World history since 1945

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1 World history since 1945 (Formerly known as World history since 1917) J. Kent IR1034, Undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences This subject guide is for a 100 course offered as part of the University of London International Programmes in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences. This is equivalent to Level 4 within the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland (FHEQ). For more information about the University of London International Programmes undergraduate study in Economics, Management, Finance and the Social Sciences, see:

2 This guide was prepared for the University of London International Programmes by: Dr J. Kent, Department of International Relations, London School of Economics and Political Science This is one of a series of subject guides published by the University. We regret that due to pressure of work the author is unable to enter into any correspondence relating to, or arising from, the guide. If you have any comments on this subject guide, favourable or unfavourable, please use the form at the back of this guide. University of London International Programmes Publications Office Stewart House 32 Russell Square London WC1B 5DN United Kingdom Published by: University of London University of London 2012 The University of London asserts copyright over all material in this subject guide except where otherwise indicated. All rights reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced in any form, or by any means, without permission in writing from the publisher. We make every effort to contact copyright holders. If you think we have inadvertently used your copyright material, please let us know.

3 Contents Contents Chapter 1: Introduction... 1 Studying world history since Aims of the course... 1 Learning outcomes... 2 Using this subject guide... 2 Syllabus... 3 Essential reading... 4 Further reading... 4 General advice on reading for this course... 4 Online study resources... 6 Essay writing... 7 Examination advice... 9 Writing notes Chapter 2: Post-war planning and the breakdown of the Grand Alliance, Learning outcomes Essential reading Further reading Introduction British and Soviet post-war planning US post-war planning The Yalta conference, 4 11 February From Yalta to Potsdam, February to July Growing conflict, September 1945 to March 1946: from the London Council of Foreign Ministers to the Iron Curtain speech A reminder of your learning outcomes Sample examination questions Chapter 3: The German question and the Marshall Plan: preventing the spread of Communism, Learning outcomes Essential reading Further reading Introduction Dividing Germany in The Marshall Plan and Europe s economic difficulties, The origins of NATO, A reminder of your learning outcomes Sample examination questions Chapter 4: The onset of the Cold War: from containment to rollback, Learning outcomes Essential reading Further reading Origins of the containment policy Developments and problems in 1948 the end of containment? i

4 34 World history since 1945 NSC Eisenhower and Solarium the end of rollback? A reminder of your learning outcomes Sample examination questions Chapter 5: Intelligence, propaganda and covert operations Learning outcomes Essential reading Further reading Different forms of intelligence Contrast between CIA and KGB US propaganda and covert operations Operational case studies Berlin and Cuba A reminder of your learning outcomes Sample examination questions Chapter 6: Nuclear weapons and Cold War Learning outcomes Essential reading Further reading The advent of the atomic bomb US and Soviet military ideas The change with the hydrogen bomb The SIOP and the Gaither committee The road to the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks Deterrence and operational issues A reminder of your learning outcomes Sample examination questions Chapter 7 The Sino Soviet split Learning outcomes Essential reading Further reading Introduction General theories The origins and causes of the split The development of the split in the early 1950s The split after 1956 and Khrushchev s denunciation of Stalin The Sino Soviet split in the 1960s A reminder of your learning outcomes Sample examination questions Chapter 8 Détente, Learning outcomes Essential reading Further reading Introduction The European origins of détente, Détente and Cold War in the changing international system Détente : US and Soviet aims and expectations The collapse of détente, A reminder of your learning outcomes Sample examination questions ii

5 Contents Chapter 9: The Cold War in Asia Korea Learning outcomes Essential reading Further reading The domestic and international causes of the North Korean invasion The US and UN response and the crossing of the 38th parallel The Chinese intervention The prisoner of war issue Armistice and the Korean War as Cold War and hot war A reminder of your learning outcomes Sample examination questions Chapter 10: The Cold War in Asia Vietnam Learning outcomes Essential reading Further reading Introduction Eisenhower and the changing Vietnamese nationalist/communist unification movement Kennedy, Diem and the increased US commitment to Vietnamisation and no US combat troops Johnson and military escalation Johnson and the increasing failure of the political struggle Nixon and Vietnamisation no peace, no honour A reminder of your learning outcomes Sample examination questions Chapter 11: The Soviet Union and the Cold War in eastern Europe, Learning outcomes Essential reading Further reading The Soviet imposition of governments in eastern and central Europe, 1947 and The death of Stalin and the new regime Problems in East Germany Khrushchev s policy on Poland and Hungary Khrushchev and the Berlin issue A reminder of your learning outcomes Sample examination questions Chapter 12: The Cold War in Latin America Guatemala and the Cuban Revolution, Learning outcomes Essential reading Further reading The problems of Guatemala The Arbenz reforms The reasons for US concern The CIA-orchestrated overthrow of Arbenz The emergence of Cuban reformist movements The Cuban Revolution Initial US responses to the emergence of Castro iii

