Evidence to The Commission on Assisted Dying 23 rd February 2011

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Evidence to The Commission on Assisted Dying 23 rd February 2011"

Transcription

1 Evidence to The Commission on Assisted Dying 23 rd February 2011 My name is Suzy Croft and I am Senior Social Worker at St. John s Hospice, the hospice for Central London. I am a member of the Association of Palliative Care Social Workers and I currently sit on the Committee as Service User Involvement Officer. I am also a member of the Interim Board of the College of Social Work. I have been a palliative care social worker for 22 years. Palliative care social work is provided in a range of settings, including independent hospices, day hospices, NHS specialist palliative care units and oncology wards. It includes working with people with cancer, HIV and a range of other life threatening illnesses. Social work is an integral part of the multi-disciplinary team within palliative care, offering an holistic service to patients and families. Unlike many fields of social work, specialist palliative care social work is potentially a universalist service and we are used to working with a diverse range of people in terms of age, diagnosis, class, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion and culture. In this evidence I will set out the concerns I would have, as a palliative care social worker, if assisted dying were to be legalized in this country and the impact I feel it would have on the patients, families, communities and fellow professionals with whom I work. I do not feel there needs to be any change in the law around assisted dying. For most palliative care social workers a central theme of our work would be enabling and supporting people to live their lives in the way they want at a time when they are losing control in so many ways. Few social workers would wish to dictate the decision that people might want to take about ending their lives. However such a decision to end a life, were it legalized, would not take place in a vacuum. I think that it is important to look at the context in which any legalization or related legislative change would take place and clearly that context is the society in which we live. As the Association of Palliative Care Social Workers pointed out in its 2006 position paper on Euthanasia and Assisted Dying a central concern has to be how safe is our society for those who may be defined as vulnerable or different, particularly in terms of age and impairment? How much is their contribution to society valued as against the costs which they may be seen to incur in terms of the support and services they require? As the paper sets out the messages that are consistently given out in our society about disability and sickness are important. We are invited to view becoming disabled with horror and pity. Disability is often deemed to be a state worse than death. This attitude is often reflected in the patients with whom I work. As they become increasingly impaired or disabled by their illnesses they may fiercely resist going out if this means they have to be in a wheelchair. They view this as embarrassing and demeaning. Yet many disabled people who look like that, go to work, pay their taxes, have families, homes, friends, go on holiday. In spite of this, as the Disabled People s Movement has strongly argued, disabled people are not awarded equal citizenship in many areas of their lives.

2 The Association went on to point out that of equal concern has to be the treatment of older people in our society. The lack of care and support for older people at the end of their lives has been well documented. The recent Health Service Ombudsman s report (February 15 th 2011) has criticized NHS staff for treating elderly people without compassion, condemning many to die in unnecessary pain, indignity and distress. Social care, which many older people need to be able to live successfully in their own homes, is not free at the point of delivery. As has also been shown older people do not have equal access to palliative care. In 2005 a report, End of Life Care commissioned by Help the Aged, showed that inequalities in palliative care mean that the opportunity to go into a hospice declines with age, as does the chance to die at home. Only 8.5% of older people who die of cancer do so in a hospice, compared with 20% of all those with cancer. Older people in nursing homes are also discriminated against in that they are far less likely to access specialist palliative care, or be admitted to a hospice. Although specialist palliative care is well developed in Great Britain, lack of access to such services is a recognized issue and is acknowledged to be based on a post code lottery. Services are generally unequally based and distributed round the country. In some areas there is very little provision and whilst most hospices and specialist palliative care services work with patients with cancer and motor neurone disease, those patients with end stage heart failure, COPD and a range of other conditions often fail to access such care. Again it has been well documented that those from minority ethnic groups, homeless people, those with drug and alcohol problems, asylum seekers and refugees and prisoners will have much more limited access to palliative care services. Coupled with these issues we are now facing a time of unprecedented cuts in the services and support for vulnerable people in our society. I meet people struggling to manage in their daily lives with lack of social support and services that do not fill the gaps. Currently, in the borough in which the majority of the patients with whom I work live, there is now no meal preparation service offered for those receiving social care whatever their condition. I am currently working with a 32 year old woman, dying of an advanced cancer, who is not well enough to cook a meal. Due to the nature of her condition she is unable to stand for any period of time. The carers are not even allowed to make a sandwich for her. It is also important to recognize that family relationships can be complicated and sometimes difficult. Currently social workers are used to having to advocate on behalf of a patient whose family may be pressurizing him/her to go into a hospice/nursing home/hospital because that is easier for the family rather than in the best interest of the patients. Often families are doing this because they are under great strain, both emotionally and financially and very occasionally because they simply no longer want to accept the burden of responsibility and care. As the Association of Palliative Care Social Workers has said Add together the intense pressure on increasingly scarce resources and coupled with a lack of access to palliative care, it is hard to resist the idea that were assisted dying to be legalized in future people may face pressure not to be here, and not to be a

