High School Registration Course Catalog Class of 2016 and Beyond

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1 High School Registration Course Catalog Class of 2016 and Beyond

2 Department of Learning and Teaching Spring 2015 Dear Renton Students, The Renton staff is passionate about ensuring that each of you graduate prepared for college, careers and beyond. Selecting rigorous and relevant courses is an essential part of ensuring every possible opportunity will be afforded to you upon graduation as you gain the critical knowledge and skills that will be required of you in today s workplace. As you decide which courses to take, it will be important that you seek the guidance of your school counselor, your family, and the expertise of Career Center staff. Now, more than ever, education is the gateway to the career opportunity that you desire. We believe in you and know that with hard work, perseverance, and a curious mind each of you will do incredible things. So, go for it! Take full advantage of the learning experiences afforded you during your high school career. We commit to supporting each of you by providing High quality instruction and learning for EVERY child, EVERY day in EVERY classroom and environment." Sincerely, Dr. Tammy Campbell Assistant Superintendent: Department of Learning and Teaching Launching Learning to Last a Lifetime 300 Southwest 7th Street, Renton, Washington p f

3 TABLE OF CONTENTS GENERAL INFORMATION Introduction/ Registration Procedure/ Student Services... 3 State and District Graduation Requirements High School Graduation Planning Forms Class of 2015 & Beyond Post-Secondary Education Planning COLLEGE ADMISSION INFORMATION Pre-College Testing Programs (PSAT, SAT, ACT) Community and Technical College Admission Requirements Minimum College Admission Requirements PROGRAM INFORMATION Worksite Learning Credits Correspondence/On-Line Learning Courses Running Start Alternative Credits Graduation Ceremonies Classification of Students and GPA (grade point average) COURSE OFFERINGS Language Arts Mathematics Social Studies Science Health and Physical Education Fine Arts (Performing & Visual Arts) World Languages Career and Technical Education English Language Learners Special Programs (Special Education) Student Assistants or Aides; Peer Tutors Index

4 INTRODUCTION SUCCESS OCCURS WHEN PREPARATION AND OPPORTUNITY MEET! The Renton School District wants to provide optimum learning opportunities for all students in order to ensure success at whatever they choose to do in life. To that end, the main objectives of the High School Registration 2016 & Beyond booklet are: 1. to provide relevant information 2. to function as a planning guide 3. to identify and describe course offerings 4. to assist in student planning REGISTRATION PROCEDURES Specific registration procedures are developed by each high school and may vary slightly from school to school. Pre-registration, computer-assigned scheduling and some in-person schedule building are common components used in finalizing student schedules. Between pre-registration and final scheduling, the staff determines the number of students who have selected each of the course offerings. This procedure results in the building of a master schedule of courses for the year; therefore, few schedule changes are permitted after pre-registration. Keep this registration booklet for reference. An important fact to remember is that course offerings vary among the high schools and from year to year however, required courses are offered every year in every high school. STUDENT SERVICES The Student Counseling Center in each high school offers specialized individual and group counseling services. A staff of professionally trained counselors is available to provide confidential assistance on an individual basis to students regarding educational, vocational, personal and social issues. Group counseling is also provided to help students improve their ability to communicate and to relate effectively to others, as well as to consider educational matters. Each comprehensive high school maintains a Career Center with up-to-date materials on occupations and post-secondary schools for students. The Career Specialist offers individualized assistance related to post-secondary training/education including information on schools, colleges and universities and on scholarship opportunities. 3

5 STATE AND DISTRICT GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS Each student is responsible for developing, updating as necessary, and having on file an education plan. Counselors will provide assistance to incoming ninth graders and their families in developing these plans. Changes in plans should receive parent/guardian consent and be submitted to the appropriate counselor. Subject area and total credit requirement during the four-year sequence must satisfy state and local graduation requirements. The following minimum requirements shall be applied: Successful completion of the following: Subject area and total credit requirements (see below) High School & Beyond Education Plan Certificate of Academic Achievement (CAA) or Certificate of Individual Achievement (CIA) Culminating Project RSD Requirements for the Classes of 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019 English/Language Arts 4 Mathematics 3 Social Studies 3 Science 2 (1 lab) Career and Technical 1 Education Physical Education 2 (.5 Health) Fine Arts 1 General Electives 6 Total Credits 22 High School and Beyond Education Plan Students must craft a diploma and beyond plan by detailing their strategies to meet their graduation requirements and outline their high school and beyond (i.e., college, employment, etc.). Culminating Project This multi-year integrated learning project asks students to think analytically, logically and creatively; integrate experience and knowledge to solve problems; and understand how their work ethic will affect future career and educational opportunities. 4

6 STATE AND DISTRICT GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS State Assessments High school students must pass tests, or state-approved alternatives, to be eligible to graduate. Required tests vary by expected year of graduation. A student s expected year of graduation is set when he/she enters the ninth grade. Exams Required for Graduation Class of Subject Test 2016 English/ Language Arts Math Science Choose 1: Reading AND Writing HSPE (Level 3 or 4 score)* Smarter Balanced ELA Exam (exit exam minimum score)+ Choose 1: Algebra 1 (Level 3 or 4 score)* Geometry (Level 3 or 4 score)* Smarter Balanced Math Exam (exit exam minimum score)+ Biology EOC 2017 & 2018 English/ Language Arts Smarter Balanced ELA Exam (exit exam minimum score)+ Math Choose 1: Algebra 1 (Level 3 or 4 score)* Geometry (Level 3 or 4 score)* Smarter Balanced Math Exam (exit exam minimum score) Science English/ Language Arts Math Science Biology EOC Smarter Balanced ELA Exam (minimum score to be determined by State Board of Education)+ Smarter Balanced Math Exam (minimum score to be determined by State Board of Education)+ Biology EOC * Reading and Writing HSPEs will be available to 12th graders who have not met their graduation requirements in spring and summer The Washington State Board of Education will set the exit exam cut score. The Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium will recommend to the Washington State Board a college- & career-ready cut score that, once approved, will be used for accountability in 11th grade. If a 10th grader meets the college- & career-ready cut score, he or she will not have to take the Smarter Balanced ELA test in 11th grade. 5

7 Certificate of Academic Achievement and Certificate of Individual Achievement Certificate of Academic Achievement (CAA): tells families, schools, businesses and colleges that an individual student has mastered a minimum set of reading, writing and math skills by graduation. Certificate of Individual Achievement (CIA): Some students in special education have additional assessment options to earn a CIA instead of a CAA. These include passing state tests in reading, writing, math and science with either the Basic option, or taking state test at a different grade level; or taking alternative state assessments (WA AIM); or taking locally determined assessments. State Approved Alternatives Students who have the skills but are unable to show them on state exams may use state-approved alternatives. Students may access the CAA options after taking the state exam in every subject area at least once. Students must take the state exam in that subject area at least once before accessing the Collection of Evidence. The Certificate of Academic Achievement Options are: Collection of Evidence Students compile a set of classroom work samples with the help of a teacher(s). Collections for students in Career and Technical Education programs can include work from their program. The state scores collections twice a year. Students must take the state exam at least once in that content area before attempting a collection. SAT or ACT Students may use their math, reading or English and writing scores on college readiness tests. Fee waivers are available for eligible students to take the approved SAT, ACT and AP exams. The minimum scores are: MATH: Algebra 1 SAT-390, ACT-16. MATH: Geometry SAT-400, ACT-17. READING: SAT 350, ACT 13. WRITING: SAT 380, ACT 15 (To qualify for writing, student must take the ACT Plus Writing Test). SCIENCE: ACT 16 Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) Students may use a score of three or higher on select AP exams or 4 or higher on eligible IB exams: Math (AP: Calculus or Statistics; IB: Mathematics or Further Mathematics), Writing (AP: English Language and Composition); Reading (AP: English Literature and Composition, Macroeconomics, Microeconomics, Psychology, United States History, World History, United States Government and Politics, or Comparative Government and Politics; IB: Language A: Literature, Language A: Language and Literature, Business and Management, Economics, Geography, History, Information Technology Is a Global Society, Philosophy, Psychology or Social and Cultural Anthropology); and Science (AP: Biology, Chemistry, Physics or Environmental Science; IB: Biology, Chemistry or Physics) GPA Comparison For 12th grade students only. A student s grades in math courses and/or English courses are compared with the grades of students who took the same courses AND passed the high school SBA/HSPE/EOC. To access this option, a student must have an overall cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) of at least 3.2 on a 4.0 grading scale AND must have taken the state exam at least once. To learn more, please visit: 6

8 STATE AND DISTRICT GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS Assessments for Students in Special Education Students earn a Certificate of Academic Achievement (CAA) or Certificate of Individual Achievement (CIA) by passing state tests in English Language Arts (Reading and Writing), Math and Science. Both allow students to receive a regular high school diploma. Students in special education that take the high school state exams, with or without accommodations, and meet the required proficiency score will receive a CAA. The following options are available to receive a CIA: SBA /EOC/COE-Basic Students take the high school SBA /EOC/COE with or without accommodations but IEP teams adjust passing criteria from Proficient (Level 3) to Basic (Level 2). Off-grade level assessments Students in grades 11 and 12 only take the SBA or EOC with or without accommodations at a grade level that best matches their abilities. Students must meet the established cut score for proficiency. Washington Access to Instruction & Measurement (WA-AIM) Students unable to take SBA or EOCs may show their skills and knowledge through alternative assessments with access points matched to their learning goals. Locally Determined Assessments 12th grade students have the option to be assessed with one of several approved published achievement tests that are to be administered at a local level. Students must meet the designated cut score in order to meet the graduation requirement associated with the content area. Awareness Level Waiver For students with disabilities at extreme low levels of cognitive interaction, IEP teams and associated district personnel can pursue a waiver from further state testing and the state graduation requirements linked to the state s assessment program. To learn more, please visit 7

9 High School Graduation Planning Form Class of 2016 Name: Grad Year: Date: Minimum credits for graduation: 22 (16 required and 6 electives) Each represents a semester class (.5 credit) ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS (4 credits) SOCIAL STUDIES (3 credits) L.A. 1,2 World History 1,2 L.A. 3,4 U.S. History and PNW History 1,2 L.A. 5,6 American Government L.A. 7,8 Contemporary World Issues MATH (3 credits) SCIENCE (2 credits) Algebra 1,2 Geometry 1,2 3 rd Credit Qualifying Course PHYSICAL EDUCATION (1.5 credits) CAREER & TECH ED (1 credit) HEALTH (.5 credit) FINE ARTS (1 credit) ELECTIVE CLASSES CHECKLIST (6 CREDITS) CULMINATING PROJECT/HIGH SCHOOL AND BEYOND PLAN MET EXAMS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION English/ Language Arts Reading & Writing High School Proficiency Exam (Level 3 or 4 score) -OR- Smarter Balanced English/Language Arts Exam (exit exam minimum score) Algebra 1 End of Course Exam (Level 3 or 4 score) -OR- Math Geometry End of Course Exam Smarter Balanced Math Exam (Level 3 or 4 score) -OR- (exit exam minimum score) Science Biology End Of Course Exam 8

10 High School Graduation Planning Form Class of 2017 Name: Grad Year: Date: Minimum credits for graduation: 22 (16 required and 6 electives) Each represents a semester class (.5 credit) ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS (4 credits) SOCIAL STUDIES (3 credits) L.A. 1,2 World History 1,2 L.A. 3,4 U.S. History and PNW History 1,2 L.A. 5,6 American Government L.A. 7,8 Contemporary World Issues MATH (3 credits) SCIENCE (2 credits) Algebra 1,2 Geometry 1,2 3 rd Credit Qualifying Course PHYSICAL EDUCATION (1.5 credits) CAREER & TECH ED (1 credit) HEALTH (.5 credit) FINE ARTS (1 credit) ELECTIVE CLASSES CHECKLIST (6 CREDITS) COMMUNITY SERVICE REQUIREMENT (Minimum of 20 hours) CULMINATING PROJECT/HIGH SCHOOL AND BEYOND PLAN MET EXAMS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION English/ Language Arts Smarter Balanced English/Language Arts Exam (exit exam minimum score) Algebra 1 End of Course Exam (Level 3 or 4 score) -OR- Math Geometry End of Course Exam Smarter Balanced Math Exam (Level 3 or 4 score) -OR- (exit exam minimum score) Science Biology End Of Course Exam 9

11 High School Graduation Planning Form Class of 2018 Name: Grad Year: Date: Minimum credits for graduation: 22 (16 required and 6 electives) Each represents a semester class (.5 credit) ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS (4 credits) SOCIAL STUDIES (3 credits) L.A. 1,2 World History 1,2 L.A. 3,4 U.S. History and PNW History 1,2 L.A. 5,6 American Government L.A. 7,8 Contemporary World Issues MATH (3 credits) SCIENCE (2 credits) Algebra 1,2 Geometry 1,2 3 rd Credit Qualifying Course PHYSICAL EDUCATION (1.5 credits) CAREER & TECH ED (1 credit) HEALTH (.5 credit) FINE ARTS (1 credit) ELECTIVE CLASSES CHECKLIST (6 CREDITS) COMMUNITY SERVICE REQUIREMENT (Minimum of 20 hours) CULMINATING PROJECT/HIGH SCHOOL AND BEYOND PLAN MET EXAMS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION English/ Language Arts Smarter Balanced English/Language Arts Exam (exit exam minimum score) Algebra 1 End of Course Exam (Level 3 or 4 score) -OR- Math Geometry End of Course Exam Smarter Balanced Math Exam (Level 3 or 4 score) -OR- (exit exam minimum score) Science Biology End Of Course Exam 10