6 34 World history since 1945 Kennedy, the Alliance for Progress and its impact on Latin America The Bay of Pigs and US reactions to the Cuban Revolution A reminder of your learning outcomes Sample examination questions Chapter 13: The Cold War in the Middle East the Arab Israeli Conflict, Learning outcomes Essential reading Further reading The efforts to find a solution to the Arab Israeli conflict The British regional position in the Middle East, the Baghdad Pact and the growing struggle for influence in the region The 1956 Suez Sinai Campaign The 1967 Six-Day War A reminder of your learning outcomes Sample examination questions Chapter 14: The Cold War in the Middle East the Israeli Palestinian Conflict, Learning outcomes Essential reading Further reading The War of Attrition Sadat s aims and his turn to the USA The 1973 Yom Kippur War and Soviet US diplomacy The rise of Likud and Camp David The 1982 Israeli invasion of Lebanon The Intifada A reminder of your learning outcomes Sample examination questions Chapter 15: The Cold War in Africa the Congo, the UN and Angola, Learning outcomes Essential reading Further reading The Cold War and Belgian and Portuguese approaches to decolonisation in The developing crisis Congo independence and the secession of Katanga The rebellion in Angola The UN and the US search for stability and the ending of the Katangan secession The ending of secession and the disunity of a unified Congo Portuguese resistance to self-determination and the Lisbon Coup Angolan independence and the increasing international involvement in a Cold War conflict A reminder of your learning outcomes Sample examination questions Chapter 16: The end of the Cold War and the collapse of communism Learning outcomes Essential reading Further reading Introduction Gorbachev s rise to power iv

7 Contents The problems with the Soviet economy The retreat from Afghanistan The developing spread of the Soviet reformist movement The impact of Poland and eastern Europe A reminder of your learning outcomes Sample examination questions Chapter 17: The end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union Learning outcomes Essential reading Further reading Glasnost, perestroika and the international changes The importance of Gorbachev and ideology Reforms in eastern Europe The rise of Yeltsin and the final days of the Soviet Union A new world order begins to emerge, A reminder of your learning outcomes Sample examination questions Chapter 18: The USA and the War on Terror Learning outcomes Essential reading Further reading Terrorism before 9/ /11 and its impact The problem of Pakistan Obama s war A reminder of your learning outcomes Sample examination questions Chapter 19: The rise of China Learning outcomes Essential reading Further reading China at the end of the twentieth century Twenty-first-century rise changes in China s economic and military power Economic growth and China s role in international institutions Regional influence: cooperation and integration? Global or international role accepting or changing the status quo A reminder of your learning outcomes Sample examination questions Chapter 20: The USA and the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq Learning outcomes Essential reading Further reading The rise of the neo-conservatives The war in Afghanistan, phase The build up to the attack on Iraq No success like failure: Operation Iraqi Freedom The invasion of Afghanistan, phase A reminder of your learning outcomes Sample examination questions Appendix: Sample examination paper v

8 34 World history since 1945 Notes vi

9 Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 1: Introduction Studying world history since 1945 The study of history is essentially about the study of human beings in time. It therefore encompasses all aspects of human society, institutions and organisations and the conflicts and disputes within and between them. As such, it is an open-ended study and students and teachers of history will always be able to add to their knowledge and interpretations of human existence in all its aspects. This course aims to explore world history from the perspective and predominance of international history and is firmly linked to international relations. At many UK universities, international history, international relations and international politics are part of the same discipline within a single department that seeks to analyse and explain world events within a global framework. The focus will be on the period after the enormous destruction, and reordering of the political and economic map of the world, brought about by the Second World War and the rise of a Communist challenge to capitalist society and to the democratic political system in the West. This challenge took place when the rise in the economic and military power of the USA made it the dominant global power after The aim of this subject is to focus on the global impact of these key twentieth-century developments and the impact of the international system becoming a Cold War system, from the late 1940s until 1991, when the Cold War s end was followed by the collapse of the Soviet Union. Looking at the impact of the Cold War on the different regions of the world provides an opportunity to examine the relationship between internal and regional conflicts (such as the Cuban revolution and the Arab Israeli wars) on the ideological global competition between the two rival blocs or systems. All the main regions of the world will be examined, where internal conflicts that were always connected to the Cold War occurred. You should be prepared to develop a basic knowledge of the Cold War history of one or more of the different areas and their contrasting geographies, cultures and societies. This will be necessary for a better understanding of the dynamics of Cold War conflict and its components in different regions of the world. Aims of the course The purpose of this course is to develop: your ability to think logically and critically your knowledge of political and social systems and of the various cultural influences on policy makers in different parts of the Cold War world. A key element is to approach the study of world history in a manageable way to enable some in-depth knowledge to be developed. At the same time, it will be necessary for you to understand some major global features, in this case the Cold War, which influenced all areas of the world for most of the period. This course is not aiming simply to provide parcels of self-contained knowledge in a small number of key works or textbooks but rather to enable connections to be made between places and events across the world and to encourage understanding and analysis of their implications. This is always a feature of the study of world history, given 1