3 burden on their families, particularly if they are old, poor or members of a minority group. Social workers understand that some people diagnosed with a terminal illness may initially feel that they do not want to live. However we need to look at the importance of the support offered to them at the time when they are in that position. A study, in which I was involved (Palliative Care, Social Work and Service Users, Making Life Possible), looked at service user s views of palliative care social work practice. The service users interviewed saw palliative care social work as making a unique contribution in offering them personal, social and practical support, on an individual basis at what was a very difficult time in their lives. People talked about feeling hopeless, out of control, as if they were going mad and at the end of their tether. They emphasized the crucial social, emotional and practical support the social worker had offered them which had helped them regain control, challenged feelings of despair and guilt and restored family relationships. The study did not raise the issue of suicide and assisted dying but some raised this issue themselves. One man described how the social worker seemed to him to have appeared at the end of his bed while he was in the hospice. Because of her intervention he lost the desire to commit suicide She s made me value the importance of my own life and made me feel important as an individual, which was lacking and which was very important to me, very, very important. I don t think I would be here now. Well I know I wouldn t be here I would have done something. I couldn t live like I was I felt of no value at all.. I don t think I would be here (without the social worker) There are some patients who do raise the issue of euthanasia and assisted dying and who have spoken of their desire for this. Clearly it is important never to choke off such a discussion and to allow people to express their thoughts and feelings however distressing it may be for those close to them. However it is often clear that many people mainly dread being a burden to others, particularly close family or friends. They feel that they have no more to offer but will only be causing others difficulties and pain. It is crucial that at such a time patients and their families have the support they need to know that they will not have to cope alone and that the medical, emotional, social, financial and practical backup is there whatever problems may arise. At such times as these of increasingly restricted funding for mainstream and support services, such issues loom even larger. If some form of assisted dying were to be legalized in the UK I would argue that this could have a profound impact on the role of hospices, the role of palliative care social workers, on the relationships between patients and their families and on the relationships between patients/families and health and social care services. There are also likely to be considerable resource implications If legalization were to take place then the procedures and services that were on offer would in my view, and from my experience, need to be completely separated out from hospice and palliative care services. An important issue, for those of us working in hospices, is the understanding and acknowledgement that already some people, who know little of the hospice movement, come into the hospice (or perhaps resist coming into the hospice) fearful that euthanasia is already practiced. That many people do not understand the present role of hospices was absolutely clear in the study on palliative

4 care social work I have already mentioned. A few years ago I ran a patient support group in our hospice day centre. On one occasion several patients spoke about how much support they got from the day centre but commented they would never come into the hospice in-patient unit as they did not want their end hastened. On the other side of the coin are those patients who choose never to talk about the fact they are dying. They and their families can confidently accept the support of hospice and palliative care services for themselves knowing that such a discussion will never be forced upon them. If and when they are ready they can begin to talk about what dying means to them while in the meantime they access the support they need with the myriad of problems that can arise when someone is very ill. If assisted dying was to take place in and be associated with hospices/palliative care units then their current role would be severely compromised. It is likely that a large proportion of patients would choose not to access their services and that there would not be the same relationships of trust that currently exist between service users and palliative care professionals. This lack of trust might also extend to the relationships between professionals working in hospices/palliative care. There would inevitably be divisions between those who were in favour of and those who opposed assisted dying and perhaps mutual suspicion as to whether patients were being influenced in their decisions according to what resources were or were not available. If assisted dying were to be legalized then, as I have indicated, the cost implications might be considerable. As well as the medical procedures and regulatory safeguards that would need to be in place there would also need to be the same kind of education and training for professionals and emotional, social, practical and bereavement support for patients and families that is currently offered (particularly by social workers) within current hospice and palliative care provision. This would require a range of personnel from doctors to social workers/bereavement counsellors and so on. We cannot assume it will be a cheap service to provide. How will decisions be made as to which services should be funded and provided? To conclude most of us are frightened of illness, impairment, disability and death. It s easy when we are young(er) or healthy to say I wouldn t want that for myself but when it happens people often feel differently if they have the right kind of support and services for themselves and their families. I have seen many people facing life threatening illnesses who continue to enjoy life sometimes for much longer than they thought would be possible, especially when they have access to good pain control and help with all the practical and emotional issues that arise when someone is facing a terminal illness. Even when people have to give up the things they have previously enjoyed such as leaving work they often do find new roles and purpose. However if the resources that are needed to support people are diverted away to fund an assisted dying system my concern would be that inevitably it would be that system that would come to be seen as the one that offered the easy solutions. Communities struggling in difficult economic times might well come to resent those who require long term services and resources and to feel that people should be choosing assisted dying instead of trying to impose an unfair burden on the rest. My plea would be that instead of concentrating

5 on assisted dying we should be putting that effort into fighting for high quality health and social care services to support all those at the end of their lives, their carers and their families. References The Association of Palliative Care Social Workers, (2006) Position Paper on Euthanasia and Assisted Dying Seymour, J. Witherspoon, R. Gott, M. Ross, H. and Payne, S. (2005) End of Life Care, The Policy Press in association with Help the Aged Beresford, P. Adshead, L. and Croft, S. (2007), Palliative Care, Social Work And Service Users: Making life possible, London, Jessica Kingsley.