12 High School Graduation Planning Form Class of 2019 Name: Grad Year: Date: Minimum credits for graduation: 22 (16 required and 6 electives) Each represents a semester class (.5 credit) ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS (4 credits) SOCIAL STUDIES (3 credits) L.A. 1,2 World History 1,2 L.A. 3,4 U.S. History and PNW History 1,2 L.A. 5,6 American Government L.A. 7,8 Contemporary World Issues MATH (3 credits) SCIENCE (2 credits) Algebra 1,2 Geometry 1,2 3 rd Credit Qualifying Course PHYSICAL EDUCATION (1.5 credits) CAREER & TECH ED (1 credit) HEALTH (.5 credit) FINE ARTS (1 credit) ELECTIVE CLASSES CHECKLIST (6 CREDITS) COMMUNITY SERVICE REQUIREMENT (Minimum of 20 hours) CULMINATING PROJECT/HIGH SCHOOL AND BEYOND PLAN MET EXAMS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION English/ Language Arts Smarter Balanced English/Language Arts Exam State Board of Education)+ (minimum score to be determined by Math Smarter Balanced Math Exam Education)+ (minimum score to be determined by State Board of Science Biology End Of Course Exam 11

13 English Language Learners High School Graduation Planning Form Class of 2016 Name: Grad Year: Date: Minimum credits for graduation: 22 (16 required and 6 electives) Each represents a semester class (.5 credit) ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS (4 credits) SOCIAL STUDIES (3 credits) Intermediate or L.A. World History 1,2 Advanced or L.A. U.S. History and PNW History 1,2 L.A. American Government L.A. Contemporary World Issues MATH (3 credits) Algebra 1,2 Geometry 1,2 3 rd Credit Qualifying Course PHYSICAL EDUCATION (1.5 credits) SCIENCE (2 credits) CAREER & TECH ED (1 credits) HEALTH (.5 credit) FINE ARTS (1 credit) ELECTIVE CLASSES CHECKLIST (6 CREDITS) CULMINATING PROJECT/HIGH SCHOOL AND BEYOND PLAN MET EXAMS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION English/ Language Arts Reading & Writing High School Proficiency Exam (Level 3 or 4 score) -OR- Smarter Balanced English/Language Arts Exam (exit exam minimum score) Algebra 1 End of Course Exam (Level 3 or 4 score) -OR- Math Geometry End of Course Exam Smarter Balanced Math Exam (Level 3 or 4 score) -OR- (exit exam minimum score) Science Biology End Of Course Exam ELPA LEVEL: 1 ST Year 2 nd Year 3 rd Year 4 th Year 12

14 English Language Learners High School Graduation Planning Form Class of 2017 Name: Grad Year: Date: Minimum credits for graduation: 22 (16 required and 6 electives) Each represents a semester class (.5 credit) LANGUAGE ARTS (4 credits) SOCIAL STUDIES (3 credits) Intermediate or L.A. World History 1,2 Advanced or L.A. U.S. History and PNW History 1,2 L.A. American Government L.A. Contemporary World Issues MATH (3 credits) Algebra 1,2 Geometry 1,2 3 rd Credit Qualifying Course PHYSICAL EDUCATION (1.5 credits) SCIENCE (2 credits) CAREER & TECH ED (1 credit) HEALTH (.5 credit) FINE ARTS (1 credit) ELECTIVE CLASSES CHECKLIST (6 CREDITS) COMMUNITY SERVICE REQUIREMENT (Minimum of 20 hours) CULMINATING PROJECT/HIGH SCHOOL AND BEYOND PLAN MET EXAMS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION English/ Language Arts Smarter Balanced English/Language Arts Exam (exit exam minimum score) Algebra 1 End of Course Exam (Level 3 or 4 score) -OR- Math Geometry End of Course Exam Smarter Balanced Math Exam (Level 3 or 4 score) -OR- (exit exam minimum score) Science Biology End Of Course Exam ELPA LEVEL: 1 ST Year 2 nd Year 3 rd Year 4 th Year 13

15 English Language Learners High School Graduation Planning Form Class of 2018 Name: Grad Year: Date: Minimum credits for graduation: 22 (16 required and 6 electives) Each represents a semester class (.5 credit) LANGUAGE ARTS (4 credits) SOCIAL STUDIES (3 credits) Intermediate or L.A. World History 1,2 Advanced or L.A. U.S. History and PNW History 1,2 L.A. American Government L.A. Contemporary World Issues MATH (3 credits) Algebra 1,2 Geometry 1,2 3 rd Credit Qualifying Course PHYSICAL EDUCATION (1.5 credits) SCIENCE (2 credits) CAREER & TECH ED (1 credit) HEALTH (.5 credit) FINE ARTS (1 credit) ELECTIVE CLASSES CHECKLIST (6 CREDITS) COMMUNITY SERVICE REQUIREMENT (Minimum of 20 hours) CULMINATING PROJECT/HIGH SCHOOL AND BEYOND PLAN MET EXAMS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION English/ Language Arts Smarter Balanced English/Language Arts Exam (exit exam minimum score) Algebra 1 End of Course Exam (Level 3 or 4 score) -OR- Math Geometry End of Course Exam Smarter Balanced Math Exam (Level 3 or 4 score) -OR- (exit exam minimum score) Science Biology End Of Course Exam ELPA LEVEL: 1 ST Year 2 nd Year 3 rd Year 4 th Year 14

16 English Language Learners High School Graduation Planning Form Class of 2019 Name: Grad Year: Date: Minimum credits for graduation: 22 (16 required and 6 electives) Each represents a semester class (.5 credit) LANGUAGE ARTS (4 credits) SOCIAL STUDIES (3 credits) Intermediate or L.A. World History 1,2 Advanced or L.A. U.S. History and PNW History 1,2 L.A. American Government L.A. Contemporary World Issues MATH (3 credits) Algebra 1,2 Geometry 1,2 3 rd Credit Qualifying Course PHYSICAL EDUCATION (1.5 credits) SCIENCE (2 credits) CAREER & TECH ED (1 credit) HEALTH (.5 credit) FINE ARTS (1 credit) ELECTIVE CLASSES CHECKLIST (6 CREDITS) COMMUNITY SERVICE REQUIREMENT (Minimum of 20 hours) CULMINATING PROJECT/HIGH SCHOOL AND BEYOND PLAN MET EXAMS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION English/ Language Arts Smarter Balanced English/Language Arts Exam State Board of Education)+ (minimum score to be determined by Math Smarter Balanced Math Exam Education)+ (minimum score to be determined by State Board of Science Biology End Of Course Exam ELPA LEVEL: 1 ST Year 2 nd Year 3 rd Year 4 th Year 15

17 Special Education Department High School Graduation Planning Form Class of 2016 Name: Grad Year: Date: Minimum credits for graduation: 22 (16 required and 6 electives) Each represents a semester class (.5 credit) LANGUAGE ARTS (4 credits) SOCIAL STUDIES (3 credits) 9 th Grade World History 1,2 10 th Grade U.S. History and PNW History 1,2 11 th Grade American Government 12 th Grade Contemporary World Issues MATH (3 credits) SCIENCE (2 credits) 9 th Grade 10 th Grade 11 th Grade 12 th Grade PHYSICAL EDUCATION (1.5 credits) CAREER & TECH ED (1 credits) HEALTH (.5 credit) FINE ARTS (1 credit) ELECTIVE CLASSES CHECKLIST (6 CREDITS) CULMINATING PROJECT/HIGH SCHOOL AND BEYOND PLAN MET EXAMS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION English/ Language Arts Reading & Writing High School Proficiency Exam (Level 3 or 4 score) -OR- Smarter Balanced English/Language Arts Exam (exit exam minimum score) Algebra 1 End of Course Exam (Level 3 or 4 score) -OR- Math Geometry End of Course Exam Smarter Balanced Math Exam (Level 3 or 4 score) -OR- (exit exam minimum score) Science Biology End Of Course Exam IEP Team may determine necessary adjustments to graduation requirements Diploma Option: CIA CAA Summary of Performance Completion Date: 16

18 Special Education Department High School Graduation Planning Form Class of 2017 Name: Grad Year: Date: Minimum credits for graduation: 22 (16 required and 6 electives) Each represents a semester class (.5 credit) LANGUAGE ARTS (4 credits) SOCIAL STUDIES (3 credits) 9 th Grade World History 1,2 10 th Grade U.S. History and PNW History 1,2 11 th Grade American Government 12 th Grade Contemporary World Issues MATH (3 credits) SCIENCE (2 credits) 9 th Grade 10 th Grade 11 th Grade 12 th Grade PHYSICAL EDUCATION (1.5 credits) CAREER & TECH ED (1 credit) HEALTH (.5 credit) FINE ARTS (1 credit) ELECTIVE CLASSES CHECKLIST (6 CREDITS) COMMUNITY SERVICE REQUIREMENT (Minimum of 20 hours) CULMINATING PROJECT/HIGH SCHOOL AND BEYOND PLAN MET EXAMS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION English/ Language Arts Smarter Balanced English/Language Arts Exam (exit exam minimum score) Algebra 1 End of Course Exam (Level 3 or 4 score) -OR- Math Geometry End of Course Exam Smarter Balanced Math Exam (Level 3 or 4 score) -OR- (exit exam minimum score) Science Biology End Of Course Exam IEP Team may determine necessary adjustments to graduation requirements Diploma Option: CIA CAA Summary of Performance Completion Date: 17

19 Special Education Department High School Graduation Planning Form Class of 2018 Name: Grad Year: Date: Minimum credits for graduation: 22 (16 required and 6 electives) Each represents a semester class (.5 credit) LANGUAGE ARTS (4 credits) SOCIAL STUDIES (3 credits) 9 th Grade World History 1,2 10 th Grade U.S. History and PNW History 1,2 11 th Grade American Government 12 th Grade Contemporary World Issues MATH (3 credits) SCIENCE (2 credits) 9 th Grade 10 th Grade 11 th Grade 12 th Grade PHYSICAL EDUCATION (1.5 credits) CAREER & TECH ED (1 credit) HEALTH (.5 credit) FINE ARTS (1 credit) ELECTIVE CLASSES CHECKLIST (6 CREDITS) COMMUNITY SERVICE REQUIREMENT (Minimum of 20 hours) CULMINATING PROJECT/HIGH SCHOOL AND BEYOND PLAN MET EXAMS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION English/ Language Arts Smarter Balanced English/Language Arts Exam (exit exam minimum score) Algebra 1 End of Course Exam (Level 3 or 4 score) -OR- Math Geometry End of Course Exam Smarter Balanced Math Exam (Level 3 or 4 score) -OR- (exit exam minimum score) Science Biology End Of Course Exam IEP Team may determine necessary adjustments to graduation requirements Diploma Option: CIA CAA Summary of Performance Completion Date: 18

20 Special Education Department High School Graduation Planning Form Class of 2019 Name: Grad Year: Date: Minimum credits for graduation: 22 (16 required and 6 electives) Each represents a semester class (.5 credit) LANGUAGE ARTS (4 credits) SOCIAL STUDIES (3 credits) 9 th Grade World History 1,2 10 th Grade U.S. History and PNW History 1,2 11 th Grade American Government 12 th Grade Contemporary World Issues MATH (3 credits) SCIENCE (2 credits) 9 th Grade 10 th Grade 11 th Grade 12 th Grade PHYSICAL EDUCATION (1.5 credits) CAREER & TECH ED (1 credit) HEALTH (.5 credit) FINE ARTS (1 credit) ELECTIVE CLASSES CHECKLIST (6 CREDITS) COMMUNITY SERVICE REQUIREMENT (Minimum of 20 hours) CULMINATING PROJECT/HIGH SCHOOL AND BEYOND PLAN MET EXAMS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION English/ Language Arts Smarter Balanced English/Language Arts Exam State Board of Education)+ (minimum score to be determined by Math Science Smarter Balanced Math Exam Education)+ Biology End Of Course Exam (minimum score to be determined by State Board of IEP Team may determine necessary adjustments to graduation requirements Diploma Option: CIA CAA Summary of Performance Completion Date: 19