10 34 World history since the size of the geographical area involved. To alleviate this difficulty, world history courses are usually constructed around a number of themes and topics which limit the extent of the courses coverage and make them more manageable for students even if acquiring more in-depth knowledge is an important aspect of historical learning. Learning outcomes Having completed this course, and the Essential reading and activities, you should be able to: analyse the nature and significance of the Cold War international system explain how the Cold War originated and how and why it ended describe how Cold War international crises were perceived and responded to, particularly by the USA, in various parts of the world relate local and regional aspects of particular conflicts to the broader international aspects of the Cold War which influenced them analyse what influenced states and their rulers as they sought to expand their power and influence and deal with threats to their interests become aware of the elements of the Cold War international system that were connected to the post-cold War era. Using this subject guide A vast subject like world history requires building up knowledge stage by stage to enable students to make progress in terms of how they approach their study, and to realise the different levels of understanding inherent in a process of learning. In some chapters, the subject guide is designed to provide an introductory framework to enable you to find a way to deal with the general issues surrounding the topic and to go on to explore regions and themes in more detail. On smaller topics it will essentially provide you with information and the main details you need, in a form which may not be so readily obtainable in a single text elsewhere. Most topics will initially require the learning of basic knowledge before building on it with more in-depth reading, so that you can eventually differentiate, but link, in analytical terms, general analysis and specific interpretation. The World history since 1945 syllabus outlined below covers a number of different topics which vary according to region and in regards to their importance to great power relations and international affairs. Some topics, such as the origins and early development of the Cold War, are much larger in terms of their chronological coverage and the amount of historical writing that they have engendered, than, for example, the Congo crisis or the Cuban revolution. The selected recommended reading is therefore of particular value for each topic. With regard to the bigger topics, you will need to do more reading in order to grasp all aspects of the subject which are introduced in the guide. The history of the world since 1945 cannot be covered in one or two essential books. Knowledge of one or two continents is not essential for an understanding of the world, however significant the power and influence of particular states might be. This subject guide is designed only to provide an introduction and framework for you in order that you can eventually, if you wish, focus your reading more effectively. The principles that are important for historical learning remain the foundations for students to build on by adding to previous study and not just seeing the world as collection of self-contained, separate packages. This is the process to which this subject guide contributes by laying an important basis upon which to build.

11 Chapter 1: Introduction Be aware that the bigger topics may not be the most complex or the most difficult to come to terms with, and you should bear in mind that the examination is not guaranteed to contain a question on every chapter. In addition, the smaller topics may well provide more demanding questions which will require you to have developed a more detailed knowledge from your reading. You will not, however, be required to write answers to very broad chronological questions such as Examine the changes in US foreign policy between 1945 and Reading is always the key to the study of history and you will not do well if you are not prepared to read widely. The subject guide is, however, intended to make you think about important historical issues and, as with many of the books on the reading list, is designed to encourage you to think critically and to ask yourself questions rather than to provide you with information or ready-made answers. For more details on reading and taking notes, see below. Syllabus The syllabus focuses on four main themes: the breakdown of the Grand Alliance and the origins of the Cold War the nature of the Cold War conflict and its covert operations and propaganda the impact of the Cold War in different regions of the world the end of the Cold War world and the emergence of new forces in the post-cold War world. Students should concentrate on the nature, origins or end of the Cold War and at least one region to understand the nature of the Cold War system. Origins The breakdown of the Grand Alliance The German Question and the Marshall Plan Rollback and containment. Nature Covert operations and propaganda Nuclear weapons Sino-Soviet split Détente. Regions Europe Latin America Asia Africa The Middle East. End The end of Communism and the collapse of the Soviet Union The post-cold War world. 3