Why Service Users Say They Value Specialist Palliative Care Social Work:

Why Service Users Say They Value Specialist Palliative Care Social Work: Why Service Users Say They Value Specialist Palliative Care Social Work: and how the medicalisation of palliative care gets in the way Suzy Croft and Peter Beresford Palliative Care Palliative Care is

More information

'Swampy Territory' The role of the palliative care social worker in safeguarding children of adults who are receiving specialist palliative care

'Swampy Territory' The role of the palliative care social worker in safeguarding children of adults who are receiving specialist palliative care 'Swampy Territory' The role of the palliative care social worker in safeguarding children of adults who are receiving specialist palliative care This qualitative study explores the role of the palliative

More information

What is hospice care? Answering questions about hospice care

What is hospice care? Answering questions about hospice care What is hospice care? Answering questions about hospice care Introduction If you, or someone close to you, have a life-limiting or terminal illness, you may have questions about the care you can get and

More information

Family Caregiver s Guide to Hospice and Palliative Care

Family Caregiver s Guide to Hospice and Palliative Care Family Caregiver Guide Family Caregiver s Guide to Hospice and Palliative Care Even though you have been through transitions before, this one may be harder. If you have been a family caregiver for a while,

More information

VALUES HISTORY. A form to assist you in making health care choices in accordance with your values

VALUES HISTORY. A form to assist you in making health care choices in accordance with your values VALUES HISTORY A form to assist you in making health care choices in accordance with your values It is important that your medical treatment be your choice. The purpose of this form is to assist you in

More information

Macmillan Cancer Support Volunteering Policy

Macmillan Cancer Support Volunteering Policy Macmillan Cancer Support Volunteering Policy Introduction Thousands of volunteers dedicate time and energy to improve the lives of people affected by cancer. Macmillan was started by a volunteer and volunteers

More information

Though not a pleasant thought it's important to think about this: when you die, who will you leave behind?

Though not a pleasant thought it's important to think about this: when you die, who will you leave behind? Personal insurance There are many risks you face during your lifetime, but the most serious ones you will face are death, disability, serious illness and/ or medical intervention (surgery). These can happen

More information

Survey of Nurses. End of life care

Survey of Nurses. End of life care Survey of Nurses 28 End of life care HELPING THE NATION SPEND WISELY The National Audit Office scrutinises public spending on behalf of Parliament. The Comptroller and Auditor General, Tim Burr, is an

More information

Ambitions for Palliative and End of Life Care:

Ambitions for Palliative and End of Life Care: Ambitions for Palliative and End of Life Care: A national framework for local action 2015-2020 National Palliative and End of Life Care Partnership Association for Palliative Medicine; Association of Ambulance

More information

Support for young carers looking after someone with a palliative care diagnosis

Support for young carers looking after someone with a palliative care diagnosis Practice example Support for young carers looking after someone with a palliative care diagnosis What is the initiative? FRESH Friendship, Respect, Emotions, Support, Health Who runs it? St Michael s Hospice

More information

Circle of Life: Cancer Education and Wellness for American Indian and Alaska Native Communities. Group Discussion True False Not Sure

Circle of Life: Cancer Education and Wellness for American Indian and Alaska Native Communities. Group Discussion True False Not Sure Hospice Care Group Discussion True False Not Sure 1. There is no difference between palliative care and hospice care. Palliative care is different from hospice care. Both palliative and hospice care share

More information

Why do I need protection?

Why do I need protection? Why do I need protection? What s inside 3 Life cover 4 Critical illness cover 7 Income protection 8 Who else would you rely on? 10 It might cost less than you think 12 A word from your adviser... Introduction

More information

ST JOSEPH S HOSPICE JOB DESCRIPTION HEALTHCARE ASSISTANT. Ward Manager / Director of Care Services (In-patient Unit)

ST JOSEPH S HOSPICE JOB DESCRIPTION HEALTHCARE ASSISTANT. Ward Manager / Director of Care Services (In-patient Unit) ST JOSEPH S HOSPICE JOB DESCRIPTION HEALTHCARE ASSISTANT GRADE: Band 2 REPORTS TO: ACCOUNTABLE TO: Ward Manager / Charge Nurse Ward Manager / Director of Care Services (In-patient Unit) JOB PURPOSE The

More information

Frequently Asked Questions Regarding At Home and Inpatient Hospice Care

Frequently Asked Questions Regarding At Home and Inpatient Hospice Care Frequently Asked Questions Regarding At Home and Inpatient Hospice Care Contents Page: Topic Overview Assistance in Consideration Process Locations in Which VNA Provides Hospice Care Determination of Type

More information

Frequently Asked Questions about Pediatric Hospice and Pediatric Palliative Care

Frequently Asked Questions about Pediatric Hospice and Pediatric Palliative Care Frequently Asked Questions about Pediatric Hospice and Pediatric Palliative Care Developed by the New Jersey Hospice and Palliative Care Organization Pediatric Council Items marked with an (H) discuss

More information

Palliative Care The Relief You Need When You re Experiencing the Symptoms of Serious Illness

Palliative Care The Relief You Need When You re Experiencing the Symptoms of Serious Illness Palliative Care The Relief You Need When You re Experiencing the Symptoms of Serious Illness Dealing with the symptoms of any painful or serious illness is difficult. However, special care is available

More information

University College London Hospitals. Psychological support services for people affected by cancer

University College London Hospitals. Psychological support services for people affected by cancer University College London Hospitals Psychological support services for people affected by cancer 2 3 Introduction - the psychological impact of cancer The diagnosis and treatment of cancer can have a devastating

More information

Young homeless people on healthcare. The views of the National Youth Reference Group

Young homeless people on healthcare. The views of the National Youth Reference Group Young homeless people on healthcare The views of the National Youth Reference Group Introduction The Queen s Nursing Institute s Homeless Health Project visited the St Basil s Charity in Birmingham in

More information

Below you will find information relevant to CCPS members which has been taken from the Single Outcome Agreement published in June 2009.