21 POST SECONDARY EDUCATION PLANNING It is a goal of the Renton School District that each student will graduate with the necessary skills and appropriate plan to continue to post-secondary options. In order to be well-prepared for any of the post-secondary options below, students should: Enroll in a rigorous academic program with emphasis on Math, Science, Language arts, and Social Studies Participate in a comprehensive career guidance program Identify and explore options and courses in an approved Career/Educational pathway Participate in programs offered through the Career and Technical Education department Participate in a service learning experience in the community Develop a portfolio highlighting high school experience Post-secondary options include: Apprenticeship Programs: Direct and specific job training with Community College component Participants enter into a relationship with an employer and develop a training and educational plan with a local Community or Technical College Community College and Technical College Offers a comprehensive liberal arts educational transfer program Offers a wide range of technical programs Awards a variety of degrees (AA, AAS) and certifications Provides students the opportunity to enroll in career development and/or Career and Technical Education preparation programs University Comprehensive liberal arts and a multitude of degree programs Awards Bachelor s degrees (BA, BS) masters degrees and doctoral degrees Provides opportunities for professional development leading to work Military Specific job training with scholarship opportunities at completion of commitment 20

22 COLLEGE ADMISSIONS INFORMATION School Code Numbers for ACT/SAT/PSAT Hazen ~ Lindbergh ~ Renton High ~ Secondary Learning Center ~ P.S.A.T. (PRELIMINARY SCHOLASTIC APTITUDE TEST) and N.M.S.Q.T. (NATIONAL MERIT SCHOLARSHIP QUALIFYING TEST) Tests subject area strengths. Finalists qualify for National Merit Scholarships. The results are used by colleges and others for scholarship consideration. A fee may be charged. When: Grade Level: October Sophomores and juniors (but only juniors qualify for NMSQT) Why: 1. Results used to determine National Merit Scholarships/ and achievement scholarships awarded in the spring; 2. Used with other records, these scores are generally valid predictors of academic achievement in college and provide a comparison with other college-bound students; 3. Provides a basis for taking other college entrance tests; Gives students the opportunity to participate in Student Search Service of the College Board; 4. Selected African American students may compete for national achievement scholarship awards. Hispanic students may compete to be considered for Outstanding Hispanic Scholarship Awards. SAT I College-bound students take this test for admission to a 4-year college or university. Nearly all colleges accept either the ACT or SAT I. The test measures academic aptitude in math, critical reading, and writing. Juniors planning to apply to four-year colleges or service academies should take the test in May of their junior year; some selective schools require SAT II tests which are subject matter tests. A fee may be charged. Students are responsible for registering and selecting their preference for the test site. The SAT may be given at your high school. When: October November December January March May June Grade Level: Register: Juniors and Seniors 21

23 COLLEGE ADMISSIONS INFORMATION ACT Measures academic achievement in English, Math, Reading and Science Reasoning, plus an optional writing test. Test contains analytical and problem solving exercises. Juniors may want to take the test in June of their junior year. Students often take both the SAT I and the ACT test to increase chances for successful admission. A fee is charged. Students currently receiving free/reduced lunch qualify for a fee waiver; see your school counselor for more information. Students are responsible for registering and selecting their preference for the test site. When: September October December February April June Grade Level: Register: Juniors and Seniors COMMUNITY and TECHNICAL COLLEGE ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Contact your high school counselor, Career Center specialist, or the school itself for more information. See also Alternative Credits, Running Start. Steps to enroll: 1. Visit the How To Get Started page at the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges website at sbctc.edu/public/pe_index.aspx to submit an application. 2. Take the COMPASS test. The COMPASS test measures Reading, Writing and Math skills. Placement in appropriate classes is determined by the colleges. A fee will be charged. 3. Have official grade transcripts sent from all other colleges attended, the high school where the student attended and/or the school granting the General Educational Development (GED). STUDENT ATHLETES Students who wish to participate in Intercollegiate Athletics (NCAA Division I, II, or III, NAIA, NJCAA, or NWAACC) must meet the specific eligibility requirements which are listed in the links provided below. Refer to your athletic director, coach, and/or school counselor for assistance and any additional information. National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA): National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA): National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA): Northwest Athletic Conference It is highly recommended that students consult individual college catalogs for admission requirements. 22

24 COLLEGE ADMISSIONS INFORMATION GENERAL INFORMATION FOR APPLICANTS TO ALL COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES High School Transcript The transcript must present the applicant's record for grades Depending on the deadline, the transcript may also reflect the 7th semester (first half of senior year). A transcript is official if it is sent directly by the high school to the college/university or sealed by the school and mailed or delivered by the applicant. If the applicant opens the envelope, it is no longer official. Test Scores: SAT I or ACT Test scores are official if they are sent directly from the testing agency to the institution or sent directly from the high school (handwritten scores are not acceptable). To speed up processing of applications, applicants should, at the time they register for SAT/ACT, request that their scores be sent directly to the institutions to which they plan to apply. Transfer Applicants - Contact each institution for specific instructions. Applicants Expecting to Participate in Athletic Programs - Contact each institution for detailed information. Running Start and College-in-the-High-School Participants - Consult each institution for detailed information about its admission and transfer credit policies. Western Undergraduate Exchange (WUE): If you are a resident of a WICHE (Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education) state, you are eligible to request a reduced WUE tuition rate of 150% of the resident rate at more than 150 participating institutions in the West. The WUE database includes which institutions participate, and which programs are available at the WUE rate. More information, including how to request the reduced rate, can be found at the WICHE/WUE website: WICHE states include: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, Wyoming, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Applicants with Disabilities - For accommodations in the application process, contact each institution or the Washington State Relay Service TTY at 800/ Freshman Admission to Public Baccalaureate Colleges and Universities in the State of Washington - Check each college s website for specific admission information and requirements. MINIMUM COLLEGE ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS New minimum college admission standards apply to students who aspire to enter a baccalaureate institution directly from high school. They spell out the numbers and types of high school credits needed for college admission. Required courses are known as the College Academic Distribution Requirements (CADR). Completing the CADR Courses does not guarantee admission to college. The CADR Courses are one of a number of criteria institutions consider when making admission decisions. 23

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27 PROGRAM INFORMATION WORKSITE LEARNING EXPERIENCE Students have the opportunity to participate in the Worksite Learning Program and earn high school credit while gainfully employed. This work experience connects knowledge and skills obtained in the classroom to those needed outside the classroom and assists students in developing or fulfilling their educational plans. Students earn.5 credits for 180 hours of successful work experience. The following requirements must be met in order to receive credit: a. Participating students must be at least 16 years of age and working in a site that meets all of the requirements identified for Teen Workers by the Department of Labor and Industries. b. A Worksite Learning Coordinator must supervise the worksite learning experience. c. The student, parent, employer and Worksite Learning Coordinator must complete the required state documentation prior to the work experience. d. Students may either find their own worksite or be placed in a worksite that is appropriate to the previous learning experience and educational goals. Interested students should talk with the Worksite Learning Coordinator at their high school or ask the career specialist in the Career Center for more details. CORRESPONDENCE/ON-LINE LEARNING COURSES High school credit for correspondence courses/on-line learning courses may be granted provided the following requirements are met: a. Prior permission has been granted by the principal or designee. b. The program fits the educational plans submitted by the student. c. Credit is granted from approved schools. The following are approved schools: 1) Schools approved by the National University Extension Association. 2) Community and technical colleges, four-year colleges and universities, state-approved private schools in Washington State, and 3) Other schools or institutions, which are approved, after evaluation for a particular course offering, by the Renton School District. RUNNING START Running Start is a program whereby juniors or seniors in high school may apply to enroll in courses or programs in a community or technical college. Both high school and college or vocational-technical credits may be obtained. Evidence of successful completion of each course in a technical or community college will be included in the high school records and transcripts. Students of junior or senior classification are eligible; if interested in this option students should contact their school counselor for details. The State Legislature has placed limits on the total FTE (full-time equivalency) funded for students. The total FTE is limited to 1.2. This calculation is based on combined course load between high school and college. Any credits taken in college beyond this 1.2 FTE limit will result in charges directly to the student or family. Additionally, while tuition is free for a class load up to 1.2 FTE, there may be other fees associated with specific courses (books, materials), which are the responsibility of student and his/her family. ALTERNATIVE CREDITS Renton School District graduation requirements are established to provide each student with the best possible educational experiences, and to comply with Washington State statutes. The Renton School District may grant credit toward high school graduation requirements or required minimum college admissions courses primarily conducted away from the facilities owned, operated or supervised by the Renton School District that meet a student s particular needs. See your high school counselor for further information. 26

28 PROGRAM INFORMATION GRADUATION WITH HONORS Distinct Honors: In lieu of identifying the two graduating seniors whose scholarship record would classify them as valedictorian or salutatorian, the Board of Directors has chosen to use the term distinct honors. Distinct honors shall be accorded to 7% of the senior class with the highest grade point average, based on their seventh semester cumulative grade point, providing no one with a grade point average of less than 3.50 shall be included. In determining class rank, a list is generated from the School District's data processing system, which combines a student's G.P.A. with values of credits earned. Students being graded on a Pass/Fail basis are not included in the ranking process. Honor Cords: All students who earn a cumulative grade point average of 3.50 or above are authorized to wear an honor cord during the commencement ceremony. PARTICIPATION IN GRADUATION CEREMONIES (Found in Renton School District Procedure 2410P) If students fulfill graduation requirements by the end of the last term of their senior year, they may participate in graduation ceremonies. Each student will be awarded a diploma after satisfactorily completing local and state requirements. Upon request, each graduating student will receive a final transcript. Graduation ceremony requirements, credit deficits, and honors will be addressed in the following manner: In order to participate in graduation ceremonies, a student must have been in attendance at least one of the last two semesters unless the student has been enrolled full time in the Running Start program. 1. All fines and obligations must be cleared prior to participation in the graduation ceremony rehearsal. 2. Each participating student must participate in the graduation ceremony rehearsal. 3. Each student who participates will purchase or rent the proper cap and gown as designated by the school administration and the class advisor and officers. 4. Caps and gowns will be worn in the proper manner as designated by the school administration and class advisor. 5. Each student who participates will be expected to cooperate with the class advisor and to participate in all parts of the graduation ceremonies. 6. Students on current suspension or expulsion will be denied participation in graduation ceremonies. 7. All credit retrieval course work, whether online or independent study, to be counted toward graduation, must be completed (including the end of course exam), and a grade received by the school no later than the Friday prior to graduation. A student cannot be concurrently enrolled in a course as part of their high school day and the same course for credit retrieval. In order to enroll in a credit retrieval course, the student must have previously failed the course and withdrawn from the class. The student s transcript will reflect a failing grade and the credit retrieval grade. Failure to comply with the above requirements will automatically forfeit a student s privilege of participation in the graduation CEREMONIES. 27

29 GENERAL PROGRAM INFORMATION GRADE POINT AVERAGE The Renton School District grading structure shall adhere to the standardized Washington State high school transcript pattern. The grading system shall be based on the following: A = 4.0 B+ = 3.3 C+ = 2.3 D+ = 1.3 A- = 3.7 B = 3.0 C = 2.0 D = 1.0 B- = 2.7 C- = 1.7 F = 0.0 D (1.0) is the minimal passing mark. While Credit/No Credit, Audit = N, and Pass marks may also be used, they are excluded from the calculation of a grade point average. Students and/or parents wishing to receive a status report on current grades may contact the teacher or check online through Family Access. Information for accessing this website and log-in/password information is sent to families in September of each year. 28

30 COURSE OFFERINGS The following courses are Renton School District Board approved curriculum. However, not all courses are offered at each high school every semester. Please contact the counseling office in your high school for specific courses offered at that building. Each course listed in the course catalog earns.5 credits per semester, unless otherwise noted. 29

31 LANGUAGE ARTS REQUIRED COURSES LANGUAGE ARTS 1,2 Course Code: QLA901, QLA902 This year-long, first year Language Arts course emphasizes and develops reading, writing, and oral language and reinforces the use of basic language skills through the writing process. All students will participate in these activities. Individual needs will determine the degree of depth and the amount of time required to achieve course objectives. LANGUAGE ARTS 1,2 HONORS Course Code: QLA991, QLA992 This year-long Honors class has more rigorous expectations of students. The learning pace is accelerated. More in-depth reading, writing, and thinking are required. Students must be highly motivated and capable of meeting course requirements. LANGUAGE ARTS 3,4 Course Code: QLA001, QLA002 Prerequisite: 10 th grade The year-long, language arts course makes provision for further development in the major areas of Language Arts identified in the first- year course. An awareness of the structure of the English language especially, that involving the sentence, the paragraph and the multiparagraph composition, will be developed by means of carefully prepared writing assignments. Literary themes offer excellent choices for study within the course. LANGUAGE ARTS 3,4 HONORS Course Code: QLA091, QLA092 Prerequisite: 10 th grade This year-long honors class has more rigorous expectations of students. The learning pace is accelerated. More in-depth reading, writing, evidence of critical thinking are required. Students must be highly motivated and capable of meeting course requirements. LANGUAGE ARTS 5,6 Course Code: QLA101, QLA102 Prerequisite: 11 th grade In this year-long course, emphasis is on American Literature with selections from Colonial Period through Modern, and writing. The multi-paragraph essay will be stressed and based on analyses of the literary pieces. LANGUAGE ARTS 5,6 HONORS Course Code: QLA193, QLA194, Prerequisite: 11 th grade In this year-long honors course, the emphasis is on American Literature with selections from the Colonial Period through Modern, and honors writing. The multiparagraph essay will be stressed and based on analyses of the literary pieces. ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION Course Code: QLA306, QLA307 Prerequisite: Completion of LA 1,2 and LA 3,4 This course engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer s purposes, audience expectations and in subjects, as well as the way genre convections and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing. Advanced Placement exam with the potential for earning college credit. Also fulfills juniors Language Arts 5,6 requirements. LANGUAGE ARTS 7,8 Course Code: QLA203, QLA204 Prerequisite: 12 th grade With a fourth year of language arts now a graduation requirement, this year-long course focuses on college and career readiness in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students will read contemporary fiction and non-fiction, do projects and presentations, conduct research, and write narrative as well as evidence-based informative and argumentative essays. There is an emphasis on students understanding their future roles in a complex world. ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION Course Code: QLA301, QLA302 Prerequisite: 12th grade This intensive, literature-based study is modeled on college freshman literature classes. The writing strand of the course emphasizes college writing skills. Students who complete the class have the option of taking the Advanced Placement English Literature exam with the potential for earning college credit. 30