12 34 World history since 1945 Essential reading Westad, O.A. The global Cold War: third world interventions and the making of our times. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007) [ISBN ]. Young, J.W. and J. Kent International relations since 1945: a global history. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004) [ISBN ]. Chapters also contain more detailed Essential reading lists as it is categorised by time period and topic. Detailed reading references in this subject guide refer to the editions of the set textbooks listed above. New editions of one or more of these textbooks may have been published by the time you study this course. You can use a more recent edition of any of the books; use the detailed chapter and section headings and the index to identify relevant readings. Also check the virtual learning environment (VLE) regularly for updated guidance on readings. Further reading Please note that as long as you read the Essential reading you are then free to read around the subject area in any text, paper or online resource. You will need to support your learning by reading as widely as possible. To help you read extensively, you have free access to the VLE and University of London Online Library (see below). Other useful texts for this course include: Leffler, M.P For the soul of mankind: The United States, the Soviet Union and the Cold War. (New York: Hill and Wang, 2007) [ISBN ]. Zubok, V.M A failed empire: the Soviet Union in the Cold War from Stalin to Gorbachev. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2009) [ISBN ]. Again, chapters also contain more detailed Further reading lists. General advice on reading for this course A vast numbers of books are required for an in-depth understanding of the world s history, and we can t pretend that a single textbook to explain the world is possible or desirable. The aim is to advise you as to which books are most useful in providing some important, but more limited, ideas and knowledge in terms of what is covered. It will be useful for you to try and achieve a general knowledge and some ideas and debates on many of the topics can be found in Young and Kent on the Cold War world. For more detailed reading you need to be selective in terms of the number of books you read, and what you note about them. An important part of your historical education means developing an ability to make judgements about what you should and should not read on the basis of what is important or relevant to your particular task, or in response to assessing what particular questions require. An alternative approach is to try and concentrate on detailed studies, and read until you feel that you have a sound understanding of the major problems on any of the themes or geographical areas, and are able to write a fair answer to any essay question you have been asked.when reading the more detailed books, do not simply read everything from cover-to-cover: some books are worth reading as a whole but generally you should use books selectively, looking only at sections that are relevant to your needs. You need to distil 4

13 Chapter 1: Introduction from them their main arguments, to note down some factual illustrations that enforce these arguments (dates, events, actions of key characters, statistics, etc.) and sometimes to write out key quotes (but keep these to a minimum, since they are difficult to remember in examinations). It can be difficult to understand the main arguments of a large book at first and the problem is always what exactly to note down (see also Writing notes below). To some extent this requires practice, but it is possible to distil the main arguments from a book by reading either the introduction, or the conclusion, or the introductions and conclusions to individual chapters. At these points almost every book contains a summary of its main ideas. The Young and Kent text has summaries/introductions to all of its chronological sections. Once you are aware of the main arguments, then any subsidiary arguments and any illustrations or good quotes should also begin to stand out. Some students believe in skim-reading : they simply read the first sentence of each paragraph. In some books this may not be a bad idea but in general it is a rather crude way of going about things. However, it can be useful to skim-read a book at first in order to get the gist of what it is saying then go back and read it in greater detail. Again, practice should enable you to keep notes on books to a minimum (perhaps four to six sides on major works; but others should be shorter or you ll simply end up with too much). But initially you may find yourself writing down more than the essential arguments and illustrations. You must work at preventing this because otherwise you will not be making the best use of your time. There is no clearly defined daily or weekly time which you should designate as reading time. In part this is because people read with different degrees of speed and effectiveness. Also you should remember that there are always new things to learn and discover, and the more you read, the better your chances of doing well in the examination, provided you can organise the ideas you have developed from your reading. Reading without thinking about, and organising, the material will not form an adequate basis for your learning experience. Remember that full-time internal students have four history courses each year, with at least two hours per week of lectures or tutorials for each course. After reading several books you may be able to distinguish several approaches to a question. It is then important to note down these differences: it can be useful in essays to show that you understand different schools of thought on an issue, the various arguments used to back them up and any differing interpretations of evidence. Once you have taken notes from all the above sources, we would advise you to boil them down into a single, coherent, comprehensive set of notes, suitable for quick revision. Some students prefer not to do this, but others can become confused in examinations as they try to fuse together ideas drawn from several sets of notes. A single set of notes will iron out any discrepancies, knock out repetitions and expose any remaining gaps in your knowledge. It will also force you to make final decisions on what you think about a historical problem: what elements are most important, where do you stand in any debate and why do you take this viewpoint? Again, a single, well-structured set of notes will allow you to adapt quickly in examinations to whatever question appears. 5