Below you will find information relevant to CCPS members which has been taken from the Single Outcome Agreement published in June 2009. East Ayrshire Below you will find information relevant to CCPS members which has been taken from the Single Outcome Agreement published in June 2009. Information is ordered in the following topic groups:

More information

WHEN YOU NEED IT MOST

WHEN YOU NEED IT MOST A HELPING HAND WHEN YOU NEED IT MOST A Guide to Your One to One Personal Support Helping Hand: One to One Personal Support Introducing ROYAL LONDON Ever since we started as a Friendly Society over 150

More information

Impact of Breast Cancer Genetic Testing on Insurance Issues

Impact of Breast Cancer Genetic Testing on Insurance Issues Impact of Breast Cancer Genetic Testing on Insurance Issues Prepared by the Health Research Unit September 1999 Introduction The discoveries of BRCA1 and BRCA2, two cancer-susceptibility genes, raise serious

More information

Macmillan Specialist Palliative Care Social Worker North Lincolnshire

Macmillan Specialist Palliative Care Social Worker North Lincolnshire Macmillan Specialist Palliative Care Social Worker North Lincolnshire Economic and quality case study Service summary This Macmillan Specialist Palliative Care Social Worker is a single, cancer specific

More information

Bringing children and young people to the heart of Healthwatch

Bringing children and young people to the heart of Healthwatch Scenario Cards Scenario 1 You are a black 14 year old young woman who wishes to talk to someone confidentially about sexual health issues. You have come to visit Healthwatch in their office but your mum

More information

HARP (Horton Addiction Recovery Programme) 14 Edmund Street Bradford BD5 0BH. Selection and Allocation Policy

HARP (Horton Addiction Recovery Programme) 14 Edmund Street Bradford BD5 0BH. Selection and Allocation Policy HARP (Horton Addiction Recovery Programme) 14 Edmund Street Bradford BD5 0BH Selection and Allocation Policy HARP (Horton Addiction Recovery Programme) will endeavour to ensure that its services are allocated

More information

Hospice Care. To Make a No Obligation No Cost Referral Contact our Admissions office at: Phone: 541-512-5049 Fax: 888-611-8233

Hospice Care. To Make a No Obligation No Cost Referral Contact our Admissions office at: Phone: 541-512-5049 Fax: 888-611-8233 To Make a No Obligation No Cost Referral Contact our Admissions office at: Compliments of: Phone: 541-512-5049 Fax: 888-611-8233 Office Locations 29984 Ellensburg Ave. Gold Beach, OR 97444 541-247-7084

More information

Hospice and Palliative Care: Help Throughout Life s Journey. John P. Langlois MD CarePartners Hospice and Palliative Care

Hospice and Palliative Care: Help Throughout Life s Journey. John P. Langlois MD CarePartners Hospice and Palliative Care Hospice and Palliative Care: Help Throughout Life s Journey John P. Langlois MD CarePartners Hospice and Palliative Care Goals Define Palliative Care and Hospice. Describe and clarify the differences and

More information

A report by Leigh Day into the experiences of disabled people in the workplace

A report by Leigh Day into the experiences of disabled people in the workplace A report by Leigh Day into the experiences of disabled people in the workplace There are over 6.9 million disabled people of working age in Great Britain, nearly a fifth of the total working-age population.

More information

Ward Manager, Day Care Sister and Clinical Services

Ward Manager, Day Care Sister and Clinical Services JOB DESCRIPTION Job Title : Line Manager: Responsible to: Manager Department : Staff Nurse (Day Care) Day Care Sister Ward Manager, Day Care Sister and Clinical Services Day Care Unit Probationary Period

More information

Assessing Family Caregivers: A Guide for Health Care Providers

Assessing Family Caregivers: A Guide for Health Care Providers : A Guide for Health Care Providers As a health care professional, you assess patients all the time. But you generally do not assess a patient s family caregiver, except to identify that person as a resource

More information

Perceived Barriers in Accessing Healthcare Services: Asylum Seekers and Refugee (ASRs) and Service Providers Perspectives

Perceived Barriers in Accessing Healthcare Services: Asylum Seekers and Refugee (ASRs) and Service Providers Perspectives BRIEFING PAPER 13 FINDINGS SERIES Perceived Barriers in Accessing Healthcare Services: Asylum Seekers and Refugee (ASRs) and Service Providers Perspectives May 2008 FINDINGS SERIES 13 BRIEFING PAPER INTRODUCTION

More information

Norfolk Dementia Care Pathway. Zena Aldridge; Lesley-Ann Knox; Hilda Hayo

Norfolk Dementia Care Pathway. Zena Aldridge; Lesley-Ann Knox; Hilda Hayo Norfolk Dementia Care Pathway Zena Aldridge; Lesley-Ann Knox; Hilda Hayo Need? Growing numbers of people with dementia. Majority live in their own homes. Family members providing care estimated to save

More information

SPECIALIST ADVOCACY SERVICES IN NORFOLK

SPECIALIST ADVOCACY SERVICES IN NORFOLK SPECIALIST ADVOCACY SERVICES IN NORFOLK Independent Mental Health Advocacy Independent Mental Capacity Advocacy Relevant Persons Paid Representative Service Annual Report 2014-2015 Introduction This annual

More information

What services are provided by JSSA Hospice? Our personalized services for patients and family members include:

What services are provided by JSSA Hospice? Our personalized services for patients and family members include: FAQ S ABOUT HOSPICE What is Hospice? Hospice is a specialized type of healthcare for patients and families who are faced with a terminal illness. A team of physicians, nurses, social workers, bereavement

More information

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Social Workers Summary Social workers help people in every stage of life cope with challenges, such as being diagnosed with depression. 2012 Median Pay Entry-Level Education

More information

Assessments and the Care Act

Assessments and the Care Act factsheet Assessments and the Care Act Getting help in England from April 2015 carersuk.org factsheet This factsheet contains information about the new system of care and support that will come into place

More information

Are there typical trajectories of social, psychological and spiritual needs in patients with lung cancer and severe heart failure?