32 LANGUAGE ARTS HUMANITIES 1,2 Course Code: QLA109, QLA110 Prerequisite: 12 th grade Students will study what are regarded as the "traditional humanities" of western civilization. Literature, painting, music, sculpture, architecture and philosophy. These subjects are not studied in isolation but within the context of important developments in science, technology, economics and general history. The class is chronological in arrangement, beginning with prehistory and working up through the twentieth century. A major intent of the course is to help students understand their own world through careful examination of western cultural heritage. The work in this class is centered on reading, writing, note taking, projects, testing and discussion. Priority will be given to seniors. UWHS ENGLISH 111: COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE Course Code: QLA400, QLA402 Prerequisite: 12th grade This year-long college level course focuses on the study and practice of writing. Students will read several literary tests, as well as several essays that other people have written about those texts. As we examine and discuss not only WHAT these writes say, but exactly HOW they say it convincingly, students will write essays in which they practice using language effectively. High school students are able to earn 5 university credits for a reduced cost for this course, through University of Washington, within the familiarity of the high school setting. ELECTIVE COURSES READING LABORATORY 1,2 Course Code: QLA907, QLA908, Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation and test results This course is designed to help students with reading in the content areas. Diagnostic tests are given to determine individual needs. Specific work on building vocabulary, expanding comprehension, improving study skills and increasing reading rate may be covered. This course can be repeated in successive semesters for additional credit. This course does not fulfill a Language Arts credit requirement for graduation. SPEECH Course Code: QLA908 The course is designed for students with a wide range of abilities. The course also stresses improvement of the student's speaking and listening abilities. Emphasis will be placed upon understanding the basic communication process including the speaker, the message, and the audience as well as those distractions, which interfere with that process. Practice will involve formal, informal and group presentations. This course does not fulfill a Language Arts credit requirement for graduation. DEBATE Course Code: QLA010 The principles of debate and the problem solving group discussion is the area of concentration in this course. The student will be involved in the research for and the preparation and delivery of debate cases on current problems. Preparation for and delivery in the individual forensic activities will be stressed. The student may elect to participate in league activities. This course does not fulfill a Language Arts credit requirement for graduation. EDITOR PRACTICUM Course Code: QLA123 (Elective or Career and Technical Ed credit) Prerequisite: Journalistic Writing and Journalism teacher s approval 10 th through 12 th grades Editor Practicum is primarily a newspaper production course. Students are expected to fill editorial staff positions and take on final responsibility for paper production: managing staff, planning, writing, producing, and editing stories, writing headlines, layout, placement of advertising, copy editing, proofreading, and distribution of the school paper. Editor Practicum may be repeated for elective credit. See Journalistic Writing course. JOURNALISTIC WRITING 1,2 Course Code: QLA009, QLA011 (Elective or Career and Technical Ed credit) Prerequisite: 10 th through 12 th grades These semester courses cover the fundamentals of journalistic ethics, journalistic law, responsible journalism, news writing, copy editing, proofreading, make-up, caption writing, headline writing, features, editorials, columns, newspaper terminology, page layout planning and the background of the newspaper industry. Students will be responsible for production of the school paper including writing articles and editorials, designing layout, photojournalism, selling and advertising, and paper printing and circulation. See Editor Practicum course. 31

33 TECHNICAL WRITING 1,2 Course Code: QLA551, QLA552 (Elective or Career and Technical Ed credit) Technical writers make complicated information easy to understand. Students will explore the field of Technical Writing as an exciting Career Pathway. Using clear explanations, graphic design principles, and reallife examples, the Technical Writing course solidifies the relationship between industry principles and written communications. Students will (1) learn about design and typographic choices, (2) learn how an industry s objectives affect writing choices, (3) practice clarity in writing and speaking, and (4) develop techniques in grammar and structure. COLLECTION OF EVIDENCE LA 1,2 Course Code: QLA993, QLA994 This course is provided to seniors only who have not yet met standard on the Reading/Writing HSPE OR the English Language Arts Smarter Balanced state exam. Students will practice and complete the tasks needed to submit a Collection of Evidence portfolio to the state (OSPI) as an alternative way to meet standard on this graduation requirement. This course will fulfill Language Arts credits for LA 1-6 only requirements. LANGUAGE ARTS 32

34 MATHEMATICS Mathematics Graduation Requirements Students in the class of 2016 and beyond must: Earn three credits from high school level mathematics courses. Students must earn one credit in each of the three categories below: o Algebra 1,2 o Geometry 1,2 o Any one of a number of third-credit qualifying courses Pass one state math exam. Students must either: o Pass the Algebra 1,2 End of Course Exam (EOC 1) or o Pass the Geometry 1,2 End of Course Exam (EOC 2) or o Smarter Balanced Math Exam or o Complete and pass a CAA* alternative option Students who qualify for special education services under WAC must: Earn three credits of math designated by their Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and Pass the number of state math exams required of students in their graduating class. Students must: o Pass the exam required of non-special education qualified students OR o Successfully complete a CAA alternative option for either or both tests not passed OR o After grade 10, pass the Developmentally Appropriate Proficiency Exam in mathematics (DAPE) College Admissions Requirements Students intending to go to a four-year college in Washington State must earn at least three credits in mathematics that include Algebra 3,4. Additionally, students must, unless they have taken a course beyond Algebra 3,4, take a math-based quantitative course during their final year of high school. This course does not necessarily have to be a mathematics course. Students should familiarize themselves with admissions requirements before making decisions about what courses to take during their senior year. Students who plan to pursue post-secondary education in a community or technical college program should take a strong math program. While successful completion of Algebra 3,4 is not generally a requirement for admission to community or technical colleges, it is recommended. *Certificate of Academic Achievement alternative options are described in the Assessment section of the OSPI website. Please visit 33

35 To be eligible to graduate, students in the class of 2016 and beyond must earn three credits in mathematics. Credit must be earned in Algebra 1,2, Geometry 1,2 and in a third-credit qualifying course. All courses in Levels 3 and above (see below) are third-credit qualifying courses. Students must earn 1.0 credit in Algebra 1,2 before taking a third-credit qualifying course if those credits are to be applied to the third-credit requirement. Students entering high school having already completed Geometry and/or Algebra and choosing to not include those courses on their high school transcript have different requirements. Students starting high school with Geometry must earn credit in Geometry, Algebra 3,4 and one additional math course. Students starting high school in Algebra 3,4 must earn credit in Algebra 3,4 and two additional math courses. Most four year colleges require that students complete Algebra 3,4 (commonly called Algebra II) to be eligible to apply for admission. Because of this, as per state law, parents/guardians must meet with a school representative and indicate that this is their choice should students wish to take something other than Algebra 3,4 as their third math credit. In general, students complete a course at the previous level before taking a course at the next level. Students may take courses within the same level concurrently. Students wishing to concurrently take courses at different levels should consult their current math teacher. Common course-taking sequences include: Algebra 1,2 Geometry 1,2 Algebra 3,4 Math Analysis/Trig and AP Statistics AP Calculus Algebra 1,2 Geometry 1,2 Algebra 3,4 Math Analysis/Trig Calculus, AP Statistics or AP Calculus Algebra 1,2 Geometry 1,2 Algebra 3,4 Advanced Quantitative Reasoning Algebra 1,2 Geometry 1,2 Algebra 1,2 Intermediate Algebra 3,4 Algebra 1,2 Geometry 1,2 a Level 3 course Level 1 Algebra 1,2 Algebra 1,2 Applied* Equivalent to Algebra 1,2 Level 2 Level 3 All courses at Level 3 and above are thirdcredit qualifying. To count as a third credit, these courses must be taken after earning 1.0 credit in Algebra 1,2. Level 4 Geometry 1,2 Geometry 1,2 Applied* Equivalent to Geometry 1,2 Algebra 3,4 Recommend C or better in both semesters of Algebra 1,2 Algebra 1,2 Intermediate Second semester only may count as 0.5 of the third-credit requirement Accounting 3,4* Algebra Applications 1,2* (Fulfill a Collection of Evidence) AP Computer Science 1,2* Computer Programming 1,2* Financial Algebra 1,2* Independent Living* (one semester only) Advanced Quantitative Reasoning Recommend completion of Algebra 3,4 (open to seniors only) Math Analysis/Trig. 1,2 Recommend C+ or better both semesters of Algebra 3,4 AP Statistics Recommend C+ or better both semesters of Algebra 3,4 Level 5 Calculus 1,2 Recommend C or better both semesters of Math Analysis/Trig AP Calculus AB 1,2 Recommend B or better both semesters of Math Analysis/Trig. 1,2 AP Calculus BC 1,2 Recommend A or better both semesters of Math Analysis/Trig or successful completion of AP Calculus AB *These courses may be taken for CTE credit in place of math credit. 34

36 MATHEMATICS LEVEL 1 ALGEBRA 1,2 Course Code: QMA903, QMA904 This first year algebra course emphasizes under-standing and applying linear functions (slope as a rate of change), as well as helping students to develop a variety of skills and techniques for manipulation of abstract symbols. In addition, quadratic functions are introduced and explored. Earning credit in Algebra 1,2 is a graduation requirement. ALGEBRA 1,2 APPLIED Course Code: QMA114, QMA115 Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 1,2 (Math or Career and Technical Education credit) Algebra1,2 Applied is a full-year course that focuses on problem solving techniques, conversions, ratios and proportions, vectors, scientific notation, powers and roots, formulas, linear and non-linear equations, graphing, statistics, probabilities, factoring, patterns and functions, polynomials, quadratics, systems of equations, and inequalities with all topics imbedded in real-world, industry-based models. Earning credit in this course or in Algebra 1,2 is a graduation requirement. LEVEL 2 GEOMETRY 1,2 Course Code: QMA005, QMA006 The year-long course is an integration of plane, solid, and coordinate geometry. Deductive reasoning is explored with informal proofs or arguments and leads to the more sophisticated concept of formal proofs. The course also includes geometric constructions, inductive reasoning and a review of first year algebra concepts. Earning credit in Geometry 1,2 is a graduation requirement. GEOMETRY 1,2 APPLIED Course Code: QMA015, QMA016 (Math or Career and Technical Education credit) Geometry 1-2 Applied is a full-year course that focuses on discovering geometry, reasoning and proof, triangle theorems, similar triangles, right triangle properties, trigonometry, polygons and quadrilaterals, coordinate geometry, perimeter and area, circles, surface area and volume, and transformational geometry with all topics imbedded in real-world, industry-based models. Earning credit in this course or in Geometry 1,2 is a graduation requirement. LEVEL 3 ALGEBRA 1,2 INTERMEDIATE Course Code: QMA198, QMA199 This course serves as a bridge between Algebra 1,2 and Algebra 3,4. The course will review all of Algebra 1,2 in first semester and introduce concepts from Algebra 3,4 during second semester. Students who struggled with Algebra 1,2 are encouraged to take this course before taking Algebra 3,4. Students who earn a higher grade in the first semester of Intermediate Algebra will have their lowest Algebra 1,2 grade replaced for GPA and crediting purposes. Students who have passed both semesters of Algebra 1,2 by the end of the first semester of Algebra 1,2 Intermediate may count the second semester of this course toward half of the third-credit requirement. ALGEBRA 3,4 Course Code: QMA101, QMA102 Recommendation: C or better in both semesters of Algebra 1,2 This is a second year algebra course. Basic concepts and skills from first year algebra are reviewed and extended. In addition, students study polynomial functions (with an emphasis on quadratics), equations and inequalities, and are introduced to logarithmic and exponential equations. Course content of second year Algebra includes emphasis on the skills needed to work with functions, including general factoring; factoring patterns for special products; fractions (and complex fractions); using exponents and rational exponents; and working with complex numbers (the unit i). Students are also introduced to topics in sequences, series, probability, statistics, and matrices (time-permitting). With permission, this course may be taken concurrently with Geometry. This is a third-credit qualifying course. ACCOUNTING 3,4 College Credit Course Code: QMA024, QMA025 (Eligible for Third Credit Math or Career and Technical Education credit) Students learn principles, terminology, procedures and applications that will give them the basic skills necessary to perform bookkeeping and accounting functions. Study includes procedures and automated accounting on computers, simulations, and analysis of budget financial statements. *To count as third credit in math, this course must be taken after earning 1.0 credit in Algebra 1,2. 35