14 34 World history since Online study resources In addition to the subject guide and the Essential reading, it is crucial that you take advantage of the study resources that are available online for this course, including the VLE and the Online Library. You can access the VLE, the Online Library and your University of London account via the Student Portal at: You should have received your login details for the Student Portal with your official offer, which was ed to the address that you gave on your application form. You have probably already logged in to the Student Portal in order to register! As soon as you registered, you will automatically have been granted access to the VLE, Online Library and your fully functional University of London account. If you forget your login details at any point, please london.ac.uk quoting your student number. The VLE The VLE, which complements this subject guide, has been designed to enhance your learning experience, providing additional support and a sense of community. It forms an important part of your study experience with the University of London and you should access it regularly. The VLE provides a range of resources for EMFSS courses: Self-testing activities: Doing these allows you to test your own understanding of subject material. Electronic study materials: The printed materials that you receive from the University of London are available to download, including updated reading lists and references. Past examination papers and Examiners commentaries: These provide advice on how each examination question might best be answered. A student discussion forum: This is an open space for you to discuss interests and experiences, seek support from your peers, work collaboratively to solve problems and discuss subject material. Videos: There are recorded academic introductions to the subject, interviews and debates and, for some courses, audio-visual tutorials and conclusions. Recorded lectures: For some courses, where appropriate, the sessions from previous years Study Weekends have been recorded and made available. Study skills: Expert advice on preparing for examinations and developing your digital literacy skills. Feedback forms. Some of these resources are available for certain courses only, but we are expanding our provision all the time and you should check the VLE regularly for updates. Making use of the Online Library The Online Library contains a huge array of journal articles and other resources to help you read widely and extensively. To access the majority of resources via the Online Library you will either need to use your University of London Student Portal login details, or you

15 Chapter 1: Introduction will be required to register and use an Athens login: The easiest way to locate relevant content and journal articles in the Online Library is to use the Summon search engine. If you are having trouble finding an article listed in a reading list, try removing any punctuation from the title, such as single quotation marks, question marks and colons. For further advice, please see the online help pages: Essay writing History does not lend itself to right and wrong answers to questions, and there is no single correct approach to any important historical problem. It is possible to write essays on the same question using different material and reaching different conclusions which both gain the same good mark. Students should be aware that it is not acquiring information that is central to the higher education learning experience. It is the ability to adapt that information and express it linguistically through arguments that provide relevant answers to questions and to select the appropriate evidence that supports particular arguments. Learning how to think is a more important part of the learning experience than acquiring information that simply describes how a particular author portrays historical events. The following provides advice to those answering historical questions in essay work and examinations, points out some pitfalls and suggests possible approaches to major problems. Notes for essay writing After choosing the questions which you wish to answer, you will need to amass a body of information and organise it into a coherent set of notes (more on this below). As you read, note down not just information but points to emphasise, investigate or question. Do not simply copy out relevant passages (unless they merit direct quotation). Instead, try to summarise or analyse them in your own words. Make sure you take notes on the analysis of the facts rather than simply acquiring the factual information (for more details on note taking, see below). It is best to structure your notes in such a way that they can be used to answer a wide range of essay questions on any given topic. This can be achieved by subdividing notes thematically. For example, on the origins of the Cold War, you might have subdivisions covering the origins between 1944 and 1946 and between 1946 and 1948, the ideological differences, the economic aspects, the particular points of dispute, then on the 1948 to 1950 period with the establishment of the Central Intelligence Agency and the growing importance of the Cold War and military rearmament. From these notes, you will be able to answer a broad range of questions on the early Cold War. Answering the question The greatest problem in writing a history essay is deciding exactly what is required from a given question. Frequently students lose most marks by failing to answer the question and only providing information on the topic in general, so this weakness deserves close attention. It means that selecting and interpreting the information most relevant to the question is important and doing the reading that this requires is the first stage. 7