Are there typical trajectories of social, psychological and spiritual needs in patients with lung cancer and severe heart failure? Are there typical trajectories of social, psychological and spiritual needs in patients with lung cancer and severe heart failure? Scott A Murray, St Columba s Professor of Primary Palliative Care Marilyn

More information

Whose life (and death) is it anyway? Gaby Wills, Assistant Director of Care Services, Jewish Care

Whose life (and death) is it anyway? Gaby Wills, Assistant Director of Care Services, Jewish Care Whose life (and death) is it anyway? Gaby Wills, Assistant Director of Care Services, Jewish Care November 2013 Improving end of life care in care homes Jewish Care Provides culturally-sensitive community

More information

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. TRANSPARENCY AND QUALITY COMPACT MEASURES (voluntary indicators) GUIDE FOR CARE AND SUPPORT PROVIDERS

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. TRANSPARENCY AND QUALITY COMPACT MEASURES (voluntary indicators) GUIDE FOR CARE AND SUPPORT PROVIDERS TRANSPARENCY AND QUALITY COMPACT MEASURES (voluntary indicators) GUIDE FOR CARE AND SUPPORT PROVIDERS 1 Transparency and Quality Compact Measures (voluntary indicators) The Government has worked with care

More information

A Guide To Our Family Services For Disabled Children

A Guide To Our Family Services For Disabled Children Caudwell Children A Guide To Our Family Services For Disabled Children Supported by caudwellchildren caudwellchildren.com caudwellkids How We Can Help You may be reading this information because a child

More information

Borderline personality disorder

Borderline personality disorder Understanding NICE guidance Information for people who use NHS services Borderline personality disorder NICE clinical guidelines advise the NHS on caring for people with specific conditions or diseases

More information

JOB DESCRIPTION. Job Title: Macmillan Integrated Palliative Social Worker. Day Therapy department, Outpatient Service & Community

JOB DESCRIPTION. Job Title: Macmillan Integrated Palliative Social Worker. Day Therapy department, Outpatient Service & Community JOB DESCRIPTION Job Title: Macmillan Integrated Palliative Social Worker Reports to: Day Unit Therapy Lead Location: Salary: Hours of work Annual Leave: Day Therapy department, Outpatient Service & Community

More information

Have you protected the most valuable things in your home? Protecting yourself as well as your home

Have you protected the most valuable things in your home? Protecting yourself as well as your home Have you protected the most valuable things in your home? Protecting yourself as well as your home What s inside 2 A product to suit your life today, and in the future 4 Income Cover for Sickness 6 Critical

More information

Inquiry into palliative care services and home and community care services in Queensland. Submission to the Health and Community Services Committee

Inquiry into palliative care services and home and community care services in Queensland. Submission to the Health and Community Services Committee Inquiry into palliative care services and home and community care services in Queensland Submission to the Health and Community Services Committee August, 2012 1 Introduction The Queensland Nurses Union

More information

Good end of life care in care homes

Good end of life care in care homes My Home Life Research Briefing No.6 This briefing sets out the key findings of a research review on good end of life care in care homes undertaken by Caroline Nicholson, in 2006, as part of the My Home

More information

Equality with Human Rights Analysis Toolkit

Equality with Human Rights Analysis Toolkit Equality with Human Rights Analysis Toolkit The Equality Act 2010 and Human Rights Act 1998 require us to consider the impact of our policies and practices in respect of equality and human rights. We should

More information

JOB DESCRIPTION. Staff Nurse Children s Hospice at Home. Head of Children s Services. Director of Patient Care. Dartford

JOB DESCRIPTION. Staff Nurse Children s Hospice at Home. Head of Children s Services. Director of Patient Care. Dartford JOB DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: RESPONSIBLE TO: ACCOUNTABLE TO: HOURS: BASE: Staff Nurse Children s Hospice at Home Head of Children s Services Director of Patient Care Full-time Dartford POST SPECIFICATION:

More information

Lymphoma and palliative care services

Lymphoma and palliative care services Produced 2010 Next revision due 2012 Lymphoma and palliative care services Introduction Despite improvements in treatment, many people with lymphoma will not be cured. Death and dying are things that people

More information

Health care for disabled children and young people

Health care for disabled children and young people Special review Health care for disabled children and young people A review of how the health care needs of disabled children and young people are met by the commissioners and providers of health care in

More information

END OF LIFE CARE FOR people with DEmENtIA SURVEY REpORt FEBRUARY 2014 EXECUtIVE SUmmARY

END OF LIFE CARE FOR people with DEmENtIA SURVEY REpORt FEBRUARY 2014 EXECUtIVE SUmmARY END OF LIFE CARE for people with dementia SURVEY REPORT FEBRUARY 2014 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This project was supported by Bupa Health Foundation. Alzheimer s Australia 2014 ABN 79 625582771 ISBN 978-1-921570-33-9