37 MATHEMATICS ALGEBRA APPLICATIONS Course Code: QMA003, QMA004 Prerequisite: 1.0 credit earned in Algebra 1,2 (Third Credit Math or Career and Technical Education credit) Algebra Applications is a full-year course that focuses on algebra: problem solving, powers and roots, formulas, linear and non-linear equations, graphing, probability and statistics, trigonometry, factoring, patterns and functions, quadratics, systems of equations, and inequalities with all topics imbedded in real-world, industry-based models. This course qualifies as a third math credit and is also the course that students should take if they wish to submit a Collection of Evidence (COE) in fulfillment of State graduation requirements. ADVANCED PLACEMENT COMPUTER SCIENCE 1,2 Course Code: QMA008, QMA009 (Eligible for Third Credit Math or Career and Technical Education credit) Prerequisite: Algebra 1,2 AP Computer Science is a fast-paced, yearlong course. Meant to replicate a college introductory programming class, it is designed for students who have an interest in business or computer related careers. Students need good problem solving skills and a willingness to work hard. Students will be learning JAVA, with emphasis on problem solving, computer science theory and program syntax. After the AP Test, students will select a study topic of interest, such as Lego-robot programming, game programming, or data management. COMPUTER PROGRAMMING College Credit Course Code: QMA026, QMA credit (Eligible for Third Credit Math or Career and Technical Education credit) Prerequisite: Algebra 1,2 The first semester is an introductory course in Computer Science designed for beginning programmers who want to gain introductory level experience using Microsoft s Visual Basic.NET or 6.0 platform and to learn programming in oriented environment. The second semester is designed for students to explore other computer program compilers such as Java and C++. FINANCIAL ALGEBRA Course Code QMA803, QMA804 Prerequisites: 1.0 credit earned in Algebra 1,2 (Eligible for Third Credit Math or Career and Technical Education credit) Financial Algebra is a full-year course that focuses on problem solving as related to: the stock market, modeling a business, banking, consumer credit, automobile ownership, employment basics, income taxes, planning for retirement, and preparing a budget. INDEPENDENT LIVING Course Code: QMA144 (Eligible for Third Credit Math option* or Career and Technical Education credit) Prepare for living on your own and making the transition into adult life! This course includes an overview of all of the skills needed to make good decisions about a successful lifestyle. Topics are looked at from a variety of perspectives and include understanding self and others, relationships, human sexuality, careers, housing, and insurance. Consumer issues include budgeting, money management, credit, banking, payroll, investments, income tax preparation and other related financial issues. *To count as third credit in math, this course must be taken after earning 1.0 credit in Algebra 1,2. LEVEL 4 ADVANCED QUANTITATIVE REASONING 1,2 Course Codes: QMA275, QMA276 Recommendation: Completion of Algebra 3,4 Advanced Quantitative Reasoning is designed to reinforce, build on, and solidify students working knowledge of Algebra 1,2, Geometry 1,2, and Algebra 3,4; develop students quantitative literacy for effective citizenship, for workplace competitiveness, and for post-secondary education; develop students ability to investigate and solve mathematical problems and to communicate using precise mathematical language supported by the appropriate use of tables, graphs and diagrams; and will prepare students for post-secondary course work in statistics, computer science, mathematics, technical fields, and the natural and social sciences. Advanced Quantitative Reasoning is a rigorous, upper-level mathematics course designed to serve as the final course in the math sequence for those who take it. AQR is open only to seniors. This is a third-credit qualifying course. 36

38 MATHEMATICS MATH ANALYSIS/TRIGONOMETRY 1,2 Course Code: QMA108, QMA109 Recommendation: C+ or better in Algebra 3,4 This pre-calculus course reviews and extends (deepens) students experiences with functions (including polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and exponential functions). In addition, students study trigonometric functions and applications of trigonometry, conic sections, sequences and series (time permitting), and some elementary Calculus concepts (with an emphasis on limits). Successful completion of this course should prepare students for a college level Calculus course. This is a third-credit qualifying course. ADVANCED PLACEMENT STATISTICS 1,2 Course Code: QMA306, QMA307 Recommendation: C+ or better in Algebra 3,4 Students in this course are introduced to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. The course content is comparable to a onesemester introductory non-calculus-based college course in Statistics and prepares students to take the AP Statistics exam. This is a third-credit qualifying course. LEVEL 5 CALCULUS 1,2 Course Code: QMA312, QMA313 Recommendation: C or better both semesters of Math Analysis/Trig. Students in this course study functions, limits of functions, the derivative and its applications, and the integral and its applications. This is a third-credit qualifying course. SUPPORT CLASSES INTENSIFIED ALGEBRA Course Codes: QMA037, QMA038, QMA915, QMA916 This course is designed to support students in being successful in Algebra 1,2. This two-period course provides additional time for learning, a challenging curriculum and cohesive, targeted supports and interventions including developing students positive beliefs about their academic abilities. This course can only be taken with instructor permission. Successful completion of the course will result in Algebra 1,2 credit and an elective credit. GEOMETRY SUPPORT 1,2 Course Code: QMA007, QMA017 This course is designed to support students in being successful in Geometry 1,2. Concepts taught in Geometry 1,2 are pre-taught and reviewed in Geometry Support. This course can be taken only with instructor permission and concurrently with Geometry 1,2. Geometry Support credits may be used only as elective credits. ALGEBRA SUPPORT 3,4 Course Code: QMA022, QMA023 This course is designed to support students in being successful in Algebra 3,4. Concepts taught in Algebra 3,4 are pre-taught and reviewed in Algebra Support. This course can be taken only with instructor permission and concurrently with Algebra 3,4. Algebra Support credits may be used only as elective credits. ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS AB 1,2 Course Code: QMA301, QMA302 Recommendation: B or better both semesters of Math Analysis/Trig Students in this course study functions, limits of functions, the derivative and its applications, and the integral and its applications. The course content is comparable to that contained in the first two quarters of college Calculus and prepares students to take the AP Calculus A/B exam. This is a third-credit qualifying course. ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS BC 1,2 Course Code: QMA303, QMA304 Recommendation: B or better both semesters of Math Analysis/Trig or successful completion of AP Calculus AB This course covers the same content as AP Calculus AB plus some additional topics. The course content is comparable to that contained in the first two quarters of college Calculus and prepares students to take the AP Calculus BC exam. This is a third-credit qualifying course. 37

39 SOCIAL STUDIES REQUIRED COURSES WORLD HISTORY 1,2 Course Code: QSS004, QSS005 Prerequisite: 10 th grade This course surveys the major ideas, personalities and events, which have been important to the development of modern civilization. The course emphasizes the development of society during the last three centuries with references to past civilization and their influence on the modern world. WORLD HISTORY 1,2 HONORS Course Code: QSS094, QSS095 Prerequisite: 10 th grade Social Studies Honors classes have more rigorous expectations of students. The learning pace is accelerated. More in-depth reading, writing, and thinking are required. Students must be highly motivated and capable of meeting course requirements. ADVANCED PLACEMENT WORLD HISTORY 1,2 Course Code: QSS096, QSS097 Prerequisite: 10 th grade This course surveys the major ideas, personalities and events, which have been important to the development of modern civilization. The course emphasizes the development of society during the last three centuries with references to past civilization and their influence on the modern world. This advanced placement offering allows students the option of taking the advanced placement test. University or Advanced Placement credit may be available. US HISTORY/PACIFIC NORTHWEST HISTORY 1,2 Course Code: QSS113, QSS114 Prerequisite: 11 th grade Studies include historical and multicultural aspects of the State, economic development and trade, the democratic idea, international trade, encouraging participatory citizenship, Native American history and culture will be examined. US HISTORY/PACIFIC NORTHWEST HISTORY 1,2 HONORS Course Code: QSS193, QSS194 Prerequisite: 11 th grade Social Studies Honors classes have more rigorous expectations of students. The learning pace is accelerated. More in-depth reading, writing and thinking are required. Students must be highly motivated and capable of meeting course requirements. ADVANCED PLACEMENT US HISTORY/PACIFIC NORTHWEST 1,2 Course Code: QSS393, QSS394 Prerequisite: 11 th grade This course content is comparable to that contained in the first year of college U.S. History. Taking the Advanced Placement U.S. History test is an option of the student. AMERICAN GOVERNMENT Course Code: QSS201 Prerequisite: 12 th grade What are the tools and techniques of modern American government? Students take an active part in organizing and interpreting data, and in the processes of making value judgments and policy decisions in political affairs. Through case studies, simulations and models, students learn to approach the issues of the day. Students will study the issues analytically to verify factual claims and consider value claims rationally. ADVANCED PLACEMENT AMERICAN GOVERNMENT Course Code: QSS301 Prerequisite: 12 th grade and U.S. History What are the tools and techniques of modern American government? Students take an active part in organizing and interpreting data, and in the processes of making value judgments and policy decisions in political affairs. Through case studies, simulations and models, students learn to approach the issues of the day. Students will study the issues analytically to verify factual claims and consider value claims rationally. University or Advanced Placement credit may be available. CONTEMPORARY WORLD ISSUES Course Code: QSS202 Prerequisite: 12 th grade This one semester course surveys the geography and problems in the contemporary non Western world. Problems of economic development in the third world and a study of competing economic and political systems will be emphasized as well as issues of war and peace. 38

40 SOCIAL STUDIES ELECTIVE COURSES PSYCHOLOGY 1,2 Course Code: QSS106, QSS109 Prerequisite: 11 th grade Human behavior is studied in this course. What causes people to act the way they do? What influences the development of a unique personality? How do we learn? Why are there differences in intelligence? ADVANCED PLACEMENT PSYCHOLOGY 1,2 Course Code: QSS111, QSS112 (Social Studies or Career and Technical Education credit) Students will study the history of psychology, research methods, the biological basis of behavior, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, learning, cognition, motivation and emotion, developmental psychology, personality, testing and individual differences, abnormal behavior and its treatment, and social psychology. By the end of this course students will be prepared to take and pass the AP Psychology Test. Successfully passing the AP exam allows this class to be counted as a required college class. ADVANCED PLACEMENT ECONOMICS-MICRO Course Code: QSS007 (Social Studies or Career and Technical Education credit) The Microeconomics course provides students with a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the larger economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets, and includes the study of factor markets and of the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. SOCIOLOGY Course Code: QSS110 Prerequisite: 11 th or 12 th grade This class is a study of human groups and the societies they form. Since what we are depends on the groups to which we belong, sociology gives you a new perspective of yourself. What causes people to behave differently in groups? If you found differences in behavior among young people in different times and places how would you explain such differences? Why is the social world built around institutions certain ways of organizing family life, work life, political life, religious life and the like? How does social change come about? How could prejudice among groups be reduced? ADVANCED PLACEMENT ECONOMICS-MACRO Course Code: QSS008 (Social Studies or Career and Technical Education credit) Macroeconomics is designed to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. Particular emphasis is placed on the study of national income and price determination, and also developing familiarity with economic performance measures, economic growth, and international economics. 39

41 SCIENCE Science Graduation Requirements Students in the class of 2016 and beyond must: Earn two credits in science. Pass a state science exam. Students must either: o Pass the Biology End of Course Exam (EOC) or o Complete and pass a CAA* alternative option Students who qualify for special education services under WAC and are in the class of 2016 or beyond must: Earn two credits in science. Pass a state science exam. Students must either: o Pass the Biology End of Course Exam (EOC) or o Complete and pass a CAA alternative option or o After grade 10, pass the Developmentally Appropriate Proficiency Exam in science (DAPE) *Certificate of Academic Achievement alternative options are described in the Assessment section of the OSPI website. Please visit College Admissions Requirements Students intending to go to a four-year college in Washington State must earn at least two credits in science. At least one of those credits must be in an algebra-based science class. Additionally, at least one of the credits must be in biology, chemistry or physics. Generally, a minimum of three years of science is recommended. Because the admissions requirements for science are quite variable, students should familiarize themselves with the admissions requirements of schools they are interested in attending before making decisions about what courses they will take. All of the science courses offered in the RSD are laboratory-based science courses. Courses which are algebra-based are labeled as such at the end of their course descriptions. Students who plan to pursue post-secondary education in a community or technical college program should take a strong science program that aligns with their goals. Common sequences of courses taken include: Physical & Earth Science Biology and Chemistry Physics either an AP or a CTE Science Course Physical & Earth Science Biology Chemistry Physics and either an AP or a CTE Science Course Physical & Earth Science Biology Chemistry Physics Physical & Earth Science Biology Chemistry Physical & Earth Science Biology CTE Science Course Physical & Earth Science Biology 40

