash Eurobarometer 355 SPACE ACTIVITIES REPORT

Flash Eurobarometer 355 SPACE ACTIVITIES REPORT Flash Eurobarometer SPACE ACTIVITIES REPORT Fieldwork: July 2012 Publication: September 2012 This survey has been requested by the European Commission, Directorate-General Enterprise and Industry and co-ordinated

More information

PUBLIC ATTITUDES TOWARDS ROBOTS

PUBLIC ATTITUDES TOWARDS ROBOTS Special Eurobarometer 382 PUBLIC ATTITUDES TOWARDS ROBOTS REPORT Fieldwork: February - March 2012 Publication: September 2012 This survey has been requested by Directorate-General for Information Society

More information

DOCTORAL (Ph.D) THESIS

DOCTORAL (Ph.D) THESIS DOCTORAL (Ph.D) THESIS UNIVERSITY OF KAPOSVÁR FACULTY OF ECONOMIC SCIENCE Department of Finance and Economics Head of Doctors School: DR. GÁBOR UDOVECZ Doctor of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences Supervisor:

More information

Payments to Overseas banks Things to be aware of

Payments to Overseas banks Things to be aware of Payments to Overseas banks Things to be aware of Payment can be made to accounts in most countries. If you wish to have your pension paid overseas, the Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS), the Funds bankers,

More information

PREFERENCES OF EUROPEANS TOWARDS TOURISM

PREFERENCES OF EUROPEANS TOWARDS TOURISM Eurobarometer PREFERENCES OF EUROPEANS TOWARDS TOURISM REPORT Fieldwork: January 2014 Publication: February 2014 This survey has been requested by the European Commission, Directorate-General for Enterprise

More information

Mapping ERA-NETs across Europe: overview of the ERA-NET scheme and its results. Susana Elena Pérez

Mapping ERA-NETs across Europe: overview of the ERA-NET scheme and its results. Susana Elena Pérez Mapping ERA-NETs across Europe: overview of the ERA-NET scheme and its results Susana Elena Pérez EUR 24668 EN - 2010 The mission of the JRC-IPTS is to provide customer-driven support to the EU policy-making

More information

Schengen routing or Schengen encryption?

Schengen routing or Schengen encryption? Schengen routing or Schengen encryption? Secure communication and digital sovereignty in Europe Prof. Norbert Pohlmann Internet Key Figure System (IKS) act with the right key figure IKS performs continuous

More information

Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI), Science and Technology

Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI), Science and Technology Special Eurobarometer 401 Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI), Science and Technology REPORT Fieldwork: April - May 2013 Publication: November 2013 This survey has been requested by the European

More information

Let's talk about rural development money!

Let's talk about rural development money! EU Agricultural Economics Briefs No 10 October 2013 Let's talk about rural development money! Financial planning and implementation of rural development programmes in the 2007-13 programming period Contents

More information

64/2014-23 April 2014

64/2014-23 April 2014 64/2014-23 April 2014 Provision of deficit and debt data for 2013 - first notification Euro area and EU28 government deficit at 3.0% and 3.3% of GDP respectively Government debt at 92.6% and 87.1% In 2013,

More information

Special Eurobarometer 423 CYBER SECURITY SUMMARY

Special Eurobarometer 423 CYBER SECURITY SUMMARY Special Eurobarometer 423 CYBER SECURITY SUMMARY Fieldwork: October 2014 Publication: February 2015 This survey has been requested by the European Commission, Directorate-General for Home Affairs and co-ordinated

More information

Briefing note. Survey of environmental liability insurance developments

Briefing note. Survey of environmental liability insurance developments Briefing note Survey of environmental liability insurance developments June 2014 Introduction This paper responds to the consideration by the European Commission (EC) of a possible EU-wide compulsory insurance

More information

3 Year: Year of the submission of the ingredient information.

3 Year: Year of the submission of the ingredient information. 1 2 Footnotes to Table 3 Name of Manufacturer or Importer: This information is submitted by Philip Morris Products S.A., which owns the relevant intellectual property rights of Philip Morris International

More information

Broadband Coverage in Europe Final Report 2011 Survey Data as of 31 December 2010. DG INFSO 80106 C December 2011 IDATE 1

Broadband Coverage in Europe Final Report 2011 Survey Data as of 31 December 2010. DG INFSO 80106 C December 2011 IDATE 1 Broadband Coverage in Europe Final Report 2011 Survey Data as of 31 December 2010 DG INFSO 80106 C December 2011 IDATE 1 Table of contents 1. Methodological notes...6 2. Executive summary...8 3. European

More information

Unmarried births turn UK into the family breakdown capital of Western Europe

Unmarried births turn UK into the family breakdown capital of Western Europe Unmarried births turn UK into the family breakdown capital of Western Europe Harry Benson, The Marriage Foundation, October 2014 Family breakdown affecting children can only come from one of two sources:

More information

Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) in Schools

Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) in Schools H u n g a r y : k e y f i n d i n g s Almost all Hungarian schools now use computers for teaching and have internet access. 77% use the internet via a broadband connection. With this figure Hungary ranks

More information

Delia Velculescu, IMF April 1, 2011

Delia Velculescu, IMF April 1, 2011 Delia Velculescu, IMF April 1, 2011 Several CEE countries have reduced pre-funding of future liabilities since 2009: Lithuania, Latvia, Romania, and Estonia: temporary measures and fiscal consolidation

More information

Edith Soghomonyan National Erasmus+ Office Armenia. American University of Armenia

Edith Soghomonyan National Erasmus+ Office Armenia. American University of Armenia Edith Soghomonyan National Erasmus+ Office Armenia American University of Armenia 1 OUTLINE Erasmus Mundus Joint Master Degrees (EMJMD) General overview How to participate as an Organisation/ Selection

More information

SURVEY OF SCHOOLS: ICT IN EDUCATION COUNTRY PROFILE: FRANCE

SURVEY OF SCHOOLS: ICT IN EDUCATION COUNTRY PROFILE: FRANCE SURVEY OF SCHOOLS: ICT IN EDUCATION COUNTRY PROFILE: FRANCE November 2012 This report was prepared by the Contractor: European Schoolnet and University of Liège under contract SMART 2010/0039. The views

More information

A Statistical Overview of the Erasmus Programme in 2012-13

A Statistical Overview of the Erasmus Programme in 2012-13 On the way to Erasmus+ A Statistical Overview of the Erasmus Programme in 2012-13 Education and Training TABLE OF CONTENTS 3 Table of contents Acronyms used in this report...14 Disclaimer...14 Preface...15

More information

Special Eurobarometer 423 CYBER SECURITY REPORT

Special Eurobarometer 423 CYBER SECURITY REPORT Special Eurobarometer 423 CYBER SECURITY REPORT Fieldwork: October 2014 Publication: February 2015 This survey has been requested by the European Commission, Directorate-General for Home Affairs and co-ordinated

More information