More information

Criteria For Referral

Criteria For Referral Criteria For Referral St Margaret of Scotland Hospice, founded by the Sisters of Charity in 1950, is at the heart of the Community providing wholeness of care for both body and Spirit. Philosophy St Joseph

More information

Improving Services for Patients with Learning Difficulties. Jennifer Robinson, Lead Nurse Older People and Vulnerable adults

Improving Services for Patients with Learning Difficulties. Jennifer Robinson, Lead Nurse Older People and Vulnerable adults ENC 5 Meeting Trust Board Date 18 th December 2014 Title of Paper Lead Director Author Improving Services for Patients with Learning Difficulties Kathryn Halford, Director of Nursing Jennifer Robinson,

More information

1. Requirements for early detection, diagnosis and treatment. Preliminary considerations

1. Requirements for early detection, diagnosis and treatment. Preliminary considerations EUROPEAN GUIDELINES FOR CANCER PATIENTS RIGHTS Edited by the ECL s European network on patients' and health professionals rights and duties Athens, 16 th October 2004 Preliminary considerations A diagnosis

More information

An unnatural death. A report into investigations of mesothelioma death and their impact on bereaved families

An unnatural death. A report into investigations of mesothelioma death and their impact on bereaved families An unnatural death A report into investigations of mesothelioma death and their impact on bereaved families 08458 50 50 20 enquiries@blf-uk.org www.lunguk.org 1 Contents p.3p.3executive summary p.4p.3background

More information

We are working more closely with people to improve health and social care services in Leeds. What does this mean for you?

We are working more closely with people to improve health and social care services in Leeds. What does this mean for you? We are working more closely with people to improve health and social care services in Leeds. What does this mean for you? GPs, health workers, hospital and social care staff are working together more closely

More information

Social Care TV Prevention: Early Intervention

Social Care TV Prevention: Early Intervention Social Care TV: Prevention: Early Intervention Transcript: Prevention: Early Intervention I am frightened to fall over, because I have stumbled a couple of times and saved myself, and that is my only fear,

More information

Utah Advance Directive Form & Instructions

Utah Advance Directive Form & Instructions Utah Advance Directive Form & Instructions 2009 Edition published by Utah Medical Association 310 E. 4500 South, Suite 500 Salt Lake City, UT 84107 Instructions for Completing the Advance Health Care Directive

More information

Loss of. focus. Report from our investigation into the care and treatment of Ms Z

Loss of. focus. Report from our investigation into the care and treatment of Ms Z A Loss of focus Report from our investigation into the care and treatment of Ms Z Contents Who we are 1 What we do 1 Introduction 1 How we conducted the investigation 3 Summary of Ms Z s Circumstances

More information

Suicidal. Caring For The Person Who Is. Why might a person be suicidal?

Suicidal. Caring For The Person Who Is. Why might a person be suicidal? Caring For The Person Who Is Suicidal For further information see also the following MIND Essentials resource Conducting a suicide risk assessment. Suicidal thoughts and behaviours are not unique to mental

More information

Summary of findings. The five questions we ask about hospitals and what we found. We always ask the following five questions of services.

Summary of findings. The five questions we ask about hospitals and what we found. We always ask the following five questions of services. Barts Health NHS Trust Mile End Hospital Quality report Bancroft Road London E1 4DG Telephone: 020 8880 6493 www.bartshealth.nhs.uk Date of inspection visit: 7 November 2013 Date of publication: January

More information

Income protection. Paying you a monthly income if you can t work because of an accident or illness

Income protection. Paying you a monthly income if you can t work because of an accident or illness Income protection Paying you a monthly income if you can t work because of an accident or illness Income Protection How it works when you can t Income Protection is a type of insurance which helps replace

More information

Care Programme Approach (CPA)

Care Programme Approach (CPA) Care Programme Approach (CPA) The Care Programme Approach (CPA) is the system that is used to organise many people s care from 'secondary mental health services'. This factsheet explains what you should

More information

Why and how to have end-of-life discussions with your patients:

Why and how to have end-of-life discussions with your patients: Why and how to have end-of-life discussions with your patients: A guide with a suggested script and some basic questions to use The medical literature consistently shows that physicians can enhance end-of-life

More information

North Shore Palliative Care Program

North Shore Palliative Care Program North Shore Palliative Care Program This booklet is intended for patients and families who are facing a life threatening illness. We hope that this booklet provides you with answers to some of your questions

More information

Printed for the Scottish Government by RR Donnelly B55529 03/08

Printed for the Scottish Government by RR Donnelly B55529 03/08 THINKING ABOUT care MOVING INTO A home? THINKING ABOUT care MOVING INTO A home? Crown copyright 2005 ISBN 0 7559 4472 0 Scottish Government St Andrew s House Edinburgh EH1 3DG Printed for the Scottish

More information

Guidance for doctors. Treatment and care towards the end of life: good practice in decision making

Guidance for doctors. Treatment and care towards the end of life: good practice in decision making Guidance for doctors Treatment and care towards the end of life: good practice in decision making The duties of a doctor registered with the Patients must be able to trust doctors with their lives and

More information

Macmillan Oldham Community Specialist Palliative Care Team. An information guide

Macmillan Oldham Community Specialist Palliative Care Team. An information guide TO PROVIDE THE VERY BEST CARE FOR EACH PATIENT ON EVERY OCCASION Macmillan Oldham Community Specialist Palliative Care Team An information guide Macmillan Oldham Community Specialist Palliative Care Team