42 SCIENCE PHYSICAL AND EARTH SCIENCE 1,2 Course Code: QSC006, QSC012 The purpose of this class is to establish the necessary foundations in the Physical Sciences and Earth Science content areas through inquiry and laboratory investigation. PHYSICAL AND EARTH SCIENCE 1,2 HONORS Course Code: QSC992, QSC993 This course is taught in alignment with the learning objectives of the standard Physical and Earth Science course but offers students an opportunity to explore these topics in more detail and requires students to demonstrate greater mastery. In addition to the Physical & Earth Science coursework students will be expected to complete additional assignments, an independent research project, and demonstrate leadership and teamwork skills. BIOLOGY 1,2 Course Code: QSC004, QSC005 Prerequisite: Completion of Physical and Earth Science This course utilizes experimental techniques with emphasis on laboratory work. Included in the course are such topics as cell structure and chemistry, adaptation of plants and animals to their environment, heredity, classification and application of biological principles to humans. At the end of this course students will take the Biology End of Course Exam. Passing this exam is a graduation requirement for students in the class of 2016 and beyond. BIOLOGY 1,2 HONORS Course Code: QSC990, QSC991 Prerequisite: Completion of Physical & Earth Science This course is taught in alignment with the learning objectives of the standard Biology 1 & 2 course but offers students an opportunity to explore these topics in more detail and requires students to demonstrate greater mastery. In addition to the Biology 1 & 2 coursework, students will be expected to complete additional assignments and an independent research project, and demonstrate leadership and teamwork skills. At the end of this course students will take the Biology End of Course Exam. Passing this exam is a graduation requirement for students in the class of 2016 and beyond. ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY (COE) Course Code: QSC019, QSC020 Prerequisite: Biology 1,2 This is a year-long course for students who need to complete a Biology Collection of Evidence (COE) to meet the graduation requirement. In this course students will complete an online assessment portfolio. As students work to complete their portfolios, they will review the biology standards taught in Biology 1,2 by applying these concepts to local, national and global environmental issues. By completing this course students will earn a full credit in science as well as, if their collection is successful, meet the Biology graduation requirement. Additionally, students who have not yet passed two semesters of biology will be able to earn Biology credits, a requirement for admission to some colleges. CHEMISTRY 1,2 Course Code: QSC103, QSC104 Recommendation: Completion of Biology 1,2 and a C or better earned in Algebra 1,2 or in Intermediate Algebra This is a college preparatory course focused on the natural elements, the compounds they form and the laboratory investigation of the laws of nature that govern the way elements react. This is an algebra-based course. CHEMISTRY 1,2 HONORS Course Code: QSC198, QSC199 This course is taught in alignment with the learning objectives of the standard Chemistry 1 & 2 course but offers students an opportunity to explore these topics in more detail and requires students to demonstrate greater mastery. In addition to the Chemistry 1 & 2 coursework, students will be expected to complete additional assignments and an independent research project, and demonstrate leadership and teamwork skills. This is an algebra-based course. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 1,2 Course Code: QSC013, QSC014 (Science or Career and Technical Education credit) This course provides students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and humanmade, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. In addition, students will explore careers in this high-demand area of study. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 1,2 Course Code: QSC164, QSC165 (Science or Career and Technical Education credit) Prerequisite: Health Sciences Career Exploration This course is designed to prepare students for further study and training in the field of healthcare and covers the basics of human anatomy and physiology including anatomical terminology, basic biochemistry, cells and tissues, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic/immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Exploration into human growth and development, and the body's response to stress, diet and disease will enhance basic principles. Course includes both in-lab and virtual lab experiences. 41

43 SCIENCE MUSCULOSKELETAL ANATOMY Course Code: QSC800 (Science or Career and Technical Education credit) Prerequisite: Introduction to Sports Medicine or Health Sciences Career Exploration Musculoskeletal Anatomy builds upon knowledge gained from the Anatomy and Physiology course to provide students with a more detailed examination of the gross anatomy of the muscular and skeletal systems and the function and control of individual joints. Students will learn to identify muscles, bones, connective tissues, and joints, as well as identifying the major blood vessels and nerves. ROBOTICS 1,2 Course Code: QSC903, QSC904 (Science or Career and Technical Education credit) Robotics is an interdisciplinary course that incorporates elements of science and technology, design, teamwork and competition. Students will learn how to take an initial idea through the design, development, construction, and evaluation cycle. Specific skills will be gained in brainstorming, teamwork and teambuilding, computer design, prototyping, construction, and self-evaluation. Projects may include robotic arms, computer /robotic programming, sumo-wrestling robots, and walking robots. The final project/competition affords students the opportunity to test their creativity, knowledge, and skill. ROBOTICS PRACTICUM Course Code: QSC910, QSC911 (Science or Career and Technical Education credit) Prerequisite: Instructor Permission This course is for students interested in participating on a FIRST Robotics Team ( First year students will learn the fundamentals of physics, fabrication, robot design, and Computer Aided Design (CAD), as applicable to designing and building a robot for the FIRST Robotics competition. Second year students will concentrate on the fundamentals of programming electronic devices for competition robots. After-school and weekend hours are integral/required components of this course (workshops, team practices, build sessions). Speak with course instructor to familiarize yourself with these required components. SCIENCE OF EXERCISE Course Code: QSC176 (Science or Career and Technical Education credit) Prerequisite: Components of Exercise Ever wondered how science applies to what you do every day? Science of Exercise builds upon knowledge gained from fitness courses course to allow students to explore how the body responds to physical activity. The course includes fieldbased scientific lab and virtual lab experiences to gain skills used by fitness and healthcare professionals working in exercise physiology, athletic training, cardiac rehabilitation, physical therapy, and even in the design of sports equipment PHYSICS 1,2 Course Code: QSC105, QSC106 Recommendation: C or better earned in Algebra 1,2 and in Geometry 1,2 Students will explore forces, motion, and energy in its various forms: mechanical, heat, sound, radiant, atomic, electrical and magnetic. An experimental approach to science, measurement, and methods of measurements are focused on. This is an algebra-based course. ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 1,2 Course Code: QSC502, QSC503 (Science or Career and Technical Education credit) The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and humanmade, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. 42

44 SCIENCE ADVANCED PLACEMENT BIOLOGY 1,2 Course Code: QSC101, QSC102 Recommendation: B or better earned in Biology 1,2 and in Chemistry 1,2 This is a college-level course appropriate for students prepared to put in substantial work outside of class time. Students investigate selected topics in the field of life sciences such as animal behavior, microbiology, plant biology, and aquatic biology. Students in AP Biology are expected to take the AP test at the end of the year. This is an algebra-based course. ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY 1,2 Course Code: QSC200, QSC201 Recommendation: B or better earned in Chemistry 1,2 and in Math Analysis / Trig. This Advanced Placement Chemistry course is designed to give depth of understanding to basic laws. Extensive laboratory investigations will be carried out in the areas of organic chemistry, descriptive and physical chemistry, and qualitative and quantitative analysis. Students in AP Chemistry are expected to take the AP test at the end of the year. This is an algebra-based course. ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS TWO 1,2 Course Code: QSC208, QSC209 Recommendation: B or better in AP Physics One and successful completion (or concurrently taking) Math Analysis/Trig. This Advanced Placement physics course is designed to support students in developing a deep understanding of foundational principles of physics in classical mechanics and modern physics by applying these principles to complex physical situations that combine multiple aspects of physics rather than present concepts in isolation. Students will discuss, confer, and debate with classmates to explain a physical phenomenon investigated in class. Students will design and conduct inquiry-based laboratory investigations to solve problems through first-hand observations, data collection, analysis and interpretation. Topics will include: Fluid statics and dynamics; thermodynamics with kinetic theory; PV diagrams and probability; electrostatics; electrical circuits with capacitors; magnetic fields; electromagnetism; physical and geometric optics; and quantum, atomic, and nuclear physics. Students in AP Physics are expected to take the AP test at the end of the year. This is an algebra-based course. ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS ONE 1,2 Course Code: QSC206, QSC207 Recommendation: B or better in Geometry and successful completion of (or concurrently taking) Algebra 3,4 This Advanced Placement physics course is designed to support students in developing a deep understanding of foundational principles of physics in classical mechanics and modern physics by applying these principles to complex physical situations that combine multiple aspects of physics rather than present concepts in isolation. Students will discuss, confer, and debate with classmates to explain a physical phenomenon investigated in class. Students will design and conduct inquiry-based laboratory investigations to solve problems through first-hand observations, data collection, analysis and interpretation. Topics will include: Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits. Students in AP Physics are expected to take the AP test at the end of the year. This is an algebra-based course. 43

45 HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION HEALTH Course Code: QPE946 (This course fulfills the health education requirement) Health is designed to prepare students for lifelong decision-making, problem solving, and health and wellness management. The focus is on helping students assume an active role in developing healthy lifestyles for themselves and others. Class topics include wellness, mental health, drug and alcohol prevention, nutrition, fitness, CPR, and human reproduction. PHYSICAL EDUCATION 1,2 Course Code: QPE901, QPE902 Introduction and expansion of fitness, technology, safety, nutrition, body awareness, team sport, individual/dual sport, and dance. Freshman class. PHYSICAL EDUCATION 3,4 Course Code: QPE001, QPE002 Introduction and expansion of fitness, technology, safety, body awareness, CPR/First Aid, racquet sport, team sport, water sport, adventure education, and recreational game. PHYSICAL FITNESS Course Code: QPE003 Prerequisite: 10 th, 11 th or 12 th grade This one-semester course is designed to provide highly motivated or interested students the opportunity to improve their overall physical fitness. The class will offer a variety of fitness activities with recreational activities incorporated throughout to provide a change of pace from the strenuous activities required of the students. WEIGHT/FITNESS 1,2 Course Code: QPE102, QPE103 This class helps students to create a lifetime self-directed wellness plan. Cardiovascular and cardio-respiratory endurance, strength, flexibility and body agility will be the class focus. BODYSHAPING Course Code: QPE300 Designed for students who wish to develop physical fitness through a variety of aerobic activities such as circuit training, aerobic dance (step, taebo, yoga), gym sticks, exercise balls, bosu balls, rope jumping, and walking/jogging. Students will be given instruction on proper warm-ups, stretching, flexibility, and cardiovascular improvement. NET SPORTS Course Code: QPE301 Designed for students with a specific interest in net sports. The course may include tennis, badminton, pickle ball, and volleyball. Rules, sportsmanship, and cooperative learning are emphasized. Fitness and conditioning activities pertaining to the sport will be incorporated into class lessons. Students will create personal fitness plans based on their results and goals. INDIVIDUAL SPORTS AND RECREATION Course Code: QPE302 Designed for students interested in the application of skills and strategies for individual/dual sports and recreational activities. The course includes ultimate Frisbee, golf, bowling, table tennis, badminton, pickle ball, lawn games (croquet, bocce, horseshoes), wheel activities, and orienteering and adventure. Rules, sportsmanship, and cooperative learning are emphasized. Fitness and conditioning activities pertaining to the sport will be incorporated into class lessons. Students will create personal fitness plans based on their fitness results. TEAM SPORTS Course Code: QPE303 Course is designed for the students interested in the application of skills and strategies for cooperative/team sport games. Course will focus on strength and conditioning for each of the team sports; activities may include football, basketball, soccer, softball, and team handball. Rules, sportsmanship, and cooperative learning are emphasized. Students will create personal fitness plans based on their fitness results and goals. COMPONENTS OF EXERCISE College Credit Course Code: QPE175 (Physical Education or Career and Technical Education credit) This class provides the student with introductory skills and knowledge needed to pursue interests and careers in Exercise Science. This knowledge is used by personal trainers, coaches, strength and conditioning specialists, exercise physiologists, physical therapists, athletic trainers, and sports equipment designers. The coursework examines the foundations of exercise and physical activity needed for people to optimize their physical and mental health. Students will examine their own abilities in order to determine plans for achieving their own fitness goals, as well as creating fitness programs for clients based on individualized needs. 44