16 34 World history since Having read some of the material and become aware of the issues it addresses and what might be important and gathered a comprehensive set of notes you must be able to select the most relevant material and be able to use it to ask as well as to answer questions. In its simplest form, failing to answer the question may simply mean getting the subject wrong: asked to write an essay on the Truman Doctrine you write one on the Eisenhower Doctrine. The only way to avoid this is to read the question thoroughly and think carefully. But such basic errors are very rare. Another problem is when only half of a question is answered. Why, and with what consequences, did the USA intervene in Guatemala? requires you to answer both parts. Too often this kind of question is simply answered from the viewpoint of Why? ; you also need to say something about the results of US intervention. Far more common is a failure to direct your answer specifically at the question. It is very easy to slip into writing all I know about a particular issue. For example, when faced with the question: How far was the USA responsible for the onset of the Cold War? you might mistakenly either write a general history of US foreign policy in the years after 1945 or a general account of the early years of the Cold War. Obviously some points about US foreign policy are needed here; details of the early Cold War years are certainly needed. But you must direct yourself at the question, looking at the USA s role in the early Cold War years in some detail, and then assessing (e.g. by looking at the role of the Soviet Union) the significance of this in leading to conflict. Always think about exactly what the question requires in order to answer it effectively and plan your essay accordingly. This crucial operation should not be left until the end of your reading but should go on continuously throughout. As your reading progresses, decide on which books or articles are most relevant. Then plan the stages of your argument in more detail. What specific points need to be made? In what order and with what relative emphasis? Can they be clarified by well-chosen examples or quotations? Planning your essay will help you to avoid the pitfalls mentioned below. Answers can be unbalanced if too much time is spent on background and not enough on the essence of the problem; too much can be written on one theme when numerous issues need to be discussed. A particular problem with history questions is slipping into a purely chronological narrative. It is very easy to produce a list of facts and dates without argument or analysis. But factual material should be used as a skeleton around which an analysis is based. (The opposite problem is a diatribe: all opinion and no evidence). An answer needs analysis. You cannot get away with yes or no even if the question could be answered in this way. Structure An essay needs to have a paragraph structure through which the argument that is appropriate to answer the question is developed. Ideally, this should include an introduction to set the scene or to indicate how the argument is going to develop; a number of paragraphs, each dedicated to a particular element in an answer; and a conclusion, which draws elements together, looks back to the original question and reaches sensible and coherent conclusions about it.

17 Chapter 1: Introduction When questions ask you to produce a list of factors, e.g. Why did the Israelis win the 1967 war against the Arab states?, the structure is fairly easy: each paragraph can look at a particular factor. But questions which ask you to discuss an issue will need more thought. In such circumstances your answer should show that you understand the question, and for some questions it will be useful to be aware of different schools of thought on a particular problem (the various ideas put by historians), but that you have a case of your own, which you favour, and which you develop in the essay from the analysis and information provided by the readings. You are not required to be completely original and will need to rely on the ideas of others. But, by being aware of the implications of others ideas and being able to adapt them to what is required by the question, you are constructing something linguistically that will form the best answers but also constitute an element of originality. Style In general, your style should be crisp, precise and lucid: use clear, understandable English to make your points. Don t waffle (i.e. write for the sake of writing). Don t be repetitive. Don t overwrite (i.e. with long, overly-descriptive sentences). There are various other things to avoid: bad spelling; colloquialisms (everyday English doesn t always sound good on paper); long or convoluted sentences. The use of the first person (I think... and In my view... ) should also be avoided. Once you ve finished an essay a good idea is to leave it overnight or even longer before reading it over. It is easier to pick up on errors in this way. Examination advice Important: the information and advice given here are based on the examination structure used at the time this guide was written. Please note that subject guides may be used for several years. Because of this we strongly advise you to always check both the current Regulations for relevant information about the examination, and the VLE where you should be advised of any forthcoming changes. You should also carefully check the rubric/instructions on the paper you actually sit and follow those instructions. Some additional advice for examinations: Read all the questions. Make sure that there are no supplementary pages, or questions printed overleaf. You must give yourself the maximum choice. Follow the rubric, at the top of the page, on how many questions to answer: there s no point answering four questions if only three are required. Also avoid answering three questions from Section A when you should have answered one each from Sections A, B and C. In order to maximise your mark it is vital to answer the required number of questions. If you are only left with 20 minutes and are running out of ideas you can at least hope to pick up some marks whereas writing nothing will get no marks at all. Choose the questions you answer carefully, making sure that you have the necessary material facts and argument to provide an adequate answer. It is at this point that having taken a full and wellstructured set of notes proves valuable. Once again, always answer the question. It is particularly easy to stray from the point in exams. 9