More information

Using the TUC Manifesto for Disability Equality. A guide for trade union activists

Using the TUC Manifesto for Disability Equality. A guide for trade union activists Using the TUC Manifesto for Disability Equality A guide for trade union activists Section one Why a manifesto? Trade unions campaign for a better future for all. The TUC s new Manifesto for Disability

More information

Care Programme Approach (CPA)

Care Programme Approach (CPA) Care Programme Approach (CPA) The Care Programme Approach (CPA) is used to plan many people s mental health care. This factsheet explains what it is, when you should get and when it might stop. The Care

More information

Who we are and what we do

Who we are and what we do Who we are and what we do What care do you provide? St Joseph s Hospice offers care to people living in North and East London. Our services include nursing and medical care, emotional support, practical

More information

Scope of Social Work Practice in Health

Scope of Social Work Practice in Health in Health Section 1 The unique contribution of social work practice in the health context The social work profession operates at the interface between people and their social, cultural, physical and natural

More information

When it comes to creating memories and sharing

When it comes to creating memories and sharing Hospice Care: Comfort and Compassion When It s Needed Most When it comes to creating memories and sharing in significant life events, the family is the focal point for commemoration and celebration. We

More information

NHS Western Isles Learning Disabilities Collaborative Celebrating Good Practice

NHS Western Isles Learning Disabilities Collaborative Celebrating Good Practice NHS Western Isles Learning Disabilities Collaborative Celebrating Good Practice This report is about the work of the NHS Western Isles collaborative. A collaborative are people and groups that work together.

More information

A Homecare Perspective. Bianca Bitsakakis, MSW RSW Pace Homecare Services

A Homecare Perspective. Bianca Bitsakakis, MSW RSW Pace Homecare Services A Homecare Perspective Bianca Bitsakakis, MSW RSW Pace Homecare Services Intimate Strangers - Social Work and Social Service Work in Palliative Care Intimate Marked by close acquaintance, association,

More information

The role of the nurse in the process of breaking bad news in the inpatient clinical setting

The role of the nurse in the process of breaking bad news in the inpatient clinical setting The role of the nurse in the process of breaking bad news in the inpatient clinical setting Clare Warnock, Practice Development Sister, Weston Park Hospital, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust (STHFT)

More information

ECOG 0 Fully active, able to carry on all pre-disease activities Score 0 without restriction.

ECOG 0 Fully active, able to carry on all pre-disease activities Score 0 without restriction. Life Choices Program of Palliative Care PALLIATIVE CARE SCREENING TOOL (Not a permanent part of the medical record) Criteria Please consider the following criteria when determining the palliative care

More information

Investigation into the death of Mr George Joseph, a prisoner at HMP Belmarsh, in April 2015

Investigation into the death of Mr George Joseph, a prisoner at HMP Belmarsh, in April 2015 Investigation into the death of Mr George Joseph, a prisoner at HMP Belmarsh, in April 2015 Crown copyright 2015 This publication is licensed under the terms of the Open Government Licence v3.0 except

More information

Protecting Vulnerable Adults from Abuse and Neglect: a U.S. Experience. Page Ulrey January 15, 2015

Protecting Vulnerable Adults from Abuse and Neglect: a U.S. Experience. Page Ulrey January 15, 2015 Protecting Vulnerable Adults from Abuse and Neglect: a U.S. Experience Page Ulrey January 15, 2015 Question. Report. Collaborate. My Position Senior Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Elder Abuse Project King

More information

Caring for depression

Caring for depression Caring for depression Aetna Health Connections SM Disease Management Program Get information. Get help. Get better. 21.05.300.1 B (6/08) Get back to being you How this guide can help you Having an ongoing

More information

TOP 10 MYTHS OF EMPLOYMENT LAW

TOP 10 MYTHS OF EMPLOYMENT LAW w TOP 10 MYTHS OF EMPLOYMENT LAW As an Employment Lawyer I often come across employers who are ill informed about employment law. They frequently believe in a number of myths about the law which are either

More information

A Health and Wellbeing Strategy for Bexley Listening to you, working for you

A Health and Wellbeing Strategy for Bexley Listening to you, working for you A Health and Wellbeing Strategy for Bexley Listening to you, working for you www.bexley.gov.uk Introduction FOREWORD Health and wellbeing is everybody s business, and our joint aim is to improve the health

More information

Relevance at the Tribal and National Level

Relevance at the Tribal and National Level . Washington State University; Psychology Post-Doctoral Resident Email: phamrick@wsu.edu Relevance at the Tribal and National Level Diabetes is an illness with serious health consequences for Cherokee

More information

NOTTINGHAM UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS TRUST POLICIES AND PROCEDURES MANAGEMENT OF ATTENDANCE AND SICKNESS ABSENCE POLICY. Documentation Control

NOTTINGHAM UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS TRUST POLICIES AND PROCEDURES MANAGEMENT OF ATTENDANCE AND SICKNESS ABSENCE POLICY. Documentation Control NOTTINGHAM UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS TRUST POLICIES AND PROCEDURES MANAGEMENT OF ATTENDANCE AND SICKNESS ABSENCE POLICY Documentation Control Reference HR/P&C/003 Date approved 4 Approving Body Trust Board

More information

Supporting Older People and Carers

Supporting Older People and Carers Supporting Older People and Carers INJURY & NEGLIGENCE SPECIALISTS Injury & Negligence Throughout the court case they were professional and made me feel at ease. I would certainly recommend my solicitors