46 HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION HEALTH SCIENCES CAREER EXPLORATION College Credit Course Code: QPE063 (Physical Education or Career and Technical Education credit) Prerequisite: 10 th through 12 th grades. Instructor approval may be required check with your counselor. This class offers students the opportunity to explore the high-demand, high-wage career field of healthcare. Students will work in the classroom to study a variety of healthcare related topics such as ethics, confidentiality, safety regulations, professional behavior, medical terminology and medical math. Upon successful completion of training, students will receive certification in: CPR/First Aid, HIV/AIDS Education, Bloodborne Pathogens. Fees for individual certifications will apply. INTRODUCTION TO SPORTS MEDICINE College Credit Course Code: QPE177 (Physical Education credit or Career and Technical Education credit) This class serves as an introduction to the concepts of sports and rehabilitation medicine. Students explore the effects of injury and the environment on the body and their implications to athletic performance. Specific emphasis is placed on the prevention of injury and initial treatments to prevent re-injury. Students will gain knowledge and skills regarding evaluating patient status, athletic injury taping, emergency planning, as well as leadership in sports and medical settings. Upon successful completion of training, students will receive certification in: CPR/First Aid, HIV/AIDS Education / preventing disease transmission. See Sports Medicine Practicum course for optional additional credit. ATHLETIC INJURY RECOGNITION College Credit Course Code: QPE178 (Physical Education or Career and Technical Education credit) Prerequisite: Introduction to Sports Medicine Students explore specific injuries and conditions. Students learn how acute, chronic, and hereditary conditions occur. Students will also learn how conditions can be differentiated by an evaluation of the mechanism, signs, and symptoms found during physical examination. Specific emphasis is placed on the recognition and immediate treatment of head and neck injuries. This course serves to explore some of the decision making skills required for careers where diagnostic decisions are made. It is recommended to take Musculoskeletal Anatomy or Anatomy & Physiology before taking this course. See Sports Medicine Practicum course for optional additional credit. ATHLETIC REHAB AND PREVENTION College Credit Course Code: QPE179 (Physical Education or Career and Technical Education credit) Prerequisite: Introduction to Sports Medicine This course provides students with the opportunity to explore the role of prevention and rehabilitation in sports and even in everyday life. Students will learn the processes and decision-making involved with rehabilitation planning and treatment. Students will learn how to apply various physical activities and therapeutic modalities used in rehabilitation. This course serves to explore some of the decision making skills required for careers where therapeutic decisions are made. It is recommended to take Musculoskeletal Anatomy or Anatomy & Physiology before taking this course. See Sports Medicine Practicum course for optional additional credit. SPORTS MEDICINE PRACTICUM Course Code: QPE174 Credit based on hours completed (Physical Education credit or Career and Technical Education credit) Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in a Sports Medicine course Students will interact with athletes in various sports medicine settings including the training room and at athletic competitions. Opportunities will allow students to apply knowledge and skills related to sports and emergency medicine. Students will gain experience by learning to apply various preventative, emergency, and rehabilitation treatments while working with athletes. 45

47 FINE ARTS VISUAL ARTS ART 1,2 Course Code: QFA941, QFA942 Art 1 focuses on developing basic techniques and understanding the elements of art and principles of design. Instruction also aims at enhancing appreciation of art and attitudes toward art in society. Upon completion of the course, the student will be better able to select art courses for further study. Art 2 is designed to allow the serious art student an opportunity for more in-depth pursuit of the skills and concepts presented in Art 1. Students will contract with the instructor for approval of projects, which meet course requirements. Approved projects will be completed during the semester in which the student is enrolled. METAL DESIGN 1,2 Course Code: QFA166, QFA167 (Fine Arts or Career and Technical Education credit) Courses expose students to the manufacturing process and develop the skills necessary to design, produce, and repair jewelry. Participants will work with hand tools, processes, and machinery to design and build jewelry in an efficient and safe manner. Students will apply basic academic skills in the manufacturing of jewelry and further develop listening, research, recording, design, quality control, and problem-solving abilities. JOURNALISM 1,2 Course Code: QFA009, QFA010 (Fine Arts or Career and Technical Education credit) Prerequisite: 10 th through 12 th grades These semester courses cover the fundamentals of journalistic ethics, journalistic law, responsible journalism, news writing, copy editing, proofreading, make-up, caption writing, headline writing, features, editorials, columns, newspaper terminology, page layout planning and the background of the newspaper industry. Students will be responsible for production of the school paper including writing articles and editorials, designing layout, photojournalism, selling and advertising, and paper printing and circulation. MULTIMEDIA College Credit Course Code: QFA020 (Fine Arts or Career and Technical Education credit) Multimedia represents the convergence of text, pictures, video and sound into a single form. The power of multimedia lies in the way in which information is linked and students will use a variety of software applications to produce multimedia projects that explore different ways to communicate through technology. Projects students will complete include: image editing using Adobe Photoshop Elements, editing sound and audio files using Audacity, and video editing using Adobe Premiere Elements. In addition to working with the software several pieces of multimedia hardware will be utilized and explored including: digital cameras, digital camcorders, and scanners. CERAMICS 1,2 Course Code: QFA945, QFA946 Basic course in creative design and construction of pottery and sculpture. The pottery unit includes instruction in the primary hand building techniques and wheel throwing. Basic skills of glazing and decoration are included in the course. The sculpture unit offers experience in modeling, carving and constructive techniques. Students will work with clay and a variety of other materials. Pottery and Sculpture 2 is an in-depth continuation of Pottery and Sculpture l with a more individualized curriculum. COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN AND DRAFTING 3 College Credit Course Code: QFA051 (Fine Arts (CAD 3 only) or Career and Technical Education credit) Prerequisite: CAD 1,2 for CAD 3 CAD 3: Gain hands-on exposure to the world of 3D modeling and animation using 3ds Max and Rhino, leading programs used by manufacturers, animators/computer game designers, and other 3D industries. 46

48 FINE ARTS VIDEO PRODUCTION 1-8 Course Code: QFA962, QFA963, QFA964, QFA965, QFA966, QFA967, QFA968, QFA969 (Fine Arts or Career and Technical Education credit) These full-year courses provide students the opportunity to develop fundamental knowledge and basic skills of video production, including hands-on experience, proper use of equipment, camera movement, framing, composition, light and sound, the use of video editing systems, and the future of editing video computers. Through classroom instruction and hands-on experience, students will be better able to see how media will be part of their lives. VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS 1-8 College Credit Course Code: QFA011, QFA012, QFA013, QFA014, QFA015, QFA016, QFA017, QFA018 (Fine Arts or Career and Technical Education credit) The Visual Communications series of courses focus on developing skills in all aspects of graphic design. Areas of study include design principles, typography, illustration, computer graphics, photography, print design, web design and video. Upper division courses allow for indepth exploration of individual student interest area(s). WEBSITE DESIGN 1,2 College Credit Course Code: QFA052, QF053 (Fine Arts or Career and Technical Education credit) These semester courses are designed to provide students the opportunity to: Develop and publish web pages, integrating a variety of technologies to browse, select and retrieve information from multiple sources; Learn to produce text that is individualistic, expressive, and engages the readers; and Work collaboratively with others YEARBOOK 1-4 College Credit Course Code: QFA266, QFA267, QFA300, QFA301 (Fine Arts or Career and Technical Education credit) First year students have the responsibility for developing and producing a yearbook, which reflects all aspects of the academic and extracurricular activities of the school. Class members will be concerned with making layouts, writing copy, picture composition and cropping, editing, proof reading and distributing the yearbook. A second year of credit will be given to students who take this course as they assume the prime responsibility for planning and producing the yearbook. 47

49 FINE ARTS PERFORMING ARTS DRAMA 1,2 Course Code: QFA950, QFA951 All students interested in any of the elements making up the production of plays will find this course interesting. The basic skills of effective, dramatic vocal and physical expression will be practiced through improvisation, pantomime, monologues and dramatic scenes, sometimes performed before an audience. The backstage elements of drama (lighting, scenery, costuming and makeup) will also be considered. In Drama 2, students organize themselves primarily for play production with the instructor acting as advisor and assistant. They have an opportunity to specialize in an area of their choice. VOCAL ENSEMBLE 1,2 Course Code: QFA003, QFA004 Prerequisite: Choir director s approval, an audition may be required This class is open to any student with instructor approval. Music will be selected from vocal literature appropriate to the voicing of the students enrolled. Considerable emphasis is given to basic voice production, music fundamentals, music history, and related music activities. This is a performing organization and will appear in various concerts, contests, and assemblies. Members are expected to participate in all performances, production, music fundamentals, music history, and related music activities. This is a performing organization and will appear in various concerts, contests, and assemblies. Members are expected to participate in all performances. TREBLE CHORUS 1,2 Course Code: QFA024, QFA025 The desire to sing is the only prerequisite for this class open to any student in the upper three years of high school. More emphasis is given to developing vocal independence through sight-singing skills, voice production techniques and greater utilization of independent study periods. This is a performing organization and members are expected to participate in all performances. MIXED CHORUS 1,2 Course Code: QFA931, QFA932 A desire to sing in a vocal group encompassing all vocal ranges is the only prerequisite of this chorus. Any high school student may participate with director approval. While considerable emphasis and time are spent in exploring and learning the vast field of choral literature, a major effort is expended for voice development techniques, music fundamentals, and sight-singing skills. This is a performing group and membership entails participating in various performances. A CAPPELLA CHOIR/CONCERT CHOIR 1,2 Course Code: QFA026, QFA028 Prerequisite: Choral director s approval, an audition may be required This is the most advanced choral class offered for high school students. The singing and studying of the finest types of choral literature, plus the review of basic fundamentals all help the A Cappella Choir members develop creative, interpretive, and appreciative abilities. This group does considerable performing and participation in all performances is required of all members. Considerable opportunity is also given for solo and small ensemble work within this group. JAZZ CHOIR 1,2 Course Code: QFA030, QFA031 Prerequisite: Concurrent membership in school choir or band and/or choral director s approval, audition may be required This is a selective as well as elective course and is designed to develop the techniques necessary to the successful performance of jazz and "popular" music. The class is performance-oriented and will afford members the opportunity to discover and develop their talents individually and collectively. Considerable emphasis is placed upon the fundamentals of music, theory, composition, and arranging. Participation in all performances is required for membership. 48

50 FINE ARTS ORCHESTRA 1,2 Course Code: QFA922, QFA923 Prerequisite: Some previous playing experience for string instrument players; audition for wind and percussion players The orchestra will play and study the finest of orchestra literature. Music from all historic periods as well as contemporary music will be studied. This is a performing group and participation in all performances is required. Opportunities for solo and small ensemble work will also exist for orchestra members. CONCERT BAND 1,2 Course Code: QFA924, QFA925 Prerequisite: Band experience or director s approval Concert Band requires some previous playing experience in band or director s approval. This course is open to all students who have achieved a minimum level of proficiency on a band instrument. Of primary importance in the program is the development of tone quality, fingering techniques, sight reading techniques and flexibility. Suitable literature of all periods and styles will be explored and studied. While some marching is done, this is basically a concert organization. Concert Band is a performing group and members are expected to participate in all performances. SYMPHONIC BAND 1,2 Course Code: QFA034, QFA035 Prerequisite: Band director s approval, audition may be required Symphonic Band consists of the most proficient band musicians in the upper three grades of the school. This is an elective-selective course based upon competitive tryout. The finest available band literature is studied and performed. An extensive individual technique program is carried on as part of the requirements. While some marching is done, this is basically a concert organization. It makes numerous public performances and membership in the band requires participation in all performances. Opportunity for solo and small ensemble work also exists for band members. JAZZ ENSEMBLE 1,2 Course Code: QFA021, QFA022 Prerequisite: Concurrent membership in school choir or band and/or band director s approval, audition may be required This a selective-elective class open to students in the upper three years of high school and designed to develop techniques necessary for the successful performance of jazz and popular music. The course is oriented so as to acquaint members individually and collectively with the musical demands of the professional musician. The demands of modern music require a workable knowledge of music theory, arranging, composition, and conducting, which receive considerable attention. This is a performing group and participation in all performances is required. GUITAR 1,2 Course Code: QFA920, QFA921 Prerequisite: Student must furnish own instrument Students desirous of learning to play the guitar or improving their own playing technique have the opportunity in this semester course. Students must receive a passing grade in Guitar l to enroll in Guitar 2 where they will study more advanced techniques including barre chords and various guitar styles, i.e., jazz, classical, rock, etc. PIANO/KEYBOARD 1,2 Course Code: QFA036, QFA037 This course is open to students with at least sophomore standing. Students will learn the fundamentals of music notation, music theory, and keyboard technique through beginning keyboard literature. The course also will explore music history and styles pertaining to the literature being studied. Keyboard 2 will continue with more advanced techniques and literature. MUSIC TECHNIQUES Course Code: QFA029 Prerequisite: Director s approval This independent study course is open to all high school students who wish to explore areas of musical interest to them. Areas of study may include beginning instrumental instruction, ensemble experience, advanced vocal and instrumental techniques, theory and composition, music history and/or world music. 49