18 34 World history since 1945 In exam conditions you should still seek to structure what you write setting the scene in an introduction, tackling the problem in separate paragraphs, and reaching a conclusion, with a good mix of fact and analysis. It is important to be able to plan roughly the areas that the answer needs to develop to construct the argument. In exams you should never write this essay will first state and secondly will argue... Finally the essay will.... You are simply wasting time by writing this. The Examiners will know what the essay has done when they have read it. Even though you will be rushed, write as neatly and legibly as possible. Otherwise you may lose marks. Remember, it is important to check the VLE for: up-to-date information on examination and assessment arrangements for this course where available, past examination papers and Examiners commentaries for the course which give advice on how each question might best be answered. Writing notes In order to complete any course in Arts and Social Sciences it is vital to produce a set of notes, taken from books and articles. These notes must eventually provide you with the necessary arguments, ideas and facts with which to answer essay questions, during the year and in examinations. The purpose of this section is to give some general hints on how to go about writing notes. As with essay-writing, it is impossible to make any hard-and-fast rules about note making. Everyone will write different notes on the same book or on the same article. Nevertheless, it is possible to lay down certain guidelines and to emphasise what you should not be doing. The first step is, of course, to decide which topics you wish to write notes on. To an extent this should suit your own interests, but it will also be dictated by the exercises you are intending to do during the year and by the questions which appear on examination papers. Past examination questions may help provide you with a focus for the various ideas which appear in books as well as giving hints as to future questions. Ultimately a set of notes, on each of the topics you have chosen to cover, should be: short enough so that you can revise from them quickly, but comprehensive enough to answer a range of questions on a given topic or area easy to understand usually by being divided into several major headings, each of which may have a number of sub-headings, and with a wide range of short, clear analytical points, if necessary, backed up by some selected factual illustrations (dates and events, or statistics, etc.). In any set of notes you should use a form of shorthand as far as possible (e.g. B for Britain; Gov for government; WW2 for Second World War; 20thc for twentieth century; cld for could, etc.). The more abbreviations you can make without making the notes difficult to decipher the better 10

19 Chapter 1: Introduction able to provide a clear introduction to the main elements under every topic, or in an article or chapter of a book. Again, a balanced subdivision of notes into major headings will enable you to use one set of notes, with some quick re-structuring, to answer several questions a mixture of arguments and facts, but with the emphasis on argument and analysis. This will ensure that the essays you write are based on analysis first and foremost. Notes must avoid mere chronology and the simple repetition of facts. Dates and events should illustrate an argument, not become a substitute for it. By the time of the examinations, you should aim to write a single set of notes on each topic you have selected. 11

20 34 World history since 1945 Notes 12

21 Chapter 2: Post-war planning and the breakdown of the Grand Alliance, Chapter 2: Post-war planning and the breakdown of the Grand Alliance, Learning outcomes By the end of this chapter, and having completed the Essential reading and activities, you should be able to: explain what each of the Big Three allies sought to achieve from the post-war settlement describe the different areas of disagreement that developed after Yalta and before the London Council of Foreign Ministers discuss which agreements at Yalta were broken show an understanding of the different reasons for the increased tensions that developed in the Grand Alliance by Essential reading Leffler, M.P. The emergence of an American grand strategy, in Leffler, M.P. and O.A. Westad (eds) The Cambridge history of the Cold War Vol 1. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010) [ISBN ]. Pechtanov, V.O. The Soviet Union and the world in Leffler, M.P. and O.A. Westad (eds) The Cambridge history of the Cold War Vol 1. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010) [ISBN ]. Young, J.W. and J. Kent International relations since 1945: a global history. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004) [ISBN ] Chapters 1A, 1B, 1C and 1D. Further reading Harbutt, F.J. Yalta 1945: Europe and America at the crossroads. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010) [ISBN ]. Leffler, M.P. and D.S. Painter (eds) Origins of the Cold War. (New York: Routledge, 2005) [ISBN ] Introduction. Mark, E. American policy towards Eastern Europe and the origins of the Cold War, Journal of American History 68(2) 1981, pp Reynolds, D. From world war to Cold War: Churchill, Roosevelt and the international history of the 1940s. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007) [ISBN ] Chapters Introduction The planning by the Western allies for the post-war world began very early on in the conflict. For the USA, official consideration of the type of world order that was generally desirable and which would serve particular US interests started before the attack on Pearl Harbour brought the USA into the war. On both sides of the Atlantic the initial assumption was that the European settlement and the problem of Germany would primarily be the responsibility of Britain and the Soviet Union. For the Soviets, the overriding concern was future German aggression and the means to ensure that they would not have to deal with it alone. At the same time, early on in the war, the British government was eager to deal with Stalin, culminating in the 1942 Anglo Soviet treaty. 13