More information

Hospital discharge arrangements

Hospital discharge arrangements Factsheet 37 May 2015 About this factsheet This factsheet explains how your discharge should be managed following NHS treatment so you receive the help you need in the most appropriate location. Depending

More information

Guide to Private Medical Insurance

Guide to Private Medical Insurance Guide to Private Medical Insurance Contents About the Exeter 4 Why private medical insurance? 5 Product highlights 6 Cover and benefits 10 Getting the right premium 15 How to apply 16 Claims overview 21

More information

Symptoms of mania can include: 3

Symptoms of mania can include: 3 Bipolar Disorder This factsheet gives information on bipolar disorder. It explains the symptoms of bipolar disorder, treatments and ways to manage symptoms. It also covers what treatment the National Institute

More information

Living with dying Patients and carers experiences of living with lung cancer. Dr Donna Fitzsimons, Lesley Rutherford & Jill McAuley

Living with dying Patients and carers experiences of living with lung cancer. Dr Donna Fitzsimons, Lesley Rutherford & Jill McAuley Living with dying Patients and carers experiences of living with lung cancer Dr Donna Fitzsimons, Lesley Rutherford & Jill McAuley Study Aims To explore the experiences of patients living with lung cancer.

More information

Dr Hazel M Chapman Dr Claudine Clucas. Registered Nurses Attitudes of Respect Towards Service Users

Dr Hazel M Chapman Dr Claudine Clucas. Registered Nurses Attitudes of Respect Towards Service Users Dr Hazel M Chapman Dr Claudine Clucas Registered Nurses Attitudes of Respect Towards Service Users Background Respect for service users is a key component of effective (Beach, Roter, Wang et al, 2006)

More information

IMPROVING YOUR EXPERIENCE

IMPROVING YOUR EXPERIENCE Comments trom the Aberdeen City Joint Futures Brain Injury Group The Aberdeen City Joint Futures Brain Injury Group is made up of representatives from health (acute services, rehabilitation and community),

More information

PSYCHOSOCIAL ISSUES AND HIV/AIDS. TIHAN Training for Care & Support Volunteers

PSYCHOSOCIAL ISSUES AND HIV/AIDS. TIHAN Training for Care & Support Volunteers PSYCHOSOCIAL ISSUES AND HIV/AIDS TIHAN Training for Care & Support Volunteers WHAT IS PSYCHOSOCIAL? Psychology + Sociology Psychosocial development is how a person's mind, emotions, and maturity level

More information

PALLIATIVE CARE SERVICES AND RESOURCES. A guide for patients and their loved ones. Living well with serious illness

PALLIATIVE CARE SERVICES AND RESOURCES. A guide for patients and their loved ones. Living well with serious illness PALLIATIVE CARE SERVICES AND RESOURCES A guide for patients and their loved ones Living well with serious illness A patient and family centered approach to living with serious illness Palliative care addresses

More information

Interpreting and Translation in NHS Lothian Policy for Meeting the Needs of People with Limited English Proficiency

Interpreting and Translation in NHS Lothian Policy for Meeting the Needs of People with Limited English Proficiency Interpreting and Translation in NHS Lothian Policy for Meeting the Needs of People with Limited English Proficiency Unique ID: NHSL. Author (s): James Robinson Category/Level/Type: 1 policy/protocol Version:

More information

Are you buying private medical insurance? Take a look at this guide before you decide 2008

Are you buying private medical insurance? Take a look at this guide before you decide 2008 Are you buying private medical insurance? Take a look at this guide before you decide 2008 2 Private medical insurance Private medical insurance 3 Contents 1. About this guide 4 2. What is private medical

More information

Six steps to successful complaint resolution

Six steps to successful complaint resolution MEDICAL PROTECTION SOCIETY PROFESSIONAL SUPPORT AND EXPERT ADVICE MPS COMPLAINTS SERIES BOOK 3 Six steps to successful complaint resolution An MPS case study www.mps.org.uk Contents Case study page 3 Step

More information

Deciding whether to become a parent

Deciding whether to become a parent Deciding whether to become a parent This information is an extract from the booklet, Relationships, sex and fertility for young people affected by cancer. You may find the full booklet helpful. We can

More information

Guidance relating to disability for the NHS

Guidance relating to disability for the NHS Guidance relating to disability for the NHS January 2014 Contents Introduction 3 Guidance relating to disability for the NHS 4 2 Introduction The NHS Staff Council's Equality and Diversity Group has reviewed

More information

Together for Health Delivering End of Life Care A Delivery Plan up to 2016 for NHS Wales and its Partners

Together for Health Delivering End of Life Care A Delivery Plan up to 2016 for NHS Wales and its Partners Together for Health Delivering End of Life Care A Delivery Plan up to 2016 for NHS Wales and its Partners The highest standard of care for everyone at the end of life Digital ISBN 978 0 7504 8708 5 Crown

More information

Gillian Parker, Sylvia Bernard, Fiona Aspinal, Kate Gridley Social Policy Research Unit, University of York

Gillian Parker, Sylvia Bernard, Fiona Aspinal, Kate Gridley Social Policy Research Unit, University of York Gillian Parker, Sylvia Bernard, Fiona Aspinal, Kate Gridley Social Policy Research Unit, University of York Kate Light Centre for Reviews and Dissemination Our funders: The National Institute for Health

More information