51 WORLD LANGUAGES FRENCH 1,2 Course Code: QWL902, QWL90 This first-year course is an introduction to French language and culture, conversation, grammar, reading, and writing. Much of the daily period is spent on oral work, for a quick buildup of vocabulary, proper pronunciation, and intonation. Students learn basic vocabulary, sentence structure, and communication skills in French. FRENCH 3,4 Course Code: QWL002, Q WL003 Prerequisite: French 1,2 or equivalent This is a year-long, more advanced course in French language and culture, conversation, reading, writing, and grammar. It emphasizes communication skills integrating more complex verb tenses and grammatical concepts. FRENCH 5,6 Course Code: QWL102, QWL103 Prerequisite: French 3,4 or equivalent This year-long course is conducted primarily in French - conversation and written activities are based on culture, short stories, poems, current events, etc. Original compositions in French will be required, and students will continue their study and application of advanced grammatical concepts and more specialized vocabulary. ADVANCED PLACEMENT FRENCH 7,8 Course Code: QWL202, QWL203 Prerequisite: French 5,6 or equivalent This year-long course aims for improvement of accent and a higher level of written and oral ability than previously reached. The literary and cultural facets of France are further explored. Supplementary texts, magazines, newspapers, pocket books, etc. contribute to the student s further learning and appreciation of French language and culture. University or AP credit may be available. FRENCH UW EXTENSION 1,2 College Credit Course Code: QWL210, QWL211 Prerequisite: French1,2 and 3,4 or equivalent, or teacher permission This year-long course is the last class in a sequence of three classes for beginning students. The goal of this course is to develop the skills of speaking; listening, reading and writing to a basic level of proficiency so that the students can communicate in French and understand the cultural context of the language. Students learn to narrate past events, talk about their life, describe objects and their functions, describe personalities, organize debates, and tell stories. GERMAN 1,2 Course Code: QWL904, QWL905 This first-year German course offers an enjoyable and stimulating language-learning experience. Using the communication based approach of the text "Deutsch Aktuell" and other materials; this class develops the ability to use German language while exploring the culture of German speakers throughout the world. GERMAN 3,4 Course Code: QWL004, QWL005 Prerequisite: German 1,2 or equivalent In the second year of German, students continue developing their oral, listening, and writing and reading skills using the Deutsch Aktuell text and supplementary materials. More advanced videos and texts offer the opportunity to vicariously experience typical life situations of German speaking teens. GERMAN 5,6 Course Code: QWL104, QWL105 Prerequisite: German 3,4 or equivalent The third-year German class requires more sophisticated application of oral and written communication proficiency attained in the first two years of study. Through authentic German materials such as magazines, novels, short stories, poems, music and films, students continue to improve their vocabulary and grammatical competence. ADVANCED PLACEMENT GERMAN 7,8 Course Code: QWL204, QWL205 Prerequisite: German 5,6 or equivalent Students in fourth year German continue learning about language and culture in a more personalized approach. This class uses higher-level materials, in German, to enhance language skill improvement and appreciation for German culture. University or Advanced Placement credit may be available. JAPANESE 1,2 Course Code: QWL906, QWL907 This course introduces the Japanese language and culture. Students will learn basic grammatical patterns and conversations at the polite level of speech suitable for young adults. By the end of Japanese 2, students will have mastered the Hiragana and Katakana writing systems and will be able to recognize about 45 Kanji. 50

52 WORLD LANGUAGES JAPANESE 3,4 Course Code: QWL006, QWL007 Prerequisite: Japanese 1,2 or equivalent In this class, conversational and situational Japanese language skills are further developed. Students learn to identify, comprehend, and speak in a wider range of situations. Aspects of Japanese culture will be more thoroughly explored in this course, and students will learn approximately 120 additional Kanji. JAPANESE 5,6 Course Code: QWL106, QWL107 Prerequisite: Japanese 3,4 or equivalent This course is a continuation of Japanese 3,4 and concentrates on reading, writing, translation technique, add vocabulary development. Students will write original compositions and prepare oral presentations in Japanese. Additional Kanji are introduced for recognition. Students will be able to use a Kanji dictionary to enhance reading. ADVANCED PLACEMENT JAPANESE 7,8 Course Code: QWL206, QWL207 Prerequisite: Japanese 5,6 or equivalent This independent study or seminar aims for perfecting the language. Through various texts and supplementary materials, students continue to explore Japanese literature, culture, history and grammar. University or Advanced Placement credit may be available. JAPANESE UW EXTENSION 1,2 College Credit Course Code: QWL214, QWL215 Prerequisite: Japanese 1,2 and 3,4 or equivalent, or teacher permission Japanese U.W. Extension is the last class in a sequence of three for beginning students. The goal of this course is to develop the skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing to a basic level of proficiency so that the students can communicate in Japanese and understand the cultural context of the language. In Japanese U.W. Extension, students learn to narrate past events, talk about their life, describe objects and their functions, describe personalities, organize debates, and tell stories. SPANISH 1,2 Course Code: QWL908, QWL 909 The course aims to teach students to understand spoken Spanish, and to speak the language with the proper pronunciation and intonation. Some history, culture and geography of Spain and Latin America are presented. Emphasis is placed on listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing the language. The vocabulary is situational and intends to develop communicative competence in the learner. Students are introduced to the Spanish culture through visitors, lectures and magazines. SPANISH 3,4 Course Code: QWL008, QWL009 Prerequisite: Spanish 1,2 or equivalent This year-long course places more emphasis on grammar and the development of vocabulary in order to permit the student to express her/his original thoughts. More extensive writing is learned. The history and geography of Spain and Latin America are featured through stories read in each lesson. SPANISH 5,6 Course Code: QWL108, QWL109 Prerequisite: Spanish 3,4 or equivalent This course intensifies the proficiency of the four skills of reading, writing, speaking and understanding. Pupils learn to write original themes. Native speakers are invited to speak and to conduct question-answer sessions when possible. Through modern Spanish and Latin American literature pupils obtain knowledge of the historical and cultural backgrounds of these areas. The class is conducted entirely in Spanish. ADVANCED PLACEMENT SPANISH 7,8 Course Code: QWL208, QWL209 Prerequisite: Spanish 5,6 or equivalent This course concentrates on an historical and literary investigation of 20th Century Spain and Hispanic America. Students may be asked to investigate an area of their choice as a term project. Advanced grammatical concepts and vocabulary are presented. The class is conducted entirely in Spanish. University or Advanced Placement credit may be available. SPANISH UW EXTENSION 1,2 College Credit Course Code: QWL212, QWL 213 Prerequisite: Spanish 1,2 and 3,4 or equivalent, or teacher permission Spanish U.W. Extension is the last class in a sequence of three classes for beginning students. The goal of this course is to develop the skills of speaking; listening, reading and writing to a basic level of proficiency so that the students can communicate in Japanese and understand the cultural context of the language. In Spanish U.W. Extension, students learn to narrate past events, talk about their life, describe objects and their functions describe personalities, organize debates and tell stories. 51

53 CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION CTE Courses Organized by Career Cluster and Cluster Pathway Washington State has adopted Career Clusters as a tool for seamless transition from education to career. Career Clusters are broad groupings of careers that have similar characteristics and employment requirements. They provide a useful framework to aid students in career exploration and can help students focus on programs of study based on personal interests. Career Clusters are supported in the career exploration application used by the district (Career Cruising), as well as other state and national websites such as Workforce Explorer and O*Net. For more information on Career Clusters, please visit CAREER CLUSTER CLUSTER PATHWAY RENTON SCHOOL DISTRICT COURSE Page 57 Agribusiness Systems Animal Systems Environmental Service Systems Food Products and Processing Systems Natural Resources Systems Plant Systems Power, Structural & Technical Systems Environmental Science AP Environmental Science Page 57 Page Page Construction Design/Pre-Construction Maintenance/Operations Audio and Video Technology and Film Journalism and Broadcasting Performing Arts Printing Technology Telecommunications Visual Arts Administrative Support Business Information Management General Management Human Resources Management Operations Management Construction CAD Video Production Editor Practicum Journalism Yearbook Metal Design 1,2 Multimedia Visual Communications IT Academy IT Academy Honors IT Academy Advanced IT Academy Advanced Honors Project Management Technical Writing Worksite Learning and Career Choices span all Career Clusters. Administration and Administrative Support Page 59 Professional Support Services Teaching/Training Careers in Education 52

54 CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION CAREER CLUSTER CLUSTER PATHWAY RENTON SCHOOL DISTRICT COURSE Page Page 60 Page Page 62 Page Page 63 Accounting Banking Services Business Finance Insurance Securities & Investments Foreign Service Governance National Security Planning Public Management and Administration Regulation Revenue and Taxation Biotechnology Research and Development Diagnostic Services Health Informatics Support Services Therapeutic Services Lodging Recreation, Amusements & Attractions Restaurants and Food/Beverage Services Travel & Tourism Consumer Services Counseling & Mental Health Services Early Childhood Development & Services Family & Community Services Personal Care Services Information Support and Services Network Systems Programming and Software Development Web and Digital Communications Accounting AP Economics Macro AP Economics Micro Financial Algebra Leadership Exercise Science Components of Exercise Science of Exercise Sports Medicine Intro to Sports Medicine Musculoskeletal Anatomy Athletic Injury Recognition Athletic Rehab & Prevention Sports Medicine Practicum Culinary Skills Culinary Skills Practicum Child Development Health Independent Living AP Psychology Medical Terminology Health Sciences Career Exploration Anatomy & Physiology Computer Programming - Introduction AP Computer Science Website Design Worksite Learning and Career Choices span all Career Clusters. *These courses span all Health Science Pathways. 53

55 CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION CAREER CLUSTER CLUSTER PATHWAY RENTON SCHOOL DISTRICT COURSE Correction Services Emergency and Fire Management Services Page 63 Law Enforcement Services Police Science Legal Services Business Law Security & Protective Services Health, Safety and Environmental Assurance Page Logistics & Inventory Control Maintenance, Installation & Repair Page Page 65 Manufacturing Production Process Development Production Quality Assurance Marketing Communications Marketing Management Marketing Research Merchandising Professional Sales Engineering and Technology Science and Math Industrial Technology Intro Industrial Technology Design Processes Industrial Technology Manufacturing Robotics Robotics Research and Development Aerospace/Advanced Manufacturing Marketing Intro Marketing Advanced Marketing Store Operations Marketing Practicum (see Manufacturing above) Algebra Applications Algebra Applied Geometry Applied Worksite Learning and Career Choices span all Career Clusters. Facility and Mobile Equipment Maintenance Health, Safety and Environmental Management Logistics Planning and Management Services Sales and Service Transportation Operations Transportation Systems/ Infrastructure Planning, Management and Regulation Warehousing and Distribution Center Operations 54

56 CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION TECH PREP College Credit Tech Prep Dual Credit is a college-preparatory program for technical careers that prepares high school students for success by earning college credit in classes that they take at their high school. In Tech Prep classes, students have the opportunity to explore career options early, in a hands-on, challenging environment. Students discover their own interests and skills while experiencing practical, real-world ways to pursue their goals in a variety of high-skill, high-wage technical careers. Tech Prep Dual Credit provides: A head start in a certificate program, two-year associate of applied science degree, or apprenticeship program; A solid basis for baccalaureate study; and The ability to apply technical skills for immediate entry-level employment after high school while also attending college. Other benefits of Tech Prep Dual Credit include: Save cost of college tuition and books Participate in high quality training programs that connect to the business and/or industry of your technical interests The opportunity to graduate from college early Steps to receive Tech Prep Dual Credit While in High School: 1. Take a Tech Prep Dual Credit certified class at your high school (see the high school registration booklet) 2. Earn a C (2.0) or better in the class (additional requirements may apply) After High School Graduation: 1. Register at a participating Community or Technical College (currently includes Green River Community College, Highline College, and Renton Technical College). 2. Bring your high school transcript with you when you register and inform the registrar that you have Tech Prep Dual Credit credits that you want to utilize. 3. The college will analyze your high school transcript (fee may apply) and issue appropriate credit. 4. Please be aware that Tech Prep Dual Credit is not guaranteed. Colleges will make a determination at time of registration and may base their decision on such factors as: the college has discontinued the course, or the college course requirements have changed and no longer match the high school course. More information See a high school counselor or a career specialist in your high school Career Center. See Tech Prep courses marked with a College Credit icon in this registration booklet. 55

57 APPROVED CROSS-CREDIT* LIST FOR RENTON SCHOOL DISTRICT COURSES The following list indicates the approved courses that may be used to meet graduation credit requirements: Fine Arts or Career and Technical Education credit Computer Aided Design & Drafting 3-4 Metal Design 1,2 Journalism Multimedia Video Production 1-8 Visual Communications 1-8 Website Design 1,2 Yearbook 1-4 Health & Fitness (PE) or Career and Technical Education credit Exercise Science Components of Exercise Health Sciences Career Exploration Introduction to Sports Medicine Sports Medicine Athletic Injury Recognition Sports Medicine Athletic Rehab and Prevention Sports Medicine Practicum Science or Career and Technical Education credit Anatomy and Physiology 1,2 AP Environmental Science Environmental Science 1,2 Exercise Science Science of Exercise Musculoskeletal Anatomy Robotics 1,2 Robotics Practicum Math or Career and Technical Education credit Math Equivalent Algebra 1,2 Applied (equivalent to Algebra 1,2) Geometry 1,2 Applied (equivalent to Geometry 1,2) 3 rd Credit Math Students may substitute a qualifying Career and Technical Education course listed below for their 3 rd Math credit. See counselor for details. Accounting 3-4 Algebra Applications (Collection of Evidence) AP Computer Science Computer Programming 1,2 Financial Algebra Geometry Applications Independent Living Social Studies or Career and Technical Education credit AP Economics Macro AP Economics Micro AP Psychology *Important: Cross-credited courses may not satisfy college admission requirements. Please check with your counselor or individual colleges for clarification. 56

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