22 34 World history since 1945 The Roosevelt administration was pledged to postpone firm post-war arrangements until after the defeat of Germany, but the principles on which the new post-war order would be based were open for discussion. These were represented early on in the Atlantic Charter drawn up on an Anglo American basis, with its commitment to ensure that all peoples had the right to choose the form of government under which they should live. These principles were always at the forefront of US officials minds, as the Atlantic Charter was geared to a political and economic order that would enable US ideals and economic influence to predominate. Significantly, by 1943 the Allies knew that they would eventually win the war the only issue was when. However, all outcomes would be threatened if a separate peace was made with Germany and its enemies, of which Stalin in particular was highly suspicious. Churchill was unequivocally committed to the alliance with communism as a means to defeat Hitler in the west, but there was a minority on the right, in and around the Conservative party, who saw the real enemy as Soviet communism which inevitably had an impact on post-war planning. British and Soviet post-war planning By 1944 the British were becoming more concerned with the occupation forces in Europe as the Soviet armies advanced westwards. They worried that their Polish allies would be unwilling to accept the necessary reality of cooperation with the victorious Soviets and that the latter would not allow the Poles sufficient involvement in the political process after the war. Western concern was intensified after Stalin s refusal to permit the Red Army to advance and thus prevent the Germans massacring those Poles participating in the August 1944 Warsaw uprising. Overall, British concerns for the European situation were a strange mix of conflicting hopes and fears. On the one hand, Churchill was concerned that the Soviets might not advance far enough westwards to ensure the defeat of Germany, which would then be left to the British and the Americans. On the other, he was worried that such an advance, particularly in the south, would have adverse implications for Britain s dominant position in the eastern Mediterranean arena where Greece and Bulgaria were particularly significant. The armistice and post-war planning committee, until the intervention of the deputy prime minister Clement Attlee, was considering the dispatch of British troops to Bulgaria. The Soviets were looking for the kind of cooperation with Britain that would increase the ability of the Soviet Union to exercise control over eastern and central Europe in order to eliminate any revival of a German threat and ensure control over those areas that had been traditional Soviet enemies. European peace after the war would be based on this, as it was assumed that the USA would not play an important role in any detailed arrangements for Europe which would essentially depend on Britain and the Soviet Union. The degree to which Stalin was prepared to concede a role to Britain depended very much after 1942 on the successes which the Red Army were having against the German Wehrmacht. The main Soviet aims were to reinforce the gains made as a result of the Nazi Soviet Pact and to ensure that they had more control of the nonethnic Polish border areas which were at the centre of longstanding Russo Polish rivalry. The British were aware of obligations to the Poles because of the contributions many of them were making to the war in the west by fighting as members of the British armed services. However, security for the Soviets implied control of those areas, particularly Poland and 14

23 Chapter 2: Post-war planning and the breakdown of the Grand Alliance, Romania, which had produced conflict in the past, and an increased Soviet influence in eastern Europe, which the inter-war incorporation of the Baltic states into the Soviet Union, had represented. Containing Germany was central to Soviet concerns about the future of Europe even if there was a fine line between security and imperialism. The need to control regions of eastern and central Europe was behind the agreement made by Stalin with Churchill in October 1944 when 90 per cent of Romania was deemed to come under Soviet influence and 10 per cent under British. In return Greece would be 90 per cent under British influence and Bulgaria and Hungary would be 75 per cent Soviet and 25 per cent British, all of which indicated a joint Anglo Soviet acceptance of the spheres of influence principle for the post-war European order. The British empire was the main reason why that principle of exclusive influence embodied in spheres of influence for each of the great powers was acceptable. Churchill, in particular, was adamant that he would not be the prime minister to preside over the dissolution of the British empire, however much the USA wanted to break the economic barrier that imperial preference and the sterling area presented to US trade and a more liberal multilateral economic order. The key imperial area in 1945 was no longer India but centred on the British position in the Middle East in the form of colonies in the Gulf and the Mediterranean and those territories which were nominally independent but in reality under effective British domination. The most important was Egypt, as it contained the largest military base in the world on the Suez Canal, although Iraq and the mandate of Palestine were also noteworthy. This significant area of vital interest bordered on the eastern Mediterranean and important European countries to the north, such as Greece and Bulgaria, and thus there was a potential clash between Soviet and British areas of influence. This was made much worse by the long-expressed Soviet desire to have unfettered access for their warships through the Straits of the Dardanelles therefore there would be a need to reconcile these vital British and Soviet concerns. US post-war planning The USA was primarily interested in defining the regulatory principles and institutions which would govern the post-war international economic order. Despite Sumner Welles (who along with Harry Hopkins was a key policy-making confidante of Franklin Roosevelt) being forced to resign from the government in late 1943, the US president continued to move away from the idea of a purely great power peace after the war. The position of the USA was enhanced more and more by its remarkable economic growth and as it became the key supplier of armaments and military equipment plus food stuffs and consumer goods for the domestic market, more attention had to be given to ensuring that the post-war world order could maintain that growth and there would be no threat of a return to the Depression days. It thus made the idea of a world of spheres of influence, originally favoured by Roosevelt on the basis of the four major Allied powers acting as policeman each with a sphere of influence, less significant. Despite the signing of the Atlantic Charter, with its emphasis on lesser and newly emerging states, before 1944 the idea was still that the initial post-war period should be dominated by the great powers acting as four policemen. It was also believed before the beginning of the war that an economic order emphasising open access to primary produce and raw materials would prevent the economic competition and conflict over future attempts 15

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